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Full text of "The Massachusetts collegian [microform]"

ROTOGRAVURE SUPPLEMENT 



M. A. C. Library. 



THE CANDY KITCHEN 

Make this year's Soph-Senior Hop better than ever. 
Again Sarris Bros, extend to you their invitation to visit the 
Candy Kitchen so that you can realize the full thrill of this 
Gala Event, Hop. Our good food and service, together with 
the festival atmosphere, will give the added touch to making 
the occasion a perfect one. 

"From now to June 1 6th, the Rendezvous for Merrymaking" 



Graduation Gifts 



COLLEGE JEWELRY FOUNTAIN PENS 

CONGRATULATION CARDS 
LEATHER BOUND HOOKS 



A utographed A uthors 



ROBERT FROST 
DAVID MORTON 



DAVID GRAYSON 
FRANK P. RAND 



JAMES A. LOWELL, Bookseller 





wmwm 



THE DAVENPORT INN 

Good Home Cooking 
Chicken and Jf affle Suppers every Sunday 

FAIR PRICES 
Phone 440 Mrs. J. K. VV. Davenport 



Compliments 
of 



"BUCK" DEADY 



Compliments 

of 
JOSEPH GINSB1.RG 



Carl. H. Bolter 

INCORPORATED 

We wish to take this opportunity to 
wish all Massachusetts State College men a 
most happy vacation. 

Amherst ■ Cambridge • New Haven 
Exeter • Hyannis 



BOSTONIAN $10 CXFCRDS 

Imported Leathers Scotch Grain 

or Calfskin - Tan or Black 

$8.25 



Rubber Sole Sport Oxfords 
White with Tan or Black Saddle 

S6.90 



B O L L E S 

SHOE 
STORE 



Bass Ha tul Seieed SS . Moccasins 

Rubber Soles-Brown, Black and 

White, and Twotone Brown 

S5.75 



See our window 

for 

other values. 




A Scene on the Campus 



I 



SUMMARY 


OF THE BASEBALL SEASON 




Rutgers 


6 


Massachusetts 


S 


Massachusetts 


13 


St. Stephens 


:< 


How <loin 


9 


Massachusetts 


4 


Massachusetts 





Middfebury 


5 


Massachusetts 


4 


Worcester Polytech. 





Wesley. in 


3 


Massachusetts 


1 


Massachusetts 


y 


Boston University 


4 


Lowell Teat 


, 


Massachusetts 


6 


Amherst 




M.i — achusetts 





Massachusetts 


<l 


1 brk 


1 


Massachusetts 


12 


Trinity 


6 


Northt istern In. 


to 


Massachusetts 


4 


Williams 


3 


Massachusetts 





Union Collegt 


11 


Massachusetts 


4 


Rensselaer Tech. 

1 


i:> 


Massachusetts 


11 



51j£ iHa0Barljit00ttfi dnUegtatt 



Vol. xlii 



AMHERST, MASS., THURSDAY, OCTOBER 1, 1«M1 



Number 1 



Large Frosh Class Breaks 

All Enrollment Records 



OVER 300 STUDENTS 
IN ENTERING CLASS 

not unusual to hear an entering 

i is spoken of as the tai - 
history of the College, l>nt it is 

-i.il that an entering class exceeds 

...it a margin as 

1 ot ':!.">. The total enrollment is 

nately 300 and ot these there are 

v. i women. A list of the freshman 

follows: 

• i< \\ '.. Falmouth 
r. \\\, Holyolce 

' i . ' .1. • afield 
M Grei n iii-lii 
]■ v, South Weymouth 

. Dl.., k.i. he 1. 1 

rg, 1 \l . Km i. 
I. S. A., Rehoboth 

M ., < •reenfield 
in, ll S., Nob* utt 
[ohn, Kingston 
I ., Brazil, Indiana 
i i Jreenneld 
Mi M„ West Springfield 
. \li~s I)., i blcopee 1-alls 
Mil - P., Agawam 
. . Sharon 
Mi is II.. Monwn 
Mi" K . 
Mo 

.. in. Mis^ A . < ,ti-i-Illii-lil 

iii. O.. Milford 

'.!:-- I,.. Athol 
im, J . Springfield 

toneham 
.ringfield 
' E., AttUboro 

S < .ri-.Illli-lil 

\\ '.. Agawam 
ni, i . Mittineague 
. W., < rroveland 
n i. . Fall K: 
■ i ■!. Mi- a . Kingston 
- 

\V . Ma) nard 
i . Milford 

l, MiM M„ Ipswil li 
Miss \I . Won ester 

M \'. 

' . l'itlslielll 

\ .. Melrose 
i , i lintoa 
I .. \nrili Adams 
i Fast Boston 
. i I . 

Ml i I , Haverhill 

M , Needham 

W., Montague 

. P II., Walthall. 

i ..niiiui.-.l on Pafte g) 



RECEPTION IS GIVEN 
TO FRESHMAN CLASS 



Mass Meeting, in Memorial Hall Also 
Mds in Orientating; Entering class 



In an endeavor tO K (, t the freshmen 

nte«l with themselves as well as 

if i he other three i lai - 
m eting was held last Thursday 

in Memorial Hall under the 

.ii oi Adelphia. The various 

• -i ii'li -lit activities on the cam- 
■ presented to the assemblage. 

Melvin Taube, who has assumed 
ibilit) iii restoring the football 

i \l .. - | httSettS tliis fall, pre 

: • freshmen a view on at h 

eneral and football in particular. 

I riday evening in the (age, the 

freshman reception sponsored l>y 

■ incil, \\ as tendered to 

i lass. In spite of the 

sti< qualities ol such an 

rig pl.u e as the new 
ers managed to make themselves 
i understood and the students 

• j oi room in which to roam 

acquainted. Arran gem e nt s 

eption were made by ' iifford 

sident of the Christi n 

m and Wynne E. Caird '32, 

I oi "Y.V« 

ling the "group, Frank I „ 

j. j r< sident of t he Council, 

: unctions of the Religious 

mat in'< body. 1 le was 

V. j mil- Caird who briefly 

; the aim-- of the Y.W.C.A. on 

Sext, < •ill Towle spoke of the 

• < !hrisl iin Assoi iat ion. Finally, 

i In- fat ultj gave us 

their ideas with refere n ce to lite 

These three were Miss 

' Hamlin. Professor Frank I'ren- 

• !. and President Rosooe \\ . 

Continued on Page 3. 



OUTSTANDING EVENT 
OF THE WESE 

FOOTBALL 
50-0 



Eleven Meets 

Bowdoin Sat. 

Strong Maine to Play on Alumni 
Field 



What should prove tO l>e one of the 

most exciting games ot the year will take 
place at Alumni Field next Saturday 
afternoon when Mel Taube's spirite,! 
football aggregation tans the stn 
Bowdoin contingent, a team which is re- 
ported to be strong in every department 

of the game this >ear. t'oach Taube is 

confident that his charges will n'> on the 
field for the second game of the season 
with as much determination an I fighting 
spirit as they demonstrated last Saturday 
in the overwhelming defeat of Cooper 
Union, Although the Nt.tten Island team 
is far from being representative of the 
best in football circles, the fact that it 
represents ^n institution with a registra 
tion of o(XH) or more students seems to 
make the achievement <>f Saturday last 
something to think about, incidentally 
making the chances of defeating Bowdoin 
brighter. 

Bowdoin College has always arrayed 
strong teams before M.S.C. lineups, and 
has managed for the last several years to 
come through with decisive victories over 

the Red ami White. In PC'S, 18-0 was 
the score, in l'.i_".» M.S.C. was on the 

small end of an is '1 tally, atul in last 

season's tray Bowdoin was victorious 

(Continued on Page 3) 

COMBINED CHORUS TO 
PRESENT "10LANTHE" 

Gilbert and Sullivan Opera To He 

Given I'nder Direction of 

Prof. Bi&elnw 

\i \t Tuesday evening at s o'clock, 
the Combined Chorus of the Ntasaat hu 
setts s tate College will begin rehearsals 

for the coming season. This year the 
work to lie presented will represent a 
radical departure from any miisieal pro 
duet ion which the student choTUS has 

offered in ret ent yt 

The work to be presented will be the 
beautiful opera "Iolanthe ' composed by 
that inimitable musical team, Gilbert and 
Sullivan, which for sheer beauty of form, 

melody, Sprightly tempo, and humor 
stands well at the head in the held ol 

1 ibilit opera. It will be presented in eon 

urt form with a reader and posstbt) the 

orchestra. The Combined (horns this 
year will have an opportunity gieatei 

(Continued on rage 4) 

Victims of Paralysis 

Showing Improvement 

All Four Persons Afflicted with tin 
Disease Now Out of Danfter 

During the present epidemic of in- 
fantile paralysis, four person iated 
with the Mas-. H husetts State ( ol 

have been aliiii ted. 

Lawrence H. Bi - instrw tor in 
physical education, is at the Dickinson 
Hospital with a light attack ot 
disease. Serum has been injected and la- 
is believed to be out oi danger of any 
paral) 

II. I i.miel 1 1 i gi aduate of the 

colli lane, was taken ill with the 

disease t his summer. As a result, paralysis 
irred in his lett h-^. Although he 
m.i- shown steady improvement, it i- 
expected that he will not obtain the use 

of his leg tor quite some time. 

Kenneth Cahoon 'o4 has not been able 

to return to college this tall, because of 
paralysis in his arm. He was afflicted 

with the disease in the middle of the 

summer and is now regaining his strength. 

Frederick !.. Corcoran 35 has ,, very 

light attack of infantile paralysis but is 

rearing comfortably at the college in- 
firmary. He is thought to be completely 
out oi dai 



FIRST ASSEMBLY 

Industry, Thrift and Tolerance 

Stressed by President in 

Opening Address 



PREXY TALKS AT Gridsters Romp to 50-0 



Greeting the largest audience of stn 
dents ever enrolled in the history ol the 

State College, President Roocoe W. 
Thatcher at the hist Assembly of the 
year on Wednesday stressed the effect 
and interplay ol the social and economic 
forces on student life. The President's 
addrejs, directly concerned with our 
present problems, reflects an attitude 
particularly to be stressed to the entering 
class, 

"The unusual conditions under which 
we are a-seiubled for the Opening Of 
another college Near seem to me to 
demand ot students that for this \e.n 

they exercise in an unusual degree the 
desirable qualities of industry, thrift and 

tolerance. 

"Industry, because this year at college, 

as in almost every other walk ol life, 
there are mans- others willing and anxious 

to seize upon the opportunities which ate 

Ours, and we must use QUI very best 

efforts to make the most of these oppor- 
tunities it we are to hold them for out 
selves in competition with others who are 
seeking these opportunities for themselves. 
"Thrift, because it has required un- 
usual sacrifice on the pari <>! those who 

make it possible for us to be here this 

year, In times like these more students 
come to our State colleges than in normal 
times but they come at greater cost of 
time and effort on the part of theii 

parents tO make it possible lor them to 

be here. Students ought to recognise 

this and to reciprocate hv being as care 
fill as possible in the expenditure ol 
money while they an- Inn- to see that it 

goes for w on 1 1\ p urp oses in every case, 

"Toll ram e, because in these days as 
never before in history, there is great 
confusion concerning w^oomic, political 

and even moral issues. Men and women 

are striving e v er yw here to see the was 
out of this confusion, and the utmost 

variety of views are held and opinions 

exp re s se d . The perfectly obvious situ- 
ation is that there \4 no char ami certain 

solution of any of these issues, as other- 

(Continued on Page 4) 

Dean Announces 
Honor Groups 

Once again the dean's office announces 

i he honor groups of the respective 
classes. Members of the newly gradu 

ated (lass and the present senior ( lass 
showed marked superiority in scholar*! ip 

and are listed as follows: 

GROUP l 

I 1931: Brooks, J. II., Shaw, f. K.. 
Stanidewdd, L., Vincent, I.. I.. 
( baa at 1932) EMiste, A. !-. Pan i. II. I,., 
.11. Smith, ' . I ■ 

( Mm "t HEW: < ni'-. H K . tfoffmmn, A .v. 
I I. 

(,i<ui l- li 

'.■ iiii.ui, Mi i, Brown, A. A- 
I. I. . Gilftut, ( . J., Gula, 
I!;;. i ,1 M Koerbcr, Mi . \,< < lair. Miss, 
ill li Mi ' W., 

,. D. M-. Oliver, '■ W , Hen e Mi Plant- 
ings, M. 1'. Pyenson, I... Rubin, I . Jmitli, I'. 
A . Stuart, K. l. , Troy, F. S., Upton, M 
A. b. Jr., Wright. Mi 

( 1. ,-...! 1932: Blai ►.. M 
II A., ( ohen, W., < mi . I. P., UeGelleke, P ■ 
l-i I,.:. W. s. Jr., Foley, J. )., FolKer, K. Sa 

. IIlt< In ock, J. D. 
< ontinued on Page ,tj 

ORCHESTRA TO HOLD MEETING 
NEXT WEDNESDAY EVENING 

The College Orchestra will hold its lir-i 
meeting ot the year on Wednesday cm ning 
at eight o i I'" k in Stoi kbridge I lall. 

I'nder i he able leadership of Edgar 
Sorton '■'•'■'<. a graduate of the New England 
Conservatory of Music, the orchestra is 

assured Ol a successful season. Veterans 
from last year's on hestra include I'al 

stone. Bates, Dunham, and Henry, all of 

the ( lass ol '34, WYt'erlow and Salisbury 

ot the i UUN "I '.,_'. 

There will be no tryouts and any 

student ot tin- college interested is 
cordially invited to join the orchestra. 

The work taken up is ot a classical 

nature, including the compositions oi 
many famous compost rs. 



Victory in Opening Game 



Past Prexy to 

Visit College 

Dr. Huttcriielil, Former President of 

College, Will Addrasi Assembly 

Wednesday 

Dr. I.. K. Hu.tei lield, a former presl 
dent of the State College, will visit the 

College for a lew days beginning Octobei 

7th and will address assembly on that 
dale. His topic will be "Scsteid.tv and 

Tomorrow." Oa the evening of the 7th 

he will speak beloie the lai ullv nicmbei s 
on the subject, "Amherst in Japan." lb- 
has two other speaking engagements 

during his \isit, one before the Amherst 

Kotai> Club ami another at the Second 
('oiikicnatioiial Church, lor the past 
few years l>r. Butterfield lias traveled 

and studied the social position o| rural 
peoples in Africa, India, China, Japan, 
and the Philippine Islands. 

Dr. Butterfield is a graduate of the 
Universit) oi Michigan and has served as 

a member of the faculty of that instilu 

tion. in 1906 in- was unanimously nomi- 
nated as president ol M.s.c. and re 

signed a similar position at the Rhode 

Island State College to accept it. The 
Index ol 1011 says ol Prexy Butterfield, 
"The administrative and teaching bodies 

have Iin leased about U'.'i , -line 1'iesident 

Butterfield has assumed charge." During 

his administration he received iiiikIi 

praise tor his efforts to make the College 
a binder and better institution, 

MANY ADDITIONS TO 
STAFF OF TEACHERS 

New Appointments Also Made in 
Extension staff of Kmployecs 



Several new appointments have been 

made to the stall of the College to till 

vacancies ami positions recently estab 
lished. Seven new people (.one this fall 
lo the resident instruction stall. Two ot 
these are in the Department of Military 
Science. Colonel Charles A. Romeyn, 
Cavalry, U.S.A., is professor and head 

of the department and Captain Dwi^ht 

Hughes, Jr., is assistant professor in the 
depart mint. Colonel Koines n is a gradu 
ale of the I'niled Stales Mllit.it \ Acad- 
emy ami has a distinguished record of 
military si r\iie. lb- comes to the College 
from the Inspector General's Department 

at the boston I leadipiat ters. Captain 

Hughes served a' 'he College from 1923 

to 1926 and is well remembeied hen-. 

Mr. I. vie I.. Bhmdell oi cupies the 
< imliinn-cl on I'.illi- i) 

Many Candidates for 

Cross-Country Squad 

Twenty Sophomores Report to Coach 
Derby for Pratt ite 

During the past wick, approximately 
twenty-five candidates for the varsit) 
cross-country team have reported to 
Coach I.. I.. Derby. Under the leader 

ship of Don Mason '32, the captain of 

tin- team, the prospects for a successful 

season are fair. Mason is the only letn-i 
man from last year's squad, bill Stewart 
Edmond '32 and Harold Soul. ;;:; 
of the most promising members of this 
|i:ad were on la a yen s team 
also. Cilford Towle '32 and "Hill ' 
rlager '33 are the two remaining upper 

i las-men on t he sipiad. 

The sophomore (lass has the largest 

number of candidates on the squad, with 
(went', ol its members trying out for t di- 
sport. Foremost among these are "Dave" 
Caird, who starred on the freshman team, 
Sabean, McGuckian, and Farrer, 

This year the distance of the course 
has been i hanged from five miles to four 

miles. The hr-t part of the course has 

been omitted BO that the (our-e Starts at 
the Drill Hall atul p roc e e d s toward < lark 
Hall instead of going around the poultry 
plant. 



COOPER UNION FIRST 
VICTIM OF NEW TEAM 

Itush and llolmherU Star 

Fresh from the tutelage of the new 
football i o.H hi Mel Taube, and playing 

Notre Dame football with the old Nolle 

Dame fight, Hu- Massachusetts Stat,- 
College gridsters took complete control 
oi Minimi I'ield last Saturday afternoon 

in the Opening name of the season with 

Cooper Union, leaving the visitors on the 

hoit end of a .Ml II tails. Mel's Ked and 
White charges gave one ol the most 

beautiful exhibitions of football ever 
seen on the campus, chalking up almost 

as many points in one gamt as have been 

scored by Massachusetts nun during the 

last two \eais. ( Issie Hotmbefg, hltci- 
m. in lor the last imi \e.ns, and bonis 
Hush, an all round athh le re. iinted from 

the i.inks of last year's freshmen, both 
played stellar roles in totaling three 

t o uc hd owns each, while their teanmiales 
gaVC some fine exhibitions of deleusivc 

and offensive teamwork. 

Freddy Welch, Massachusetts Skate 
quarterback, received the ball at the 

kickoll and ploughed on for ID vanls 
In Ion- he was downed The Kid and 
White then displ.iMil in a steady match 
down the held, exhibiting the smoothly- 

functioning attack which characterised 
the advances of Captain Clifl Foakett's 

men throughout the flay, bonis Hush 

first electrified the crowd when In- not 

away lot a twenty '-yard jaunt and set 
the ball down in the shadow of the goal 
posts. Although a fumble on the goal 
line almost upset the ( ham es lor a score, 

Cooper Union was unable to v;<-t out of 

(Continued on l'.iU>- t 

SOCCER TEAM MEETS 
WORCESTER TECH MEN 



First GajBM to lie Played on Soccer 
Field This Saturday 

Building a much stronger defensive 
team, along with persistent practice of 
offensive tactics, Coach Larry Hri^s has 

molded a Strong varsity SOCCCr team into 

shape foi t he opening game wit h Won ester 

Tech on the State Colleges soccer field 
next Saturday morning at 10 o'clock. 
Although Won ester has (piile a strong 

team this year, the State soccei eleven 

plan to put Massai huseits ahead from 

tin- st.nt in the inter-sport rivalry be. 

tween the Km-.me is and the State Col- 
legians. 

Ill spue of the fat t thai < oai li Hi i 
was taken ill very suddenly, the men have 

kept improving under the tutelage of 
I K-ddie Ell rt, basketball < oat h, "S<-ot«y ' 

\bli hell, and Captain Eddie \\ askiewii /. 

I ot this only home game lot the var- 
sity hooters this season, the probable 

lineup should unhide: Jon/ak as goalie, 

Jackson as centei forward, Taft or 

Kozlowski in the inside left posiln,n, 

Waskiewici and Warren playing in the 
inside ri;<ht position, Mackimmie will 

probably be at outside lett, while |,n,, 
ol V Wheeler will be at outside ri^lit , 
Hitch OCk or Cowling will be the (enter 

halfback, Pruyne and I'd but at right 
and h-tt halfback respectively, and Cou- 
ncil, Siiuman, and Hodsdon will alter- 
nate in t he fullb.i' k po-it i 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 



Friday, October 2 

V'iki p. in. R.izih) N'inlit, ' .i«e an/1 Lowr 
LevcL 
Sal unlay, October J 

10.00a. in. Varsity Soccer, Worcester T<-< li 

li' re 

2.30 i>. m. Vanity Football, Bowdoin bete. 
7 .30 p m. President's Reception t'> the 
Memorial Hall 
Tuesday, October <i 

k.oo j, iii. ( omblnol ( horns, Memorial 
Hall. 
We, In. s.l.o . October 7 
:{.'_'o t). in A etnbly, Stockbridg* Hall, .VI- 
forroei Pre idenl ..i 

Kenyon I-. Butterfield. 
7.00 p. in. Orpheiu ' lub, Memorial Hall. 
8.00 p. m. (oil. -.■'• Orchestra Rehearsal, 
Sin. kbridge Hall 



I 



> 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 1, 1931 



XCbe flfoaseacbusetts Collegian 



Official newspaper of 



the Massachusetts State College. 
Wednesday by the students. 



Published every 



Wallace W. Stuart "32 
hi an a tint liditor 



BOARD OF EDITORS 

Frank L. Springer '32 
Editor-in-Chief 

Oscar Margolin "32 Rial S. Pottbr. Jr. "32 

Associate Editors 



DEPARTMENT EDITORS 

Editorial 

Frank L. Springer ,32 



Alumni and Faculty 

Marjorib I. French '34 

Athletics 

William II. Wear '32 

Eugene Guralnick '33 

W. Grant Dunham '34 



Feature 
Oscar Margolin '32 



Cam put 

Edmund Nash '33 

Alfreda L. Ordway '33 

W. Raymond Ward '33 

Harrietts M. Jackson '34 

Joseph Politella '34 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT 

Eric H. Wettbrlow Jr. '32 

Business Manager 



Kenneth E. Hodge '32 
Advertising Manager 

Ashley B. Gurney '33 



Business AuUlaoti 



William A. Johnson '32 
Circulation Manager 

Philip H. Lsvsrault "33 



Subscriptions 12.00 per year. Single copies 10 cents. 



Make all orders payable to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In case of change of address, subscriber will please notify the business manager 
M toon as possible. 

Alumni and undergraduate contributions are sincerely encouraged. Any com 
munications or notices must be received by the editor-in-chief on or before Monday 
evening. 



Entered as •econd-claas matter at the Amherst Post Office. Accepted for mailing at special rate of 
postage provided for in Section 1103. Act of October, 1917, authorized August 20. 1918. 



WELCOME 1V35 

You are a Urge class, the largest ever to have enrolled here and the first to enroll 
under the new name of Massac husetts State College. We hope and believe that you 
have quality as well as quantity. 

You are members of the siidcnt body and are expee ted to conduct yourselves at 
all times as such. Think over the college traditions lor probably some day, you, too, 
will cherish them. Always be willing to help another fellow, even though it is in 
inconvenience to you. 

YOU have access to one of the most beautiful campuses in New England, so m. cla- 
use of it. Studies are of primary importance but do not overlook extra-curricular 

activities. Just rcmc-ml.e-r to conduct yourselves as gentlemen at all times and \<>u 
will find that you will !>e easily assimilated into the student body at Massac husi tts 
State. 



INFANTILE PARALYSIS 

Rumors have bean Bying thick and fast about the- campus during the past week 
with reference to infantile- paralvsis. Fortunately the great majority of them rumors 
are entirely unfounded. There is no cause to worry about contracting this malady if 
we use just a wee bit of common sense-. Sonic- of this common sense- is to eat heartily 
and regularly, dress according to climatic conditions, secure sufficient sleep, play or 
walk in the sunlight or Open air, find relaxation by getting out in the open rather 
than remaining cooped up in a stuffy movie theatre. 

Dr. Radcliffe informed us last Monday morning that the cases which developed 
here at the college were only two in number, were not severe, and were contracted 
before coming to college. 

Keep a high bodily resistance by using regular health habits coupled with com- 
mon sense and you need not fear an attack of infantile paralysis. 



AT LAST, A COLLEGE SONG BOOK 
You may proc ur e from the College Hook Store one of the new books containing 

the words and music of the Massachusetts State College songs. The long-awaited 

song books are pa|)er bound and can be secured for the very reasonable price of 

thirty -five cents. 

These books fill a much anticipated desire on the part of the student body to 

purchase a collection of "Songs of t)ld Massachusetts" with both the words and 

music. 

By the way, most of the songs are written for a quartet, so if the first tenor part 
when played OS the- piano with one finger does not sound like the tune you imagined 
it to be, try the second tenor part. You will probably find the melody there. If not, 
blame yourself or the piano. We imagine it will be the fault of the piano. 



SPEEDING 

Whether due to the gradual relaxation of freshman rules or to other causes, it is 
nevertheless a fact that the courtesy which used to prevail on the campus has been 
on the decline of late. College men no longer salute each other with a friendly 
"hello" as they pass, and underclassmen parade on the sidewalks four abreast with 
utter disregard for the rights of other pedestrians. Hut the- most flagrant discourtesy 
of all is displayed by those students who drive their cars with absolutely reckless 
speed on the campus roads. It is not long since students were not permitted to bring 
cars to college, and if such tactics continue, it may not be long until the present 

privilege of having a car at college be revoked. 

Fortunately, the last two accidents which occurred here, though serious, did not 

result in fatalities; but are college men so childish that only the ultimate catastrophe 

can make them realize and practise the most elementary courtesy toward their 

fellows? 



Sty* pramon 

The Picaroon sat at his desk signing 
checks like the big executive he is, when 
suddenly there came a tapping at his 
door. "Come," said the Picaroon in that 
tone of authority which he knows so well 
how to use. The door opened and in 
step(>ed the strangest apparition the 
Picaroon had ever seen outside of a 
Currier & Ives pri.it of Mr. and Mrs. 
Mauve Decade in all the glory of their 
languidly elegant late nineteenth century 
attire. The apparition was evidently of 
the feminine gender, for it kept talking 
incessantly from the moment it opened 
the door. Its person was diminutive, but 
it wore a longish skirt beneath which its 
little feet were just visible. Its feet were 
so plainly in sight, in fact, that I couldn't 
help leering just a little. The rest of its 
costume I must pas., over in silence, for 
I just don't understand these things. But 
I cannot forbear to mention its hat. 
Perched precariously on the top of the 
apparition's head at a queer rakish angle, 
it seemed somehow to be only half of a 
hat, with an odd turned-back brim in 
place of the other half. From one end of 
this crescent-shaped headpiece depended 
a huge orange feather which, drooping 
sadly down one side of her face, curled 
under her chin and tickled her opposite 
ear. 

By the time the Picaroon had recovered 
from his astonishment, his visitor had 
appropriated a chair and was talking a 
blue streak: 

"—and so I went and bought this per- 
fectly beautiful hat, Mr. Picaroon, and 
the salesgirl told me it was absolutely 
unique and modeled after one that the 
Kmprcss Eugenic had worn. And would 
you believe it, Mr. Picaroon, all the other 
co-eds have been and gone and copied me, 
and now I haven't got no individuality 
at all! Please write something in your 
column that will make all those catty 
old co-eds absolutely llinch! Oh, I could 
te-ar the-ir cye-s out!*' 

The Picaroon leaned back in his chair, 
and bowed with that inimitable- composure 

of his. "Charmed," he murmured. 
"Would Mademoiselle be no kind as to 

leave her name, age, weight and specific 

gravity? Also are you doing anything 

this evening?" 

She- blushed and answered that she had 
nothing to do that evening, whereat t he- 
Picaroon recommended a good novel by 
Warwick Deeping or Brace Barton. At 

this, she seemed peeved for some reason 
or other and dep art ed abruptly without 
a word of thanks. A few clays later I 
mw her and was stiuck by the change in 
her appearance. She wore a little green 
beret, and, in company with a lot of 
other little girls, was happily and con- 
tentedly jumping nines on the sidewalk 
in front of Draper Hall. 



Love in a Mist 

There was a young man in the South, 

Who had an enormous mouth; 

Excuse it this time, 

For the sake of the rhyme, 

Hut his mouth was simply uncouth! 

His nose had forgot where to stop; 

His ears had gone over the top; 

And as for his eyes, 

I think it is wise, 

To describe them as simply pop! 

His clothing was all of a tatter; 

His food consisted of batter; 

His life with his wife 

Was continual strife, 

And his children resembled the latter! 

Bewailing his fortune so tough, 

He became addicted to snuff; 

And died in a fret, 

Which we cannot regret, 

For surely he lived long enough! 



HALF THE FRESHMAN 

CLASS PLEDGE FRATERNITIES 



EDITORIAL POINTS 

Another tradition at Massachusetts State is that seniors shall be permitted to 
leave Chapels and Assemblies before the other three classes. 



We think Cooper Union must be backed by a certain oil company. At least, our 
roommates believe that they will "change to Shell" after seeing Cooper Union uni- 
forms last Saturday. 



Board is more reasonable and the general lab fee makes the science majors feel 
more prosperous. 



With the football team opening as it did, the Chorus making plans to produce 
"Iolanthe," and the Varsity Club Quartet on the Sen ial Union schedule again, we 
think we have a big year ahead. 



Here's hoping the ban on dancing will be lifted before the Amherst game house 
parties on October 31. 



Looks from here as though the sophs 
are waving the white feather by coercing 
the administration into a postponement 
of the rope-pull. Might as well learn to 
swim now, sophomores, since the pool 
will be closed for a while. 



Those aren't symptoms, Dear Reader; 
they're simply the natural effect of 
reading this column. 



Paid your lab fee yet? 



Let no onv think 
These things are cinches, 
its a tough job 
Writing fifteen inches 



With approximately half of the fresh- 
men pledging the various fraternities 
last Monday morning, the first rushing 
season of the year was brought to a close. 

Following is a list of the pledges: 

Phi Sigma Kappa— W. D. Barrett, 
lQ84j W. 11. Alderman, R. Allen, A. 
Hurgess, C. H. Daniels, F. Goddard, E. 
Hall, H. W. Hatch, R. Libbey, E. Pren- 
tiss, R. Smith, L. Williams, H. Wood, 
and P. Wood, 1935. 

J.T.V.— F. Andrews, C. Clark, J. 
Geary, W. Cone, G. Congdon, K. Cox, 
R. Cummings, D. Foley, M. Galbraith, 
H. Cavagan, Z. Jackimczyk, S. Jillson, 
W. Kieda, C. Krtii, W. Madden, J. Mc- 
Kelligott, J. Moran, W. Mozden, R. 
Siira, Strickland, L Willard, 1935. 

Kappa Sigma—]. Bennett, E. Genast, 
C. Fowler, J. Criffin, K. Nash, M. Nay, 
W. Senecal, K. Steadman, and T. Warren, 
1935. 

Theta Chi—L. Blake, C. Cross, G. 
Hartwell, D. Horton, E. Horton, W. 
Hovey, R. Jerauld, W. Johnson, W. 
Leach, O. Trask, J. Valentine, N. Wheeler, 
1935. 

Sigma Phi Epsilon — F. Caron, L. Carr, 
(.. Higclow, J. Casey, L. Clark, G. Curtis, 
W. Gillette, E. Guenard, R. Hutt, R. 
Koch, B. Kelleher, T. Leary, A. Muscho- 
vic, E. Nassif, C. O Brien, W. Raleigh, 

A. Sandford, 1935. 

Lambda Chi Alpha— C. Bearse, W. 
Hrown, D. Daniels, W. Eaton, R. Lamson, 

B. Lillie, J. Moulton, W. Muller, A. 
Newton, R. Schreiter, S. Tani, A Tikof- 
ski, II. Yeeriing, 1935. 

Alpha Sigma Phi—S. Arnold, S. Bliss, 
W. Hodman, C. Honzagni, J. Bailey, R. 
Bray, G Brune, J. Colman, R. Evans, 
R. Harris, H. Hinckley, O. Leavitt, R. 
Murray, A. Johnson, A. Ramsdell, R. 
DiMarzio, A. Ruffo, S. Shongood, R. 
Thompson, I). Wallace, and W. Wallace, 
19:55. 

Alpha Gemma Rho — M. Davie, E. 

Fisher, C). Hogaboom, S. Little, W. 
Newman, A. O'Brien, G. Shaw, S. Snow, 
W. Tirrell, 1936. 

K»Ppa EpfUon — P. Clark, P. Doyle, 
S. Neweoiul). R, N'orris, W. Pelton, D. 
Rogers, N. Stevens, 1936. 

Delia PW Alpha D. Arcnbcrg, I. 
rVrenb er g , S. Bresnich, M. Dobin, J. 
Dwarmon, A. Feinberg, C. Hurwitz, B. 
(iolub, H. Heriiianson, I. Kerlin, A. 
I.andis, H. Labia, L. l.ebishefsky, H. 
Michelson, J. Miller, J. Novick, L. Pollin, 
H. Riseman, P. Robinson, S. Salamoff, 
M. Shapiro, II. ScharfT, M. Todt, M. 
Weiner, H. Tannenbaum, D. Zucker, 
1935. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 1, 1931 



MANY ADDITIONS TO STAFF 

(Continued from Page 1) 

position of professor of horticulture made 
vacant last spring by the death of Pro- 
fessor C. H. Thompson. He is a graduate 
of Iowa State College and has had several 
years commercial exj>erience in the fields 
of horticulture and landscape architecture. 
He comes to the College from the firm of 
Olmsted Brothers at Boston. 

Miss Mildred Hriggs has been appointed 
assistant professor of home economics in 
the position formerly occupied by Miss 
Marion L. Tucker. Miss Hriggs is a 
graduate of DePauw University and has 
a master's degree from Iowa State College. 
She comes to this College from the Uni- 
versity of Minnesota. 

Mr. Herbert K. Warfel is Mr. Grannis' 
successor as assistant professor of Zo- 
ology, coming from Oklahoma University 
where he received his master's degree. 
He is a graduate of Western State College 
of Colorado. 

Two graduates of this College of last 
June have been appointed instructors; 
Constantine J. Gilgut in Botany and 
Frederick S. Troy in English. 

There have been five recent appoint- 
ments to the Extension Service staff. 
(cContinued on Page 4) 



ANNUAL ROPE PULL POSTPONED 



An indefinite postponement of the 
rope pull across the pond has been d,. 
cided upon by joint action of the ad- 
ministration and the student Senate 
Since the exertion is considerably taxinj; 
upon the system of the individual, thus 
increasing his susceptibility to infantile 
paralysis, the authorities state the po 
bility that the event will not be h e ],j 
during this term. 

Although full preparations had he t n 
made Saturday, such as roping the u-rr;- 
tory on both sides of the Pond, and 
designating parking space for visitors 
slippery grounds and general health 
considerations made the annual classic 
impossible. 




Sigma Beta Chi, one of the three girls' 
societies, had its first meeting, September 
28, at which an executive committee for 
the coming year was elected. The com- 
mittee consists of Celeste Fiore 
Clarisse Taylor '32, Marion Hunter 
Maybelle Anderson "S3 and Laura Cordon 
'32. Anne Digney '31 was chosen alumnae 
advisor for the society. Plans were out- 
lined for the activities of the year. 
Several teas and bridge parties have beta 
planned as social events to take place 
during the term. 

Edwina Lawrence '32 has planned to 
organize a College Girl Scout Troop to 
assist the local troop in Amherst. All 
girls who have been scouts are invited t > 
become members, and it is hoped that a 
large group will co-operate to make the 
scout troop a successful undertaking. 

Freshmen women are under a new 
housing plan this year. Due to the 
number ol new girls and the lack of rooms 
in the Abigail Adams House, freshmen 
are forced to live in private off-campus 
houses. As far as has been possible a 
small group of girls have Ite-cn uiven 
rooms together. About twenty ot the 
girls were fortunate enough to oi 
rooms in the dormitory and thill r 
the inconvenience of walking to and from 
campus. Next year it is hoped that 
girls of 1935 may live in the Adams 1 loan, 
and the girls of P.).'>4 will be asked t) 
live off campus tor the year. 

OFFICERS ELECTED BY 

THE CLASS OF IMS 



President -John W '. Hennett 
\ in- President Marian MacLaughlin 
Secretary — Elizabeth C. Perry 
Treasurer Julian P. Griffin 
Captain — John P. Colman 
Sergeant-at-Arms — Sheldon Bliss 

SWIMMING POOL CLOSED 



As a precautionary measure in helping 
to prevent the spread of infantile par.dyss 
at the Massac husetts State College, the 
swimming pool in the Physical Education 
Building has been closed until further 
notice. Professor Curry S. Hicks, director 
of Physical Education, said the (>ool had 
been closed on the advice of Dr. Harold 
K. Miner, State Department of Health 
official at Holyoke. The pool will re- 
main closed for at least two weeks. 



FRESHMAN SINGING 



Freshman practice singing of the 
college songs is to be held in Howker 
Auditorium on appointed nights at &M 
p. m. rather than the North Dormitory, 
according to a recent statement ot the 
Senate. The announcement was made to 
supersede previous statements in the 
Freshman Handbook. 

Special arrangement is being made by 
Ed Loomar '32, song leader, to have 
slides containing the words to the songs 
screened on the auditorium stage to aid 
the freshmen in the singing. 



THIS SPACE RESERVED 

IN THE LAST ISSUE OF EACH MONTH 

FOR 

THE POEM OF THE MONTH 

It is the intention of The Collegian to publish in the last issue 
of every month a poem which shall have been selected by a 
competent judge from as many manuscripts as may have been 
submitted by undergraduates in competition. Such manuscripts 
must be left at Mr. Rand's office by the 15th of the month and 
will not be returned to the authors. It is expected that a prize 
of $2n will be available at the end of the year for the published 
poem which shall have been adjudged the best of the group. 
The closing date for the first competition is October 15. 

The Editors 



27 th Year 



HONOR GROUPS 
(Continued from Page I) 

Hunter. Miss, Jorczak, J. S., Keyes, C. C. Libbey. 
\\ ( . Markus, Miss. Merrill, R. H., ODonnell. 
P i l'rince. C. G., Ross, P. H., Salter, L. A. Jr.. 
Stuut, W. W.. Utley. W. S., Whitten, G. V.. 
M.nson. Mia*. 

Class of 1933: Barr, J. B., Bearse, A. E.. 
(h.iiowrth. H. W., Goodell. B. C, Issur, B., 
Smith, W. Th Southwick, L., Swartzaelder. J. C. 
Class of 1934: Adams. S., Bates. R. G., Camp- 
hell. Miss, Caird, D. W.. Cooke, T. V. Jr., Coombs. 
i l'.. LH-nmark, H. S., French. C. L.. Frigard, W., 
Hatch B. L., Kozlowski, W., Merritt, Miss, 
Nattl. I. Steffek, E. F. 
* d GROUP III 

,ss of 1931: Bosworth. W. E. Jr., Bottomly, 
li \i, Calvl. J., Campbell, Miss A., Carpenter, 
H 1) Clarkson, Miss, Cucinotta, L. B., DanKel- 
muver'. W. R.. Darling. H. D.. DeFalco, Miss, 
DoiiKlass. F. T.. Dyer. Miss, Field. G. W.. Fits- 
OraM. P- R-. Gorman. J. W.. Cower, A. H., 
Harker. W. B.. Hanks. H. M. Jr.. Hastings. K. B.. 
Holm, C. G.. Johnson. A. C. Jones, L. A., King, 
M N.. Lawrence. J. C. Loar. R. D.. Lyman, Miss, 
Meyer. Miss, Manty. C. W.. Norell, Miss, Rooney, 
K c , Stoddard. H. T., Takahashi, L. H.. Tucker, 
K 15 Yichules. Miss. Wahlgren, H. L., White, 
i;. T.. Woods. J. J. Jr. 

of 1033: Anderson, Miss C, Batstone, 
\V 1- . Boland, Miss. Boston. Miss, Burrington, 
| < '., Carter, F. Ii., Chase, H. M. Jr.. Clark. W. 
K jr., Dickinson. Miss, Digus. R. I... Doyle. 
| 1 " Kvans. R. W., Fabyan. W. W., Fiore, Miss, 
Gagllarduexi. V. N., Hale. K. F.. Haynes. A. ( , 
Hewlett, C. H.. Lawrence. Miss. Mason, D. W., 
in.luiiVr, Miss, l'ineo. V. C. Parsons, Miss, 
SaJeatos, C H.. Smilh. A.. Taylor, Miss A., 
Towle. G. H.. Tippo, O., Warner, Miss. Wear, 
\V II., Whe-eler, K. M.. Wherity, R. W., Wilson. 
J.L 
Class of 1933: Asrjulth, D.. Clark. C. E., 

.11, J. B., Dechter. J. M.. Grithn, Miss. 
Gurney, A. B., Hale. Miss, Hovey, A. E.. Howes, 
K V , Karlson, E. R.. Levereault. P. J.. Miller, 
Mis Munson. Miss. Parker. A. C, Scott. S. B., 

mides, G. F.. Taylor, F. H., Ward, W. R., 
Wei a, F.J. 

of 1934: Alton. H. R.. Becker. R. F.. 
Bernstein, H. B.. Burke. R. ¥.. Clark, Miss, 
c Ink. F. G., Cook. Miss E. A.. Cowing. R. T., 
Dexter, K. W« I>ow, Miss, Ducke-ring. Miss 

n .\. A., iiugec, Ml«s, la ck t on , Mi... Lojko, 

\1 ii Mackin. C. A.. McCarthy. Miss. Osgood, 

B. ii., Politella, J., Ryan. A. S.. Smilh, D. II. 

Solomon, B., Southworth, W. H-. Wc-int>erger, B., 

Wbeekr, N. A . weaakr, Mam 

Among the members of Fraternity Row, Alpha 

Gamma Rho retained its scholarship lerad with 

I >igma and Kappa Epsilon closely follow- 

Alpha Gamma Rho 80.34 

Kappa Sigma so us 

Kappa EpaUos <9.21 

l).lt.i Phi Gamma 79.09 

Lambda Chi Alpha £8.01 

n i'.» 

Delta Phi Alpha 78.31 

Phi Sigma Kappa 76.78 

Alpha M^Mia I'hi 7t> l.j 

Non-sorority '^ 

Phi l.i'-ilon 75.96 

c hi I 

fraternity 75.4 

Vi.uAv.-rage T, 7 - 29 

Total Women Average 77. 0o 



VISIT 

BARSELOTTI'S 

m/Kin/iients for the smoker- Pipes, 
Pouches, Smokers Combination 

Ice Cream, Candy, Sandwiches 

Best in Drug Store Merchandise 
Best in Drug Store Service 

Henry Adams & Co. 

You have tried the rest? 

Now try the BEST 

And that's the 

AMHERST SHOE REPAIRING CO. 

"Goodyear Welt System Employed" 



L A N Dl S 

Your College Cleansert, Dyers, Tailors and Haberdashers 
Tuxedos and Fulll Dress Suits for Rent or Sale. 

IT IS TO FEEL 



27th Year 



PHONE Sll-w FOR FREE DAILY Motor SERVICE, AND LEARN WHAT 



SATISFIED. 



LARGE FROSH CLASS 

(Continued from Page 1) 

C!e?ary, J., New London. Conn. 
Cohen, R., Docheste-r 
Colman, J., Bolton 
CoU>ti, Miug A.. Agawam 
Conary. \\\. Hraintree 
Cone, \V., hist Oi.inge, N. J. 
Congdon. ti., Millis 
Conru-ry, Miss E., Kasthampton 
Connolly, Miss II., lladley 
Consolatti, J.. Lee 
Cook, D., Amherat 
Corcoran, P., Stonehani 
Corcoran. H., Westheld 
Cox, A., Hridgeuater 
Cox. K., West Springfield 
Crabtree, Mis* A., Gardner 
Crosby, G.. Huguenot, N. Y. 
Cross, C, Onset 
Cumining, 1< , Bristol 
Currier, Miss M., Amesbury 
Curtis, G., Taunton 
Daland, Miss L., Wakefield 
Danle-ls, C, Melrose 
Davis, ii., Stafford Springs, Conn. 
Daze, R., Willimansett 
I>eardon, Miss A., Palmer 
Dec, Miss M . Hadley 
Dempaey, A., Huntington 
Dennis, G., Framinsnam 
DiMarzio, R., North Plymouth 
Dimock, C., Longmeadow 
Dolihue. H.. Haverhill 
Dol.ui, Miss B.. Turners Falls 
Donaldson, Miss M., Agawam 
I>oyle, B., Northampton 
Dubie, R„ Turners Falls 
Dubin, M., Maiden 
Durham, Miss G., Ipswich 
Dwight. Miss A., Giiswoldville 
Eaton, P., Waltham 
Elder, II.. Mount Herinon 
Eldridge, J., West Bridgcwater 
Epstein, H., 
K\ -.ins, J., Arlington 
Evans, R., Easthampton 
Fach, Miss W , Bernardston 
Fay, Miss P., Chict>|iee Kails 
Farrand, Miss M., Won ester 
Feinberg, A.. Dorchester 
Fisher. E., Waliiole 
Fitzgerald, P., Haverhill 
PI ■ k, Mi-s K , Northampton 
Fletcher, E., Duig Island, N. Y. 
Foley, Mis9 C, Amherst 
P ot ty , D., Salem 
Fowler, (., We-st Ne-wton 
Prey. Miss ( '., South Hadley Falls 
Friediii h, Miss L. 
Foxhall, W.. Shrewsbury 
Priaard, T., Maynard 
Gaibralth, M.. Greenfi el d 
Gary. Miss M., Montague City 
t l.i\ agan. II , Boston 
Geadler, Miss M., e ,n-<-nfield 
I ieaeat, K.. Pittafield 
George, C, Be-h-hi-itown 
Gillette, W., BUIerka 
Gledhill, Mi-s P., Dalton 
Goddard, P., Woourn 
Goldberg, Miss II., Revere 
< Iolub, Ii., East Longmeadow 
Oonl. ut. Miss <,., I .lirhaven 
Govoni. Miss I., North Agawam 
Granger, l< . Weat field 
Graham, E., Soutb Grovebtad 
(iritlm, J.. Indian Orchard 



Dine to the strains of 
tantalizing music at . . . 

BUCK DEADY'S ROADHOUSE 

College Drug Store 

\V. H. McGRATH, Reft. Phnrm. 
AMHERST, - - MASS. 



S. S. HYDE 

Optician and Jeweler 

Oculists' Prescriptions Filled. Broken lenses 
accurately replaced 

BIG BEN ALARM CLOCKS and other 

reliable make* 

S PLEASANT STREET, (up one Bight) 



STUDENT SUPPLIES 



Loose Leaf Note Books 

Dictionaries 

Artist Materials 



Portable Typewriters 

Inks 

Fountain Pens 



ALL THE LATEST BOOKS 

JAMES A. LOWELL, - - BOOKSELLER 



WELCOME... 

Come in and see a new and complete line of High 
Grade Haberdashery. We have^catered to College Men for over 
forty years and we can please you as we have hundreds of others. 
You will need some of the following: 

SLICKERS $5.00 — LAUNDRY CASES $1.50 
CORDUROY SLACKS $3.95 

F. M. THOMPSON & SON 



Gue-nard, E.. Dracut 
Guion, Miss E., Newton 
Gunn, Mi I . I i ih.unpton 
Gnrka, J., Wan- 
GttaowaUj V.. Florence 
Hall, i:.. I'pton 
Ilanis. Miss M,, U-ominster 
llciiis. K . U-oiniiist, i 
Il.inuilin. J., Northampton 
Harlow, H., Shrewsbury 
Harrington, Miss B„ Ludlow 
Hartwell, G . Maiden 

II. ist. Miss R., Won-este-r 

Hatch, H . Plymouth 
Hermanaoa, R.. Dorchester 

Mill, hlry, II. 1 )<•■> h.-st.-i 
Hogaboom, O., New Britain 
Horton. D., Welllleet 
Horton, B., Newtonville 
Hovey, W , Wakefield 
Hubbard, K., Sunderland 
Hunter, R., Melrose 
Hutt, K., Glastonbury 
Jaworski, E.. Adams 
Jaikiimzyk. '/.., Florence 
Jerauld, R.. Newtonville 
Jillson, S., Re-adslxiro. Vt. 
Johnson. A., Agawam 
Johnson, W., Haverhill 
Jones, Miss M., West held 
Jordan, \V., Revere 
J in I si ni, V., Lawrence 
Keil. J , AttlelH.ro 
Keuehsr, B., Turners Falls 
Kellogg, Miss F:.. Arlington 
Kie-.la, W., Wesltlrl.l 

Kiely, J., Northampton 

Kerlin, I.. S[)encer 

Kimball, I. , Amherst 

Koskela, V.. Maynard 

Krtil. C . Weatfield 

Lamson, R . F'oxboro 

l.uiilis, A . Amherst 

Lannon, Miss M., Holyoke 

Leach, W., West Bridgewater 

Leary, Miss J., Holyoke 

Leary. T.. Turners Falls 

Leavitt, R., Franiingham 

I^e-lx-shevsky. L.. Thompsoiiville, Conn. 

Libbey. R.. Westhoro 

Lillie, B., Spriasneld 

Lladquiat, R.. I^ast Ixjngmeadow 

Little, S.. Newburyport 

Liring, Miss K , Melrose Highlands 

Lubin. B . Boston 

MacLaughlia, Miss M.. F'isherville, R. I. 

MacOuestloa, B., Winchendon 

Maddea, W., Ware 

MallcM-k. R.. Greenfield 

Mason, Mi« i< . Bast lx>ngmeadow 

Maeters, B . Athol 

Mc Kelligott, J.. I 'aimer 

Merry, Miss A.. Ouxbury 

McKean, Miss i> ., Holyoke 

Miller. L, Don heater 

Miller, M . Northamptoa 

Mi.Inlson, H.. Dorchester 

Moraa, J . Millis 

Moulton, .1 , last Weymouth 

Mo/.lin, \V , Three Riven 

Murray, R., Holyoke 

M 1 1 -li< >\ i< , A . < .n-eiiticl'l 
N.ish. K . Aliinttiiii 

.!. I-. . North Adams 
Nay, M.. Abington 
Newcomb, 8. < ii.mge 

Newman, \\ '.. l-loinl.i 

New ton, A . Ihsron 
Nietupski, I' , rhree Rivers 
Norris, l< , Sharon 

No\ i. k. i< , Sharoa 

c »i» i .-. Mi - I- . Sandwich 

c >' Brien, ]•'. , Win luster 

O'Brien, A.. Noithampton 

Oliver. Miss F" . Huntington 

I'aivms. Mis K., e rawford Notch, N. II. 

Pease, e; , Aaiherat 

Pease. II.. Aahfield 

I'ellissier, Miss |< . II.c<ll.-y 

I'.-iton. W., New Bedford 
Perry, Miss f '... Watertowa 
Pillsbuiy, Miss M., Ashby 
Phutridge, D . Ik-dford 

I'lotezyk, J., Vernon 
I'ollin, I. , Springheld 
Prentiss, fe , I 'pton 
I'roulx. Miss II., Willimansett 
I'ntiiain, Mi~s s , Spiinglield 
Putnam, R. Greenfield 
Raleigh, W., Springfield 
Ramsdell, A. Palmer 
Rei. h. Miss E-, Springfield 

Reardoa, Miss M.. Hadley 
Reed, Miss R.. Waltham 
R i s e ia aa , N.. Revere 
Rohliins, H., Norwich, Conn. 
Robbins, Miss V., Norwich. Conn. 
Rohinson, P., Revere 
Rod. Miss S . Otis 
Rogers, I)., Lynn 
RothlH-rg, A., F"eeding Hills 

RuffO, A , I-ee.lillg Mills 

Salamoff, S.. Roxbury 

Saadford, A.. Ware 

Sargeat, Miss H., Aubiimdale 

Sarieat, Mi-^s R-, Wollaston 

Bavaria, T.. Ware 

S< hlaeffer, VV , EneJewood, N. J. 

s. hreiter, K . \\ 'iliiole 

Sr hubert, Mi^s B., Roxbury 

Sott, W., West BliHimfield. Conn. 

Seacord, K., New Roc hells, N. Y. 

Sena al, W.. Ploreac t 

Shapiro, M . North Adams 

Sharff, II . Chelsea 

Shalt in k, W . Ii-'!' hertown 

Siddall, G., Amherst 

Shaw, G., Palmer 
Simmons, G., Amherst 
Shongood, S.. New York, N. Y. 
Sleep, Miss ( '.. Pltc hburg 
Siiva, R . ( enterville 
Sleeper, II , South Oroveland 
Smith, Miss M., (ins-nfield 
Smith, R., West I'pton 
Snow, S.. West Roxbury 
Sprague. Miss M., Waliole 
Stanford, Miss D , Df^lham 
Stevens, N., Haverhill 
Ste-adman, K., Ne-e-elham 
St.-wart, D.. Arlington 
Stone, P., Athol 
Streeter. Miss H.. Springfield 
Sumner, II., S<|uanlum 
Taft. Mis< K., Dalton 
Tani, S., Worcester 
Tannenbaum. H.. Roxbury 
Thatcher, Miss E.. Athol 
Thayer, C, Williamsburg 
Thompson. R., NorthneM 
Tinti. Miss C. North Agawam 
Tikofski, A., Wali>ole 
Tirrell, W., South Weymouth 
Todcr, B.j Maiden 
Tosches. H.. Milford 
Tramposeh. H.. Huntington, N. Y. 
Trask, O.. Lexington 
\ alentine. H., Framingham Center 
Veeiling, H., F^-»st Weymouth 
Wallace, D., Arlington 
Wallace, W„ Arlington 
W r arren, T., Lawrenn- 
Warner, R., Williamsburg 
Weiner, M., Maiden 
Wihry. B., Haverhill 
Whiteomb. H., West Arton 
Whitton, Mis c, , North Adams 
Willard. L., Won ester 
Williams, 1... Melrose 
Winokur. L., I>»n hester 
Wool. II., West Ipton 
Wood. J., Greenfield 

Wood, I'.. Melt 

Wordell, II.. S.merset 
Vule. Mi-s e . Palmer 
Zcwski, W , Northampton 
Zucker, D., Holyoke 



OOOfll UNION FIRST VICTIM 
(Continued from Page 1) 

daaftr, and Hotmberg pnaoad icroM tlie- 

I. ist white line- fen | tone lielown. t'.i|it.iin 
Fotlcttt then put liis trusty ten- into id ion 
and nude- food on the try for point liter 
Keul Dttrini tlM rt-maindfr of the 

quartar, PrifBrd, sophomore- h.dili.ick. 

made- sonic- si/e-alile- gains, paviaf the- \v.i\ 
for a thirty five- yard dash on the- part of 
Bush, who followed this feat with anolhc-t 
twenty yard trip to the goal posts. The 

quartet i-mUA on Cooper Union's i"> yard 

line after ( >ssie llolmln-ri; scooped a loag 
pass out of the- air for a twentv yard K->'i). 

Getting late action again, Welch 

ploughed thraagtl the- ec-nter of the line 
for 11 and IU yard gaiaa, le-aclin^ the 
third inarch to the goal posts, where 
Hotaberg again hurled himself across the- 
line for a score. Cliff Koskett hgaifl 
kicked the hall sepiarely hetween t he- 
white posts for an additional point. I he- 
remainder of t Ims quarter was elMtfaetariaai I 

l>y long gains on the- p.nt of "Tuffy" 
Sylvester and Murray Hicks '82, the 
rangy halfliat k who clistingiiished him- 
self on the gridiron during his sophomore- 
year. As the first half was al>out over, 
Louis Hush made- a beautiful 40-yard run 
for his second touchdown. Shortly after, 
Murray Hicks stepped into the- lime-light 
again with another touchdown, leaving 
the score at the half MM), the visitors 
having lieen unalile to credit t heins.-K es 
with a first-down so far dtttittg the game. 
The second half was as one sided as the 
first, the visiting team showing itself to 

be wearied el the stead) raahet being 

BMUM against it. Mush and rlolOsberg 

each made- one more touchdown, the- 
Ictte-r making a total yardage <>| gfi v .,rels, 
and Mush running cloee to 7(t yards in 
all. Wood, tightiiig Red and White | M . k, 

merited six more- points oa aa oil tackle 
play, after steady advances cm the pan 

of Frigard and Welch. A slight rallv 00 
the- part ot the Cooper I'nion plavcts 

was in, t heroically by the beautiful 

tackling of Fabian and Murrington, 



PATRONIZE 



The College Barber Shop 

"M" BUILDING 

M. S. C. 



SANG LUNG hand laundry 

No. 1 Main St. Amherst, Mans. 



REPAIRING AND ALL KINDS OP 
WASHING DONE AT REASONABLE 
PRICES. 

Our Laundry First Clasa 

Our Policy Guarantee 
NEXT TO THE TOWN HALL 



TYPEWRITERS 

for Sale and Rent 

Bl K' kf A a A 

H. E. DAVID 



Birthday Cards 

Convalescent Cards 

Greetings for 

all Occasions 

Miss Cutler's Gift Sbop 



assisted by Ed Chm oi the sophomore 

OOBtlngeat, and the visitors wru- kept 
ccinpletelv sewed up in their nun terri- 
tory. 

The suniniury: 

Massachusetts State Solomon, Moun- 
tain, Goodall, lc; Poahett, Gov, Chapin, 

It; Murke-, S halTner, l«; Elourgeois, 

Leery, Griswold, c; Sihaon, Cumceinga, 

Cutler, tk; Sicvers, BttStingtOn, it; Smith, 

Ryan, Fahiaa, re; Welch, i. (l jko, qb; 
Holnaberg, Sytveater, lhl> ; hush, Hale, 

rhl>; Frigard, Micks, Wood, f|». 

Cooper Uttloa Laving, re; De-mars, rt; 

Dirrocco, Hums, Johnson, rgi Goren, c; 
Zaeouia, Nesti, |g>i Hagea, Arncfc, It; 

Anastasia, le; Smilh, Ro M -n, qb; Kspositi, 

rhb; Joseph. , Goran, lhl». 

Score by period! 1 2 .'{ 4 

Mass. Stale- |3 l.{ \2 li> gg 

Cooper I'nion Q (I o o o 

Touchdowns Holmberg .'{, Hush ,!, 

Wood, Hit ks. I'e.iuls alter touchdown 
l-'oskett 2. Referee Whalen, Spriagfteld. 

r, "l>i''- W- I-. Stearns, Springheld. 

I in. sniau R. C ea t on g, Sprinfleld. Tkne 

lour 16ttL |M-ric«|s. 

FRKSIIMAN RKCKI'IION 
(ContlnucMl from Page I) 

Thatcher. Following Preeidesn Thatcher 4 ! 
talk, refresh meat! vera s er ve d and the 

students continued to K et ac epiainted. 
I'lans for the- dance- that would have- 1.,-en 

a part ..f the- re cepti on had to be abaa< 

cloned at the- last minute < I tie- to a sti^ 
geetioo From the- Stat;- Hoard ot Health 

with reference to pr eve nt ing any further 

spread of infantile paralysis. 



KI.KVIN MKKiS IIOWDOIN SAT. 

e -.ntliiii.-.l from Page I) 

again, the st ore being lm 0, \. . ording 

to Mel Taube, the- results ,,i the fray 

with Cooper I nioo arc encouraging, .nt>\, 
although there are i few last nunttte 
rearrangements to be made-, he- bopei to 

Ki\c- the- tans al Alumni |i,.| ( | next 

S.il uiclav a real spci t.nlc-. 



AMHERST 

PARAMOUNT Picture*- PI JBLIX Theatrea 

3 S 8 2.30-6.30-8.30 

Price* Matinee* .M»c Evening* 40c 



Wednesday, Sept. 30 



JOHN IIALLIDAY & MARY BRIAN In 

"<:api'ain appucjack" 

Modern niyatcry ro—itoi ,,\ ,, rlsshini k*> 

in. in th.ii nut worn. in inula resist. 

James <;ieaaon (;<>medy Ripley 

Carl.MMi ll<Klft.- PiMlge Pathe New* 



'IhnriMlay, Oct. I 



GKORGE ARLISS 

a* 

"ALEXANDER HAMILTON" 

Di.un.iti. Gesniut brum* you has greateat 

ill IlllVlllHIlt. 

Kosriir Ales (Comedy Novelty 

Mickey Mouse Cartoon News 

( "iii|.li-tt- Sliows: 2::tQ IMP (),.(() gJQ ,, m 



Krlelay. Oct. 1 

Booth Tarklngton'* 

"PENROD AND SAM" 

with Leon Janney. Junior ( ...uulil.in and 

/ i/ii Pill* 
A tin.- Urs tii.ii will .ipiH-.H to aayoac sad 
everyone. 
Comedy Ca n<K>n Novelty New* 



Siitcirelay, Oct. .< 



Two UIk cjuality Featurei 

gOMl M> LOWE LOIS MOHAN 

Kl. Hit I M.I.I 

III 

"THL SPIDKR" 

and 

VICTOR McLACLKN AND 

JEANETTE MacDONALD in 
"ANNABELLE'S APFAIR8" 
Vttx New* 



Monday, Tuesday. <Kt. 5. b 
An emotional drama for nil grown-ups! I In- 
v. i% buman love Mory of ti»- mil who railed 

benell "bad" sad the \x>y who wai I neithei 

a wife; nor a had-. I 

HAD <;|RI." 

from tin- unique novel l,y \ ii».. DefaNH 

atarrlaj Sally Kilers aad James Dunn 

t.'harlie Chase Com. ,| v Jones Golf Reel 

Cartoon I'. n amount News 



THE CANDY KITCHEN 

Sam's Bros, extend 

their hearty welcome 

to the class of ipjj 

Sarris Bros. Candy Kitchen Restaurant Inc. 









THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 1, 1931 



HICKEY-FREEMAN SUITS 

Bzgin the scHodI year right by wearing Hickey-Freeman Suits -the styles and patterns are different. 

Good clothes are good Psychology. Consult "Tom". 

THOMAS F. WALSH 



PREXY TALKS AT ASSEMBLY MAW ADDITIONS TO STAFF 

(Continued from FsgS li (Continued from Pafte 2) 

wise it would become apparent and WetledeyC. Harrington, extension special 

adopted by the many seekers after nicb ist in agricultural engineering, ii a gradu 



truth. Hence, regardless ol the poaitive 
nets ot one's convictions, be ought to 
have tin utmost of tolerance for the con« 
v let ions and opinion* of others. These 
ought to be the dayi of very frank dis- 



ate oi Cornell University. Il<- has been 
associated sdth several organisations as 
engineer and comes to the College direct 
from the Portland Cement Association. 

Roy IC. Moser is newly appointed 



cuasioa luit that discussion ought to he jperialist in farm management. He is a 
free from ranror ami intolerance and in graduate of Ohio State University and 
every case we ought to give the credit ol \ ua done graduate study at Cornell. He 

has been county agricultural agent of 

Jefferson County, Ohio, for eleven years. 



being honest and sincere in his views to 

the man vv ho differs Iron) us. 

In short, these are days when in an 

unusual way experience* 1 on a college 
campus may serve as training for ex- 
perience in lii«' and education for citisen- 
ahip." 

COMBINED CHORU8 TO PRESENT 

(Continued from Page 1) 

than ever before to show its real capa- 
bilities. 

Again tin- organisation is fortunate in 
having Professor William I*. BigeJow of 
Amherst College as director. Those who 

sang ill the chOTUS of last season will re- 
memlier how thoroughly enjoyable it was 



The expansion of the radio educational 

program ot the Extension Service has led 
to the appointment of John ('. Baker to 

t with the whole extension editorial 

program. Mr. Baker is a graduate of 
Purdue University and comes to this 

College from a position in the publicity 

service of that University. 

Arnold M. Davis, a graduate ol this 
College in the class of 1931, has been 
appointed assistant e xt enaioa specialist 

in horticulture and is to undertake a 



to carry through the rehearsals and pre demies credit will he awarded to those 



sent a concert under his capable and 
enthusiastic leadership. 

Membership in the Combined Chorus is 
open to all members of all four classes, 
regardless of scholastic eligibility. Aca* 



entitled to it. Regular attendance on 
Tuesday evenings from X to '.» o'clock 
and a deain to make the chOTUS the !.; I 
ever are the only requisites fnr member- 
ship in the organization. 



program of home grounds improvement 
BJ i part of the extension service. 

The extension service staff in home 

economics has been increased by the 

appointment of Miss Grace B. Gerard 

who is to give particular attention to the 
program in home furnishing. Miss 
Gerard is a graduate of the I'niversity 
of Illinois and comes to this College from 
Home Bureau work in Illinois. 

In the Experiment Station, Miss 
Bernice Wait has been appointed to the 
research staff in home economics to fill 
the vacancy caused by the death of Miss 
Esther S. Davie*, Miss Wait is a gradu- 
ate of McKendree College in Illinois, and 
has done graduate work at the I'niver- 
sity of Illinois and at the I'niversity of 
Chicago from which latter institution she 
holds the Ph.D. degree. She has been a 
teacher of home economics at several 
land grant colleges and comes here from 
the I'niversity of Chicago. 

During Mr. Mighell's year's leave of 
absence, James K. Thigpen will serve as 
research assistant in farm management. 
lie is a recent graduate of Connecticut 
Agricultural College. 

William S. Mueller who has served at 
this College lor two years as fellow i" 

dairying has been appointed assistant 

research professor to take the place ol 
Mr. Kenneth K. Wright, resigned. 



M. S. C. MEN'S MOTTO IS ALWAYS 

LET "DAVE" DO IT 

AMHERST CLEANSERS, DYERS 
and LAUNDERERS 



PHONE 828 



Near the Town Hall 



PHONE 828 




Thomas s. guilds 8 

Incorporated 1 

SMART SHOES and HOSIERY for COLLEGE MEN and WOMEN " 



QUALITY MERCHANDISE 
275 High Street, 



PRICES TO SUIT 



Holyoke 

Largest Shoe Store in Western Massachusetts 

noooiootOioxoK 



i 
I 

oil 



JOSEPH GINSBERG 

HIGH GRADE SHOES 

Come in and look them over! 
19 Pleasant St. Amherst, Mass. 



JACKSON & CUTLER 

Dealers in 

DRY AND FANCY GOODS 

Amherst, Muss. 



(( 




GREETINGS TO 

MASS. STATE MEN 

both old and new 

IT WILL BE A PLEASURE INDEED TO SEE OLD 
FRIENDS -AND A PRIVILEGE TO MAKE NEW 
ONES. WE WISH THAT THIS MAY BE A YEAR 
OF UTMOST SUCCESS TO YOU. 



Bostonian" Shoes for Men 



Come in and see the new 

Bostonian "Scotch Grains" 

-we consider your visit a compliment 

whether you purchase or not 

$7.50 to $12.00 
BOLLES SHOE STORE 



AUTHENTIC 
CLOTHING 

This year, as always, we are 

prepared to give you the 
utmost in dollar for dollar 
value. In proof, may we ask 
you to eome in and see our 
"Commander" at S25.00, 
a superb suit finely tailored 
to our highest standards. 



CORRECT 
ACCESSORIES 

Everything in good taste tor 
the well groomed State man. 
You will rind in our shop 
the very latest and finest in 
furnishings at prices that will 
be a most pleasant surprise 
to you. 



Qreetings . . . 

to all State Men 

and 

sincere wishes 

for a 
successful year, 

4> ♦ ♦ 

E. M. SWITZER JR. 

Inc. 

AMHERST, MASS. 



Fine Shoes at $6.00 and $7.50 

CALL UPON US FOR PRKSSING AND REPAIRING. 
WE LOOK FORWARD TO YOUR EARLY VISIT 



CARL H. BOLTER 

INCORPORATED 

shops at YALE, HARVARD, EXETER, and IIYANNIS 



Hand Laundry Work Desired 

Prices reasonable 

Satisfaction guaranteed 

MRS. V. E. GAULDEN 
53 Triangle St., cor. East Pleasant 

PATRONIZE 
The Sandwich Man 

R. L. BATES, North Amherst 



GO TO 

FI SHER'S 

For the Best Values in 
Ladies' Full Fashioned Silk II" 

"Cannonette" 
•'Munsingweafor "Vanity Fair 

SERVICE WEIGHT OR CHIFFON 

at only $1.00 a pair 

Full Line of the New Fall Shades 




Everything in Hardware 
and Radio Equipment 

ATWATER - KENT 



AND 



MAJESTIC RADIO 

THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 

THE WINCHESTER STORE 



Sfo UlaflMrfrttfigttfi Ql0lh>ma« 



Vol. XLH 



AMHERST, MASS., WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 7, 1931 



Number 2 



ELEVEN HANDS BOWDOIN 32-6 SETBACK 



SOCCER TEAM TURNS 
BACK ENGINEERS 1-0 



Team Shows Up Well in Only Home 
Game of Season 



Starting off the season with a beautiful 
display of technique, the Maroon and 
White soccer players showed their su- 
perior strength at the game by nosing 
out Worcester Tech to the tune of 1-0 at 
Alumni Field last Saturday afternoon. 
The game was one of the hardest fought 
contests ever seen on the soccer field, the 
victory coming on the heels of the con- 
quest over Bowdoin on the gridiron 
shortly before. Despite the enforced 
absence of Larry Briggs, hard-working 
coach, Captain Eddie Waskiewicz and 
his ten followers showed a sustained 
offensive and an impregnable defensive 
which did credit to Larry s coaching and 
to the tutelage of Freddy Ellert and 
Scotty Mitchell. Bob Jackson of the 
sophomore contingent, who bids fair to 
become a dependable player at the inside 
left position for the rest of his college 
career, scored the only goal against the 
Engineers. The lineup: 



Mass. State 




Worcester Tech 


J. Jorczalc. lib 




g. Bull 


Connell, rfb 




rfb, Whittum 


Hudson, Ihb 




lfb, Tillan 


Hitchcock, chb 




rhb. Allen 


Pruyne, rhb 




chb, Shumski 


C.ciwinK. Shuman, olf 




Ihb. Cotton 


Mackimmie, ilf 




ort, Johnson 


Tuft, cf 




irf. Hebel 


Jackson, irf 




cf, Hammer 


W.iskiewicz. orf 




ilf, Lyiii.in 


Tctro. K 




olf, Sanderson 


Score — Massachusetts State 


1, Worcester Tech 


(». Goal — Jackson. 


Referee — 


Suher. Linesmen — 


Bm 1« rt, Royal. Tinw 


— 20-minutc quarters. 



FRESHMEN VICTORIOUS 
IN ANNUAL CONTESTS 

Cynical Senior Airs Opinion of Razoo 
Night for Collegian Readers 



"L-a-d-i-e-s- a-n-d- g-e-n-t-1-e-m-e-n." 
The long-drawn out wail creeps slowly 
over the cage of the Physical Education 
building, drowning out the cat calls, 
jeers and turmoil of the spectators, and 
finally returns to its author, "Red" 
Bosworth, as he stands in the ring, 
master of all he surveys. Kazoo Night 
has liegun. At the ringside combatants 
fidget nervously like wild animals eager 
for the fray; press agents, cigarette 
hanging low out of tense mouths, busily 
scribble down the events; and s|>ectators 
• due forward in their seats, palms sweat- 
ing in tightly clenched hands, and sibilant 
sighs issuing from clamped jaws. Two 
men may be seen entering the arena: 
one, Biglow "M, dark-haired and lanky; 
the other, Gillette '35, stock and well- 
knit. The first round of the boxing match 
passes with a Hurry of blows. The second 
begins like the first but ends with a 
knock-oui. "Em" Grayson counts ten 
over the vanquished form. The freshie 
is out cold! 

Hardly have the boxers left the place 
of contest when two wrestlers, each 
about 10 stone weight slither to the mat, 
Lucy, champion ot the class of 1994, 
t.ikes his place in the far corner, while 
his opponent, Bonzagni, bearing the 
tolors of the freshmen, faces him in the 
epposite corner. Referee Brackley 
whispers sweet nothings in their ears and 
then they are embracing each other. 
() ne and one-half minutes of torture 
elapses before brother Lucy is pinned 
rely to the mat. Loud cries of "38 ' 
usee forth from the stands. Score: one 
•>out each for the two classes. In the 
next match, a boxing bout, two stalwarts 
■'re busy tying on soft-padded gloves. 
>nds are giving last minute advice to 
r charges. Farrar 'M, weighing 145 
pounds glances at the sea of faces sur- 
ging him; Tikofski o5 of the same 
ht, views with eagerness the coun- 
nce of his rival. The bell! Both 
make for each other, and after a 
minute of wild swinging the flower of the 
(Continued on Pafte 3) 



OUTSTANDING EVENT 
OF THE WEEK 



Louis Bush, sophomore halfback, 
becomes the outstanding college foot- 
ball scorer in the East. 



Dr. Butterf ield 

Visits College 



Former President of College Returns 

For a Few Days. Speaks to 

Students at Assembly 



For the next few days, Dr. Kenyon L. 
Butterfield, former President of the 
Massachusetts State College, will be in 
Amherst. This afternoon, he spoke before 
the student body on the subject "Yester- 
day and Tomorrow." 

This evening at S o'clock there will 
be a meeting of the faculty in Memorial 
Hall, at which time Dr. Butterfield will 
speak concerning his recent travels in 
the Orient and in particular about the 
college at Sapporo, Japan, in the organi- 
zation of which several alumni and early 
members of the faculty of this College 
took an important part. 

STATE COLLEGE MAN 
NOW LEADING SCORER 

By Scoring 38 Points in the Last Two 

Games, Louis Bush '34 Becomes 

Leading Scorer in the East 



After shouting themselves hoarse in 
praise of the brilliant and spectacular 
field running of Louis Bush during the 
two opening games of the season, the 
football fans of Massachu setts State 
College >vil! wehoiu- the news that Bush 
is now the leading scorer of the East. 
Having totalled a distance of 47S yards 
against Cooper Union and Bowdoin, 
scoring six touchdowns and chalking up 
two [joints trying for points after touch- 
downs, the former Turners Falls athlete 
has run up a record of 88 point*. McCall 
of Dartmouth, LaMark of N.Y.I'., and 
Moran of Syracuse are tied for second 
place, each having scored 36 points. 
Holmberg, another State College back, 
was tied for twelfth position, having 
■cored 24 points. 

It will be remembered that Bush was 
a member of the championship freshman 
teams of last year, having starred as 
halfback on the football team, as left 
forward on the basketball five, and as 
shortstop on the baseball team. 

Leading scorers of the East: 

C. T.D. P.A.T. Total 

Bush, M.S.C. I 6 2 :«S 

McCall. Dartmouth 2 6 36 

Moran, Syracuse 2 6 36 

LaMark. N'.Y.U. 2 6 36 

Grossman, Rutgers SCI 31 

Grossman, N.Y.U. 2 5 1 31 

Winters, Davis Elkins 3 5 30 

lltwIU. Columbia 2 4 I M 

Murphy, Fordham 2 4 3 27 

Morton. Dartmouth 2 3 8 26 

Chesnulvech, B.C. 2 4 1 21 



Outing Club Will Hold 

Meeting Thurs. Night 



Thursday evening at 7.30 p. m. the 
Massachusetts State Outing Club will 
hold its first meeting of the year in the 
Memorial Building. The plans of the 
club for the year will be discussed and a 
tentative program arranged. Hikes will 
be scheduled every week from now on. 
Professor Holdsworth of the Forestry 
department will lie the speaker of the 
evening. All members are requested to 
be present, and all who wish to become 
members are invited to attend. The club 
anticipates a busy and eventful year. 
The Cabin fireplace is near completion 
and should be ready for use in a few 
weeks. 



CAPT. SUMNER AGAIN 
LEADS COLLEGE BAND 



Rehearsals to Be Held Every Tuesday 
Night at 7.00 p. m. 



According to Captain Sumner, leader 
of the College Band for several years, 
prospects for a high-ranking band are 
unusually bright this year. Approxi- 
mately 17 sophomores, all veteran play- 
ers, are planning to continue their work 
with the organization this year, while 
15 freshmen, some of whom already are 
active participants in the College Or- 
chestra, have signified their desire to 
play. Captain Sumner and those who 
have played under his baton in years 
past extend a cordial invitation to all 
those in the four-year course who are 
interested to join the band at once. 
There are no tests to pass, the only re- 
striction being that candidates shall la- 
able to perform satisfactorily on one of 
the conventional band instruments. Re- 
hearsals, starting on October 0, will be 
held at 7.00 p. m. every Tuesday night. 

Last year the band played at all the 
home football games, was taken to Tufts 
College at the expense of the Physical 
(Continued on Page *) 



COMPARISON OF 1930 

AND 1931 ENROLLMENT 



Comparisons of the I9.'tt) enrollment of 
the various divisions of the student body 
of the College with the enrollment in 
1931 have been released from the Regis- 
trar's Office. 

Registration HMO 





Men 


Women 


Total 


Seniors 


78 


:«) 


10K 


Juniors 


93 


30 


12:* 


Sophomores 


IL'.I 


39 


MS 


Fresh men 


• 

I 1 > 


01 


030 


Specials 


2 







Total 471 160 634 

Registration Ittl 

Men l\'(),lhll 'Total 

Seniors 97 M) IJ7 

Juniors 102 80 1.12 

Sophomores 144 80 MM 

Ircshmen 220 84 .104 

Specials 2 1 li 



Total 



505 



195 



7(A) 



NOTICE 

Because of the holiday, October 12, 
the Massachusetts CtiltgiaH will be 
distributed at 4 o clock Thursday 
afternoon, October 15, rather than on 
Wednesday afternoon. 



CAMP! S CALENDAR 



"Tomnrnnr, and tomorrow, and tomorrow 
creeps, in this petty pace from day to day, to 
the Itrt yUal'lc <,j retarded lime." Shakespeare. 



Wednesday, October 7 

7.00 i>. m. Ol phi III Club. Memorial Hall. 
7.30 p. m. M.S.C. I Mi.it inn So ciety , Senate 

Room. Memorial Building 
8.00 p. m. CuHtan Orchestra rehearsal, 
Stockbrklije Hall. 
Thursday, October 8 

7.00 p. m. Outing Club Meeting. Mcmrai..! 
Building. 
Friday, October 9 

8.00 p.m. President's Reception to new 
faculty members. Memorial Hall. 
Saturday, October 10 

Alumni Home-Coming Day. 

2.30 p. m. Varsity Football, Middlebury, 

here. 
Varsity Cross-Country, Worcester Tech, 
here. 
Monday, October 12 
Holiday, Columbus Day. 
Mountain Day. 
Tuesday, October 13 

7.00 p. m. Band rehearsal, Storkbridge Hall. 
Wednesday, October 14 

7.00 p. m. Orpheus Club, Memorial Bldg. 
8.00 p. m. Orchestra rehearsal. Stockbridge 
Hall. 
Thursday, October II 

4.00 p. m. Collegian Distribution. 
Varsity Soccer, Amherst at Pratt Field. 



Strong Bowdoin Invaders 

No Match for State Team 



Harriers Meet 
W.P.I. Saturday 



Engineers Expected to Furnish Plenty 
of Opposition to State College Men 



Worcester Tech will ojx-n the 1081 
varsity cross-country season at the State 
Cottage next Saturday afternoon, when 
they race the Massachusetts men over 
the State College course. The meet is 
expected to finish between the halves of 
the varsity football game with Middle- 
bury on Alumni Field. 

In spite of the fact that the material 
has lieen going through the developing 
process all fall, the May State men should 
make a pretty good showing as they will 
be running on their home course. Wor- 
cester Tech has a good dab of harriers 
this fall and Captain Don Mason ';52, 
Stuart Kdmond ':<2, C.ifTord Towle '.(2, 
Harold Soule "Mi, Bill Hag* •:<:<, Dav« 

Caird ':U, Harold Sabean '.{4, "Mac" 
(Continued on Page J) 

FOOTBALL TEAM MEETS 
MIDDLEBURY SATURDAY 

State College Kleven Should Easily 
Add Another Oridiron Victory 

A rather weak Middlehury eleven 

should |iva the Maajactuiattti grktawfl 

an easy chance to add another victory to 
their string, as a result of the football 
game to Ik- played at Alumni Field on 
this Saturday. After the results ol the 
fiowooiii game, ami on glancing iiin»„„ ■ 
the past record of Middlebury Massa- 
chuaetti fwiea, the potaibility of another 

i (inipusl appears very lavorablc. 

In l'.»2x, the Maroon w.uriors defeated 

the Middlebury football team by the 
■COtC of 7 to 0. In HI2'.*, when the Black 
I'antheis had < iiiarnaccia and Jacobs 
playing for them, the State College 

eleven was barely aoaad out by the 

won- of 14-12. Last year the Vermont 
boys were defeated by the Massachusetts 
ball-carriers to the score of 7 to 0. 

Middlebury started the season off this 
year by losing their first gaflN to Lowell 
Textile by the wore of 21 to 13. Their 
line-up contains very few veterans, and 
while their backs seem rather fast, the 
home team has little to fear in the way 

of competition. 

The probable lineup of the Middlebury 
team is: re, Keid, Sorenson, rt , Kosbrook, 

Hinman, rg, Lovetl, Wright, Cunning 

ham, C, Whitman, Ig, Jocelyn, Johnson, 
It, Macl.ean, le, Thrasher, Thiele, qb, 
Markowski, rhb, Hartley, lloyle, Collins, 
Ihb, Yeomans, Itakcman, fb, Reily, 
Hartley. 



Exhibition of French 

Scenes in Mem. Hall 

I'rofessor Frank A. Waugh, head of the 
Division of Horticulture, has on exhibition 
in the Memorial building some very in- 
teresting and unique etchings. The 
majority of them have for their theme, 
old French scenes, while others are nature 
scenes. T. Oakley, the artist has shown 
exceptional talent in these simple yet 
beautiful, pen and ink sketchings. It < .111 
be noted that he has introduced into his 
pictures very beautiful sky effects. 

Eepectalty notable among the works is 
the etching entitled "The Cathedral 
Dominates Ouimper." It has the re- 
ligious atmosphere that surrounds so 
many of the pieces in the exhiliit. 
"Pastoral" is a fine example of Oakley's 
power to portray vivid nature scenes. 
Several ship si enes are shown, one of the 
most interesting being his "The I'ort of 
Sympia." 



Long Runs by Bush and Wood and 

Accurate Tackling by Captain 

I oskett Feature Saturday Came 

As cheer after cheer in praise of the 
new gridiron mentor, Mel Taulie, broke 
lorth from 2IMH) delighted fans, the 
Maroon and White eleven tasted the 
sweet nectar of revenge last Saturday at 
Alumni Field and left the Polar Hears of 
Howdoin College exhau.ted on the small 
end of a .'f2 (5 score. Louis Bush, shifty 
sophomore halfback and a brilliant open- 
field runner, repeated his iH-rformances of 
the preceding Saturday and chalked up 
three touchdowns, totaling m\ yards of 
spectacular and fan-electrifying running. 
FriKard, rugged sophomore back, and 
Harold Wood, also a dependable back, 
scored a touchdown each, the latter in- 
tercepting a pass and speeding lio yards 
for a tally. The final score is almost a 
reversal of the 4o (( defeat sullered last 
year at bowdoin, and makes in the first 
two games of the season K2 points against 
six for opponents. Together with the use 
of the Notre Dame Purdue system in Mel 
Taube's new gridiron regime, these facts 
teem to indicate the ushering in of a new 
football era at Massachusetts State. 

Things looked rather dark lor the home 
ic.nn after the bowdoin kickofL Due to 
a fumUc on the ."{K-yard line, the Polar 
Pears took possession of the hall and 
ploughed steadily on toward the last 
white line, Captain Kicker scoring on an 
orf-tackle play. 'The ronfidenre of t he 
(Continued on Page i) 

DAIRY HEAD VISITS 

FOREIGN COUNTRIES 

Professor Krandsen Attends World's 
Dairy Congress During Summer 

Professor J. II. Frandsen ol Massachu- 
setts State College has recently returned 
Ironi E«HOpa. where he visited parts of 

Holland, Germany, Belgium, and France, 

and attended the World's Dairy Congress. 
"'The congress was very interesting," he 
■aid, "but, it was even more interesting 
to study at close range Danish agricul- 
ture and the methods of co-o|wrat ion 

which have contributed so much to the 

plospei it v of the Danes. 

"The Agricultural Fair or l.ivest<»<k 
Show in Denmark is preeminently ;m 

educational institution ami espe. j.d effort 

is put forth to mafce it Of value to t di- 
smal I wale farmer. Three regional shows 
are held annually, one on ea< h ot t he 
islands of Zeeland and T uen where the 
Danish red cow predominate-,, and one 
in Jutland where the bla< k and white 
cow is most c om mon. <M the animals 

exhibited, 90J r eceiv e d bmm premium. 

'The premium though small, seemed to 
stimulate interest in better cattle." 

'These livestock shows have temporary 

quarten and are held in different towns 

to give all dairy localities opportunity to 
participate in i hern. 

The remarkable value of these edu- 

'ational shows seems to lie in lostering 

i mp rovement in the type and production 

of Danish Dairy catth- An outstanding 
feature "f the Danish system of judging 
is the (it that regardless of how good in 

type the animal is, it cannot receive first 
prize unless it qualifies from the pro- 
duction (xiint of view. In Professor 
Frandsen 's judgment, some similar svs- 
teni could be adopted with profit in more 
of our Anierii an sto< k shows. 

Leadership in the field of butter and 
cheeat making is generally com eded to 
the Dam--, and the Dutih. and then- was 
great interest in this year's exhibit of 
these two products held in connection 
with the Dairy Congress. Those who 
have attended a number ot rach shows 
say that the remarkable exhiliit of butter 
was the largest that had evei Ixen made 

in any country. 

(Continued on Pafte 3) 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 7, 1931 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 7, 1931 



Ubc fl&assacbusetts Collegian 



Official newspaper of 



the Massachusetts State College. 
Wednesday by the students. 



Published every 



Wallace W. Stuabi '32 
Managing Editor 



BOARD OF EDITORS 

Frank L. Springer '32 
Edttor-in-Chief 

Oscar Margolin '32 Rial S. Potter. Jr. '32 

A gsociatt Editors 



DEPARTMENT EDITORS 

Editorial 
Frank L. Springer ,32 



Alumni and Faculty 

Marjobie L. French '34 

Athletic* 

William 11. Wear '32 

Eugene Guralnick 33 

W. Grant Dunham '34 



Feature 
Oscar Margolin 



Campus 

Edmond Nash '33 

Alfkeua L. Ordway '33 

W. Raymond Ward '33 

Harrietts M. Jackson '34 

Joseph Politklla '34 



32 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT 

Eric H. Wetterlow Jr. '32 

liusinest Manager 

Kenneth E. Hodgk '32 William A. Johnson '32 

Advertising Manager Circulation tdanagtr 

BiMln«M Assistant* 

Ashley B. Gurnkv '33 Philip H. Hvbeault "33 



Subscriptions $200 per year. Single copies 10 cents. 



Make all orders payable to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In case of change of address, subscriber will please notify the business manager 
M soon as possible. 

Alumni and undergraduate contributions are sincerely encouraged. Any com 
munications or notices must be received by the editor-in-chief on or before Monday 
evening. 



Entered aa second-class matter at the Amherst Post Office. Accepted for mailing at special rate of 
pottage provided foi in Section 1103. Act of October. 1917. authorised August 20. 1918. 



WELCOME HOME 

Dr. Kenyon L. Butterfii-lcl, president of the Massachusetts State College from 
1<XX> to 1U24, returns to our campus today for a few days' stay with us. This will 
be a twenty-fifth anniversary celebration for Dr. Hutterfield as it was on October 
17. 1906 that he was inaugurated as President of this College. Dr. Butterfield re- 
tired from the administration of Massachusetts State to undertake a no less difficult 
problem of constructive administration at his Alma Mater, the Mulligan State 

College. 

He came to Massachusetts at the age of thirty-eight, then one of the younger 
college presidents in the country and entered upon his service here with the clearly 
defined and openly mowed purpose of developing a high grade agricultural college. 
Thus the work of agricultural research in all of its phase.-, was encouraged and fos- 
tered l>\ President Butterfield. The curriculum of the degree course was broadened 
and e.iriched; graduate COUTSM were organized; the Stcckbrkige School of Agricul- 
ture had its beginning during his regime; and a c om prehensive system of extension 

trviee was developed. 
According t<» Ralph J. Watts, then Secretary of the College, "his administration 

.,- i haracterued by a broad understanding of the problem of agriculture m all <>i 

I phases; a rare capacity in the organization of projects and forces; and ability to 

discover and enlist capable associates lor the work to be accomplished and to inspire 

their best efforts and co operation in its successful attainment.' 

In 1908, I'r. Butterfield was a representative of the state of Massachusetts to 
the White House conference in Washington to consider the problem of national 
conservation. In 1908, be also was appointed by President Roosevelt as a member 

of the COmtry Life Commission. In 1913, Woodrow Wilson appointed President 
Butterfield as ■ member ol the American Commission Ofl Rural Credits which spent 
four months in Europe making a careful Study of agricultural credit and (((operation. 
In 1918, Dr. Butterfield was selected bj the International Y.M.C.A. to take charge 

ol the vocational education among the soldiers overseas. He also served as the ex- 
pert in vocational education on the commission appointed by the North American 

Board of Foreign Missions to investigate conditions in China. 

For the past few years he has studied the social position of rural peoples in 
Africa. India, China, Japan, and the Philippine Islands. Much of international 
interest may be gained from our brief contact with our former Prexy during the 
few days he will be with us. Make the mo-t ol them. 



tH?e prarmnt 

THE STRAYED I.AM 15 
A short short true true story. The 
heart -ending confession of the President 
of the Outing Club as told in strictest 
confidence to the Picaroon. Read this 
saga of a man's fight to regain the true 
path. You will thrill! You will throb! 
You will palpitate! 

(Rending time, 20 seconds) 

"Every been hard up, mister?" whined 
the mendicant with the three days 
stubble on his otherwise clean shaven 
face. Instinctively, the generous Pica- 
roon's hand sought his cash pocket and 

buttoned it securely. "What the h 

do you want?" he said with a kindly 
smile. "I ain't et since noon," pleaded 
the tramp. At this the Picaroon borrowed 
a dime from somebody and treated the 
tramp to a cup of mocha and a heaping 
plateful of doughnuts. While he ate, the 
tramp related the following story. 

"I was once as good a man as you, 
Sir. I had a nice home, good clothes and 
a spotless reputation. Overconfidence is 
what done for me,— overconfidence and a 
nagging wife. One day I shouldered my 
pack, dodged my last rolling pin, said 
goodbye to the old homestead and set 
out for the wilds of Mount Toby, where 
there was only bears and wildcats, and a 
man could have a little peace. Every- 
thing was rosy till it began to get dark. 
I was singing the third from the last 
stanza of Mademoiselle, when I suddenly 
realized that I had blundered off the 
path. 'Keep cool! The Outing Clubber's 
first rule is to keep cool,' I said calmly 
to myself as I ran around in little circles 
calling 'Peep! Peep!' Then I recollected 
that people who got lost in the woods 
always walked in a great circle, so taking 
a course by the north star, I walked in a 
great circle and came back to my starting 
point. This ditln't seem to do much good. 
I became panic-stricken and rushed 
hither and yon, often calling for my 
mother in piteous accents. The night 
was pitch-Mack. I COUld hear the bears 
and wildcats closing in, and I knew 
that it wax the end." 

The tramp had finished his coffee and 

sat staring meditatively into the distance, 

"Well?" -aid the Picaroon encourag- 
ingly. 

"That's all." -lid tin- tramp, and 
signing heavily, he liften his pack and 

(iir.appe.ired into ila underbrush, 



ALUMNI NOTES 



The August number of American 
Landscape Architect published in Chicago 
includes several articles by former State 
College men. Prentiss French (former 
faculty) has an illustrated article on 
"Design of a Family Memorial." Larry 
Caldwell ex-'15 has several photographs 
and descriptions of gardens designed by 
himself. Conrad Roser '22 has a finely 
illustrated article on golf grounds con- 
struction. The editor of American Land- 
scape Architect is F. A. Cushing Smith 
(former faculty). 



STOCKBRIDGE 



Marshall Headle IS. who is chief test 
pilot of the Lockheed-Vegas Aircraft 
Corporation, Burbank, Calif., is one of 
the best known fliers on the Pacific Coast. 

In July, of this year, he set an altitude 
record of 26,050 feet in a Lockheed mono- 
plane with a disposable load of 21(50 lbs. 

Mr. Headle at one time was a landscape 
architect in Springfield, Mass., and des- 
signed the rose gardens in Forest Park, 
Springfield. He entered aviation at the 
time of the war and since then has made 
flying his business. 



~M) Laurence Spooner is to be an 
assistant in chemistry at Harvard Uni- 
versity this year. 



29 W. Gordon Hunter is employed 
in the office of Fletcher Steele, landscape 
architect, in Boston. 



The Stockbridge clubs, Alpha Tau 
da m ma and Kolony Club, held open 
houses to the freshmen of the School 
last Tuesday evening. Refreshment- 
were served at each house and manv 
freshmen turned out. 

The Freshman-Senior Reception by the 
Christian Association was given in the 
Memorial Building Thursday night. 
Many of the Stockbridge faculty were 
present and short talks were given by 
President Thatcher, Professor Sanctuary, 
and Mr. J. Paul Williams. A picture 
showing campus life was shown for the 
especial benefit of the freshmen and the 
affair closed with light refreshments. 



Enrolment figures for Stockbridge 
School indicate a class of 158 freshmen 
including seven girls. 

Seniors have registered a total of 113 
returning from placement, including five 
girls. This figure also includes four new 
seniors entering from county schools of 
agriculture with a year's credit. Total 
registration is 271. 

Every New England state except 
Rhode Island is represented in the in- 
coming group, as well as New York, 
New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Illinois, and 
Michigan. 



'29 A. C. Winton is using his training 
in landscape architecture for the city 
planning board of Springfield, Mass., and 
on the side is now doing a zoning ordi- 
nance for the city of Westfield. 



'.'«) John Tank who is doing survey 
work for the l.S.D.A. in New York City 
has moved to 289 Washington St., 
Hempstead, L. I. 



Eliot F. Rogers, S'31, is registered as 
a s|>ecial student in the Harvard Gradu- 
ate School of Landscape Architecture 
and plans to take the full three year 
course. 



Norman B. Burbank and Donald T. 
Maroney, both graduates in horticulture 
last year, are registered as special stu- 
dents in floriculture this term. 



In the recent intelligence te-t given to 
the Freshmen, the question was asked; 
What is a man called who has attained 
the BgC of eighty? The inevitable bright 
boy of the class made answer as lollows: 
An old man. Go to it, Sophomore-! 



A WORD TO HIE WISE 

|ust to remind you that you are now college men, students at the Massachusetts 

State College. Refrain from carr>ing on as if you were still in high school. Conduct 

yourselves as gentlemen. Kx.essivc laughter, loud talking, whistling, booing, and 

passing "wise remarks" in the theatre brand you as one of those morons who attempt 



Well placed shot, Senator Thompson! 

Only you forgot to mention the fact that 
the Sophomores, and the Juniors al o. 
insist v. .tit till the sacred Seniors have left 
before they in turn quit the chapel seat-;. 
This ought not to be so very ciifti' ull 

the Sophomores will appreciate a chance 

of getting ahead of the Freshmen for 
once in a way, and the- natural posture 
of the Juniors is sitting down. 



More than 4(H) people were present at 
the public reception in Hyde Park, Ma--., 
given recently to Captain Alfred J. 
Kelley '13 who is military drill master at 
Hyde Park High School. Jamaica Plain 
High School, and Washington Irving 
Intermediate School. 

This spring the regiment at Hyde Park 

High School won first prize in the Boston 
street parade, the fourth consecutive 

year they have captured this prize in 
competition with all other Boston High 
Schools. This is an unparalleled event 

in the history of Boston schools. 



Freshman class officers have been 
elected as follows: President, John M. 
Turner, Springfield, Mass.; Nice- Presi- 
dent. Alfred B. Jaeger, Newark, N. J.; 
Secretary, Barbara K. Desoe. West 
Springfield. Mass.; Treasurer. Carl A. 
Frank, Falmouth, Mass. 



CO-ED NOTES 



Senior students acting on the Stock 
bri.!gc Press Board are: Francis I.. 
Keohan, Weymouth, Mass.; Horace II 
CI ,rk. West Springs' Id, Mass.; William 
I". Nye, Springfield, Mass. 

The pledging season for the two 

Stockbridge Clubs will be concluded at 

noon on Friday, October '.'. and all 

pledges mu4 be in the Short Course 

<■ not later than five o'. lock on that 

dav. Pledge acceptances should be 

turned in at the Short Course ''tine not 
later than live- ii'dixk on Tuesday, 

October 13. 



1 wi.-h that whoever is the cause of the 
Picaroon's room mate having to write 
those thousand word themes would 
please reconsider, as the Picaroon s room- 
mate keeps him up till the wee sma' hours 



to attract attention by being obnoxious to their associates and the people who are ami that's wh> this column isn t any 
lorced to be seated near them. Ju*t remember! 



EDITORIAL BRIEFS 

Bush has had quite a time romping about Cooper Union and Bowdoin these 
past two week-ends— and may his romp continue. 



Either the pangs of jealousy or the press of external circumstances have at last 
forced the sophomore co-eds to oppress the innocent, green -bonneted freshman 
co-eds in quite a similar manner to that which they swore last year was forever a 
thing of the past. But then, that is their privilege. 



better than it is. 



Anybody who wishes to contribute to 
this column may do so. The Picaroon 
will accept anything except obituary- 
notices and reports of Adelphia meetings. 



HEPZIBAH 
education," said 



Gwendolvn 



We wish that the Boston Post would rise out of the dim past and refer to this 
college as Massachusetts State rather than the now antiquated "Aggie" and MAC, 



|... ;t would have sorely taxed our imagination to visualize State Col 

t that had ref e r en c e to football. 



ege 



of the C 



certainly look- good with a crowd on it. doesn't it? 



"I need 
Grace 

Mehitabel Dorothy Marjorie Chase, 

So she packed all her duds in her travel- 
ing case, 

And hied away off to college. 

"I need education," she said with a smile, 

Just a little you know, and once in a while. 

So she slept through her lectures in true 
co-ed stvle, 

And College just rhymes with knowledge. 

She received her degree and was married 
ere long 

To a rising young lau nd r y m an named 
Charley Wong, 

Which was lucky lor me as he spoke 

English w rong, 
And addressed his porridge as "pollklge." 



Margaret M. Boston '32, President of 
the Women's Student Government A- 

sociation, presided at the first meeting 
ot the Association in Memorial Building. 
Monday evening. Plans for the activities 
ol the council for the t'-rm were brought 
before the girls. 

Last week the first meeting of the 
executive board ol the Home Economics 
Club was held under the direction of 
Marion Hunter *32, president of the 
club. Miss Marion Briggs, the new- 
Professor of Home Economics at the 
college has been chosen as faculty advisor, 
and presented the girls an interesting 
schedule lor the club. The committee 
decided favorably upon the idea of in- 
troducing exhibits and demonstrations to 
interest the girls of the club. Marjorie 
French '34 was chosen publicity agent. 

Mrs. Melvin H. Taube chaperoned a 
party of seven girls who had the first 
overnight hike of the term to Mt. Toby. 
The typical beautiful fall weather made 
the week-end at Toby most enjoyable, 
and although this hike was for Senior 
girls only, it is hoped that all the co-eds 
will take advantage of the weather and 
spend a night in the cabin before cold 
weather arrives. 



SWIMMING POOL REGULATIONS 

The Swimming Pool may be used b) 
members of the following groups: 

Massachusetts State College student-, 
Stockbridge School students, 
M.S.C. graduate students, 
Employees of the College, 
The College Faculty; and members ot 

their immediate families who are at 

least 14 years of age, 
Students of Amherst High School and 

other children residing in Amherst ol 

High School age. 
All use of the pool must 4 be in accord 
with the following regulations: 

1. Any ix-rson who has not h 
examined and passed by Dr.^Radclttr 
within the past year must have such 
examination by him before entering the 
pool. 

2. Towel service tickets may be pur- 
chased, by those who have been approved 
by Dr. Radcliffe, at the College Treasu- 
rer's Office. This ticket is good for one 
term and costs men SI .00 and women 
SI .50. 

8. The towel service ticket must he 
presented to the person in charge of the 
supply room each time a towel or swim- 
ming suit is taken out. 

(Continued on Page 3) 



A CORRECTION 

In last week's Ct4 ffMN, there appeared 
in the calendar a notice with reference to 
a re. eption of the freshmen by the Presi- 
dent. We regret our error in making this 
announce ment as there is to be no re- 
ception of the freshman class by President 
Thatcher. 



OPPONENTS' SCORES 

The following list indicates how sever. 
of our opponents fared during the footb i 
games played la t Saturday. 
Coast Guard 7, Worcester Poly 6 

Princeton 27. Anther! 

Springji Id :v.i. Colby 

Arnold 13, Wagner fl 

Lowell Teh 21. ItMltkttf} VI 



On Sale beginning to-day — 200 pairs of corduroy and woolen trousers, knickers, and breeches at $3.40 per pair. 

Choice of seven new shades. 



YOUR PAIR IS READY FOR YOU. 



COME EARLY! 



27th Year 



L A N D I S 



27th Year 



BOWDOIN DEFEATED 32-6 
(Continued from Page 1) 

a/gg given a severe jolt, however, 

omnipresent Bush received the 

kickoff and ran the length of the 

■ i tie the score. For the rest of the 

Ills charges kept the Bowdoin 

completely sewed up in their own 

territory. Captain Cliff Foskett putting 

a beautiful exhibition of tackling. As 

Ike I. ill drew to a close, Bush ran back 

punt for a distance of 35 yards, and 

sveral plays later took a short pass from 

Holmberg and eluded five would-be 

L kit rs for a distance of 40 yards. Im- 

, ely after, Frigard ploughed ten 

Lnl, oil left tackle for his first touch- 

Lttii Oil a college team. Cetting within 

Ljofl distance again, the Maroon and 

lYhite warriors paved the way for Bush 

down the goal line, where he 

ionipletcd a magnificent 40-yard pass 

l„m Ossie Holmberg, after which Louis 

|)ush kicked the pigskin squarely over 

— bar, leaving the tally at the 

|.,]t period, 19-6. 

Returning to the fray, the Polar Bears 

I rally which for s while looked 

I ajg. Spectacular tackling on the 

Lrt til Dave Mountain of the sophomore 

pntingent, Burrington, heavy guard, 

SibsOfl "M, coupled with Freddy 

long, spiral punts, repulsed the 

|i-iiors, however, and the third quarter 

with the ball on Massachusetts' 

h-yard line and the Black and White 

h.n i m the defensive. After a Welch 

knt, the visitors tried a pass, which 

\, t * intercepted by Tuffy Sylvester. 

VISIT 

BARSELOTTI'S 

». n ■■ijuirements for the smoker- Pipes, 
I out lies, Smokers Combination 

lot (ream, Candy, Sandwiches 

fest in Drug Store Merchandise 
Best in Drug Store Service 

lenry Adams & Co. 

I' ii have fried the rest J 

Now try the BEST 

And that's the 

HT SHOE REPAIRING (0. 

'Goodyear Weh System Employed" 



Shortly after, Bush broke loose around 
left end and left 5* yards of Bowdoin 
tac klers in his dust, bringing the score up 
to 25-0. Theh Louis Bush made good on 
the extra point. From this point on, Mel's 
charges made a field day of it, Harold 
Wood intercepting a pass and running half 
the length of the field for a score. The 
|K>int after was a failure. The last quarter 
featured by high-flying tackles on the was 
part of Fabyan, and by the pass-blocking 
and offensive work of Murray Hicks, a 
senior fullback who registered so well in 
former seasons of the old M.S.C. football 
regime. The summary: 

Bowdoin— Barbour. Larsen, Madera, re; Gould, 
Kimball, rt; Olson, Torrey, rg; Milliken. c; Bilo- 
deau. Ciamer. lit; Hay. It; Barton, le; Gatchell, 
Brings, qb; Ricker, rhb; Bakanowski. Riid. Ihb; 
Richardson, Brown, fb. 

Mass. State Ryan, Mountain, Fabyan, le; 
Foskett. Clow. It; Cununings, Sibson. Bickford, 
Is; Leary, Bourgeois, c; Schaffner. Burke, rg; 
Sievers. Burrington, rt; Smith, Goodall, re; 
Welch. Lojko, qb; Holmberg, Sylveser, lhb; Bush, 
Hicks, rhb; Frigard, Wood, fb. 
Score by periods 12 3 4 

Mass. State 6 13 13—32 

Bowdoin 6 — A 

Touchdowns — Ricker, Wood. Frigard, Bush 3. 
Points after touchdowns — Bush. Referee — C. L. 
Graham. Springfield. Umpire — J. P. Whalen, 
Springfield. Linesman — J. F. Farrel. Michigan. 
Time — 15-minute quarters. 



HARRIERS MEET W.P.I. 
(Continuedlfrom Page 1) 

McGuckian *34, and John Farrar ".U 
should have their work cut out for them 
in attempting to increase the lead which 
Massac husetts holds over the Engineers 
so early in their 1981-1939 rivalry. 



Dim' to tltc strains of 
tantalizing music at . . . 

BUCK DEADY'S ROADIIOUSE 

College Drugstore 

W. II. McGRATH. Refi. Pharm. 



AMHERST, 



MASS. 



S. S. HYDE 

Optician and Jeweler 

Oculists' Prescription* Filled. Broken lenses 

accurately replaced 

BIG KM ALARM CLOCKS and other 

reliable makes 
i PLEASANT STREET, (up one Bight) 



DICTIONARIES 

From 25c up 



jWc i.-n r's New International 
pVebster'a Collegiate 
IXew i enttiry Dictionary 



in 



vols. 



Winston Simplified Dictionary 
College Standard 
(Funk A Wagnalb) 

Concise Oxford Dictionary 



FOREIGN DICTIONARIES 

\JAMES A. LOWELL, - - BOOKSELLER 



FRESHMEN VICTORIOUS 
(Continued from Page 1) 

sophomore class begins to fade. His 
knees are wobbling and his body S/eaVSS 
around the ring. A wet and dirty towel 
thrown in by his seconds saves him. 
"Art Shires IP' strides from the ring, a 
winner. 

Another wrestling match takes the 
attention of the mob. Coleman of the 
"Soft'es ' and Mactjuestion of the 
"Ireshies' join hands in greeting in the 
center of the ring while Brae klcy re- 
views the rules of the contest. Then 
both men launch themselves at each 
other. A writhing of bodies and an inter- 
lacing of arms and legs, and Mac-Oueston 
is the victor. Two more wrestling matches 
follow in rapid succession. Cole "M wins 
the first fall from Zukor ':i. r >, and Putnam 
of the Flush and Smiaroski of the Sophs 
wrestle to a draw. The last match ol the 
evening, a boxing bout, ends also in a 
draw. After three rounds of fierce 
slugging, Seperski .i4 and Ramsdell '35 
rest from their labors only to learn that 
neither one is given the decision. The 
final score of the mate lies: Frosh 8, 
Sophs 2, No decision 9. Yeh Yeh ':if>! 

Now the freshmen are seen preparing 
themselves to leap frog their way through 
the lines of waiting sophomores. Out 
through the door rush the freshies. Hear 
the "smack" of smarting hand on sting- 
ing buttock. Revenge is sweet! At last 
the frosh have run the gauntlet, and both 
classes are assembled on the field north 
of the Drill Hall. The sophomores are 
seen circling the freshmen. A pistol 
shot a break of lines and grappling 
bodies. Three minutes of tearing off 
night-shirts. A second shot, and both 
sides are busily engaged in dragging 
victims to their respective |>ens. Seven 
minutes elapse and then a final shot 
rings out. A count ol penneel men i* 
taken, a count of shirts ripped oil and a 

count oi ^hiits retained i^ taken. The 

final reckoning: Kreslimi-ii 102, Sopho- 

ntores 28. The Freshmen have won! 
"So endeth the- lesson." 



FIRST DEBATING MEETING 



Now Showing . . 



A particularly fine lot of 

LIGHT WEIGHT SLIP ON SWEATERS 

Priced from 

$2.50 to $4.50 

GOLF HOSE 

$1.00 to $2.50 
F. M. THOMPSON & SON 



Tonight, Wednesday, Oct. 7, the first 
meeting of the M.S.C. Debating Societ) 

will be held in Room I, Memorial build- 
ing at 7. .in p. 111. This meeting will start 
the preparation., lor the coming debating 
ieason. E v e ryo ne interested in public 
■peaking and debating is asked to attend. 

Fast year, the Mas*. State debating 
team went through one ol its most mi 
usual schedule-... Fight \arsitv debates 
\ccrc he-Id, seven ol them away and oni- 
on this campus. The team met opponents 

at Springfield, ami Worcester; in Maine, 

Ne w York, and Pennsylvania. Among 
the new college! cm the 1 schedule were 
New York University, Lehigh, and 

Bowdoin. The one- home contest was 
with a team from Utah. Another un- 
usual feature- was the first radio de-bates 
this college had ever participated in. The 
two radio de-bates were broadcast from 
New York City and Bethlehem, Penn. 

Debating at Mass. State offers, the re- 
fore, many advantages to those in the 
society. Not only do our teams receive 
valuable preparation in expression, logi 
cal thinking, and investigation of i)erti- 
nent questions, but also experience in 
platform speaking, travel, and radio 
broadcasting. Freshmen, as well as 
upperclassmen, are eligible tor varsity 
debating. 

Among the veterans who will report 
this evening are Leonard Salter, for two 
years Captain-Manager, Richard Folger, 
and Ashley (iurncy. Tonight's meeting 
will consist of a short discussion of plans 
for the coming season, under the direction 
of Salter '.'52. Later on, Prof. Walter E. 
Prince will give the men thorough prepa- 
ration for the coming meets. All debate 
candidates must be present tonight. 



SWIMMING POOL REGULATIONS 

(Continued from Page 1) 

4. No panon wearing bandage- oi .id 
hesive will be permitted in the pool, 

■"> Every person must take a thorough 
bath in lOOp and water before putting on 
a swimming suit or ente r i ng the pool, 

l'». Any |H-rson entering the pool with 
any condition likely to be- spread to 
others, or result in harm to himself, will 
be summarily denied any further use of 
the pool. The responsibility is on you. 
If in doubt at any time, consult Dr. 
Radcliffe. 

7. High School students may come only 
at the hours scheduled and the super- 
viscr named by the Amherst School 
authorities must be present throughout 

the period. 

K. High School students who wish to 
use the pool must first report to the 
office of the Superintendent of Amherst 
Schools and receive an enrollment card 
to present to Dr. Radclitfe. They will 
then follow the rules stated above. 



NEW POSTAGE RATES 



Those of you who might be sending 
mail to Canada or England should bear 
in mind the new postal rates which re- 
cently went into effect. First e lass mail, 
lette-rs up to two ounces in weight, re- 
quire three (3) cents postage to Canada 
and five (">) cents to England. Fetters 
with insufficient stamps are returned to 
the sender for additional |>ostagc before 
lc.tv ing the local post office-. 



PATRONIZK 



The College Barber Shop 

4 'M" BUILDING 

M. S. C. 



SANG LUNG hand laundry 



No. 1 Main St. Amherst, Mass. 

KKPAIKINO AM) SIX KINDS Of 
WASHING IK)Nh AT KK.VSONAIU I 
PRICKS. 

Our l.aundr* First Class 

Our Policy Guarunieoti 

NKXT TO TDK TOWN MAI. I. 



TYPEWRITERS 

for Sale and Rent 

*.' ».' i.' A A A 

H. E. DAVID 



Persian and 

Indian Prints 

for your 

Wall, Dresser or Tabic 

Miss Cutler's Gift Shop 



make 
your 
date 
now! 

M I DN mPs HOW 

TONITE 10 3u T p m 




AMHERS 
THEATRE 



T 



PIIONK Mil 



.* Shows Daily. 2..W; 6..W; K..UI p.m. 
Prlceee Matinees .Uk- kvenlnftN 40c 



YVtHlnc-Ntliiy, October 7 

A regahu bW when mmti itaal yaw su t 

"The MAT" with 

■ALLY onhi. ji nk OOLLYsM 

VIKCIMA (IIKKKII I 
An in> i tible Bow tr) scmasp arholl i-.iw rev 
-'«'*• •" I" -. beadae he* and heartac be .. km 
•<•• iet} Imi .1 ride. 



Thursdny, October H 



i V'. i amactag and i »■ Ulna pl< tare ever lilnsedl 
"BAST oi SOUNBO" ettfe 

KOSK IIOMAKT CHA& HICKKDKI) 

A i. .in. hi. .• lnl.! wliil, |,||.. iIioiikiihI IwmsU 

il'-i ,i Ba m i D | eok aaol 



Friday, October *» 



He* Beat ii ■ Mo lern Novel 

•VMIIIK BHOULMttU" »lth 

j\<:k hoi.t makv amor 

kk.akik) corti /. 

-I i.ii ,i love be i husband i outd sol tlve 

'"'ill 1 "" - "" 1 '" '' ''' l '" 1 "'" ' wlthdra 

Satunfaj . October 10 
Double Factum I'milr.im 

Everyone's tatkhni ibout thrilling and uni 
•TAHI " 

A I. "Ii ml nun. ill., I will hnl, | 

pi. ii, , i wiii, n startling dlStrem ■-. 

and 

OKI win 1 1. \i\kw nn 

PAUL PACK 
in tin- • omedy roasatv e 
' IIIK NAUGHTY KURT 



M onday. Tuesday. October 12-l.t 

iiil.irioii-, ioiihiIv el linn laughable, 

lllll. Ill 

TIIK KOI R MARX HROS 
in "MONKKV Itl SIM SS" 

You don't h.iv in Km-., about tim oati 
Everybody know H'm the yeai - Kfeamta 
, omedy. 



CANDY KITCHEN 

Good food is essential for good health! 

Don't ruin your health hy eating cheap food, 
dine at the Candy Kitchen and 
insure good health. 

Sarris Bros. Candy Kitchen Restaurant Inc. 



WISDOM 

Appearance of success is essential to the man who seeks success. The "almost good" is nowhere so conspicuous a failure 
as »n a suit of clothes. It is wise to rely on the hand tailoring and the fine imported fabrics used in Clothes by LANGROCK. 

E, M. SWITZER JR., Inc. 



- - r 



U. A. C. Library. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 7, 1931 



Its encouraging when a 

opened his eyes to the 

it at that 



OUR CUSTOMERS RETURN 

customer comes back and tells you that his first pair of Miller-Cook Shoes 
present-day shoe values. He is confirming our belief that there are no shoes 
price to-day. How could there be? They are made by Nettleton. 

THOMAS F. WALSH 



has 
like 



CAPT. SUMNER LEADS BAND 

(Continued from Pafce 1) 

Education department for the Tufts 

M.s.C. football game. 1'layecl at the 
various rallies held on ran. pus. served as 
a military hand during the entire spring 
term, plave-tl at the dedicatory exercises 

<>f the new Physical Education building, 

acted as a concert hand during the Com- 
mencement Week, and was hired as the 
Official hand for the Alumni Day exer- 
cises at Mt. Ilolyoke College as a fitting 

climax of a husy year. 

This year Captain Sumner hopes to 
follow somewhat the same program, with 
additions and revisions for the enjoy- 
ment of the m embe r s . As an added 
feature, it is hoped that a concert <>f the 
hest in standard hand music will he 
given sometime during the course of the 
year. Captain Sumner has already 
planned accordingly, and is fairly con- 
fident that he can turn out a 35 or 40 
piece hand of no small merit. 

To those who have heen on campus in 
past years Captain Sumner needs no 
introduction; to those who are contem- 
plating a stay here, the upperclassmcn 
have merely to point him out as the 
musician host who welcomed Captain 
Stannard and his Army Band of Wash 
ington on occasion of their concert on 
campus last year, and who directed that 

incomparable organization in the playing 

of his own number, "Fight, Massachu- 
setts." This piece, dedicated hy Captain 
Sumner to the foot hall team of 1980, was 
later broadcast by the Army Band and 
featured in Washington on several oc- 
casions before the President. Its in 
elusion in the newlv -published college 
song hook docs the- c o ll e ge honor, inas- 
much as it is the most stirring, melodious 
march-song ever written for Massachu- 
setts State-. Inc identallv , it is hoped thai 
the students of the college will ham the 
words and music of this piece for cheering 
purposes at the various games, as it is 

especially suitahle for outdoor, spirited 
singing. 



SOCIAL 


UNION ENTERTAINMENTS 


Nov. 


80 


Varsity Club Male Quartet 


Dec. 


4 


Arthur < .uitcrman, Poet, 
Reader 


Dec-. 


11 


State- College Kcvue 


Jan. 


,s 


Ben Greet Players in "Twelfth 
Night" 


Jan. 


17 


Symphony Franeais from the 
Most on Symphony Orchestra 


Fab. 


5 


Dr. Harlan Tarhell, Magician 


Feb. 


1'.) 


Professor F. A. Waugh, M.S.C., 
Illustrated Lecture 


Mar 


11 


Concert by M.S.C. Musical 
Organizations 



'L".i Irene bartlett is employed at the 
New National Museum, 10th and H Sts., 
N.W., Washington, D. C. 



'28 Dave Bradford is chief draftsman 

lor the Granville Brothers Aviation Co., 

Springfield, Mass. This company d esi gned 

and built the Gee Bee plane which 
averaged 886 miles per hour to win the 
Thompson Trophy air races held on 
September 7 in Cleveland. 



M. S. C. MEN'S MOTTO IS ALWAYS 
LET "DAVE" DO IT 

AMHERST CLEANSERS, DYERS 

and LAUNDERERS 

PHONE 828 Near the Town Hall PHONE 828 



SUNDAY CHAPEL SPEAKERS 

Nov. 1 Rev. James Gordon Cdlkey, 
South Congregational Church 
Springfield 

Nov. 8 Rev. K. C. McArthur, Massa- 
chusetts Federation of 
Churches 

Nov. 15 Rev. J. Paul Williams, M.S.C. 

Nov. 22 Rev. Bernard C. Clausen, First 
Baptist Church, Syracuse, 
N. Y. 

Dec. (i Rev. Jay T. Stocking, Pilgrim 
Congregational Church, 
St. Louis, Mo. 

Dec. 18 Rev. \V. Russell Bowie, (".race 
Church, New York City 

ASSEMBLY SPEAKERS 

Oct. 7 Dr. Kenyon 1-. Butterfield, 

formerly President of M.S.C. 

Nov. I Miss Winifred Wygal, National 
Board, Y.VV.CA. 

Dec. 2 To he announced 



'21 Gid Mackintosh has just formed 
C. G. Mackintosh & Co., Inc., landscape 
engineers and contractors, with the main 
office at High Point, N. C. There are 
these branches: Chrysler Building, New 
York City, Donald R. Lane '29, manager; 
Clastonbury, Conn., C. H. Roser '22, 
manager; Boston, Mass., O. H. Spencer 
'21, manager; and Wilmington, Del. 




Og 



I 



Thomas S. childs 

Incorporated 
SMART SHOES and HOSIERY for COLLEGE MEN and WOMEN J 

QUALITY MERCHANDISE PRICES TO SUIT 

275 High Street, Holyoke 

Largest Shoe Store In Western Massachusetts 

oil 



'27 Raphael Biron is with the U. S. 
Bureau of Entomology, Arlington, Mass. 



.50 & '31 William Brooks 
Miss Shirley Faton Upton, 
193] at North Reading, Mass. 



Drew- 
Sept. 



to 

12, 



VISITS FOREIGN COUNTRIES 

(Continued from Pafte 1) 

Following the Danish idea of making 

all such work as educational -«s possible-. 

each visitor was provided with an inch 

vidual WOOden spoor, and a sample- Oel 

butter. 

There- were also exhibited 600 samphs 

of cheese mostly Danish, Swiss. Gowda 
and Roquefort. 

In regard to modern and sanitary 
methods of proces s in g, handling and 

marketing fluid milk. Profess o r Frandsen 

thinks the- Danes can learn much from 

America. 

The efforts <>! Danish dairv le-aders can 
be fairly well summed up by saving that 
the-v are all working together lor higher 

average production of all cows, sti I 

better quality Of butter and cheese, and 
seeking to secure maximum returns tor 
the- dairy farmer through their co-opera- 
tive assexiations. 







SCHEDULES 






Varsity Football 


Sept. 


M 


Cooper Union here 


Oct. 


:{ 


Bowdoin here 




10 


Midellebury here 




17 


Norwich at Northfield 




M 


Worcester Tee h at Worcester 




31 


Amherst at Pratt lie-Id 


Nov. 


7 


Springfield at Springfield 




14 


Wagner here 




21 


Tufts here 



Varsity Cross-Country 
Oct. l(> Wo r cest er Tech here 

16 Wesleyan .it Middle-town 

■2\ Harvard Open Intcrcollcgiates 

at Cambridge 
:i\ Anthem at I'ratt Field 

Nov. 7 St. Stephens here- 

'.i Ne-vv England* at Boston 

Varsity Soccer 
Oct. :; Worcester Tech here 

10 Pending 

IS Amherst at I'ratt Field 

30 Wesleyan at Middletovvn 

Nov. 4 Clark at Worcester 

14 Conn. Aggie at Storrs 



Massachusetts State College will be 
re| .resent ed by John C. Barry '01, now 

with the General Electric Co., Erie, at 
the- inauguration of the youngest presi- 
dent of a Class A college in the United 
States, when William Pearson Tolley, 
A.M.. Ph.D., is formally inducted into 
the presidency of Allegheny College, at 
Meadville, Pa., Friday, October '.it h. 



Allen S. West, Jr. *31 is at New Haven 
Joiag graduate work at Vale. 



Miss Marguerite liosworth *M re- 
ceived her Master's Decree in foods this 
summer at Michigan State. 



Last Saturday, October :*, Jane Patter- 
son '20 was married to Roger Hintze *29 
at Unity Church. Amherst. Miss Patter- 
son is the Daughter of Professor Charles 
H. Patterson, head of the department of 
English at M.S.C. 



INTERCOLLEGIATES 



ALUMNI NEWS 



THIS SHOULD 


INTERES1 


vou 


1 








Point) 




U. 


/.. 


/•'. 


1. 


Ai my 


') 





1J7 


»'. 


New Vork Univ. 


o 





110 





Dartmouth 


rj 


1) 


117 


6 


Columbia 


2 





112 





Cornell 


2 





106 


8 


Sv racute 


*> 





o."» 





( olgate 


■i 


!l 


85 





Springfield 


- > 


I' 


gfi 





Mass. State 


Q 


I) 


82 


6 


ALSO THIS 






Amhc r.4 





1 





2. 


Won ester lech 





1 





i 


Noru ic h 


n 


1 


6 


.-«> 


Middle-bury 





Q 


13 


X2 



27 Tiff Williams, assistant su|x>rin- 
tendent of Creenwood Cemetery. Chicago, 
III., reports that his business has taken 
somewhat of a drop since Chicago elected 
a new mayor. 



And here is a hint to prospective pro- 
lessors. A CO-ed at one of the northern 
institutions of learning tells of her ideal 
of a college professor as he should be. 
He should be about sixty years of age. 
•must be familiar with the works of 
great writers and must know a little of 
everything and everything about some 
particular subject in which he is inter- 
ested, lie must look the part of a man 
of superior intelligence and. last but not 
least, a goatee or a moustache is prefer- 
able." 



L'S Walter Marx is foreman for 
Hood ft Sons, Forest Hills, Mass. 



11. 



'28 Gordon K. nuirne is doing in- 
vestigational work in poultry breeding 
and nutrition at the Western Washington 

E xp er iment Station, Puyallup, Wash. 

He writes that there was no snow at 
Puyallup last winter, and a minimum 
temperature of 20 degrees F. That, he 
savs. to a Californian might not be excit- 
ing, but nevertheless he believes it rather 
remarkable and interesting. 



Hand Laundry Work Desired 

Prices reasonable 

Satisfaction guaranteed 
MRS. V. E. GAULDEN 
53 Triangle St., cor. East Pleasant 



Mass.ic-hus.-tts has a fair representation 

of horses at the Three County hair being 
he-Id at Northampton this week. The 
Military department has five entries 

participating in the lumping and saddle 

e l.i-se-s. 



PATRONIZE 
The sandwich Man 

R. L. BATES, North Amherst 



'lis Chet Mareton is working for his 
Ph. I) at the I niversity of Toronto. He 
will finish in 1932 and expects to study- 
then in Cambridge. England, and at the 
I'astear Institute, Paris. 



'IS Bob llawhy won tin- Lord Jeff 
handicap cup at the Amherst Golf Club 
on September 7. Prolc-or Vic Rice won 

the t omb s to ne troph 
.same club. 



ottered by th 



'28 Seth J. Ewer has published an 
article in the Main* Naturalist, Vol. 10, 
pp. 87-98, called 'Botanical Fxplorations 
at Katahdin, and "The Ram's Head 

Lady's Slipper 1 in Wild Flower, Vol. s. 
1931. 



JOSEPH GINSBERG 

HIGH GRADE SHOES 

Come in and look them over! 
19 Pleasant St. — Amherst, Mass. 



JACKSON & CUTLER 

Dealers in 

DRY AND FANCY GOODS 

Amherst, Mass. 

"Bostonian" Shoes for Men 

Come in and see the new 

Bostonian "Scotch Grains" 

— we consider your visit a compliment 

whether you purchase or not 

$7.50 to $12.00 
BOLLES SHOE STORE 

19 35 - State College Stationery - 193 5 

Banners, Pennants and Stickers 

Laundry Cases $1.50 - - - Refills 25c 

A. J. HASTINGS "SSSST - AMHERST, MASSJ 




Headquarters for Riding Outfit- fa 
Men and Women at the COLODNY 
CLOTHING CO., .{2 Main St., (neor^ 
Northampton. We carry full line 
Riding Breeches, Riding Boots, and all 
accessories. We are exclusive agents 
for the famous Colt-Cromwell lineol En- 
glish Made Riding Boots and Officers' 
Boots. We also take Special orders tor 

LADIES' RIDING BOOTS $10.00 up 

Come over to llamp and set 
Our Assortments! 



GO TO 

FISHER'S 

For the Best Values in 
Ladies Full Fashioned Silk Hose 

"Cannonette" 
"Munsingwear'or "Vanity Fair" 

SERVICE WEIGHT OR CHIFFON 

atonly $1.00 a pair 

Full Line of the New Fall Shades 



Everything in Hardware 
and Radio Equipment 

ATWATER - KENT 



AND 



MAJESTIC RADIO 



THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 

THE WINCHESTER STORE 



i?l|g maaaarfrttfigtia (SolUntatt 



Vol. xlii 



AMHERST, MASS., THURSDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1931 



Number 3 



COMPULSORY MILITARY 
FAVORED BY FACULTY 



Questionnaire Reveals 68 Members 
of Faculty Would Retain Com- 
pulsory Military Training 



FOOTBALL MEN INVADE 
NORTHFIELD SATURDAY 



Norwich Team Expected to Furnish 
Strong Opposition 



Sixty-eight out of 102 members of the 
[acuity would retain the basic courses in 
military on the compulsory basis, while 
I favor entirely elective courses, answers 
t,i a questionnaire returned by the ii.- 
ktructorj reveals. The questionnaire was 
submitted by the President's Office to the 
ii '-it lent faculty, to ascertain opinion in 
reference to the petition for voluntary 
training signed by 27f> students, and sub- 
mitted to the President last June. 

Practically !M) per cent of the faculty 
voiced an opinion on the subject, with 
102 out ot the 115 replies to the question- 
naire returned. Of the <>8 favoring mili- 
tary, 47 preferred the present two year 
requirement! and 21 a modification (18 
favored a one year course with option 
between military and physical deucation 
the aeoond year; three favored a required 
count of one year only). 

The submission ot the petition for 
elective military was the result of nm- 
Milc-rable student agitation on the cam- 
pus. In essence, the petition bases its 
contention on the ground that in the 
opinion of Atto r ney -General Mitchell ■ 

land-grant college would comply suffi- 
ciently with federal requirements if it 
offered a pro|>er and substantial course in 
military training, even though students 
arc not required to take it; that military 
training is condemned by leading edu- 
cators both for its insufficiency and its 
inompatability with the education of 
youth; and because many students have 
both religious and moral objections 
ajainst it. In the attempt to place mili- 
i Continued on Page 4) 



Coasting along with three decisive- 
victories to its credit, the MlS—fhllWlll 
State College football team invades the 

wilds of Northfield, Vermont to engage 

in a gridiron encounter which, according 
to the latest reports, will be a stiff battle 
for either team to emerge the victor. 
Naturally the State College gridstcrs, 
with past victories comparatively easily 
won, have nothing but the incomparable 
optimism of the winner, but as everyone 
knows, apple carts are quite easily over- 
turned. While we do not predict a defeat, 
we do say that the forthcoming game 
with Norwich will prove a real test for 
the team. 

In the two games which our immediate 
Opponent* have played, they have been 
soundly trounced, first by Dartmouth by 
a score of oti-li and second by Mates by 
the almost equally impressive score of 
.'}')-(). But one must remember that the 
(Continued on Page 3) 

Liberal Club to Hold 

First Meeting Friday 



.Members to Hear Discussion 
"Money," Led by Reverend 
Akeley of Amherst 



on 



Soccer Eleven 
To Play Amherst 

Booters Favored to Win Over 
Shattered Amherst Team. Meet- 
ing to Take Place Today 



Enconrngnd by their victory over 
W.I'. I., a very strong and confident soccer 
team will face a shattered Amherst 
eleven, at Hitchcock Field, today at 
3.00 p. m. The Amherst College hooters 
art considerably weakened by the loss of 
twelve letter men, and are lacking for- 
ward line material. Thursday will pre- 
Kat a chance to the State College eleven 
to break the Amherst record of two years 
of undefeated teams, if ever that record 
i- to be shattered by the Bay State 
h o ote r s . 

Although the definite lineup has not 
been selected, it is highly probable that 
tin- positions will be held as follows for 
Mass. State: Jackson, center forward; 
Cap! YVaskiwicz, inside right forward; 
H. E. Taft, inside left forward; Tetro, 
outside right forward; Kozlowski, outside 
left forward; Pruyne, center halfback; 
Shuman, right halfback; Hitchcock, left 
halfback; Hodsdon, right fullback; Con- 
ic fullback; Jorczak, goalie. 
cr this season, many promising 
(Continued on Page 3) 



CAM PI'S CAI.F.NDAR 



ic<. M are not hert to play, to dream, 
>ijt. 
■ h.ir.l w,rk /<> do and loads to lift." 



I'icrsday, October 15 

n. Vanity S acc a , Ajnbcnt, at 
I'r.ctt Field. 

in. Floriculture Club Meeting, 
ii Hall, 
p. IB. Orpheus Club. Sextet Refaeanml. 
Iri 'l >>. October 16 

mi. Vanity CwwC oanti y, 

■ ' .m. at Middle-town. 

■ Lilxral Club Meeting, Memorial 
line?. 
s "orcl:, v , October 17 

ill. N'nrwi. h.at NortlifieM, Vt. 
iy, October 18 

OttUng < lub. Hike to Toby, 
-t Experiment Building, 
. October 19 

Collegian Try-outs, Collegia*. 
Memorial Building. 
■*»t mI.i\, October 20 

' born*, Mc m trial Building. 



"Money, Money, Money," will be the 
topic of T. B. Akeley who is the first 
apeaker on the Liberal Club program for 
the coming year. Mr. J. Paul Williams 
has invited the dub to gather for its first 
meeting at his home in North Amherst, 
this Friday evening, October 16, at 7.48 
The executive committee, whit h is com- 
posed of Richard Folfer and Oscar 
Margolin, hasarranged for transportation. 
Members and those interested will meet 
at the Memorial Building at 7..'«). Re- 
memher the date, Friday evening, time, 
7.30, It is a regular old-time fire-side 
discussion too. 

A word concerning the apeaker, T. H- 
Akeley, is one of the foremost liber- 
als in this vicinity. He formely 
held a professor's chair at the 1 niversity 
of Roch— tar and has done graduate work 
at Harvard. At the present time he is 
pastor of the Unitarian Church in Am- 
herst. He is well-known for his knowledge 
of public affairs. 

Perhaps there are a few who are won- 
dering what is the function of a Liberal 
Club on campus. Its main purpose is to 
provide an opportunity for stutlents to 
discuss and to become better acquainted 
(Continued on Page 3) 

OUTING CLUB MEETING 
HELD LAST THURSDAY 



HARRIERS TAKE 
INITIAL EVENT 

Worcester Tech Defeated 25-31 In First 
Meet of Season 

The Massachusetts State College v.tr 
sity harriers, placing five runners in a 
row alter Worcester Tech had plated tWO 
men at the finish line for first and second 
places, defeatetl the Knginccrs on the new 
course- last Saturday afternoon, the final 
tally being SB-SI, Summary: 

Won by Huell of Worcester Tecli 

2nd. L. Granger of Worcester Te. h 

3rd, Cairdof M.S.C. 

1th. Mason of M.S.C. 

5th. Kdmondof M.S.C. 

6th. Karrarof M.S.C. 

7th, Snow of M.S.C. 

Mh, R. C.ranijer of Worcester Te< h 

Mb, tiieenwood of Worcester Tech 

10th, Towlcof M.S.C. 

11th, Kothemich of Worcester Tech 

PROF. WELLES GIVES 
HIS IDEAS OF EUROPE 



Tells of His Trip Abroad Last Summer 

Professor Winthrop S. Welles, head ot 
the department of Agricultural Lduca- 
tion at Massachusetts State College, 
spent part of the past summer in Europe 
where he visited Kngland, Holland, 

France, Belgium, and the German Rhine 

country. About a week of his time was 
spent in and around London, a week 

distributed in Holland, Belgium, and 

( a mi. my and I week in ami around 
I'aris. 

In rural England, Professor Welles 
BO ticed tome especially interesting fea- 
tures the large size of the grain adds, 
(Continued on Page 4) 



DR. K. L BUTTERFIELD 
SPEAKS AT ASSEMBLY 

Former President Sees Bright Future 
for College Under New Name 

"I want to think that the Massachu- 
setts State College will pioneer in Edu- 
cation as it has pioneered in Agriculture, 
I want to hope that her graduates will 
venture far to enforce the liberties of 
humanity; to make this a better world 
lor the masses, who aie just beginning to 
lincl themselves," Dr. Kenyon L. Mutter- 
fieltl told the stutlents of the college of 
which he was president for IS \e.tis in 

the first assembly on October 7. 

Commenting on the change in the 
name of the college, Dr. lUitterheld ex- 
pressed the thought that it was a wise 
one. "The t hange will herald a new era 
and a new epoch in the college's signifi- 
cance. The new era will outstep anything 
in the past history of the institution," he 
assert etl. 

In his talk before the town Rotary 
Club on Thursday, the former M.S.C. 
President stressed the relationships hi 
(Continued on Page 3) 



COLLEGIAN TRY-OUTS 

All those members of the four-year 
student body who are interested in 
competing for positions on the edi- 
torial board of the Massachusetts 

Collegia*, will meet in the Collegian 
(Mine-, Memorial Hall, next Monday 
evening, October lit, at S o'clock. No 

previous newspaper experience is eeces- 

sary. Freshmen, sophomores, ami 
juniors are all eligible to compete 



Large Number Report 

For Debating Tryouts 

Sixteen Students at Meeting; Captain 

Manager Leonard Salter 

Speaks to Group 



Club Decides Upon a Hike 
Week Policy 



Every 



A hike every week is the policy decided 
on for the future at the first regular 
meeting of the Outing Club held last 
Thursday in the Memorial Building. The 
first series of hikes will be to acquaint 
the new members with the various trails 
on Mt. Toby. Later hikes will be to Mt. 
Warner, the Pelham hills, the Holyoke 
range and other gotxl hiking and camping 
spots. The new fire-place at the M.S.C. 
O.C. Cabin is nearly completed, which 
will enable members to spend week-ends 
on Toby during the winter. The old 
constitution was scrapped and a com- 
mittee appointed to draw up a new one. 
Alter the business meeting. Professor 
Holdsworth of the Forestry department 
gave an interesting account of his travels 

and adventures in the forests n Sweden. 

Professor Holdsworth is practicing on the 

college holdings on Toby the excellent 

forest technique whit l> he learned abroad, 

Next Sunday, at .'{.(H) p. m. the first 

group will meet it the East Experiment 

Station to take the bus tor Sunderland 

where Woodbury's Tra ! -t irts, If any- 

I !-nc- wishc"- to hike up Saturday afternoon 

'■ for an overnight hike. >cv Margolin '32, 

I Crawfoi Pearson S'32. 



MUSICAL CLUBS NOW 
PRACTISING WEEKLY 

Combined Chorus is Working to Pre- 
sent "lolanihe"; Orchestra 
Also Busy Rehearsing 

Increasing undergraduate interest in 
music has been evidenced at the o|>ening 
rehearsals of the combined chorus anil 
the college o rchest ra last week. On 
Tuesda y evening in Memorial Hall. 7." 
members of the chorus repot t ed ready to 
start work on the Gilbert and Sullivan 
opera "lotanthe" under the expert direc- 
tion of Professor William P. Higelow of 
Amherst College. Though it is as yet 
early for any ate urate predictions to be 
made, progress in the work is more than 

satisfactory. The intention is to p r tstu l 
the opera in con ce rt form with possible 

assistance from the orchestra. 

Soprance and tenors are still needed to 

form a WCil-Manced thorns antl it i> 

expected that the next rehearsal will find 

a number of people ready te> fill this need. 
.Membership is Open to all foar classes 
and to the faculty and guests as well. 

Thus far, the e !.iss<-s of '34 and "■'>'> art- 
best r epres e n ted at the rehearsals but 

more material should be forthcoming 
from the upper classes. II. l. Bishop •'!-' 

is manager of the chorus for the current 

season. 

(Continued on Page 3; 



OUTSTANDING EVENT 
Of THE WEEK 

Varsity Cross^Country team, in the 
tir^t meet of the season, defeated 
Worcester Tech., Saturday*. 



Sixteen stuelents reporteel at the lust 
meeting of the Massachusetts Slate 

College Debating Society on Wednesday, 

October 7, making it one of the Ingest 

si piaels to report for debating in a number 

ol years. Three of the members have had 
intercollegiate debating exp e rien ce before-, 
fcva have taken part in class debates, 
and all others have- had cxpci ienc v in 
| some type of public shaking. The mem- 
bership of the Soc i e t y also includes one 
co eel. 

Captain-manager Leonard A. Saltei M2 
discussed plans for the coming season, 

and gave- a record of the Society's activi- 
ties in the recent past. According to the 
present plans a schedule equal to last 
year*! is to be followed. Two debates 

with New York University have already 

been arranged, one to take plate in New 
York City, and the other on the campus. 
In all probability, the first of the year's 

debates will be held with Clark Univer- 
sity in Worcester, whom the- State College 

deba ter s have defeated cuneecutJvety for 

the past two years. The varsity team 
will travel south during the latter part of 
the winter term. It is expected that a 
freshman team will also be available for 
(Continued on Page 3) 

CROSS COUNTRY TEAM 
MEETS WESLEYAN FRI. 

Meet to Re Run on Hilly Middletown 
Course 

With a confidence bred of glorious 

victory, the- Mass.uliu-.etts State College 
rross country team will match its speed 
and endurance against that of Wesleyan 

('c)lleye- w he'ii it meets the lattei team next 

Friday at Middletown, Connecticut. Al- 
though the Wesleyan course which Is 

very hilly and difficult is absolutely 
foreign to all of the State harriers, the- 

c ross country team's combination ol three 

seniors antl four sophomores sliouhl aid 
greatly in its eltorls to beat e)(f (lie- 
attack e>f the Mieldletowners. 

Last year, a strong, fa^t ■-tipping 
Wesleyan aggregate completely overcame 
our runners on the college course, but 
this year with Captain Mason leading the 
way and strongly supported by Edmunds, 
Towie, Caird, McGuckian, Farrar and 
Snow the defeat of a year age* should be 
turned to a victory in the coming meet. 

The victory of the- State- harriers la-t 

Saturday proved to everyone who has 
been following the progress ol the team 

tliat the men have been working hard ill 
their endeavours to place a wiiinin,; team 

to the- for--. \ . irdl the- Middle 

tenwi'r-. tin- in' • t this I evil I Ik.- 

their first ami so there is lit! • 
telling the r tre-n 



STATE ELEVEN DOWNS 
THIRD OPPONENT 32-6 

Middle l. hi > is Kasy Victim of Smooth 
Functioning Team 

Rush Again Scores Three Touchdowns 

With his excellency, Governor Ply, as 

an unexpected guest ol bOOOJ at Alumni 

Field last Saturday afternoon, Captain 

( lilt l-oske-ti ami his gridiron watnoi-, 
vaaquiahed a haul lighting Midellebury 

aggregation to the tune ol a :i2-(> scene-, 

duplicating the talk ssada a week ago in 
the tray with the Polar bears of Mowdoin. 
Louis Hush, in 809 yards of spectacular 
field running tallied three touchdowns, 
while (Ksie rlolmberg and Hill 1'rigaid 
snch stored one, ( )ssic making the longest 
run of the game from a lineup position 
on an fifi sard dash through left tackle 
for a seoie. The final result place-, 
(each \b-| Tube's team in eighth 
highest scoring position among the 
principal .".1 colleges of the last, while 
Push retain! his place- IB the spotlight as 
highest scorer ill the Last, having run up 
nine touchdowns and kit keel two points 
in tries for points after touchdowns. 

The first Quarter was easy sailing for 
the- MarOOn antl White. Holnibeig 
rushed the opening kie kofl back ten a 
gain of l.'U yards, after which Lriganl ami 
< tssic ploughed Steadily on foi eight and 
ten yard gains. Before the game was 
I line- minutes old, the elusive Louis bush 
put his distinctive- twist into action, and 
i an lit) yards for the first store, for a 
while the two teams fought it out ill 
miduclcl, during which time the tackling 
of Irig.irel, Push ami Smith ol (he- 
Sophomore contingent continually re- 
pulsed the visitors. The blue antl White- 
backs pave a beautiful exhibition of 
(Continued on Page i) 

Freshman Camp 
at Lake Wyola 

To be Held This Saturday and Sunday 

On Saturday and Sunelav, Oct. 17 and 
IX, Freshman Camp is tO be held at 
Lake Wyola where two cottages have 
been secured to .t, e oinmodate thirty or 
forty men. Along with a general good 
time there will be discussion on the sub- 
ject "The Place- of Religion in College 

Life," led by W. J. Kitchen of the lielel 
Council e>f the V.M.C.A. one of the 
outstanding "Y" me-ii in the New Kng- 
land ( "olle-ge-s. 

Men who are anxious to gel in on this 
good time should speak to J. Paul Williams 
at his offiee in the- "Mem" building or to 
(.if Towie not later than Friday night. 
This is a necessary check betause mejre 

than one hundred men expressed intercut 

in the Camp during freshman we-ek. 

Freshmafl camp for the first time is 
being held after the- opening of the college 
year. The former tamp purpose of intro- 
duttion to college activities and program 
was met this year by the- mass me-eliiig 
be-fore the first football game. The- week 
end at Lake- W)rotS will be a tamp where- 
freshmen tan get to know eac h Other, ami 
where they tan share ideas on subjeils 

most \ ital to them. 



SOCIAL ACTIVITIES' TO 

BE RESUMED NOV. 1 

Latest news from the infantile- 
p.iialysis front: if no ne-w eases re-sult 
the- ban will be lifted on or before 
November 1st. On that date- the- pool 
which has remained idle- for such a 

kmg i»e ri<»d will be opened, and so<ial 

activities will resume- their normal 
c QUI ' 

l!n- latest Case was that of Douglas 

Danieli on October nth He is doing 

line and will ree ovei with RO alter 

.elicits ot paralysis. Edward Masters 

taken ill with paralysis em the- 6th 

of the- month lb- i, also recovering 

with no paralysis, 

If in -w cases arise, the opening of 

"m»! and the- st.m .,| sex i.i ] ae ti\ i 

-.ill be delayed three weeks from 

t he elate oi t he- new infee I ion 



I 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1931 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1931 






JLbc flfcassacbusetts Collegian 



Official newspaper of 



the Massachusetts State College. 
Wednesday by the students. 



Published every 



Wallace W. Stuart '32 
Managing Editor 



BOARD OF EDITORS 

Frank L. Springsr '32 
Editor -in-Chief 

Oscar Marcolin '32 Kial S. Potter, Jr. '32 

Associate Editors 



Alumni and Faculty 

Makjorik L. French '34 

A tilled.* 

William II. Weak '32 
Eugene Guralnick '33 
W. Grant Dunham '34 



DEPARTMENT EDITORS 

Editorial 

Frank L. Springer ,32 

Campus 

Edmond Nash '33 

Alfrbda L. Ordwav '33 

W. Raymond Ward '33 

Harrietts M. Jackson '34 

Joseph Politella '34 

Feature 

Oscar Margolin '32 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT 

Eric H. Wbtterlow Jr. '32 

Hasinas Manager 

Kenneth E. Hodge '32 William A. Johnson '32 

Advertising Manager Circulatum Manager 

Business Assistants 

Ashley B. Gubnky '33 Philip H. Hvsrault '33 



Subscriptions *2.00 per year. Single copies 10 cents. 



Make all orders payable to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In case of change of address, subscriber will please notify the business manager 
M toon as possible. 

Alumni and undergraduate contributions are sincerely encouraged. Any com 
munications or notices must be received by the editor-in-chief on or before Monday 
evening. 



Entered as second-cla»s matter at the Amherst Post Office. Accepted for mailing at special rate of 
postage provided foi In Section 1103. Act of October, 1917. authorised August 20. 1918. 



MEDICAL CARh OF GRADUATE STUDENTS 

It seems that graduate students on the campus occupy ■ very unenviable position. 
To use the vernacular, they just do not "rate." The other day, one of the member) 
of our graduate echool felt ill and thought thai he had some of the symptoms of the 

early etafea of infantile paralysis. In order to confirm or disprove his belief, he hied 
himself to the Infirmary, finally secured an interview with Dr. Kaele liffc only to be 
told that because he was not a member of the undergraduate student body, his con- 
dition could not be diagnosed. 

In spite ot the fact that graduate students do not pay a health fee similar to the 

paymenl required of all members <>i the undergraduate classes, we think that it ii a 

dangerous practice to refuse to dJagUOM suspected ailments occurring among ^radii 
ate students. Not 00l) is it detrimental to the health and peace of mind of the ".radii 
ate student but also the students who pay a health lee must l.e considered. Graduate 
students are continually mixing with the members of the undergraduate student 

body, hence if a graduate student should become victim to a communicable disease, 

deferred diagnosis and treatment might cause many ot the student with whom he 
comes in contact to be afflicted with the disease. 

So, lor the sake of good health among the students who are paying a health lee 

each term, we surest that graduate students l.e permitted to receive proper diag 

nosis and treatment by the college physician and that the health lee paid thrice 
annually l>> the undergraduates should be sufficient to (are tor all cases from the 
"raeluate school which come to the attention of the college health officer. 

STUDENT FORI M 

Time is drawing near for Student Forum again. This year, it is the intention of 
Adelphia to present items ol real interest for discussion and decision by the student 
body, lu order to gain some insight into the proble m , which the student body dc- 
sires to solve and to guarantee the inclusion of these problems in the program which 
Adelphia will arrange for the next Student Forum, we feel that such statements 
should be nuetntrd in writing to one of the members of Adelphia as soon as possible. 

In other words, Adelphia desires to make the Student Forums of this vc.ir center 
about topics in which the students have a vital interest with the hope that more 
constructive work can be accomplished throng) the medium of Adelphia this year 
than in former years. 



2Uj.e praroon 

It was midnight. The Picaroon was 
hard at work writing the poem of the 
month. Me had entitled it, "Women I 
Have loved and Left." 

"Ilm! ' he chuckled grimly in his beard. 
"Won't the whole 'Abbey' have to take a 
Vacation, though, alter this gets into 
print!" He pound out a K<>»d stiff drink 
ol mellow October from the joy-ju^ that 
he always carries around with him in 
..is,- of emergencies. It's really amazing 
how many emergencies there are in life, 
if one will only take the trouble to look 
for them. 

"What rhymes with belle?" he mut- 
tered, swinging by his toes from a nearby 
chandelier. "There's only one word I can 
think of, but if I use it, the editor will 
get h from the alumni, and I'll get 

h— from the editor. Oh, deary deary 
me!" After a moment's pause he said to 
himself, "Look here, my man. Let's do 
this thing methodically. Get out your 
ruler ami dividers." Thereupon he 
worked so diligently that his room-mate, 
staggering in at four o'clock after a night's 
debauch, found him in a most deplorable 
condition. Divided, like all Gaul, into 
three parts, he was clambering over floors 
and ceilings, crooning in a melodious 
melaii holy tone: "Belle, belle, will no 
one tell, will no one sell, can no one spell, 
or even yell, a word to rhyme with belle, 
belle, belle?' 

"Oh h !" exclaimed the room-mate, 

thinking himself a victim of the d.t.'s. 

"Not at all," said the Picaroon. "The 
alumni would resent it," saying which, 
he curled himself up in a comfortable 
cuspidor, and slept the sleep of the just. 
And that, Dear Children, is the really, 
really reason why the Picaroon's room- 
mate had to be taken away to Belcher- 
town. 



CO-ED NOTES 



Track has started again this fall; a 
sport which has been somewhat neglected 
in the past few years. Janice Munson "M 
is the manager this fall, and there is 
plenty of opportunity for the develop- 
ment of a snappy co-ed track team. 
Practice is held three times a week, and 
candidates have reported for all the 
usual track events, and also the added 
feature cross-country. Although the 
girls are not allowed intercollegiate con- 
tests, there still remains plenty of com- 
petition between the two athletic societies, 
Omega Chi, holder of the cup, and Tri 
Sigma. 



Wednesday night, October 14, fea- 
tured the opening of the Home Eco- 
nomics Club under the guidance of the 
new faculty advisor, Miss Briggs. The 
first meeting proved to be a party for all 
the Home Economics majors with the 
freshmen Home E co n omic s majors as 
special guests. Each class in turn fur- 
nished part of the entertainment. Apples, 
cider and doughnuts were served. Alberta 
Skipton "34 was in charge of the enter- 
tainment. 



STOCKBRIDGE 



The Stockbridge senior dais at a me 
ing this week elected new officers for 
ensuing year. President, Charles 

Dawson; Vice-President, Leon E. Pen 

Secretary, Lois L. Babb; Treasin 
Leonard A. Burnham. 

The class also elected two Stud' it 
Council members: Horace H. Clark. 
Francis W. O'Leary. 



BUSH IS STILL HIGH 
SCORER OF THE EAST 



FOOTBALL 

With a third of the season in the background, the varsity football team certainly 
has started CO make a record for itself. However, there are some Strong opponents 
to be laced in the nc \t lew weeks and the mettle of the State College eleven should 
In- tested to the utmost as the next four games are all to be played on foreign territory. 

Nevertheless, much c reclit is clue the men who have been working each clay clown 
on the field preparing for this 1931 season and also to the coaches who have htefl 
teaching football, the sport, to these men. The team certainly looks good and, better 
than that, it is getting results. The team is not the only group that has pep to it J subjects. Give him a subject particularly 



Seriously si>eaking, The Flaming 
Meteor, who is my deadly rival in the 
Poem of the Month contest, was just in 
here to ask me if I could tell him a four 
letter word to rhyme with S hnit/elhauser. 
Can anyone help him out.'' 

One of the many freshmen lor whom I 
write themes presented me the other clay 
with the problem of describing a hand- 
saw. "Here, young fellow," said I, "take- 
back your subject. I cannot so degrade 
my art lor the sake ol a few peltry pence." 
Later I lound that all my clients are 
required henceforth to write on such 
subjects as "Lighting a Pipe in a High 
Wind,' "How to Choose a Wife," etc. 
I must confess that I am astonished and 
deeply grieved at this policy. Because 
our college grows larger, need we become 
more stupidly standardized? Because 
freshmen are not always as intelligent as 
other people, need we encourage their 
stupidity? The average freshman mind 

is dull enough. Why make it proficient 
in dullness? The silent bore is at least 
harmless. The eloquent bore L as deadly 
as the average Sunday Chapel speaker. 
Think of all the eloquent bores the college 
will release in years to come! h style, 
as Mr. Schopenhauer claims, is the physi- 
ognomy of the mind, then our future 
graduates will be blockheads potential 
radio announcer.-, and trigidaire sale sm en . 
Feed a freshman dull subjects, and he 
will turn in dull themes. Besides he will 
get to hate English and all closely related 



Leads Winters of Davis and Elkins 
By Two Points 

Louis Bush, brilliant sophomore ground- 
gainer, and triple-threat man who bids 
fair to remain in the spotlight during the 
rest of his career, is at latest reports 
maintaining his place as highest scorer in 
the East. Bush has scored 50 points on 
nine touchdowns and two points in tries 
for points after touchdown, while Winters 
of Davis ft Flkins, who holds second 
rating, has tallied nine touchdowns. 
Ossie Holmberg, another Maroon and 
White star, is among those tied for L'arel 
place. A comparison in yardage of the 
total gains made by these two charges of 
Mel Taube's show that Bush has covered 
a distance of 7<>1 yards with the pigskin, 
while Holmberg has carried the ball lor 
a yardage of 900. The rating: 



Mr. Basil Wood, College Librai 
presented an instructive talk on the Me 
and value of the library to the Stud 
body of the Stockbridge School .it 
Assembly on Thursday, October 8. 

Mr. Margolin, President of the Oul 
Club, extended a cordial invitation to 
the Stockbridge student body to join | 
club. It is hoped that a large inn; 
will take advantage of this invitation. 

The senior S.C.S. girls gave the S 
bridge freshman girls a delightful pii 
on Sunday afternoon, October 4. 

The Stockbridge (dee Club held its 
first meeting Thursday, October 8, it 
7 p. m. in Stockbridge Hall. There were 
eighteen members present. Plans were 
discussed for the coming year. Meet 
will be held every Tuesday evening it 
7.30 p. m. in Stockbridge Hall, duriiu 
fall term. 



Rev. John A. Haw ley of the Firs] 
Congregational Church was the Assemhly 
speaker on Tuesday, October 13. 

Rev. Charles H. Cadigan of the Epis- 
copal Church will be the speaker oa 
Thursday. Mr. Cadigan is director of 
religious activities at Amherst College . 



/'/iivcr ami (.allege 


Pa*. 


C. 


7./. 


I'm. 


Pg. 


1 . 


Bull, Mass. Stat.- 


hb 


:i 


'i 


-> 


ii 


M 


Winter*, I>avi< Klkins 


lib 


i 


<» 


o 





.-,1 


Hewitt, Cotambta 


hb 


:i 


1 


7 


1 


El 


Crossmun. Rut tiers 


hb 


:» 


K 


1 





m 


Moran, Syracuse 


hb 


:i 


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(1 


4S 


Davy. New River 


hb 


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t) 


Morton. Dartmouth 


'lb 


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10 


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4(1 


Crossuian, N.V.I'. 


hb 


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:t7 


l-i>liel. Syrai us' 


fb 


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J. Laniark. N.Y.U. 


ul> 


:i 


6 








as 


Whales, Catholic V. 


hb 


:t 


(i 








AC, 


Kve-rhart. NVw River 


hb 


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M 


Slielton. Davis Klkins 


hb 


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Hinkle. Biuknell 


fb 


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fb 


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a 


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SI 


Savaid. Lowell Textile 


hb 


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Brow, Allegheny 


hb 


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Ferrate, Cornell 


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Battle. Manhattan 


fb 


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Holmlx-ru. Mass. State 


hb 


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30 


M.Craeken. W. Lib. 


hb 


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30 


J. Murphy, Forelham 


hb 


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27 



John C. Merchant, S*28, is now In. 

in the office of Indian Affairs, Department 
of the Interior, Washington, 1). C. His 
home address is, l'.tlK II Street, NAY. 
Mr. Merchant was formerly of Roalindak 

and Jamaica Plain High School and 

majored in Vegetable Gardening while 

here. 



Samuel I.. McCoy. Jr., S':il), is li\ ing at 
.111 Amstead Street, Durham, North 
Carolina. He majored in Dairy Manu- 
factures here Bl School, but bis exp erie nce 
has been largely ill other fields since 

graduation. He is now planning to take 

up soe ial service work in the south an 
the negroes. 



s the students have- the fever, too. There has been some might fine support given 
the team. We hope- that, win or lose, the students will continue to give the team 
the same support they have shown during the- past three games. 



Tllh POKM OF THE MONTH 

Thursdav, t )c tolu-r 15, today, is the last day on which contributions for the poem 
of the month may be submitted to Professor Rand at his office in Stockbridge Hall. 
The Cfitlegian sincerely hoix-s that there wi 1 be a sufficient number of college men 
and women interested to make the Poem of the Month a worthwhile institution at 
Massachusetts State, both during this year and future years. Every college worthy 
of the name should encourage creative writing to the best of its ability, for no college 
can be considered to be ol true collegiate standing unless its students genuinely 
attempt a legitimate form of self-expression and creative writing, whether in verse 
or prose, is one of the best of these forms. 

EDITORIAL BRIEFS 

Speaking of team-work, didn't our varsity cross-country team present a beautiful 
example of it last Saturday in racing Worcester Tech? 

We must hand it to the frosh CO e-ds tor singing, what? 

hance te> air its opinion about compulsory military 



DELTA PHI ALPHA 
HAS NEW HOUSE 



Now the faculty hi 

training. 



had 



What, \ou Say Mountain Day? Well, what about it? 
Don't forget the Freshman Camp this week end. 



interesting or inspiring to himself and he 
naturally writes with a good deal more 
enthusiasm. At first his fancies may he- 
somewhat extravagant and he may write- 
like Dr. F. Hereward Carrington who 
committed in all seriousness a gem of a 
poem all about dewdfOpa on a cat's soul. 
As a rule, however, with years and ex- 
perience the style becomes more sober 
and precise naturally, and ot itself, yet 
the imagination is all the more robust for 
having been exercised in its early stages. 
Furthermore, unless the subjects be- 
come more inspiring, the Picaroon will 
have to give up writing freshman themes. 
The professors will then be deprived of 
the privilege of reading the Picaroon's 
works of art; the Picaroon will be de- 
prived of his one means of working his 
way through college; the rest of us wil 
be deprived of the Picaroon; and the 
whole college will go to pot! 



The Picaroon is still waiting fos con- 
tributions to the colyum. Come! Come! 
Laelies and (.entlemen. I grow im- 
patient! 



New Fraternity House is Located on 
Cosby Avenue 

Any new building that becomes a part 
of this College is bound to receive a 
heartv reception, but until you have been 
through the new Delta Phi Alpha house, 
you haven't seen the latest. Situated at 
1 Cosby Avenue, it is a neat little white 
house, of the Dutch Colonial type, with 
a trim patch of lawn in front of it. Let's 
enter and ask one of the members to 
show us around, so that we can see what 
the latest addition to the campus has to 
show. 

We enter a rather spacious and com- 
fortably furnished reception hall which 
leads directly into the long, oak finished 
parlor. The parlor has been furnished 
with an eye to comfort, and in front of 
the cheery fire-place we notice a large 
over-stuffed sofa, while restful pillow- 
backed chairs fill the corners. The parlor 
opens directly into the fraternity office 
ami the other living room. 

The living room is furnished in Colonial 
maple, with home-spun pillows, and holds 
the piano as well as the usual odd chairs. 
(Continued on Page 3) 



Kolony Klufa held its opening meeting 

of the 1932 season on Monday night. 

September -H. Twenty-one of the- _i 

members ^oing out on placement welt 
back to start the year off; sixteen li 
in the house. 

On Wednesday night. September 
the Club held a freshman smoker, with 
about KM) trosh attending. Entertain- 
ment was provided for them by member! 
of the club. 

In the two weeks the club has bees 
functioning, many renovations ha\ 
made in the house. 

Kolony Klub, under the able leader 
ship of its officers, President. Ralph 
Stratton; Vice-President, Ralph Wyatt; 
Secretary, Harold Ek; Treasurer, Frank 
O'Leary; Marshall. Phillip Short asd 
Historian, Sherwood Stedman, and the 
supervision ot a social advisor, ProfessX 
GladfeKer, look forward to even a more 
prosperous year than the one it enjoyed 
last year. 

STOCKBRIDGE 
SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE 

Class of 1933, Major Groups 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 
Barney. Grover C. 
Bonnemort, Charles R. 
Burrell. Robert H. 
Carlson. Walter \V. 
Caton, Rodney W. 
Cook . Gordon M . 
Dennen, Frederick YV. 

(Continued neit week) 

LIBERAL CLUB MEETIM. 

(Continued from Page 1) 
with social, political, and ee 
rpjestions of the present day. 11 
the club is one of five which is spo 
the League for Industrial Dei: 
Lectures to be given at Smith ' 
during the winter term. The meet 
are usually small, informal Brest' 
cussions in character. 

Anyone interested is cordial h 
to be the guest of the club at 
meeting, this Friday evening, at 
the Memorial Building. 



- 



lirst 



Invest in a pair of the newest corduroy trousers, knickers, or breeches .... Price $3.40 per pair. 

YOUR PAIR IS READY FOR YOU! 

Ta n d i s — 

Your Haberdashers, Cleansers and Dyers. TIL. 811 -w 



T E L . 8 1 1 - w 



PR. BUTTERFIELDS ADDRESS 

(Continued from Page 1) 

•he peoples of the Last anel Wast, 

declaring that "the world cannot call 

iviluted, until the rural masses are 

in a more abundant life. These 

are a world-problem, and must he 

reckoned with economically, politically, 

I religiously, from the humanitarian point 

,md as a danger to overpopula- 

To the- Women's Missionary Soe :ety at 

t -..,. First Congregational Church, Dr. 

Butterfield said that the missionary field 

on the eve of a new advance. Work is 

1*0 be concentrated on the newly stirring 

,me>ng the rural masses of Asia, 

who have to be taught to read anel write, 

,,„1 where Christianity must establish 

community churches. He expressed the 

conviction that "the missionary is still 

I needed, and in some countries will be 

d for an indefinite period." 



It) PLAY AMHERST 

(Continued from Page 1) 

I prospects have appeared, and they are 

giving many of the veterans on the squad 

Mupetition for places. Iloaglan, 

\|.i, kimmie, Stephans, Talbote, and Cow- 

.nnong those from whom much 

I i :1 ,i\ be expected. To date, the entire 

I team il in good condition with the ex- 
I option of a minor injury to Hodman, 
Iduring scrimmage. 

1 lie following veterans may be ex- 
I ejected to appear for Amherst: Stewart, 
e.ird; Morton and Campbell as 
illli.ceks, Howclin at fullback; and Red- 
hem .it goal. 

Best in Drag Store Merchandise 
Best in Drug Store Service 

Henry Adams & Co. 

| V ii have tried the rest? 

Now try the BEST 

And that's the 

AMHERST SHOE REPAIRING CO. 

■ ar Welt System Employed" 



DEBATING TRY-OUT! 

(Continued from Page 2) 

debating with the surrounding institu- 
tions. 

The candidates who reported last week 
are Leonard Salter, Jr., Rich. ire! Folger, 
anel Phillip Conned, all of 'A2; Coatas 
Caragianis, Ashley (iurncy. and John 
Fowler, class of *83; Nathaniel Mill, 
Charles Dunphy, anel Lliot Landsman, 

'.'U. The freshman debaters are Bernard 

Doyle, who debated with St. Michae I's 
team in Northampton; Lester Williams, 
seasoned speaker from Melrose; Myer 
Weiner, declaimer and debater trom 
Maiden High; Richard Hubbard, who 
was a member of the Amherst High 
team; Roger Warner of Williamsburg, 
who reached the semi-finals in the 
National Oratorical Contest last year; 
and Gladys WhittOO, who had consider- 
able experience in oratory and debate at 
Drury last year. 

The next meeting will be held in the 

Memorial Huilding on Wednesday evening 

October 81, at 7.90 p. m. 

NOTICE 
The Faculty ( ommittee cm Student 
Life has voted that permission for dane cs 
will not be given until further notice. 
This action has been taken in accordance 
with recommendations oi the State Hoard 
of Health concerning dances during the 

prevalence of infantile paralysis. Mow 

ever, it is hoped that the restriction may 
be removed SO that the fall house el.imvs 
may lie held at the time of the Amherst 

game. (lark L. Thayer 

Chairman, Student Life Committer 



College Drugstore 

W. H. McGRATII, Reg. Pharm. 
AMHERST, - MASS. 



S. S. HYDE 
Optician and Jeweler 

OculUta' Preacrlptlona Filled. Broken Irrme* 

accurately replaced 

BIG BEN ALAKM CLOCKS and other 

reliable makes 
% PLEASANT STREET, (up one fllflht) 



DRY CLEANING NEWS 

Although we charge only $1. to clean and press your suit, we have a special offer. 
Uy using our cou|>on book you can still save 25c more per suit. 

Fir particulars - inquire at our ojjue or our driver. 

Phone 635 SWISS CLEANSERS & DYERS Phone 635 

Over Flritt National Store 



DICTIONARIES 

From 25c up 



Webster's New International 
Webster's Collegiate 

New Century Dictionary 

in 2 vols. 



Winston Simplified Dictionary 

College Standard 
(Funk & Wagnalls) 

Concise Oxford Dictionary 



FOREIGN DICTIONARIES 

JAMES A. LOWELL, - - BOOKSELLER 



Now Showing . . 



A particularly fine lot of 

LIGHT WEIGHT SLIP ON SWEATERS 

Priced from 

$2.50 to $4.50 

GOLF HOSE 

$1.00 to $2.50 
F. M. THOMPSON & SON 



MII>l)LKBURY DEFEATED J2-o 

(Continued front Page I) 
triple-pass plays, but John Burringtoa 
w.i> always on hand with his magnificent 
■hoc lace tackles, and the Opponents were 

forced to kick. This move proved cii> 

astrous to the blue ami White, however, 
for Hush scooped the hall into his anus 
and raced «.rj yartls for a telly. 

I>uring the second quarter the Middle 
bliry team braced and made- a steads 
mard to a spot within firing distance. 
Here, however, the low tackling of 
I oskrtt and t he pass blocking of "Minker" 
Smith figured strongly in preventing a 
Blue and White score. Hush and Holm 
hern then reversed the order of things, 
and, after a succession of short passes 
and 10 and 2(1 yard gains, paved the wax 
for Hill Frigarclto make lii> second touch 
down of the season. The Middlebury 
ekv*g made a strong rally, but were 
doomed to disippointinent, as the half 
ended with the ball on the Massachusetts 
teams ;) yard line. The tries for points 
.iltcr touchdowns by Koskett and Mush 
having failed, tin- score at the hall stood 
18-(). 

A punting duel b et we en Welch of 
Massachusetts and Ycoinaii> of Middle- 
hury featured tbe third epiarter. For a 
while the pigskin seesawed back and 
forth in the center of the gridiron. After 
some average gains hy Ossie Holmberg 
Sad Hush, however, the latter felt the 
scoring urge again and literally clo\c 
througb the center of the line to race f><) 
y. in Is for his third touchdown. This time 
Koskett made i;e><>el on a placement kick 
tor the point after. The remainder of 
the period w,t> de\e>teel to a rather un- 
exciting period of fumbles, incomplete 
passes and sin, ill gains on the part of 
both sieles. 

At the opening of the final period Fate 

nave- Ossie Holmberg the opening he de- 
served lor his steady ground-gaining 

throajghottl the fray, and he smashed 
through left tackle for a he .ml did SS 

yard run. He wau downed b\ two Blue 

and White men just alter rrosaillg the 
List white line. Murray Hicks, ran^\ 
fullback, made good cm the point after. 

Tackling by Lojko, substitute quarter 

h.uk, and Murray Hicks featured the 
defensive work of the Maroon and White 
against the- visitors in their last drive for 
a score. However, in the e losing minute* 
of play Mel Tailbe sent in a complete 
third-string lineup, and Henle of Middle 
hury crashed through for a touchdown 
after bis teammates had worked their 
way down the field to tin- shadow of the 
goal | Mists. 

Tin' lineup: 

MIDDLEBIKV aadtft; Ill—a. rastrooi. 

rl; Lovrll, .Sorc-nson, TliicMc, m, Corliss. Wliitiii.ni, 
Kerriri, c; Josclyn, VVrinht, lg; Mai le-.ui, Jolnc-on. 
TlirarthcT I (apt.), Ic; Murkowaki, Zuka. qfcj 
Hartley, Km, rfctb; I loyli-. Vcomans, lhl>; Kcilly. 
Hake man, Collins, fb. 

mass. BTATB Mount iln. ffnln a w B. Kal>yan. 

Ic; Foskftt (('apt.), (low, It, Hnrk< , S liiifln.r. 
Cumtiiirms, Ik; Le-ary, BoSfSUoiSa Griswold, c; 
Bic kf ord, Hbann, True, ric HurriiiKion. Silver*, 
rt, Smith. Ryan, (loodal!. rr, WVMi, l^.jko. qb; 
HcilinbcTK, ByhfMter. Ihfo; Bush, Wooil, ilili. 
FiiK.ir'l. Micks, fb. 

Toik li'lown-i Hush .'{. KriKard Hbimberg, 
Hoylf. Points after touchdown — PcMfcett, I licks. 
Rcfrr«T -Ginsberg of Konlhani. I'rnjiirc T. P. 
Shea of B. U. USMSBMS I • A. I'cycrson of 
Colgate-. Time — 18 min. quarters. 



VISIT 

BARSELOTTI'S 

All the requirements for the smoker- I'ipes, 
Pouches, Smokers Combination 

Ice Cream, Candy, Sandwiches 



BEFORE RETIRING 
DROP IN AT 

"BUCKS" 



MUSICAL GLUM practisim; 

(Continued front Pu£e 1) 

ruder the direction oi Edgar Sottas 

'•'*•'>, a graduate of the New England 

Conservatory « »t Music, the college 
orchestra opened its season with an 

unusually large attendance at its fust 
meeting. With this auspicious start, 
much is being planned for the year. 

Members of the orchestra enrolled to 

elate are as follows: Violins Hatstonc 

'.'>4, Moody '. , {:i, Schreiter, Sumner, 

Weiner, l'lanit/er, Goluh "35, I'iano 
Hates and Miss Pushee '.'{•». Clarinet 
Dunham '.'H, Miss Allen, Bliss, Ttask, 

<uu\ Jennings '.'i. r >. Piute Clark '36. 

Trumpets Lister '.M, Cross, l.ibbey '.'{. r >. 
Pass Wetterlow '.il'. Cello Henry :!l 

Alto Eldridge, Anderson '.'*. r >. Drums 
S ala n o f '36. Leader Sorton '.'!:<. Man 

agci Mac Lean '33, 



FRKSIIMAN CROSS-COl V1RY 
Freshman crosscountry for this \c.ii 

shows many favorable p r ospecta foi a 

brilliant season. About twenty -five men 
have reported so far, and among them 
many are beginning to show merit at 
this early date. Although official lone 
trials have not yet been taken, tin- 
ted low ing men look especially promising: 

C I.. Cross, W. R. Gillette, K. Stca.lman, 

L. V. Blake, II. R. Debbie, and W. 

Fastball, The schedule is: 

Oct. 34 Amherst Irosh at Amherst 

39 Jr. Varsity at M.s.c. 

Nov. <> New Kiiklands, Moston (pend.) 
12 StcM khrielgc here 



PATROMZK 



The College Barber Shop 

"M" BUILDING 

M. s. c. 



SANG LUNG hand laundry 

No. 1 Main St. Amherst, Mass. 



KKPAIKINt; AND AIX KINDS OK 
U ASIIINt; IMINK AT KKASONABI.K 
PRICKS. 

Our Laundry Fir*t Claaa 

Our Policy Guaranteed 

NKXT TO THE TOWN IIA1.L 



TYPEWRITERS 

for Sale and Rent 

at at at jl a u 
H. E. DAVID 



Flower Pots 
Howls and Vases 



in 



Inexpensive Pottery 



Miss Cutler's Gift Shop 



DELTA Pill ALPHA HOUSE 

(Continued from Pag* i) 

Hie office also serves as I he study foi t lie 

house- manager, and (he Cham ellor. The 
first tlocn ol the house' c out. tin-., aside 

from the looms mentioned, a study 

arranged to hold loin ol (he residents. 

On the second Igor, we find three 
more "study rooms" furnished in almost 
the same niaunei as the- room on the hist 
Story, and the top pail of the house i> 

devoted t<> sleeping quarters As are sre 

about to leave-, the- lions,- president oil, is 
an apology to the campus because no 

house ararming us reception has been held 

as yet, but he expl.nns that it is clue lo 
the hail on house dances and receptions 
on campus. He eoidi.dU m\itcs JnSpfJC 
tion and \isits from liiends, while he 

hopes io offei an all-school reception soon 
INVAD* \(>Rlll! ll I |> SATURDAY 

(Continued from Page I) 
former COllffC is way out o| Norwich's 
class ami that Mates his bSCfl the Maine 
Stale champions for two years running. 

Moreover, in these gamee, the soldiers 

had no chance to put into action their 

reputedly etrou| osTenas, but there is no 

doubt that State does not intend to let 
them st. nt now. Again, one must also 
keep in mind the t.u t that Mucky" 
Connor, the Norwich men to r, served Ins 
apprenticeship in the stall of the- N.Y.C. 
coaches under the leadership of "Chiek" 
Meehan, and such an apprenticeship is 
not to he- disregarded with a toss of the 
head. Mut insofar as the w.iinois of 
Mass. State are- cone c-rned, the coming 
contest this Saturday will be the fourth 

consecutive win regardless < >t the adver- 

sit v of t heii opponents 



AMHERST 
THEATRE 1 

I* HONK Hill 

4 Shows Daily, 2..W; »»..«»; H.Mt p.m. 
Prleea Matlnevn <i», Kvenlnfta 40c 



Thuroday, October IS 

Robert I- Bbtrwood't Gnat st.iK<- Su 

"WATEHLOO HKIIm.i 
wllh MAK CI.AKKr., KENT DPI CLASS 

Kriilay. October K. 



CONSTANCK BENNETT in 
"BOUGHT" 

with BEN LYON, KicilAKD BENNETT 
Wasted you look I" l.i Ileum it I>m Ihmiiiv. 
mi dram poa will fad par- 
fee I loll 



Saturday, October 17, 1 Keulurc ■» 

JOAN BENNETT, MARINE AI.HKICIIT In 
"HUSH BfONBI " 

and CBQBJCE O ItKII.N A SALLY kll.r.KS 

In "A HOI V IIKKOK 



Monday. Octobe r I* 

l-.xti.i' Battal Tin- Mcttsra Sesaatloa >ii iii<- 

VlMl' * * * * • 

'•nVE STAB FINAL" 
with KDWAKD C. BOfJIMBON 

- ■ 1 1 ■ I .1 -. Illl lll.lt IIIK i ll -l.it '.I t 

I iii s,l.,\ October 20 



Sjh-i t.u ul.it Romance in Paramowt'i 
"ROAD TO RKNO" 
st.irriiiK 
OkOStsa Kmii-rs I il) oi I ishiii.m 

I'eftfty Shannon William Hoyd 

Irvinft Pechel Wynne GBSsaU 

Judith Woods Skeets C ,.i||,,i>h< r 



CANDY KITCHEN 

Good food is essentia] for good health! 

Don't ruin your health hy eating cheap food, 
dine at the Candy Kitchen and 
insure good health. 

Sarris Bros. Candy Kitchen Restaurant Inc. 



WISDOM 

Appearance of success is essential to the man who seeks success. The "almost good" is nowhere so conspicuous a failure 
as in a suit of clothes. It is wise to rely on the hand tailoring and the fine imported fabrics used in Clothes by LANGROCK. 

E. M. SWITZER JR., Inc. 



! 



U. A. C. Library. 



4 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1931 



HICKEY-FREEMAN CLOTHES 

When you select your Fall suit, look for one thing first — a name whose quality standard, this season, is as good or better 
than it was in the past! The Hickey- Freeman label protects you against the deception 

so frequently called to the appeal of price. 

THOMAS F. WALSH 



PROF. WHAM GIVES HIS IDEAS 

(Continued from Pafte I) 

tin- number <>f thatched farm buildings, 
and the prominence of the hedge rows, 
with tell oaks growing in them, dividing 
the fields. All along the country roede 

the large number ol bicycles was not id- 
able. 

He noticed that in the outskirts of 
London, all the Knglish cottages have 
flower gardens in front, varied in size anil 

depth from a few to fifty feet. Bet ween 

the yard of each cottage and the street 
is a picket feme. There seems to be 
much new home building going on, evi- 
dently a development project, with many 
small cottages going up together. 

Crcat use is made of the Thames for 
pleasure boating rather than for com- 
mercial enterprises, Professor Welles re- 
marked. 

One question came to his mind im- 
mediately Why docs England continue 

to pay money to beep up apparently 

useless royal palaces. 1 ' 

"One week of Knglish food SflUl 
enough," stated Professor Welles. He 
said it was a relief to get on the boat 
crossing the North Sea and get a good 

Dutch meal. Generally ■peeking, he 

stated, the English population give one 
a sort ot drab feeling. From the Tower 
to the castles, London seems moldy. 
The Tower itself was disappointing, just 
a collection of jail buildings. In the 
British Museum, the three points most 
interesting to Professor Welles were the 
Kosetta Stone, the Elgin Marbles, and a 
human sun baked body, dating before 
4500 B.C 

Professor Welles felt an unfavorable 
reaction toward the Hclgin people and 
their ways. They seemed to fail to give 
one a sense of stability. A most im- 
pressive association in Belgium came 
from being at the drill grounds where 
Edith Cavell was shot. 

A sense of relief came with meeting 
the German people in Cologne. They 
were a different people. Whereas up to 
this point depression had prevailed, the 
outlook of these people was more up- 
lilting. Apparent lack of want among 
the people in Germany was outstanding. 
Buildings, streets, everything was kept 
up, clean, and looked well cared for. No 
groups of unemployed people standing 
around were visible. "Nothing excessive 
can be said of the Rhine Castle country." 
he continued. In this beautiful country 
the most striking thing was the- way IS 



COLLEGE FOOTBALL RATING 



Latest developments in the football 
world have placed the Massachusetts 
State- College football team in eighth 
highest scoring position of the fifty-one 
principal colleges and institutions of the 
Hast. Statistics follow: 



(olUge W 

New York U. -i 

Columbia •'* 

Army ; 1 

Syracuse 3 

Corasil :t 

Dartmouth •'! 

I'ittsburtc 3 

Mass. State ■< 

Tufts 1 

Colgate 3 

Williams 3 

Rutgers 3 

Tom pie; 3 

Brown 3 

Wash, and Jeff. I 

Harvard 2 

Kordham 2 

IVun. 2 

Boston College I 

Bmknell 2 

Lafayette 2 

Holy Cross 2 

(•eorgetown 2 

Carnegie Tech 2 

Vill.mova 2 

Springfield 2 

Lowell Textile 2 

Bates 2 

New Hampshire 2 
Western Maryland 1 

Princeton 1 

Yale I 

Navy 1 

Conn. Aggies 1 

Trinity 1 

Worcester P. T. I 

Rhode Island 1 

Lehigh 1 

We-st Virginia I 

He-nn State 1 

Wesleyan 1 

Arnold I 

Providence 1 

Vermont 1 

Maine 1 

Amherst 

Bowdoin 

Norwich ° 

Mi.hllclmry 

Colby 

Boston U. ° 



T F 

o ua 



A 


149 
147 13 
143 13 
132 
131 
115 
114 12 
21 6 
101 



6 

13 














1 
(J 













1 









1 















73 13 
72 6 
(34 
.-><) 
43 
67 
48 
46 
39 



71 2« 

77 16 

65 20 
50 41 
45 10 
45 24 
85 26 
53 25 
36 28 

18 45 

66 25 
34 19 
26 26 
13 12 
13 14 

26 20 

19 14 
8 25 

32 32 
21 60 
19 25 

6 47 

19 40 

33 58 

27 65 
15 27 

6 34 

o r.7 

6 90 

19 114 

6 76 

33 



Pel. 

1.000 
1 (KM) 
1.000 
1.000 
1.000 
1.000 
1.000 
1.000 
1.000 
1.000 
1.000 

law 

1.000 
1.000 
1.000 
1.000 
1.000 
1 000 

i (xw 

l.(XX) 
.667 
.667 
.667 
.667 
.667 
.667 
.667 
.667 
.667 
.500 
.500 
.500 

. 608 

.500 
NO 

. .VX) 
.500 
. 333 
.333 
333 
.333 
.333 
.333 
. 333 
.333 
.000 
.000 
.000 
.000 
.000 
.000 



which grape vines literally cover the 
Rhine valley. 

France has been very adept at putting 
her best wares in the front windows in 
Paris. It is a dream city. The attitude 
e>t the Parisian population is that of not 
taking life too seriously. The most in- 
teresting spot in Paris, concluded Pro- 
lessor Welles, was the Arc de Triomphe. 



GORDON SILK HOSIERY 

new values at $1.00 and $1.35 

JACKSON & CUTLER 

Amherst, Mass. 



WHY OVER-PAY ON YOUR DRY CLEANING? 

We will dry -dean and press your suit or topcoat for $1.00 

We call and deliver free daily 

Phone 635 SWISS CLEANSERS & DYERS Phone 635 

Over First National Store 



COM PULSOR Y M ILITAR Y 

(Continued from Page 1) 

tary training on an elective basis, M.S.C. 
follows the example set by the University 
of Wisconsin, which had its military 
training placed on an optional basis in 
1023. The University of Cincinnati 
followed suit a few years later, and at 
the present time the University of 
Washington, Iowa State College, the 
University of California at the Los 
Angeles branch, and the University of 
Vermont are conducting campaigns for 
eliminating compulsory military. 

Brought before the Board of Trustees 
of this college at their recent meeting, 
that body postponed all action on the 
petition until opinion concerning it 
should have been investigated. The 
President's committee which ascertained 
the faculty standing, consisted of Secre- 
tary Robert D. Hawley, Professor A. II. 
Lindsey, and Professor K. P. Holdsworth. 
The petition and all opinions will be 
considered when the Trustees meet in 
January, and final action will be taken 
at that time. 

The questions and explanation as sub- 
mitted to the faculty in the questionnaire 
follow: "It should be stated that the 
Federal Lead Great Act of m\2 requires 
the inclusion of military tactics in the 
curriculum in order to make the institu- 
tion eligible to receive the Federal Funds 
thus appropriated. These funds amount 
to approximately $44,(XM) yearly. The 
National Defense Act of 1914) provided 
for the establishment of R.O.T.C. units 
at such colleges. This act states: 'That 
no such unit shall be established or main- 
tained at any institution until an officer 
of the Regular Army shall "have been de- 
tailed as Professor of Military Science 
and Tactics, nor until such an institution 
shall maintain under military instruction 
at least KH) physically fit male students.' 
It is possible that military instruction 
could be provided by the college without 
the R.O.T.C. organization, but it is not 
known whether or not this would satisfy 
the federal requirement. This would, ot 
course, increase the cost of such instruc- 
tion to the college. 

"With these facts in mind, you are 
asked to please answer the following 
questions: 

"(1) Do you believe that the Military 
Training course at this college should be 
required for two years as at present ( ), 
or should be entirely elective? ( ) 

"(2) If some modification of the 
present required program, as indicated 
below, is possible; would you prefer it to 
either of the two alternatives suggested 
in epjestion (1)? 

"(3) If you favor a modification of 
the present required program, which of 
the following plans do you prefer: (a) 
Required military training for one year 
only; (b) Required military training for 
one year with option between military 
and physical education the second year?" 



M. S. C. MEN'S MOTTO IS ALWAYS 
LET "DAVE" DO IT 

AMHERST CLEANSERS, DYERS 
and LAUNDERERS 

PHONE 828 Near the Town Hall PHONE 828 




Thomas S. Childs 

Incorporated 
SMART SHOES and HOSIERY for COLLEGE MEN and WOMKN 

QUALITY MERCHANDISE PRICES TO SUIT 



275 High Street, Holyoke 

Largest Shoe Store in Western Massachusetts 



Ol 



JOSEPH GINSBERG 

19 PLEASANT ST. 

Men's Furnishings - Shoes repaired, called for and delivered 
Freshmen, come in and see our selection of shoes, priced moderately, 
Special sale now on leather coats, just what you need for cold weather, 

CALL 984-M 



Given Away 

A pair of Bostonian $9. Oxfords 
A pair of Friendly Five $5. Oxfords 

FOR PARTICULARS, SEE OUR WINDOW 

BOLLES SHOE STORE 

Sheaffer, Parker, Waterman and Moore 
FOUNTAIN PENS 

Your name engraved - No extra charge 

A. J. HASTINGS TSESSEm" AMHERST, MASS. 



Two "Best Sellers" 

Shirts of Fine French Flannel 
in Canary, Green and Blue Shades . . . $3.00 

Botany Flannel Robes, 

a new high in quality, a new low in 
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shops at Yale, Harvard, Kxeter, Ilvannis 



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Between Town Hall and Masonic Building 
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LADIES SHOES HEELED 4<h 

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Men and Women at the COLODNY 
CLOTHING CO., 32 Main St. , (near <Up* 
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accessories. We are exclusive agents 
for the famous Colt-Cromwell line of En- 
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YOUNG MEN'S CAMPUS CORDUROY 
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PATRONIZE 
THE SANDWICH MAN 

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jgfo jBaisaarfrttagttH ffloUrgtatt 



Vol. XLII 



AMHERST, MASS., WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 21, 1931 



Number 4 



VARSITY SOCCER MEN 
DEFEAT AMHERST 2-1 



\mherst Team, Undefeated in Two 

Yours, Succumbs to State Hooters 

as Jackson and Koslowski Scire 



Continuing a well >t irttii s eason , the 
rarity soccer team defeated a etrong 

Amherst College team by the store of 
2-1, at Hitchcock Field, la>t Thursday, 
[ackaon acored the furet point of the 

, during the di>t quarter, followed 
hy a store by Davidson of Amherst 
during the eecond quarter, and Koslowski 
,,ut the State hooters in the lead bj 

ing the third tally, during the third 
quarter. By winning the game, the 
M.s.C. soccer team, broke a record "I 
two years of undefeated playing, held by 
the Amherst eleven. 

\mherst started the game, by taking 

the aggressive side, but due to weak de- 
fensive playing and poor passing, she 

(Continued on Page 3) 



College Sixth Among 

Highest Scoring Teams 

Maroon and White Eleven Has Scored 
147 Points to Opponents' IN 

I he results of 25 or more games played 
in the East last Saturday have boos t ed 

the hopes of Maroon and White football 

fans up one more notch, inasmuch as 

Mt I Taube'a gridiron aggregation is, 

according to latest rejMjrts, rated as 

sixth among the highest scoring machines 

in this section of the country. The 

re "ids of leading colleges: 

Points 





IV 


L 


T 


F 


A 


New York University 


4 








1SII 


7 


Syrai use 


4 








17(> 


J> 


( (ilumliia 


4 








1HH 


■ 


( ornell 


4 








16. r i 


11 


Pittsburg 


4 








147 


1) 


Mate 


4 








147 


is 




4 








184 





Allegheny 


4 








181 


11 


Brown 


4 


Q 





«.»7 


I!) 


Williams 


4 








H« 


18 


k Jefferson 


4 








SB 


1« 


i rainui 


I 


(» 





50 


18 


Harvard 


:i 








SI 


l.'i 


Penasyhranki 


:i 








7s 


7 


lohtM Hopkins 


■A 








BO 


l'l 


Monti lab Normal 


2 








46 


1 


W< ■ 1 ilx-rty 


:i 


o 


1 


in:, 


fi 


Ford nan 


a 





1 


71 


18 


Temple 


:i 





1 


01 


7 


' It V 


2 





1 


.-.:i 


8 


l.urg 


2 





1 


88 


6 


BuckaaU 


2 


(1 


*» 


71 


2 s 


(Continued 


on I'aUe 3) 







LIBERAL CLUB HEARS 
TALK BY REV. AKELEY 



I'astor Talks on Unsoundness of 

Present Economic System to 

College (.roup 

Money" was the subject which the 
R ever end T. H. Akeley discussed with 
the liberal Club at its meeting last 
Friday evening at the home of Mr. J. 
I'aul Williams in North Amherst. The 
t.ilk was preceded by a short business 
Meeting, in which the following officers 
wire elected: President, Ray Ward ':{.'}; 
Vice President, Margaret Ohlwiler \'J2; 
Set retary-Treasurer, Mary Black '.'52. 

Mr. Akeley, who is pastor of the Unity 
Church, Amherst, gave a short talk on 
our present economic system, in which he 
■aid that the system was morally un- 
MNjnd because it allowed the unrestricted 
accumulation of wealth without regard 
for the common good, and permitted 
certain privileged classes to take unfair 
advantage of lower classes. He summar- 
ized the present depression with the 
inent that the people who have the 
- also have the money, leaving the 
I without either. 
A lively discussion followed this pre- 
ii of the problem, in which the 
•hole group took part touching not only 
monies, but questions of philosophy 
M-hology as well. Mr. Akeley 
to be one of the most capable and 
! >lc men who ha., ever been a guest 
liberal Club, and also to be so 
ng as to make his listeners forget 
"nomics is called "the dismal 

next meeting of the club is soon 

announced. At that meeting there 

ht another excellent speaker. A 

for the rest of the year will 

discussed. 



OUTSTANDING EVENT 




()F THE WEEK 






<> Tempore <> Merest! We 


ded 


rate 


the flannel Hat -iron to the 1- 


roan 


who 


had his military breeches i let 


insed 


and 


pressed by the tailor. 







FOOTBALL TEAM 
TO PLAY W.P.I. 

Team Will Attempt to Add Anotber 

Victory to Its String of 4 Wins 

When Invades Worcester Sat. 

With four impressive victories to its 
credit, the Massachusetts State College 

football team will journey to Worcester 

this coming Saturday in an attempt to 
aiU\ another win to its already proud 
ret ord at the expense of W.P.I. Without 
being unduly optimistic, one can say 
with a great deal of surety that the State 

gridatera will put the skids to the less 

powerful Worcester eleven this weekend. 
Last Saturday, a seemingly weak Amherst 
team overwhelmed our near-future oppo- 
nents by the score of HI-7, completely 
baffling the Worcester backs in the 
execution of plays that would not have 
residted in any kind of gains against a 
strong team. In the game in question, 
(Continued on Page 3) 

WESLEY AN HARRIERS 
BEAT STATE COLLEGE 



Caird, State Runner, Loses Way Due 
to Poorly Marked Course 

Although displaying the seme effective 

teamwork as was shown in the first meet 
with Worcester Tei h the week before, the 
Massachusetts hanirs were defeated by 

the Wealeyan University cross-country 

team last Friday at Middlctown, the 
final score being 24-'5.'?. Victory was 
almost a sure thing for Coach Derby's 
Maroon and White charges at the two 
mile mark of the 4..S mile course, but at 
t his point 1 ),ive Caird, a promising runner 
and one of last year's Freshmen letter- 
men, who was leading the field at the 
time, lo>t his h.iv, due to the fact that 
the course was very poorly marked. This 
unfortunate event gave Keyset and 
Snyder of Weslcyan a chance to win the 
run, coming in first and second respec- 
tively. Had ("aird come in first, the 

Massachusetts runners following Keyset 

and Snyder would have placed well 
enough to defeat the Connecticut team 
decisively. The summary. 

Won by Keyser of Wealeyan. 

Tied for 2nd iiosition Ci places) — Snyder, 
Ba< ten of VVesleyan, Mason of M.S.C. 

Tied for lird position (fitfa and 6th places) — 
Snow and Karrar of M.S.C 

7th— Edmond of M.S< 

Kth — (iordon of VVesleyan. 

ftth — Bloom of VVesleyan. 
10th — Wilcox of Wesleyan. 
11th — Bunyan of Wesleyan. 
12th— Towleof M.S.C. 
13th— McGuckian of M.S.C. 
1 1th— Caird — lost way. 



Two Freshman Co-Eds 

Are Hurt in Accident 



Janet Lockhart and Margaret Crean 

Escape Serious Injury When 

Car Turns Over 

On Friday morning Janet Lockhart and 
Margaret Crean both of the class of \'Xi4 
luckily escaped serious injury when their 
car turned over on the Sunderland road 
while they were driving down to the 
College. The accident occurred when 

Miss Lockhart, in passing a horse and 
buggy, attempted to avoid striking a flog 
which ran in front of the car. The road was 
wet and slippery and the car turned over. 

Miss Lockhart was uninjured but the 
car rested on Miss Crean. Both girls were 
taken to the Farren Hospital in Montague 
where it proved that Mi-s ( 'nan's in- 
juries were not as serious as they first 
appeared. One arm was badly bruised 
and there were several cuts and bruises 
about her head. She is expected to be 
fully r e c o ver ed in a short time. 

Rumors to the effect that one of the 
girls had been fatally injured wire for- 
tunately discredited soon after their 
inception. 



JUDGING TEAM WINS 
HONORS AT ST. LOUIS 



Team Places First in Judging of 
Ayrshire Dreed 

lour silver cups and a handsome silver 
placque were the trophies brought home 
b) the Slate College dairj judging team 
from the National Dairy Show recently 
held at St. I. ou is. In judging the Ayrshire 

lined the team placed Brat. In COmpeti 

tion with other colleges in judging all 
types the Massachusetts team won filth 

place. Twenty two oiliei teams from all 
p.uts of the United States were contest 
ants at the National Show. This recent 
showing of the team equals the highest 
record of any previous team in a national 
contest. Nearly a decade ago, in I'.tL'L', a 
team coached by Professor Salisbury also 
plated fifth in the national dairy show. 

Individual honors were won by Richard 
Merritt who placed sixth in judging 
Ayrshires and eighth in (iuernsevs 
William Libbey placed second in judging 
both the Ayrshire and Jersey breeds. 

The team was composed of Cary 
lloulctt, William libbey, and Richard 
Merritt. 

Christian Association 

Holds Freshman Camp 

(iroup'tif IY00I1 Meet at Lake Wyola 

to OoA Acquainted and Discuss 

Problems of College Life 



Last Saturday afternoon the Christian 

Assik iation took a group of Freshmen out 

to Lake Wyloa, Shutesbiiry , for Fresh 
man Camp. A good lively game of foot 
ball helped every one to get acquainted 
and to forget all campus cares. Supper 
was served cafeteria style, and as the 
heavy exercise in the open air had aroused 

heart \ appetrties, all ate beartilv , 
After supper tin- fellows got together 

in the living room of the cottage to sin^ 
and to discuss, undei the able leadership 
of "Mill" Kitchen of the Field Council 
of the Y.M.C..V, the personal problems 
which arise under the Stimulation of the 

college envi ronm ent. Every one announ- 
ced his name, his lioiiu- town, and his 
main interests in life. The discussion 
which followed was helpful to those who 
did not yet know what their ambitions 
were. The rest of the evening was spent 
in games and conversation. 

On Sunday morning, after some group 
singing, "Hill" Kitchen again led a dis- 
cussion, which dealt with social problems 
with which the students had come in 
contact. Among the questions which 
were brought up was World I'e.ne, I n 
employment, im leasing materialism, and 
soi ial problems peculiar to the college 
campus. Following this everyone joined 
in a .strenuous game of football) and then 
gathered again to discuss what students 
■ an do about such problems. Asa result 
(Continued on Page 3) 



State Gridsters Sweep 

Norwich to 33-6 Defeat, 

Fourth Victory 



INNOVATIONS IN 
GRADUATE SCHOOL 

Credits for Master's Oegree Cut to 

.SO; New Major in llort. Man. 

Recommended 



Massachusetts State College Graduate 
School his lowered its requirements 
credits lor the master degree to tiitv 

points. This new move makes the State 
College graduate system common with 
lliat in use in other laud giant colleges. 
Pressure was brought which forced t he 
change because such a large percentage 
of tin- advance students are graduates ol 
other state colleges and universities. 

With the new svstem effective immedi- 
ately, the master degree may now be 

obtained with one year of study. Form- 
erly, seventy-five credits were required 
and one and a hall vcars of study. 

Another motion which was passed at 
the meeting of the graduate stall was 

that a recommendation be sent to tin- 
trustees asking that a major in llorti 
(Continued on Pitfte J) 

CROSS COUNTRY TEAM 
GOES TO ANNUAL MEET 

Harriers Travel to Harvard to Take 
I'art in Open lntcrcollej»iales 
of Small Colleges 



INDEX MUTING 

There will be a meeting of the ]9'.i'A 
Index board in the Index Office, 
Memorial Hall, Thursday evening at 
7.1") p. m. 



With intentions ol showing the same 

etiii tive teamwork which featured theii 

first two encounters this season, Cosch 
Derby's harriers are slated to appear at 
Harvard I'niversity next Friday at I pin 
to take part in the annual Opes Inter 
Collegiate Meet. Reports indicate that 
the team is in line shape, and much is 
expected of Dave Caird in particular, 
(aird, a Sophomore ground gainer of no 
mean ability, met with hard link on | 
very poorly marked unirse at Wesleyan 
last week, and is in hopes of making up 
for this disappointment in the coming 

affair. 

The race, covering a course of 4 J miles 
on the shores of the picturesque Charles 
River in sight of the magnificent Harvard 
Stadium, will include ten or more con 
tingents from New England Colleges. 

Although the largest number of men on 
a team in a regular dual meet is seven, 
this event has been instituted for the 
express purpose of allowing each college 
to enter a complete squad, thereby giving 
the reserves a chance in real c omp etition. 
The college entering the largest group of 
runners is awarded a plaque, suitably 
(Continued on Page 4) 

K.O. Club Plans for 

Large Reorganization 

Outside Speakers to Address the 
Members on Pertinent Ouestions 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 



"The happiness of the times was extraordinary 
when it uai In-.tful to think what you wished and 
say what you thought." — Tacitus 



L 



Wednesday, October 21 

7.00 p. m. Debating Club Meeting, 

Memorial Hall. 
7.30 p. m. Ffcmsld Club. Fernald Hall. 
8.00 p. m. Orj.heus Club. Memorial Hall. 
8.00p.m. Orchestra .Meeting, Stockbridge 
Hall. 
Thursday, October 22 

I2..10 p. m. Stockbridge Assembly. 

6.00 p. m. K.O. Club Meeting, Stockbridge 

Hall. 
7 HO p, in. I-andscape Club Meeting. 
7.1.") p. m. Index Meeting, Index Ofli e. 
Friday. October 23 
Vanity ' rots Country, Harvard Intcr- 
ooUesiatet, ( ambridfe. 
Saturday, October 24 

Varsity Football, Worcester Tech at 
Worcester. 
Sunday, October 25 

nsn) p. m. out.. e. Ck'b Hike to Mt. Tobey. 
Monday, October 26 
s.iki p. m. CoiUtUn Cabs, Colletiaa Ottce, 
Memorial Hall. 
Tuesday, October 27 

8.00 p. m. Cboraa R- hearsat, Memorial 
Hall. 



4-H club activities on the campus will 
begin tomorrow night when the Karry-On 
club will hold its reorganization meeting 

in Room 114 of Stockbridge Hall at 

• i p. m. At least 7") new members are 
ex|>ected to attend, from present indi- 
cations. 

Mr. Willard II. MtlttSOn, director of 

the Extension Service at the State 

College, will address the group on the 

"Role of the Extension Service in 4-11 

Club Work." Willard Pattern, county 
club agent of Hampden County will also 
speak. A sup|>er is to be served for 26) . 
during the course of the meeting. 

The meeting will be led by President 

Cost. is L. Csragianis "-'>'-i. The other 

officers "f the club are: Catherine Ellis 
M. | i. e president; Men Cummings ':;:;. 

treasurer; Kuth Gardner '34, secretary; 
and Virginia Reed S.S.A/33, historian. 



Aerial Attack Proves 

Too Much for Cadets 
Iiusii Again stars. Totalling 

27 Points 
Sweeping aside a stubborn defensive 

line with one aim. and smashing low the 

plunging backs with the other, the me- 

Chanical Massachusetts Slate College 
gridiron robot ran slipshod ovei the 

Cadets ol Norwich on their home held 
last Saturday, the seme at the end ol the 

game standing at .'{,'i tl. OftCC moie the 
State College team attributes much of 
its scoring power to its left halfback, 
the diminutive "l.oti" Hush, who whirled 
down the field four times loi as nianv 
touchdowns as well as kicking time 
(Continued on Page J) 

Many Candidates Out 

For Collegian Board 

Five Sophomores and 21 Freshmen 
Report at First Meeting 

live Sophomores and seventeen Fresh- 
men entered the competition lor election 

to the CoUegian Hoard at the first masting 

held in the Senate Koom, Monday night. 
This vc.n's group is the largest number 
to report for a long period of vcars. 

The competition will extend through 
the entire I. ill term, with weeklv meetings 
1 1 ir ci it i< ism ami discussion I .lei t ions to 
the Hoard will Im- held during the second 

week ol January, 
The candidates from the Sophomore 

class are: Ruth Campbell, Catherine 

Ellis, Helen Meiitt, Uavinond Royal, and 
Nancy Russell. The Freshmen t lass has 
the following r epresen tatives: Mary I.. 

Allen, Isaat Aienlieig, llaiold BnCOtt, 

t.unn. ii Brune, John Colinaii, Alfred I . 

Cox, lid, Daniel lohv. Robert Koch, 
(Continued on Page .(> 

BUSH CONTINUES AS 
EASTERN SCORE KING 

By Scoring 27 Points Against Norwich 

Hush Has Increased His Lead 

to H Points 

Having continued his brilliant seasonal 

football career Mrrthfoui more touchdowns 

and three |toints after SCOffS Ifl the game 

with Norwich last Saturday, Lotus Hush 

lias not only kept his place as king of 
I. astern football Miners but has run up 
a sufficient number of points to warrant 
his stay for some time at the top of the 
list. With nine touchdowns and five extra 
points to his credit, Hush heads the 
rating with X.1 |>oints, while Moran of 
Syracuse is second with a total of 90, 
giving Hush a margin of li.'l. Ossie Holm- 
berg, another Maroon and White half- 
back, who has given beautiful exhibitions 
of forward passing and dependable rush- 
ing, is li-ted as 1 Ht h highest, having 



earned 36 points. 


He 


is 


tiei 


wi 


til 


our 


Others. The ret ords: 












Flayer and College 


pos. 


c- 


It. 


pat. 


'&• 


a. 


Hush, Mam. State 


hi. 


4 


l.'i 


.". 


K\ 


Mor;m. Syr.u WC 


hi. 


4 


10 








ao 


QauMiWi KiitK<-M 


hi) 


4 


!l 


I 







Hewitt. ( oliimtjia 


St 


4 


<» 


1 


o 




1' i.lnl, Syi.ic MC 


II, 


4 


a 





o 


■IX 


Pernio, < orwll 


1!) 


4 


a 








4X 


Grownnan. NY 1 ' 


hh 


t 


7 


1 





41 


Montgomery, < olumla. 


oh 


1 


7 


1 





■1.1 


Ml ' ill. Dartmouth 


hi) 


4 


7 


1 


() 


42 


havy, .Ww Kiv.r 


III) 


4 


7 


I 


o 


42 


Slultoii. O.ivi, ft Klkin- 


hb 


a 


7 


a 





42 


<.;iil>a< k. All'-Khany 


ft) 


4 


7 





o 


42 


J. Murphy. Pofdiuun 


hl> 


4 


a 


.-. 





41 


Morton. Dm mouth 


afa 


4 


.-. 


10 





III 


1 SlmiT . Dti-xil 


fh 


4 


») 


2 





:tx 


l.virhart , New Kiv< - r 


hh 


1 


A 





o 


aa 


llarlin. Loyola (Md.) 


hh 


1 


fi 





o 


:«t 


IIoIiiiIhtk, Man. Ntat<- 


hli 


4 


a 










J Dt Maik. N V I 


hi. 


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6 


a 


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Whelan, < at hold 


hh 


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(» 




Hinkle, Buaknetl 


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4 


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1 


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Berger, Allegheny 


hl> 


4 


I 


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:ti 


s.iv.nd. Lowell Textile 


hh 


1 


a 


1 


o 


II 


VV Heller, Pitt 


hh 


1 


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o 


30 


Bahr, La Sail.- 


hl> 


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o 


:io 


M< ' i.k ken, W. Libert) 


hh 


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o 


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Battle, Manhattan 


fh 


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o 


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Reider, Pitt 


hh 


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Howie, Williams 


ah 


4 


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lliion.tnno. Hiown 


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Stecker, Army 


hh 


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Alio. St 1. 


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White. Harvard 


tl) 


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o 


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lh 


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Tuttle. William 


hh 


4 


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20 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 21, 1931 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 21, 1«M1 



Qbc flfcassacbusetts Collegian 



Official newspaper of 



tin- Mass.it Imsctts State College. 

Wednesday by the students. 



Published every 



Wallace W. Stuart "32 

Mut i tilling Editor 



HOARD OF EDITORS 

Fkank L. Springer '32 
l.tiiltir-in-Chitf 

OKU Margolin "32 Kiai. S. I'oiikk. Jr. '32 

A i untitle Editors 



Alumni and Faculty 

Marjorib I. French '34 
Athletics 
William M. V\i ak "32 
Eugene Guralnick 33 



DEPARTMENT EDITORS 

Rdltorlal 

Frank L. Springer .32 

Campus 

KiiMii.Ni> Nash '33 

Alfreda L. Ordwav '33 

W. Raymond Ward '33 

Harsiette M. Jackson '34 

Joseph Politella '34 



Feature 
Oscar Margolin 



'32 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT 

Eric H. Wbtterlow Jr. '32 

Business Manager 

Kenneth E Hodge '32 William A. Johnson '32 

Advertising Manager Circulation Manager 

Business Assistants 

Ashley B. Gurney '33 Philip H. Liverault '33 



Subscriptions 4r2.00 per year. Single copies 10 cents. 



Make all orders payable to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In case of change of address, subscriber will please notify the business manager 
at soon as possible. 

Alumni and undergraduate contributions are sincerely encoutaged. Any com 
munications or notices must be received by the editor-in-chief on or before Monda> 
evening. 



Entered a* second-class matter at the AariMCsl Post Oilier. Accepted for mailing at special rate of 
post age provided foi in Section 1103, Act of Octol>er, 1917, autl-ori/ed Auunst 20, 191K. 



FACULTY OPINION ON MILITARY TRAINING 
\W believe thai the caption heading the article in last week's Cotkgian create*, an 

erroneous impression in the minds of readers who glance only at the headline ami do 
not read the both of the article. We hope to correct this impression by recapitulat- 
ing; some ol the I. it Is presented in the statement of the results of circulating cpicstioii- 

nairea among the members of the faculty. 

First, there were 102 replies' gathered from the H"> members ol the resident 
fatuity. Second, 17 members of the faculty preferred the present two year require- 
ment. Third, M members favored entirely elective course* in military traiiiiiiR and 
fourth, 21 desired modification of the present system, is favoring a one year course 
with an option between military training and physical education during the second 

year, and three favored S required COUfSC in military training for one year only. 
Draw your own conclusions. 

The group thai desires niotlilitat ion ol the present sxstein is the key group. In- 
clude this group with those who advocate a continuance t>i the present system and 
the faculty K'*' s on record as in favor of compulsory military. If, however, those 
desiring modification are ilnssrd with those favoring placing military training upon 
an elective basis, ihe faculty could just as well go on record as being opposed to 
compulsory military training. 

S«>, before coming to a conclusion with reference to the statu I taken by the (acuity 
with reference to military training ai the college!, one mu -i consider the group advo 
eating modification <>t the present system. 

AUTUMN AND MOUNTAIN DAY 

We seniors look back to the Octobers of <»ur freshman anil sophomore sears and 

think ol the Mountain Days which every member of the college enjoyed in appreci- 
ating the natural beauties ol nature as viewed both at a distance and also close at 
hand from the slopes ami summit of Mount Tobey. 

We lt«ik bach U) last fall and this fall and have a feeling that something has been 
lacking. Theoretically, we have had Mountain Day. but practically we have not. 
It has not been the Mountain Dav of the years previous. A half -do/en Students 

climbing Mt. Tobey on October 1:2th. a holiday, certain!) does not remind one of a 
real, honest-to-goodnesj Mountain Day. 

The whole college lose-, something when Mountain Da) is "pul on the melf." 
We gain a day ot classes but we los.- s vivid appreciation of natural beauty. Is it 

Worth it? We do not think so. 

M on main I >a\. sail was two ami three years ago, is a tradition which the studenl 
bod) al Masaachusetts State does not wish to have deleted and we hope that the 

two lower tlasses will have a chance to know Mountain Day ai the junior* and seniors 
know ii a day when everyone (limbs Mount Tobey and enjoys it a day during the 
week, not a holiday; an unannounced suspension of classes until the very morning 
ol Mountain Day; a day <>i informality, gel to-gether, and good fellowship, a day 
to see Nature iii it-, mod beautiful array. 

COLLEGE SONGS 

The College song has an enviable place aj a cohesive and beneficial tone. It i* 
revered as a tradition and welcomed a.-, a diversion. Massachusetts State songs are 
real and close tt you, the undergraduate of this campus and you can derive a great 

deal ol pleasure from singing and playing them. 

College song books are available on the campus at a ver) nominal cost, and they 

contain a ut>od collection ol the SOOgS of this college published for the tt-e of the 

■tudents. A song sever did anybody any harm, and it has eves been said t<> be 

benetiti.il. Get a SOng book and trv the SOngS. You will find your favorites printed 
there, some that Mill had forgotten will come bat k as you try them over again. 

When the name of the college was changed this last year, it m i essitated a change 
in the wording of some of the verses. This has been done in the new son- look. 

New songs also add t" the value ol tins publication. 

The student body has been asking for a song book, now it is lure on the campus 
at a timely moment. There is no time like the present to usi and appreciate this 
book ot the jongs of our Alma Mater. 



Sljr pranwn 

Of course the Editor, beini the Editor, 

is entitled to more privileges than the 
rest of ua; but still a man in his important 
position ought to have a tpotlesa reputa- 
tion. I always suspected that he was i 
ill Club sympathiser at heart, and I 
knew that he bad raised guinea pig-> in 
his youth, but these things fade into 

innoccuous insignificance, become poor 

paltry piffling |>e< < adilloes compared with 
the frightful secret that I am about to 
reveal. Here, then, is the naked, palpi- 
luting truth. 

The Maharajah was ret lining in a dig- 
nified position on his right foot. He was 
hard at work censoring the Picaroon's 

column (even an editor has to do some- 
thing once in a while, just to relieve the 
monotony of thinking), when in walked 

a person, salaamed thrice and handed the 

Maharajah a box 00 a silver salver. The 
Maharajah thanked him and handed him 
a box on the ear in return. The person 
salaamed once more and retired, taking 
with him, by way of remembrance a 
generous handful of the Maharajah's hair 
and a small but still quivering morsel of 
the Maharajah's left ear. In the silent e 
of his sanctum, the Maharajah opened 
the box. In it was a note, and an ancient 

corn cob rich with the fragrance of the 
barnyard. The note read: 

Dear Mr. Editor: 

Mebbe tbis'll help pay for my last 
veers suscripshun to yer paper, i got 
a |R-k taters yer COOd of bed but 

the ole cow et em all, too bad. 

Yours sinseerly, 

A. Nawn 

From the hollowed com cob, the 
Maharajah with trembling fingers drew 
forth a folded card on which the inscrip- 
tion was engraved in letters of blood. 
"C.racious!" shrieked the Maharajah, 
"my past has risen up to confront me! ' 
He turned away, his suit grey with 
horror, and tossed the following Stansai 
i.ito the waste basket in the bottom of 

which the Picaroon was taking his after- 
noon nap: 

Hurray! Hurray! I'or Hani Warmin' Day! 
Annual shindig for the hicks they say, 
Roll in your pumpkins and pitch in yer hay 

Comb out the hayseed, an' hie this way! 
liring ver gal, Now don't forgit Vr! 
She might be Oueen, ye gol' dumed critter; 

Tell 'cr she's pretty 'n sit down beside 'er; 
Swig to 'er health with teal apple cider! 
October sixteenth is the date all right, 
The hour is a quarter to eight that night. 
The musk 'n dam in' 'II sure be fine, 
'N listen, hicks, try I ein' on time! 

Ag. Club 
Annual Ikirnvvarmin' Committee 

On reading this document, the Picaroon 

climbed out of the waste basket, salaamed 

thrice and threatened to publish every- 
thing unless be received considerable 
hush-money. "Then he departed with the 
hearty assistance of the Maharajah who 

left a sincere and abiding impression on 

the Picaroon's posterior by means of a 
well-placed number nine shoe in which 
the foot bad been allowed to remain. 




Marion Hunter ".12, president of the 
Home Economics Club, introduced Miss 
Mildred Hriggs, faculty advisor, to the 

members at a meeting held Wednesday, 

Oct. 14, in the I lomestead. Miss Skinner 
and Miss Knowlton were guests of honor, 
and all the Freshmen Home Eco nom i c s 
majors were invited. 

Each of the three Upper (lasses put 
on a stunt for the entertainment, of which 
Laura Cootey "^2 had charge. Repre- 
senting the Sophomores, Alberta Skipton, 
Mary Tomlinson, and (Catherine Ellis 
sang a song entitled "The Mushroom." 
A short skit, "The Identical Words, ' was 
put on by Edith Smith, Sarah I'caslee, 
and Elisabeth Wheeler, all of the Sopho- 
more (lass. A Soagalogue, led by Doris 
Benjamin, was given by the juniors. 
Mildred Twiss of the Senior class gave 
the "Address to the Ladies of the Bean 
Valley Literary Class." 

Refreshments consisting of apples, 

cider, and doughnuts, were served aftcjr 
the entertainment. 



About L'."> girls attended the informal 
get-together in the "Y" room at the 
Abbey Friday evening, Oct. 16. A num- 
ber of stunts were put on. A debate, 
Resolved: that there is a Santa Claus, 

was held. The affirmative side included 

Sarah IVaslee "34, Marion Harris '35, 
and Alma Merry '.'{">, with Mildred Twiss 
'.'52 as rebuttal sp ea ker. The negative 
side was represented by Josephine Fisher 
'84, Virginia Robbins ':>.">, and Fma 

Flack '36. The affirmative side was de- 
clared the winner and was awarded a box 
of animal crackers. The rest of the 
evening was spent in playing cards and 
games. Wynne Caird "A2 and Mildred 
Twiss "A2 were in charge of the affair. 



All but about twenty of the 200 mem- 
bers of W.S.C..A. passed the examination 
given Thursday on rules and regulations 
from the handbook. A mark of S."> was 
required to pass the examination. 



Lambda Delta Mu held a most enjoy- 
able meeting Oct. HI when Mrs. Frank 
Rand talked of Fngland and the poet 
William Henley. Nearly every member 
was pr esen t Plans were made for the 
(Continued on Page i) 



ALUMNI NOTES 



Dear Mr. Picaroon: 

If all the people that read your column 
were laid end to end. it would serve them 
right. 

W.C..D. '"I 



EDITORIAL BRIMS 
The) say that (lollies make the man. Evidently some 
Similarly tor we saw a pair in tin- role ot elegant mendicants 
flaunting the full regalia of their "monkey suits" a week-end 
of the Amherst-Worcester turnpike. 



I re limen hav e heard 
t he) w ere bumming 
or so ago by t he side 



I; does Stretch our imagination a bit to think of Dr. Cii.imberlin as a freshman 
at ( txford last year, but he certain!) kept its interested last Monday morning at 
Chapel, relating some ol hi- experient es at that ancient seat of learning tiering the 
pa -t school year. 



We were toll I. 

reason the trees u 

how green t hw h,t 



( on tu It tit iallv that ' 



ul 



iv were passing it on to you, 



that the 



rm 

t_n . 



t!-, 



son and scarlet these days is that the) have just realized 
summer, and cannot help but blush. 



Here's hoping you recover from that one by next week 



Yoi and I know better than to read 

such rot. don't we, W.G.D.? 

Under tilt spreading mistletoe 
Then stood a little co-ed dame; 
She stootl ,i long long time although 
Nobody came. 

Hut still she thought that someone would. 
And so she stool, and stootl, and stood! 

WW. TO 

I understand that several of the 
younger p r ofesso rs on the campus are 
heartily endorsing our Collegian. Thank 
youse, gents! 

To speak of lice 
Is not quite nice. 
Still the) ve a plat c. 
They till up space. 



Alice Johnson '29 is back at Cornel' 
doing graduate work. 

Mr. and Mrs. Laurence Jones (Mary 
Ingraham) 28 and '20, are back from 

Mexico for a short visit and attended the 

Mass. State Middlebury football game. 
They will return to Mexico where Larry 
is locat e d in business the 23rd of October. 

Roger Tourtellot '20 was on campus 
last week. He is on his way to the west 
Coast where he will act as purchasing 
agent for an eastern firm. 

Taylor Mills '20 has begun work for 
Batton, Barton, Durstone A Osborne, an 
advertising firm in New York. 

Newell Frey .'II is doing graduate work 
on campus in Chemistry and Education. 

Dr. Chauncey Y. IVrry '24. graduate 
of Harvard Medical School '28, has 

op ened an office in Greenfield. 

Anna May Renter Ml is working in the 
girls reformatory at Hudson, N. Y. 



ST0CKBRIDGE 



Class of tfU, Major (iroups 
(Continued from last week) 
Field. Gsaras A. 
liciii, Lewiesoa (». 

J-olail. John I . 
(jootlnow, Mollis B. 
Il.tniy. JOMflfe I'. 
Jurkko. Leu l > 
Kilt t>\ lie James II. 

Merrill, Hasty W. 

Rcirden. I'.iul B. 
S.ns, diaries A. E. Jr. 
Simmons. Ian W. 

stone, Harbcrt E. 
Towiif, Lelaiul S. 
Williams, Henry P. Jr. 
Wist, Rolx-it L. 
DAIRY MANUFACTURES 
Amman, Kurken G. 
Bedford, Edward T 
Bedford, Harold P. 
Benson, Ralph T. 
Bernicr. Arthur L. 
Hi inns. Robert 0. 
Brown. GsStaS A. 

Burbaak) Gtoa If. 

( ottrell. Lewit A. 
1-Ycney, Joseph M. 
< ,ates, William E. 
Hsvaelberg. Edward E. 
Hanncrty, James 11. 
Hilton. Harry E. 
Hokan.son, Harold R. 
dock, Clarence R. 

LetetUer, Walter L. 

M.udonald. John U. 
M.nston, l.awnnie W. 
Mu.ller. Gsorit T. 
NOOSS, Kenneth M. 
Steele, Arnold D. 
Yiilancn. t'nlo B. 
FLORICULTURE 

Cameron . Charles R. 
Carroll. Ethel B. 
(astro. Anthony 
Currier, Charles A. 
Davis, Cwendolyn 
|)< BBS, Baihara E. 
DSstotS, Stanley 
Koiilsham. Charles K. 
Hastings. Chilton M. 
llcl>ert. Lisle J. 
Hopkins. Alii I L, 
Hunt. Harold E. 
Jsaecr, Allied B. 
MessSssas, llimafd H. 
Kenan, Stanley K. 
I.ivenii'iie. [.eland Ii 
Loft us, James A. 
Mettill. Alevtndii.i 
Nylantl, Harry E. 
( I'Neil. James E. 
lVaison. II. Hold J. 
Reed. Virginia 

Rider, Cssol a. 

Robbins, Ronald ('•. 
Scott, 1 >.i\ id 

Small. Frank A. 
Sullivan. John J. 
Thayer. Cordon E. 
Thompson. Floyd F. 
Wakcticlil. Fester H. 
Whit inn, Norman J. 

(Continued on Page 4) 



LANDSCAPE CLUB MEETING 

All persons interested in attending an 
illustrated lecture by Professor Frank A. 

Waugh, head of the division of Horticul- 
ture at this College, are cordially invited 
by the Landscape Architecture Club. 

The hit ure will be given in the lecture 
room of Wilder Hall, Thursday evening, 
at 7.30 p. m. Professor Waugh will 
speak on "Roadside Ecology." All land- 
scape architecture majors are advised to 
attend. 



NOTICE 

A number of lost articles, ranging 
from fountain pens and text-books to 
wallets containing fair sums of money, 
are being held lor their owners at the 
lost and Found Department in the 
Treasurer's Office. Since most of the 

hut articles find their way to this de- 
partment, both freshmen and Upper- 
Classmetl are asked to make their 
claims and return., to it. 



COMMUNICATION 



To the Editor of the Collegian: 

Juggling figure, is a noble art, depend- 
ing on who juggles them. The headline 
last week "Conipalsory Military Fa\ 
by the Facultv" war. worded as 
sweeping victory had been secured 
the militarists from that (|uarter. To ' 
thinking man. however, the Rgura 
hardly support that statement. It n 
be wdl to remember that the petition 
submitted last June to President Thatcher 
did not request abolishment of milit.irv 
training but rather a change that ul i 
required to an elective basis, and y 
of the ltvj answers to the facultv i 
tionnaire expres ft! a desire for some kind 
of chanje. Is that a majority foi 
present system of compulsory mil i tan 
training for two college years? I hardly 

consider it as such. Further, if a- 

as 55 exp r es se d the wish for modification 

of the present svsU-m does it not 

I ..r to say there is decided room !" r 

farther enlightened discussion? It 
be well to ask how many member- 
faculty are aware of the vvidc- 
oppoution to the system of comp 
military education from diversified so 
in our country today? It would be 
nearer fact to say that the opinioi «• 

pressed by the returns from the qi 
naire is nearly divided with the 1 
tipping on the side of change in ! 

present svstem. 

C.if. T«> a 



SOPHOMORE CLASS OFFICERS 

President — Ldmund L. Clow 
Vice- President — Carlton MacMa 
Treasurer — Alvin S. Ryan 
Secretary Harriette M Jacks' < 
Captain Alexander A. Lucey 
Sergeant-at-Arms Wallace E. 

Thompson 
Historian Ruth 1). Campbell 



Have Your Winter Clothes Cleansed. Repaired and Mended Now! 

27 YEARS OF EXPERIENCE GUARANTEES YOU SATISFACTORY WORK! 

L A N D I S 

TEL. 1 1 1 - w For Free Motor Delivery T K I, . S 1 1 - w 



FRESHMAN CAMP 
(Continued from Page 1) 

, program was suggested tor the 

i i hi Association, and it was decided 
the future much more work should 
among the Freshmen. The great 
i| the Freshman Camp in pro- 
moting brotherhood and active fellow- 
gave rise to the suggestion that 
camps be held at regular intervals 
.ut the year. This success was 

ugety to the efficient leadership of 

Mr. Kitchen and Mr. J. Paul Williams, 

l„ bill" I lager '.'{.'* for generously otfer- 

Ltse of the cottages, and to Leslie 

Kim ! '35 for furnishing much very 

ni food. 



VARSITY SOCCER 

(Continued from Page 1) 

could not hold this status for a very long 

Ihe State eleven passed into the 

Amherst territory, and by drawing out 

• k- and the goalie, stored the first 

l»)int. The play now shifted back and 

forth lather evenly, until the Amherst 

i awarded a free kick in t lie 

team's territory. The kick was 

I carried through successfully, and the 

as tied. 

From the beginning of the third 

ter, the Amherst team was easily 

iyed by Coach Larry Rrigg's bovs. 

the play was carried on almost 

I entirely in front of the Amherst goal, the 

point being scored after clever pass 

■ ;> the field. 

The line-up: 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 

(Continued from Page 1) 

cultural Manufactures be astablisbed, 

Ihe following subjects were .mggeMcd as 

suitable minor credits toward advance 
tlegrees: English, Geology, Economics, 

Modern Languages, and Floricult ure. A 

year of residence and full time work is 
also required. 

This year's enrollment showed an in- 
crease of over seventy percent from that 
t>t any past year. The School now has 
over one hundred and eight members. 

At future meetings the stall will under- 
take definite problems for consideration. 
One of these questions concerns thesis 
requirements in subjects other than the 
physical and biological sciences. Another 
concerns the length of time allowed for 
completion of thesis. Other subjects lor 
discussion are what constitutes residence, 
and the publicat ion of the thesis lor the 
doctor's degree. 



VI S.C. 

Waakiewii z. irf 
r< I •>. ilf 

ski, iirl 
mie, nil 
i lil> 
ihli 
mt. Hitchcock. llil> 
hi, 

- lib 



Amherst 

K. Fort 

W, Davidson 

ill, Stewart 

cf. Ward 

orf. Snow 

oli. Smith 

( lil>. Morton 

rhb. Campbell 

Hil>. (lark 

lib. Greenough 

r(l>, Baldwin 



I V u haw tried the rest? 

Now try the BEST 
And that's the 

AMHERST SHOE REPAIRING CO. 

' lyear Welt System Employed" 



WILL PLAY W.P.I. 
(Continued from Page 1) 

ihe running backfield men of the Engin- 
eers appeared to be weighted down by 
some unknown encumbrance, the nature 
of which one could not ascertain with 
much correctness from the sidelines. 

In Tinker, the Worcester aggregate has 
a triple threat man who is skilled in 
parsing, running, and kicking. Putnam, 
the W.P.I, quarter will find his match in 
the crafty "Freddie" Welch, State's field 
leader, while Asp, the 300-pound fullback 
W'll hit a stone wall when he bucks the 

Massachusetts line. The probable line- 
up for the State College will have llolm- 
berg, Hush, Wood, and Welch in the 
backfield positions, while the line will 
consist ol Foskctt and Uurrington at 
tackle. Mountain and Smith or Ryan at 
the cutis, Shalfner and Sibson at guard, 
and Learv at center. 



S. S. HYDE 
Optician and Jeweler 

Oculists' Prescriptions Filled. Broken lenses 

accurately replaced 

BIG BEN ALARM CLOCKS and other 

reliable makes 
3 PLEASANT STKEET. (up one flight) 



DRY CLEANING NEWS 

Although we charge only $1. to clean and press your suit, we have a special offer. 
My using our coupon book you can still save 25c more per suit. 
For particulars — inquire at our ofice or our drirer. 

Phone 635 SWISS CLEANSERS & DYERS Phone 635 

Over First National Store 



MODERN LIBRARY 
95c 

Nearly 200 titles 

MODERN LIBRARY GIANTS 
$1.00 

Tolstoy's War and Peace Hoswell's Life of Johnson 

Hugo's Lea Miserable* 



UMES A. LOWELL, 



BOOKSELLER 



Now Showing . . 



A particularly fine lot of 

LIGHT WEIGHT SLIP ON SWEATERS 

I 'r iced fiom 

$2.50 to $4.50 

GOLF HOSE 

$1.00 to $2.50 
F. M. THOMPSON & SON 



STATE (.KIDS I KRS SWEEP 

(Continued from Page 1) 
points alter touchdown. Norwich fouinl 
Us m tiring P OW er in Holmes tluvr triple 
threat man who in.ule the opponents 
sillsh' tally. The Cadet's tlelense was 

centered mostly in their Gibraltar-like 

(enter ami in their two speedy ends, anil 

the backield p ro ved very weak having 

Chosen to play the waiting method of 
attack. 

The first quarter began as a punting 

duel with Holmes of the losers hav inn 

the edge These tactics did not last long, 

however, for Mush, slipping oil tackle 

behind ni^ed i nte r fer ence, dashed down 

the field lor 72 yards of head lone; Bight 
making State's first touchdown. Within 
a lew minutes, the Stands again rose to 

their led as Holmberg ran through tackle 

for the second talk a L'.". yard jaunt of 

continuous side-stepping. The r em ainder 

of the quarter was spent in unfruitful 

attempts on the part of both teams to 

score, the ^'mmn of our hacks licin^ 

Completely neutralized l>y the low. twist 

Ing punts ot the Norwich left halfback. 

In the following iK'riod, both teams 
Scored a touchdown. The State College 
tallied first when "Ossie" Holmberg. 

after beating back the attack of the in- 
coming ta c kles , hurled the pigskin for 
25 yards straight to the wail inn arms of 
"Lou" Bush who was Standing on his 

o ppon ent s' goaltline. The latter kicked 

the eatrs point. With but a lew minutes 
ol play left in the same quarter, tin 

Cadets took advantage of a golden op|x>r 

tunitv when they recovered a fumble on 

our 20-yard line. A forward pass netted 

our adversaries ten yards and a fust 
down, and then the line strengthened to 
hold the home team for three downs with 

no perceptible k<<ii»- () " the fourth down, 

the Horsemen opened up with a pas> 
over the goal line which Holmes leaped 

high to catch, thus scoring the only 

touchdown for his team The score loi 

the hall was l'.t 6. 

Hardly had the third quarter begun, 

win n the State College opened up on its 

opponents with a smoot h-workin^ aerial 
attack, with "Ossie" and "Louie" doing 
the passing. Down the held towards the 

Norwich goal slowly moved the line <<i 
scrimmage. Then without a moment's 

waning, Hush took a pass from Holmberg 
vnder his arm and streaked for the Nor 
with line some l."> yards away, the result 
bsang another tally for the State College. 
Throughout the rest of the period, the 
playing of both of the teams was fairly 
even; one outstanding feature, however, 
was the brilliant playing on the part of 
Murray Hicks, State's defensive fullback. 
The fourth period saw another and final 
tally added to the sum total points 
aasessed by the State aggregate. To- 
wards the middle of the contest, Holmberg 

threw another pass to the elusive Mush, 
who immediately scrambled the remain 
iiiK 46 yards for a touchdown the third 

during the game he tallied on passes 
from lloliiibcrn. The contest closed with 



COLLEGE 

(Continued ft 
Ai im\ 

Dan mouth 
I afayette 
Rutgers 

\ ill. nun a 

Y.llr 

Carnegie Tech 

Nav \ 

HOI) ('loss 

t leorgetown 

Huston College 

West Virginia 

Wesle) .in 

Duquesne 

\\<si, in Maryland 

I'lill, rtoo 

Amherst 

1 ehlgh 

IVmi sea,- 

Bates 

New Hampshire 

Springfield 

Conn, Anni.s 

Tufts 

Lowell Textile 

Provident e 

Arnold 

Trinity 

Win, estei I'olv 

KImhIc island 

Middleburj 

Vermont 

Maine 

Colby 

Norwich 

Bowel,, in 

BostOII I llivi'lsily 



SIX I'll 



Kill 



I 



I 

I 
1 

1 
1 
I 
I 

II 
II 
II 



Puge 1) 

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o 

(I 

o 

(i 

u 

u 

it 

I 

l 

it 



(I 

1 

o 

o 

n 

| 

n 



u 



l 

ii 





I 

II 

(I 

u 

ii 

o 

ii 

o 

II 





i tu i 
137 

i»d 
7d 
.vr 
...t 



71 

so 

I.-. 
Ill 
la 

2"> 
7s 
:u 
25 
:(•-• 

2."> 

;t<i 
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L'O 

33 

aa 

38 

•_v. 

21 > 

L'.'« 

X 

:ti 
27 
2 '1 

Ti* 
i a 

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o 



Ili 

sa 

an 

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II) 

is 

L'li 
41 
:w 
i;u 
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S3 
:is 
08 
in 
ill 
:).". 

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L'li 
I I 
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:t:> 
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2s 

II I 
71 
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Ill 
in 



GO-ED NOTES 

Ciintliiuttl from I'uge Jl 
nc\t meeting Which is tO he a Hallowe'en 
I""'* held at the i Mining plant of Mi 
Charles \V. Miller. 



the second string of both the clubs fight- 
ing for final honors. The sunim.irv: 
Mass State 
Mountain, If 
Poskett, Clow, It 
sintint-r, ( iiiiiiiiings, Ik 
1 eary, Bourgers, c 
Sibson, Simpson, r« 
si. \ .is, Burriagton, it 
Smith, Ryan, re 
Welch, l-ojko. i|l> 
Bush, Sylvester, 1 1, 1 > 
Holmberg, White, rlil> 



Norwich 

re, Ralston, Mersheimer 

ii. i onsoletl . Woodard 

rg, Lemalre, Smith 

< . I'.iiins. Boynton 

Ik. HiintiiiK. Richardson 

It. Martin. Ward 

If, Caswell, Williams 

t|l>. O'Brien, (ianisliv 

rhl>, Barnes, Deve< . bio 

Mile Holmes 

H>. Weiss 



Wood, Frigard, 1 1 • 

S on- Mass. Si. ili- .ft, Norwich ii. 

Touchdowns Bush I. Holmberg, Holmes 
I onus .,it. t touchdowns Hush :t. Referee 
< 1- Graham, Springfield. Umpire ii \ 
Prentice, Vermont, linesman I- Laird, D.nt 
mouth, linn- 18 minute period 



PATRONIZE 



The College Barber Shop 

"M''' BUILDING 



Alioiii twent) Home Economics majors 
visited Storrowton at the Eastern States 
Exposition Grounds In West Springfield 
last Saturday. 

Storrowton is a Nee lai^lantl colonial 
Village, one of the tetv pJaOM ill New 

England where an cut ire cat Iv Ameiican 

community may be visited. The build 

ingS have been I r.ius|Mirtfd limn valioiis 
plates in New I' upland and re erected for 

the purpose ol perpetuating for all time 
the lust <>i earl) New England architec 
mie. The village includes ■ church, 

mansion, I. us set's ollu c, red bin k st hool 

house, stone blacksmith, shop, farmhouse, 
tavern and store, (ape Cod cottage, 

town hall, and ham. 

Ihe sin i ounding grounds are landa aped 
attractively, with broad gravel walks and 
old fa s hi oned gardens. The buildings face 
a typical Mem or common, with the 
■ hutch dominating the group from its sit.- 

on a rising knoll 

To enhance tin al t i.n t is em-a ol I he 

Colonial Village each building is furnished 
in the period i<> s hich il belongs and is m 

Charge ol .1 hostess who graciously wcl 
(tunes the v psitOTS. 

A most enjoyahle as well as inslrutlive 

afternoon was spent by the visitora. 
COLLEGIAN HOARD 

(Continued from Puge 1) 

Silas Little, Jr., Howard Mlchelson, 
Daniel Orenberg, Henry Riseman, David 

Rogers, Marion Smith, S. id Snoss, 

Emanuel Todu, and Myei Weiaer. 



M. S.C. 



SANG LUNG hand laundry 

No. 1 Main St. Amherst, Maas. 

KKPAIKINC; AND AIL KINDS Or 
WASHING IK>NE AT KKASONAHI K 

I sK K.rS. 

Our Laundry First Class 

Our Policy Guaranteed 
NKXT TO TIIK TOWN HALL 



TYPEWRITERS 

for Sale and Rent 

at k' *r a a \* 
H. E. DAVID 



AMHERST 
THEATRE 1 



.« Shows Daily, 2..10; <,.<(); K.tO p.m. 

I- veiling* 40c 



Prices 



Matinees Ul. 



College Drugstore 

W. II. McCRATH, Keg. Pharm. 



AMHERST, 



MASS. 



V I S I T 

BARSELOTTI'S 

All the requirements for the smoker - I'ipes, 
Pouches, Smokers Combination 

Ice Cream, Candy, Sandwiches 



This Week at "BUCK'S" 

TOASTED ICE CREAM 
SANDWICHES 



HALLOWE'EN 

Invitations, Tallies 
and 
Place Cards 
». - _i 

Miss Cutler's Gift Shop 



Wad n — day. October 21 

ADOLPHI mkmiii 

LEILA IIVAMs 
NOKMAN POSTER 

in "MEN CALL IT I.OVK" 



Thursday. October 22 

I Al. I. II. All HANKHKAD in 

"MY SIN" 

with Frederic March 



Friday, October l.i 



WINNIE LICHTNM In 
"SIDE SHOW" 

wllh CSaWSM liulierHorlh 



Saturday, October 21 



DOUBLI MM l KI-. I'RuilRAM 
III SIKH MA ION In 

•'SIDhWAI.kS OP NEW YORK" 

with Anil a PUgS und Cliff Kd wards 

also 

Warner Hailer and Dorothy McKaill 

in "Til KIR MAI> MOM FAT" 



Mi. ml. n , (», ioImt IS 

££? " r \ H .' k . , Ka > Wrsnssi 

Miriam Hopkins Keills Ts«MMy 

in "24 HOURS*' 



Tuesd ay, October Jfc 

t.li.nlo "tlhii " Sales in 

"THE STAR WITNESS" 

With Waller Huston ami | ranees Star 






State Men, 

Celebrate your ueekh 

football victory 

at 

Sarris Bros. Candy Kitchen Restaurant Inc. 



GOOD 

They've got to be good Switzer's and Chesterfield have one thing in common Taste 

Good taste in choosing your, clothes is a simple matter at Switzer's 

E. M. SWITZER, JR., Inc. 






U. A. C. Library. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 21, 1931 



BTOCKBRIDGI 

(Continued from Pafte 2) 

Wis,-, Haloid II. 
Woc.cl.ircl, GMfSC N. 
Wiiuht, Donald C. 
IKtKTK ULTURE 

h.mIw.ii. Guctn. r. 

Bowrtiir Rotor! H. 

Hondo. Henry J. 

Humillt !j . James \V. 

Burridae, Georsi I 

( lOW, Kohcll 1-'. 
(rouse, John S. 

Dibble, Chart** '•• 

Dolby, Waii.n < 

Douii. Edward J ■ 
Eastman, Allien I. 
Prank, Carl A. 
Grady, flmadi J- 
< ,i.iy. Rk hard H, 
llall.mn. Aitlmr K. 

Hand, J>>in> B. 
Haves, Lauren w. 
Hill. Alfred N. 
Hill. Bernard T. 
Koistiiirn, I'.iul o. 

labtlaaa, Ahtl 

Mansfield. Richard D, 
Martin, John K 
Mclver, William H. 

Marl rr* i William j. 

MacQuade, Joseph W. 
Newton, Donald J. 
Oehmc, Cluster G. 
O'Neill, Nicholas 
Root. Bagat W. 
Schmid. Fred D. 
Schoonmalcer, Robert S. 
Shulander. Raymond F. 
Smith, John 
Spalding. GeanP H- 
Spear. Philip A. 
Steams, lVrry C. 
Stele, Charles H. 
Steria, Wilbur R. 
Sullivan, l'aul T. 
Swanson, Milton R. 
Tileston. Robert C 
Townscnd, Allan L. 
Turner. John If. 

Yanl-eciiwcn. John K. 

Wilson, RotxTt <■■ 

Woodward. Robert A. 

Wyckofl. I.dward S. 

Younu. Joseph II- 
FRUIT (.ROWING 

Urate. Altx-rt G. 

(Utter. James R. 

I)oiIk<-, Henry D, 

llemlri.kx, Charles II. 

Kantoiil. AlUrt W. Jr. 

Sherwood. Warien W. 

Silxl, John K. 

Smith. Rolxrt s. 
POULTRY 

Anderson. Rernhardt A. 

Booth, Charles I). 

Calvert. I'loyd C 

Crawshaw. Richard K. 

Cromwell, Harold F. 

1-enno, Cordon II. 

Callaidier. John V. Jr- 

Gelimaii. Raymond !•'. 

(;<.s,iniinski. Btoptoa 

Malm. 1-rank J. 
Harris, Klbett 
Murphy, U <> V. 



BURBERRY COATS 

WARMTH WITHOUT WEIGHT 

These imported Coats are different from Domestic Garments always retain their same looks, 

whether old or new. 



Consult "TOM" 



THOMAS F. WALSH 



Praetor, Tterataa A. 

Riley, Herbert B, 
Simpson. C.eorKi- 
Vcina. Manuel M. 

Waring, i<i' hard 
VEGETABLE GARDENING 

Couney, Jotepfa !•■ 

Leeaardi Bdsar D. 

Senior, Goorac C, 

Bbathao, John A. 

Wakelee, Robert C. 



The |)0!iltry (lasses of the School 
waited Connecticut Agricultural College 
at Storra, Thuraday, Oct, 16, Thirty-two 
Stockbridge School atudenta and nine 
college atudenta made the trip. 

Professor Warner of Storrs explained 

the value of the egg laying conteat and 
conducted the party over the plant. 

Following the tour of inspertion the 
students separated into two groups: one, 
conaiating of Stockbridge freshmen and 
college poultry iudghag students were 
given an opportunity to judge and 

daaaify some of the Connecticut fowl, 

and the second group, Stockbridge seniors. 

went to the Isolation Farm and were 
shown the results of Dr. I.andowcr's 
experiments in genetic factors. The 
Doctor was present and answeretl freely 
the many questions asked. 

The seniors were next entertained by 
Professor Warner who presented some 
Original ideas on Cocctdiosis baaed on his 
work of the past year at Harvard Medical 

School. 
The students were a c co mp a ni ed by 

Professors Sanctuary and Hanta, and 
Mr. Vondell, superintendent of the 

College poultry plant. 

The A.T.C. Chlb and Kolony Klttb 
pledgee are starting their initiation work 
this week. The following students have 

pledged as listed below: 

A. T. <;. Club 

John M. Turner, Sprmntield, Mass. 
John Smith. South Dartmouth 
Henry P. Williams, Jr., Detroit. Mich. 
Kenneth MacLeod, Ipswich, Mass. 
Raymond Shulander. Chicago, 111. 
Edward S. Wyckofl, Bedminiter, N. J. 
George C. Senior, Salisbury, Conn. 
Carl Frank, Falmouth, Mass. 
Lester 11. Wakefield. Lunenbura. Mass. 
George H. Lowrte, Jr.. New Bedford, Mas.. 

James A. Sullivan, lloyokr. Mass. 
Ormond K. Williams. Bridgeport, tonn. 
Kmil laeachke, Adams. Mass. 
1' ran. is A. Doland, Billenca. Mass. 

Richard Crawakaw, Medford, ,Bm 
Floyd M. Galbralth, Greenfield, Mass. 

Wilbur R. Steria. Dnvville N. Y. 
Leland B. I.ivermore. l.iiillow. Mass. 

Robert A. Woodward, Franungham, Mass. 
Bernard T. Hill. Framinaham, Mass. 
Edward Haaelberg, Fitcbburg, Maaa. 
Frederick W. Denne, Gloucester, Mass. 

Kolony Klub 

Charles It. Cameron. Boston, Mass. 
Glen M- Burbank, Warren, Mass. 
Robert C. TUe rto a. Dor cb eater. Mass. 
Lowell, Kastman. Falmouth. Mass. 
Frank Dyer. Btoatbtoa, Mass. 



George N. Woodward, Worcester, Mass. 
Harold Hokanson, Brockton, Mass. 
(, rover C. Barney. Jr.. Lunenburg, Ma- 
Leo V. Murphy. Manbfteld. Mass. 
( luster Oehme, Princeton, Mass. 
Cottrell, Lewis. Mtddletield, Mass. 



Robert C. Wakelee S*33, as a member 

of the Mattatuck Drum Corps, the oldest 

five and drum corps in the United States, 
affiliated with the Putnam Phalanx of 
Hartford, Conn., is attending the York- 
town chl, ration with his organization, 
on October 18, 19 and 20. 

Director Willard A. Muiteon, College 

1905, of the Kxtension Service, spoke on 
the work carried on by his department in 
all its various activities over the state at 
the Assembly on Tuesday. 



M. S. C. MEN'S MOTTO IS ALWAYS 

LET "DAVE" DO IT 

AMHERST CLEANSERS, DYERS 
and LAUNDERERS 

PHONE 828 



PHONE 828 



Near the Town Hall 




*•»„ 



Thomas s. guilds 

Incorporated 1 

SMART SHOES and HOSIERY for COLLEGE MEN and WO MEN j 

QUALITY MERCHANDISE PRICES TO SUIT 

275 High Street, Holyoke 



Largest Shoe Store in Western Massachusetts 



*»« 



At the Thursday Assembly, Professor 

Gunaeaa of the Agricultural Engineering 
department will present a moving picture 

film entitled "The Romance of the 
Reaper." This is the centennial year of 
the invention of the reaper and the film 
has been especially prepared to show the 
historical significance of the event. 

This film will start promptly at 12:30, 
fifteen minutes earlier than the scheduled 
Assembly period, so that students are 
urged to report promptly after the lunch 
hour instead of waiting until 12:45. 

Faculty and college students are in- 
vited to attend, if interested, and all 
..eats OBI floor are available back of row N, 
in liowker Auditorium, also all balcony 
seats. 



JOSEPH GINSBERG 

19 PLEASANT ST. 

Men's Furnishings - Shoes repaired, called for and delivered 
Freshmen, come in and see our selection of shoes, priced moderately. 
Special sale now on leather coats, just what you need for cold weather. 

CALL 984-M 



CROSS-COUNTRY TEAM 
(Continued from Pafte 1) 

inscribed, while the team actually winning 
the cross-country run is given a trophy. 
For the last two years the Springfield 
College outfit has held this tup, and, in 
the event of winning it again, the gym- 
nasts will keep it for posterity. 

The following men will accompany 
Coach Derby on Friday: Captain Mason. 

Edmund, Caird, McGncktan, Farrar, 
Snow. Houran, Alton, Cole, Jenkins, 

Schenck, Coombs, lliland, Merrill, and 
Henry. All participants in the meet will 
be given a complimentary ticket to the 
Harvard vs. Texas game at the stadium 
the following day. 



Given Away 

A pair of Bostonian $9. Oxfords 
A pair of Friendly Five $5. Oxfords 

FOR PARTICULARS, SEE OUR WINDOW 

BOLLES SHOE STORE 



KAPPA SIGMA WINNER OF 

1NTERFRATERN1TY TROPHY 



gordonI^ hosiery 

new values at $1.00 and $1.33 

JACKSON & CUTLER 

Amherst, Mass. 



WHY OVER-PAY ON YOUR DRY CLEANING? 

We will dry-clean and press your suit or topcoat for $1.00 

We call and deliver free daily 

Phone 635 SWISS CLEANSERS & DYERS Phone 635 

Over First National Store 



Final results of the Interfratemity 
Activities Program 1990-1981: 

Kappa Sigma .... 

Alpha ( '.amma Kho 

Phi Sigma Kappa 

Sigma Phi Epsilon 

Lambda Chi Alpha 

Kappa Kpsilon .... 

Alpha Sigma Phi 

y.T.v 

Delta Phi Alpha 

Theta Chi 



5<i 
"»() 
44 

:tt 

20 
20 
10 
10 

9 
f> 



LOOSE LEAF NOTEBOOKS 

Every Sixe 

10c to $5.00 

A. J. HASTINGS Nt =r AMHERST, MASS.I 



Headquarters for Riding Outfits for 
Men and Women at the COLODNY 
CLOTHING CO., :V2 Main St., (near dt 
Northampton. We carry full line of 
Riding Breeches, Riding Boots, and all 
accessories. We are exclusive agents 
for the famous Colt-Cromwell line of En- 
glish Made Riding Boots and Officers' 
Boots. We also take special orders for 

LADIES' RIDING BOOTS $10.00 up 

YOUNG MEN'S CAMPUS CORDUROY 
TROUSERS $3.75 and Up 

Come over to Hump and see 
Our Assortments! 



SHIRT VALUES 
COMPARE! 

White Broadcloth or Oxford Shirts $ 

Blue Oxford Shirts at 2.00 

Tab Collar Shirts at 2.50 

Short Point Collar Shirts at 2.50 

An opportunity worthy of your investigation 

CARL. H. BOLTER 

INCORPORATED 
shops at Yale, Harvard, Exeter, Hyannis 



THE NATIONAL SHOE REPAIRING 

21 MAIN STREET 
Between Town Hall and Masonic Building 
MESS' SHOES SOLED and HEELED $1.75 

FULL SOLES and RL'BBER HEELS 12. 

I. adits' Skoe$ SoUd and Rubber llttU J 1.40 

LADIES SHOES HEELED 40. 

All Work Guaranteed 




I.50 



PATRONIZE 
THE SANDWICH MAN 

R. L. BATES, North Amherst 



GO TO 
FISHER' S 

For the Best Values in 
Ladies' Full Fashioned Silk Hose 

"Cannonette" 
"Munsinftwear" m "Vanity Fair" 

SIRVICE WEIGHT OR CHIFFON 

at only $1.00 a pair 

/•';/// Lint of the New Fall Shades 



Everything in Hardware 
and Radio Equipment 

ATWATER - KENT 



AND 



MAJESTIC RADIO 

THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 

THE WINCHESTER STORE 



Sffo jWa*i0arfrtt0gttH fflnllrrttatt 



Vol. XLII 

FOOTBALL TEAM HELD 
TO 3-0 BY WORCESTER 



AMHERST, MASS., WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 28, 1931 



Foskett's Beautiful Place Kick Pre- 
vents Scoreless Tie 



Last Saturday, the Massachusetts State 
College eleven met its first serious opj>o- 
sition in the form of the Engineers of 
W.I'.I., who were dealt with rather 
moderately in being forced to accept a 
;; defeat on their own field. Although 
it is generally conceded that the home 
club got all the breaks, one can hardly 
overlook the probability of Worcester's 
croaaing our goal line at the end of the 
half had the play but continued for a 
fa* minutes longer. The outstanding 
pl.iyers for the State College were Frigard, 
Welch, and Leary, while Harris and 
Mai lory starred for the losers. 

The first half showed the temporary 

mastery of the Engineer's line over that 

of the State College, while the driving 

force of their plunging backs completely 

(Continued on Pafte 3) 



DR. GILKEY TO SPEAK 
THIS COMING SUNDAY 

Well Known Religious Leader to Ad- 
dress First Sunday Chapel of Year 



Dr. James G. Cilkey of the South 
( onuregational Church in Springfield, 
will address the first Sunday Chapel of 
the year at the State College on Sunday, 
November 1, in liowker Auditorium. 
Ahvaya a favorite with Massachusetts' 
itudenta, Dr. Gilkey is a man of remark- 
ably stii ussful versatility in the literary, 
axial, and educational fields. 

A graduate of Harvard University in 
1912, Rev. Gilkey received his Master of 
Art-, degree the following year, and then 
weal abroad to study at the universities 

ol Berlin and Marburg in Germany. He 
luated with a Bachelor of Divinity 
from the Union Theological 
Seminary in 1910. At the present time, 
Dr. (iilke\ is directing an elahor.ite pro 
ur.mi of institutional charity work, in 
connectiofl with his preaching. 

The speaker is a trustee of the Y.M.C.A. 
College in Springfield, and has been preai 
dent of the Springfield Symphony Or* 
i since 1924. lbs literary works 
arc |uite numerous, included in which 
arc: A Faith for the New Generation," 
reta of Effective Living," and "The 
Certainty of God." 




Football Squad to Meet Amherst Saturday 



Student Flower Show 

Comes November 7-8 

French Hall to be Scene of Brilliant 
Display of Flowers 



Elaborate plans are being made for 
the annual Fall Flower Show which is to 
bf held November 7 and S in French Hall. 
past years, there will be one central 
featute, surrounded by other displays, 
feature has not yet been decided. 
Dnphtya will be many and varied this 
year. Some, but not all, have been out- 
lined. 

I!"re will be a 19.33 class competition 
W Vaae arrangements of large flowered 
chrysanthemums. The Stockbridge seniors 
*''ll also have a class competition for 
meket arrangements of small flowered 
(Continued on Page 4) 



OUTING CLUB NOTICE 

s t rting at the Notch, the Outing 
Cl "b w II hike the length of the Holyoke 
next Sunday afternoon, weather 
Permitting. At two o'clock, a large truck 
ick up the hikers at the East Ex- 
it Station, and bring them to the 
niOi of the trail at the Notch. 
Tom there, the truck will proceed by the 
the foot of Mount Holyoke in 
It to meet the party there and carry 
to Amherst. There will be a 
im fare of forty cents for the 
' ! 'rip, but if enough are present, the 
be reduced accordingly. As 
i OOM can be accommodated 
'!>!>. All members should be 
U this will be one of the most 
1'le hikes of the year. 



Vic Parties Comprise 

All Post-Game Dances 

Fraternities Limited to Smaller Affair 
Because of Sickness 

If the much cussed jinx whit h has tlm- 
far Canned the cancellation ( ,f s<HJ.d 
a< tivities 00 Campua doesn't d,i ide to 
come out of his hole where he has been 
hibernating these past few weeks. Fra- 
ternity Row will once again resume its 

hoase dance program with victrota and 
radio parties this Saturday evening 

following the Amherst game. The Inter- 
fraternity Council, late last week, upon 
the advice of Dr. Radcliffe and the Social 

Committee voted upon aeveral measures 

of tinsel) interest. Fir.-,t, the council 
voted to cancel entirely or to defer the 
usual Fall Round Robin, aecondly, to 

put to a vote among the fraternities ai 
to whether the Round Robin shall he 
deferred until after the lull i game or 
whether the fraternal bodies would join 
with the Tufts Informal Committee and 
make a super Tufts Informal and thus 
cancel the individual parties. Thirdly, 
the council voted to allow the individual 
fraternities to hold "Vi< " parties after 
the Amherst game, if they should so like, 
and if no new para ly.. is cases should arise 
which of course would automatical!) 
cause the ban to be reestablished for 
another three week period. 

At the fraternity meeting Monday 
night all the houses voted to hold "Vic" 
parties after the Amherst game, and the 
majority voted to hold a Round Robin 
after the Tufts game. 



OUTSTANDING FVFNT 
OF THK WFKK 



Cliff Foakett kicked a held goal last 

Saturday. The last time a Massachu- 
setts team scored a held goal is far 
beyond our memory. 



Bush Maintains Place 

Among High Scorers 



Number 5 



TRADITIONAL RIVALS 
TO BATTLE SATURDAY 

i 

Strong State Football learn to Meet 
Amherst on Pratt Field. Cross- 
Country Team Also to Fugujle Kivala 

What promises to be the most exciting 
town classic in years will take pla. e next 
Saturday at L':(K) on Pratt Field at 
Amherst College when the most sensa- 
tional eleven in the history of M.s.c. 
journeys forth to meet AI Wheeler's 
Purpk aggregation on enemy territory. 
With the "spirit of progress" as their 
watchword, the Maroon and White 

Pilgrims are in readiness to avenge the 
long series of defeats suffered at the 
hands <i| (he Lord Jelf teams during the 
course of hostilities between the town 

rivaia. 

So far, Amherst and Massachusetts 

have met on the gridiron on 81 occasions 

since the opening of the football series 

between the two colleges m 1.HH1. Of 

(Continued on Page 3) 



WINNIFRED WYGAL TO 
SPEAK AT ASSEMBLY 



Well Known Traveler to Discuss In- 
ternational Kconomic Situations 



State College Halfback Has Five 

Point bead Despite l-ailure to 

Score Against Worcester 



SENIOR BADLY HURT 
BY PASSING AUT0IST 



BAND WILL PLAY 
AT AMHERST GAME 

Musical Organization to Make Initial 
Appearance Saturday 

More than fifty experienced musicians 
Comprise the personnel of what is prob 

ably the finest band the State College 

has ever had. It will make its initial 
appearance in the Maiaachuaetf (heci 
ing Section, at the football game, Pratt 

I it Id, next Saturday. 

Ira hates' "Victory March," and 
"When Twilight Shadows Deepen," have 

been arranged for the band by Captain 
Edwin M. Sumner and Grant Dunham 
'34, and will be played at the game for 
the first time. The bandmen will appeal 
(Continued on Page 4) 



Walter Utley, Struck by Car Last 

Monday, is Now Resting at 

the Infirmary 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 

"Disparage not the faith thou doth nut know.'' 



"Walt" Utley, a senior at this college, 
was struck and badly injured on Pleasant 
Street at a quarter of one, Monday, by a 
car driven by Joseph Gurski of this town. 
He was rushed to the college infirmary 
where an examination revealed that he 
had a simple fracture of the left leg and 
several minor bruises and contusions. 
Dr. Radcliffe and Dr. Durgin set the 
leg which is now in a plaster cast. 

Eye witnesses say that, while the far 

was not going at a fast rale of ■need for 

an open road, that it was going altogether 

too fast for a crowded thoroughfare. The 

(Continued on Page 4) 



Wednesday, October 28 

7..50 p. m MwtllH, Orpheus Club, Mrino- 

riul Hall. 
8.<X) p. m. OadHettl Rehearsal, Stockbridge 
Hall. 
Thursday, October 29 

7.00 p. m. Band Rehearsal, Stockbridge 
Hall. 
Friday, October Ml 
BlOckMdai Football, Williston Academy, 

here. 
7.]', p. rn. Mass Meeting, Stockbridge Hall. 
Saturday, October 31 
2.00 p. m. Varsity Football, Amherst, 

Pratt Field. 
2.00 p. m. Varsity Cross-Country. Amherst, 
Pratt Fi.ld 
Sunday, November I 
9.00 a. m. Chapel. Dr. James Gordon 
<,ilkey. South Congregational Church. 
Springfield. 
2.00 p. rn. Outing Club Hike. Mt. Holyoke 

Ran Ke. 
.'J. 15 p. m. Radio Conceit, New York Phil- 
harmonic On lustra. Memorial Hall. 
Tuesday, November 3 

7..'50 p. B. ( ollcwian Tryouts. Collegian 

Office. Memorial Hall. 
fc.00 p. m. Chorus, Memorial Hall. 
Wednesday, October 4 
:i.i>f) i». m. Amiably, StocfcbrMni Hall, 

Winnifrcd Wyfa], LeCtORf and Traveler. 
7.00 p. m Meeting l>bating Club, Memo- 

rial Hall 



Despite I lie Cut that he was held 
scoreless by the |-'.ni;ineei I I if \\..|«,-stei 

Tedi last Snturday, Louis Hush, State's 

sensational sophomore halfback, who has 
run rampant this season, has still main 

tained his undisputed lead as king of 

high scorers on the Eastern Kridimns. 
With a tOtel ol 83 points piled up as a 
remit of (Tossing his opponents' goal line 
13 times and chalking up 6 points after 

touchdowns, I'.usii is challenged only by 
Garbark of Allegheny, who ■cored four 
touchdowns against Adnan last Saturday, 

thus bringing his total s< ( ik ap to 7s 

points, five |M)ints behind "Lou's" aggre 
gal ion of tallies. 

Winters, the Davis and Klkiiis star 
who was second to Hush among the high 
scorers on Eastern gridirons Saturday 

before last, (ailed to i ncr e as e his totality 

ol points when he was completely held in 

check by the football team ol St. Francis, 
consequently dropping to third place in 

the list of high scorers. The following 
are the twelve leading s< orers in the East! 
/'or. fV. Id 1'at.Eg. T 



Bajfc, Mom state 


lib 


:. 


l.i 


r, 





Ki 


Gorbork, Allrgeay 


lib 


.'. 


l.t 








7K 


Winter. O.ivi, Klltins 


hi. 


(i 


12 








72 


Moran, Syracuse 


lib 


a 


11 


ti 





lio 


Hewitt. Columbia 


'lb 


.-. 


X 


u 


1 


60 


'.in, -in, ,n. Rats 


lib 


.-. 





1 





:,.-, 


J. Murphy. Fordham 


lib 




H 


7 





:,:, 


Campiglio, YV I.itx-rty 


lib 


B 


8 


:t 





:.i 


Whelan. Cathoh, 


hb 


r, 


K 








4M 


Sacnoa, Doris»E9ctM 


bl. 


r, 


K 








4X 


McCall. Dartmouth 


hb 


.', 


H 








4X 


Pernio, i ornell 


fb 


4 


H 








48 


Kisln-1, Syracuse 


fl, 


I 


K 








4K 


M ' r.ic ken, W laln-rty 


hb 


~t 


7 


1 





•».( 


Montgomery, Coll,i.i 


'lb 


1 


7 


1 





l.'f 



HARRIERS TAKE SIXTH 
PLACE AT OPEN MEET 

Springfield Wins Dennis O'Connell 

Trophy for Third Year at 

Harvard Contest 

Competing with six other harrier teams 
at the Open Inten ollegiates at Harvard 
University last Friday afternoon, the 
Maroon and White outfit rated sixth 
pine. Snow, coming in first of tin 

State College team, earned 22 points; 
Caird, 2.">; Mason. ;;.",; Edmund, !c 
Farrar, 16, the remaining eight men of 
h Derby's aggregation all finishing 

(Continued on Pag* 4) 



Miss W'innifred Wvgal, associate ex- 
ec uiive Monetary <>! the Student Council 

of the Y.W.C.A., and a well known 

traveler, will address the second assembly 

of the season on Wednesday, November 

1, in Howker Auditorium, In all prob- 
ability, Miss Wygal will daacma Inter- 
national economic situations. 

A (mm In ol Considerable note, Miss 
Wygal has attended a number of Kuro- 
pean Ann i ic an Student Conleieuces ami 
has made a trip anumd the world st iidy- 

■ « • vi soc i.d conditions. < totatanding among 

her experiences is the fad that she spent 
a week with < .handi in his Ashram, being 
one of the very few women allowed to do 
so. She also numbers India's greatest 
poet, Tenure, among bar acquaintances. 
Miss Wygal is considerably interested, 

ami has taken an intense participation, 
in mans student movements. Concerning 
her ability as a speakci, one who has 

heard her often enthusiastically arritasi 

"Miss Wygal, in addition to her first- 
hand inhumation about world affairs, has 
the remarkable attributes ol an ext r.i- 
ordinarily engaging shaker. She treats 

In i audiences to etatements laden with 

interest and seasoned with humor. She 
is spoilt. meoiis. She shows that she is 
living lite, not merely exi-ling through it." 

Soccer Team to Meet 

Wesleyan This Friday 

Tanas Has Shown Much Improve- 
ment, Developing a Strong Offensive 

Friday, '»■ toher 30, ought to see another 

victory added to the chain that the State 
hooters have started t|,j s season, when 
they overcome the Wesleyan Cniversity 

meeer team at Middtetown, Conn. Wes- 
leyan has started the season with a fairly 
strong showing, having added as their 
most recent trophy a .'M victory over 
Amherst. However, several apparent 
weak points in their line-up ought to 
had the way to another Hay State vie toiy. 
(Continued on Page 2) 



MASS MEETING 
FRIDAY NIGHT AT 7:15 
IN STOCKBRIDGE HALL 

Speeches will he 

FEW, short, SNAPPY 
AND TO THE POINT 

The HAM) will Im- THERE! bring 
your SONG HOOKS! 

If you have not already situ red your 
COpy ol the NEW song l.ook, drop in at 
the College Hook Store, South College, 
and you ran gain permanent possession 
of one for only 35c, 

GET CHEERING SE4 IM>\ SEATS 
for the game before SATURDAY and 
you will be SURPRISED!!! Cofuesrouud 
FRIDAY NIGHT and maybe YOU will 
be LEI IN on the SECRE I 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 28, 1931 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 28, 1931 



tjbe flfcassacbusette Collegian 



Official newspaper of 



the Massachusetts State College. 
Wednesday by the students. 



Published every 



Wallace W. Stuart '33 
Managing Editor 



BOARD OF EDITORS 

Frank L Sprinoeb '32 
Edttor -in-CkUf 
Oscab Margolin '32 Rial S. Potter. J*. "32 

A ssociaU Editors 



DEPARTMENT EDITORS 
Editorial 
Frank L. Springer '32 
Alumni and Faculty Campua 

Marjorie L. French '34 Ediiond Nash '33 

Athletics Alerbda L. Ordway 33 

William H. Wkar '32 W. Raymond Ward 33 

Eugene Guralnick 33 Habbibttb M. Jackson 34 

Joseph Politella 34 
Faatura 
Oscar Margolin '32 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT 

Eric H. Wbttbrlow Jr. '32 

Business Manager 

Kbnneth E. Hodge 32 William A. Johnson '32 

Advertising Manager Circulation Manager 

Buslneaa Assistants 

Ashley B. Gurnby '33 Philip H. Hvbbault '33 



Subscriptions $2.00 per year. Single copies 10 cents. 



Make all orders payable to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In case of change of address, subscriber will please notify the business manager 
as soon as possible. 

Alumni and undergraduate contributions are sincerely encouraged. Any com 
munications or notices must be received by the editor-in-chief on or before Monday 
evening. 



Entered as second-dais matter at the Amherst Post Office. Accepted for mailing at special rate of 
pottage provided for in Section 1103. Act of October. 1917. authorized August 20. 1918. 



NOW IT HAS HAPPENED 

Monday, a senior in the collcRe sustained serious injury when struck by an auto- 
mobile on Pleasant Street . A new sidewalk is under construction making it necessary 
for pedestrians to walk in the street from Hutterfield Terrace to Phillips Street. The 
victim was one of these unfortunates. 

Inasmuch as the Town of Amherst is so grossly negligent in properly warning 
traffic in this area that it appears that the college would have to post this area in a 
suitable manner such that motorists would be informed of the absolute necessity of 
driving carefully and considerately because of the hundreds of students who are 
compelled to walk in the street. As long as the town is irresponsible concerning tin- 
dangers tO Which it exposes its CoHefjatC residents, it seems that the college should 
inform passing motorists of the dangers of the narrowness of Pleasant Street, es- 
pecially when dogged with |>edestrians. It is absolutely imperative that restrictions 
be placed Upon the speed Of automobiles throughout the \icinity of the campus 
between the Center of the town and North Amherst. Due to the fact that the town 
authorities are so lethargic with reference to the safety of pedestrians, it seems ex- 
pedient that the college authorities take steps to prated its students from unthink- 
ing motorists. 

l'ossihly this unfortunate occurrence OH Monday will serve as a vivid reminder of 
the fact that students, too. must beep their mind on traffic while walking along (lit 
narrow streets in the vicinity of the campus. Kach motorist is entitled to a share of 
the road see that he net- it. and with plenty to spare. 



FRIDAY NIGHT 

Saturday afternoon. St.ite plays Amherst in football. The week-end starts 
Friday evening with a mass -meeting in Stockbridge Hall. Frequent and intensive 
practicing has had very favorable results upon the manner in which the freshmen 
cheer and sing. A chance to "brush up" on the college cheers and songs would be a 
benefit to all of the upjicrclassmen. You had better take advantage of the rally 

Friday night. 

Again we meet Amherst on the football field. Start off the week-end right by- 
coming over to Stockbridge Hall Friday night. It also would be a pretty good idea 
to carry down to Pratt Field on Saturday some of the enthusiasm which you will 
exhibit and absorb Friday night. How about it? 



Shr prarmnt 

The Collegian try-outs bring back to 
the Picaroon's mind poignant memories 
of the days when, as a freshmen, he 
scampered hither and yon over the 
campus, searching out various and sundry 
news items to fill the anaemic pages of 
the Collegian. How my little heart beat 
high with exaltation when I saw my first 
article in print. It was a faultless piece 
of work consisting of a list of the names 
of the contestants in a forthcoming poultry 
judging contest. I knew that it was good, 
because "Shep" Cleaves, who was then 
the Editor, threw two chairs at me when 
I submitted it. Usually he threw three. 

One day I was ordered to write an 
article on a tea dance to be given by 
Delta Phi Ciamma. In my colossal 
ignorance I called every fraternity in the 
college before some pitying upper class- 
man told me to try 8392. A very cool 
feminine voice asked me what I wanted. 
I didn't (mite go so far as to ask if this 
was the Abbess, but I said that I wanted 
to speak to the entertainment committee. 
The voice replied that most of the com- 
mittee were out to lunch, and wouldn't 
I be satisfied to speak to the chairman, 
she herself being the chairman? Then she 
wanted to know who was I, anyways. I 
replied that I was the Collegian, and 
would she please tell me all about the 
tea dance? Oh, yes! Certainly!— and for 
the next half hour she raved on and on 
till my head whirled with taffeta and 
beige, with chaperoaea and punch and 
orchestras and prominent couples, with 
programs, favors, Japanese lanterns, re- 
freshments, and all the endless planning 
and complication necessary to a success- 
ful affair. I wrote the article up just 
anyhOW, throwing everything in till it 
resembled the hash at Draper Hall. 
Fortunately for me, no one ever reads 
Mich articles anyway, but I still shudder 
at the very remembrance of the mon- 

strositv which 1 finally submitted. This 
year's neophytes ought to do much better, 

as freshmen in general are much more 
sophisticated th an in thos e halcyon days. 

Dear Mr. Picaroon: 

Having recently visited Amherst and 
seen yo'ir most excellent nioustachio, I 
am sure that you can help me in my pre- 
dicament. Let me explain myself briefly. 

The local Ladies' Sewing Circle is to 

give a play, the proceeds to go to the 
unemployed of the town, (both of them). 

I have been east as the villain, and 
ueedless to say, 1 am tremendously 
pleased, because SI IK has promised me a 
kiss, (and a big one, too!) if I take the 



RADIO CONCERT TO BE 

HELD IN MEMORIAL 

HALL EVERY SUNDAY 



Each Sunday afternoon the regular 
concert of the New York Philharmonic 
Symphony Orchestra will be presented 
from 3:15 to 5:15 by radio in Memorial 
Hall. The concert is presented just as it 
is given in Carnegie Hall without in- 
terruption or advertising except for the 
critical comments during the intermission 
by Mr. Olin Downes, the distinguished 
critic of the New York Times. 

It is hardly necessary to point out the 
musical value of this weekly event. The 
New York Philharmonic Symphony is 
one of the greatest orchestras in the 
world, and the only one having the 
services of three great conductors during 
the season. At present the leader is 
Eric Klieber, with the incomparable 
Toscanini to follow. All lovers of music, 
both in the college and in the town, are 
invited to attend. 



STOCKBRIDGE 



Dwight Williams S'32 who sustained a 
broken neck in the Hartford High game, 
October 10, was discharged from the St. 
Francis Hospital last week and has re- 
turned to classes. He is in a plaster cast 
from hips to neck, and the doctors have 
every hope of a safe recovery. 



FROSH CROSS-COUNTRY TEAM 

DEFEATS AMHERST 20 TO 45 



Everett LeMoult ex-S'24 has written 
he plans to attend the Amherst-Sun> 
game Saturday. He is in the florist 
business at 34 West 28th Street, New 
York City, in partnership with his 
father, firm name Adolph LeMoult. 



Charles R. Pitt S'27 of Bridgeport, 
Conn., and Ralph W. Smith ex-S'27 of 
Brooklyn, N. Y. were on campus this 
week. Smith is now a paying teller with 
the Irving Trust Company and was 
married to Kathleen Callahan S'27 last 
April. They are living at 1562 Oct m 
Avenue, Brooklyn. 



As a fine start for future records, the 
M.S.C. Frosh Cross-Country team de- 
feated the Amherst Frosh team by the 
score of 20 to 45 last Saturday at Amherst 
College. The course was three miles 
long, and the time for the run was 10 
min. 48 sec. Casey, who won for the 
State team, ran a very fine race. As only 
the first five places are scored, it is inter- 
esting to note that the first ten M.S.C. 
men had all finished before the fourth 
and fifth for Amherst came in. The 
order of finishing: Casey, M.S.C; Miner, 
Amherst; Blackburn, M.S.C; Strickland, 
M.S.C; Ramsdell, M.S.C; Orose, Am- 
herst; Little, M.S.C; Warren, Amherst; 
Prentis, M.S.C; Willard, M.S.C; Allen, 
M.S.C; Trask, M.S.C; Warner, M.S.C; 
O'Ncil, Amherst; Bryant, Amherst; 
Draper, Amherst; and Poland, Amherst. 



Mr. Fred Knutson, Amherst College 
will act as coach of the Stockbridge Glee 
Club. Mr. Knutson has had consider.t! in- 
experience in both the college glee club 
and choir, and studied voice this wanner 
in New York. 

Regular rehearsals will be held an h 
Wednesday evening at 7.30 p. m. in 
Room 114, Stockbridge Hall. All stu- 
dents should report promptly. 



Stockbridge cross-country schedule for 
L861: 

Oct. 29 Amherst Freshmen at MM. 
Nov. »i Amherst Jr. Var. at M.S ( 
19 M.S.C Freshmen at MM 
All races will start at 4 p. m. 



THE AMHERST GAME 

Really, there is nothing we need to say about it. 



EDITORIAL BRIEFS 

What a relief to have the mid-season let-down occur at the Worcester Tech game 
instead of during the Amherst game. 



Can you beat it! Bush romps all over the football field during the past few weeks 
and miraculously is able to remain unscathed, but let him romp about Draper Hall 
for a few hours each day and what does he do but collide with a tray and so gains 
the privilege of wearing a few feet of adhesive tape on his forehead. 



part well. But, and here's the rub 
one requirement is that 1 have a long 
Mack, sleek, twirly nioustachio. Not a 
cute "smooth" one, Sir, but a genuine 
villainy, sneaky black nioustachio. 

For two weeks I endeavored to produce 
such a one, but in vain. 1 have plenty 
of long black hair on my legs and chest, 
but your Extension Service said that 
transplanting was impossible at this 
season. True, I have a few microscopic 
hairs on my upper lip, but alas! they are 
curly, and, dash it, red! Of all colors, 
I have to grow a red nioustachio! Oh, Sir! 
the mortification will kill me. (Aj>ologies 
to The Flaming Meteor.who, notwithstand- 
inghiscolor scheme, isa pretty good louse. | 
What can I do, Sir? Please, please help 
me! If I fail, I lose my reward, and SI IF 
will probably bestow that kiss on Mont- 
morency Pembroke, the hero, curse him! 
If you can solve my problem, I will send 
you my newly purchased moustache-cup, 
very handsome, and labeled "Papa." 

I am twenty-one, handsome, and un- 
married although they tried hard to git 
me. Yours in breathless anticipation, 
O. Watana Siam 



SOCCER TEAM MEETS WESLEY AN 
(Continued from Page 1) 
While the Wesleyan forward line shows 
remarkable Speed and passing ability, 
their backs do not seem to have the 
necessary stamina nor do they show the 
kicking ability that our team possesses. 
From what has been apparent in recent 
practices, the Maroon and White team 
has developed a sufficiently powerful 
offensive to place the "pill" within the 
Wesleyan net for the winning points of 
the game. All of the veterans on the 
team are showing great improvement, 
and many of the newcomers are develop- 
ing into clever players. Jackson and 
Koslowski are outstanding among the 
sophomores, while Mackimmie, Pern- 
stein, and Landsman are catching on fast. 



Five students of the College sad 
fifteen Stockbridge School student a 
companies] by Instructor Roberts visited 
some of the large fruit farms of the state 
while enroute to Boston for the annual 
marketing trip of the pomology COUra 

Among farms visited was the BoitOS 
Fruit Farm where many orchard supplies 
are sold as well as having production area. 
The Nashoba Packing (.'ompatn Si 
Ayer extended open house priv, 
through Mr. Thomas Hamilton, local 
manager, a Stockbridge graduate oi - s 
Students next went to the frost 
Insecticide Company of Arlington, trus- 
tee Harold L. Frost '1)5, president, dis- 
tributors of graders, wipers, and orchard 
supplies. 

After a night in Boston the part] 
visited Faneuil Hall Markets, Boston I 
Maine Fruit Auction, New York, N« 
Haven & Hartford Terminal Market . 
the various commission merchants, tad 
finished the trip with a tour of the 
Qutacy Cold Storage. 



PROBABLE STARTING LINEUPS FOR THE GAME SATURDAY 



Last Saturday, it was an upset among small college football circles — this Saturday 
we are expecting another upset, only this time we are upsetting tradition. 



Now when Ah was in St. Lewis" some affectation, we think. 



We do not need to question Sid Masse's loyalty, especially after he showed the 
Cleveland News what's what about who's who. 



Don't forget to exchange your student activities ticket at the Drill Hall before 
Friday noon if you want to be in the State cheering section next Saturday. 



And we 
meeting. 



shall see you Friday night in Stockbridge Hall forji real MASSachttSettS 



Dear Mr. Siam: 

I was very pleased to get your letter, 
as I am majoring in advanced psycho- 
pathology, and yours is as advanced a 
case as any I have known. And another 
thing,— your English is terrible. Isn't 
that a dangling modifier or something in 
your first sentence? And I'm sure you 
use a lot of tautology, whatever that is. 
However I'll leave your language to the 
tender mercies of the English Depart- 
ment. As for moustachios, you can get 
them two for five at the local Woolworth 
store. That's where I get all mine for 
my various disguises. Send along the 
young lady's name and address with her 
picture and I'll see what else can be done 
on the matter. 1 may stretch the truth a 
bit when I say that I am as handsome as 
you, but at least, my dear Sir, you can- 
not call BME a barefaced liar. 

Sincerely, The Picaroon 





MASSACHUSETTS 






AMHERST 


\o. 


Name 


Position 


No. 


Same 


12 


MOUNTAIN 


Left End 


55 


C. KENYON 


10 


FOSKETT (Capt.) 


Left Tackle 


♦14 


FEINBURG 


18 


SCHAFFNER 


Left Guard 


59 


SKILES 


25 


LEARY 


Center 


41 


A. KENYON (Capt 


17 


SIBSON 


Right Guard 


17 


PHILLIPS 


88 


SIEYERS 


Right Tackle 


68 


POTTER 


20 


SMITH 


Right End 


29 


MASON 


39 


WELCH 


Quarterback 


26 


GREENOUGH 


47 


HOLM BERG 


Right Half 


58 


CADIGAN 


46 


BUSH 


Left Half 


39 


WARNER 


24 


FRIGARD 


Fullback 


44 


DEPASQUA 



IF ONLY— 

When Garlin died, it was as if a tune 
Had broken off, as if the meager light 
Had fled forever from the skeleton moon. 
And left you calling through the endless night. 

When Garlin died, the silence and the cold 
Crept in your bones until the marrow froze; 
Only the tale the solemn stillness told 
Haunted your sleep, and followed when you rose. 

Somehow, you never thought, when he was here, 
Of how the world would seem when he was gone; 
It is too late to offer words of cheer; 
( iarlin is dead! The passing bells at dawn 
Knell and re-echo, tolling without end, 
(iarlin is dead! Garlin who was your friend! 

Author, Oscar Margolin '32 

Judge, Professor Charles H. Patterson 

Manuscripts for next month's competition must be left at Mr. Rand's office 
by Novcml er 1.1. 



NOTICE! 



Now on Sale 



NOTICE! 



Wool Mufflers — $2.00 — up 

SCOTClTPLAIDS and PLAIN COLORS 



L A N D I S 



TEAM HELD BY WORCESTER 

Continued from Paga 1) 

overcame whatever defense we were able 
to offer. Time and time again, Harris 
an ,| Orake penetrated our line for gains 
aj several yards on each center rush, but 
when the Massachusetts gridsters felt 
their backs to the wall, the Worcester 
e always lost the ball on downs. 
Karris threw a big scare into the State 
College spectators when he intercepted 
om of Holmberg's passes and ran the 
hall back to the other end of the field. 
Urn he was overhauled by "Howie" 
rs on Stated 25-yard line. A series 
o| plays put the home team within 
■coring distance, but the closing of the 
half blasted all chances for a touchdown. 

AH the real excitement came in the 
iscoad half, particularly in the closing 
period. A rejuvenated State line re- 
turned to the place of combat, while 
liush and Holmberg showed more con- 
fidence in their handling of the ball, the 
latter beginning to toss his passes with 
more accuracy and speed. The third 
quarter was replete with center rushes, 
end sweeps, and arching forward passes. 
Drake, quarter back for the Crimson and 
i, ray. pulled the smartest bit of football 
lur the day in this period. Dropping back 
M kuk on State's 4'J-yard line after his 
had been held for three downs and 
tits four more yards to go for first down, 
Drake signaled for the pass back from 
.enter. With three of our men closing in 
on him rushing the kick, the Worcester 
i paused, poised like a bird in 
mid-flight, and then heaved a beautiful 
20-yard pass down the sidelines to his 
team -mate, Mallory, who gathered in 
• >nly to be tackled by a Massa- 
chusetts- State player. 

In the final quarter both teams strove 
to break the 0-0 tie. In the middle of 
tse |Hnod Massachusetts took possession 
ol tin ball and slowly but surely marched 
down the field, with Holmberg, Hush and 
Frigard hitting the line for continuous 
gains. Worcester halted State's progress 
OB it> 7-yard line and on the third down 
threw Bush, who was attempting an end 

iweep, lor an 8-yard loss. As the two 



You have tried the rest? 

Now try the BEST 



teams faced each other for the fourth 
down, Captain Foskett came out of the 
line, and with Lojko holding the ball 
upright on the ground, the former booted 
the pigskin through the uprights of the 
goal posts to score the only points of the 
game. Massachusetts then kicked off to 
Worcester, who fumbled after two plays. 
State recovered, thus putting our team 
once more in scoring position. Worcester 
threw off the State College attack and 
held for downs, and then proceeded to 
march up the field. They were halted on 
our 35-yard mark and State's ironmen 
took possession of the ball just before 
the end of the game. The summary: 

Worcester Tech 

re, Mallory 

it, Werme, Cantor 

rg. Rice, BpsaM 

c, Maggiacomo 

lg, Osipowuli 

It, Larson 

le. Leach, Penta 

qb, Drake 

rhb. Ekberg, Smith 

Hit.. Harris 

fb, Fogg 



Mass. State 
Mountain, le 
Foskett, It 

Cummings. Schaffner, lg 
Bourgeois, Leary, c 
Sibson, Bickford, rg 
Sievers, rt 
Solomon, Smith, re 
Welch. Lojko, qb 
Holmberg, White, Ihb 
Bush, Sylvester, rhb 
Frigard, fb 

Score — Massachusetts State .t, Worcester Tech 
0. Goal from the field— Foskett. Referee — J. A. 
Chalmers of Middlebury. Umpire— T. F Shea of 
Boston University. Head linesman— V. N. Wall 
of Worcester. 



And that's the 



AMHERST SHOE REPAIRING CO. 

< iaadyaar Welt System Employed" 



TRADITIONAL RIVALS 
(Continued from Page 1) 
these contests Amherst has been the 
victor 20 times, and the "little red 
machine" of M.S.C. has tied four and 
won six. These games were played 
annually except for a long cessation of 
rivalry between the years 1907-1081. 
The last fray out of which the Maroon 
and White emerged victorious was in 
1024, the score that year In-ing 17-7. 
Since then, however, Amherst has won 
six in a row, with these scores as results 
in successive years: 27-0, 21-7, 2u 0, 
13-0, 18-0, and 86-6, the latter being 
the tally of the game, in which the 1030 
team crossed the goal line first. 

Although the JelTmen made a rather 
poor start this season Coach Wheeler has 
produced within the last few weeks a 
team which will be hard for Captain Cliff 
Foskett and his men to stop. The 



S. S. HYDE 

Optician and Jeweler 

Oculists' Prescriptions Filled. Broken lenses 

accurately replaced 

BIG BEN ALARM CLOCKS and other 

reliable make* 
3 PLEASANT STREET, (up one flight) 



Amherst record this fall includes a 10-0 
win over Worcester Tech, a 7-0 victory- 
over I'uion, a decided loss to Princeton 
with a margin of 27-0, and a hard-fought 
game with Wesleyan as a "Little Three" 
opener, the result of which was a favor- 
able 14-0 score for the Middletown eleven 
Mel Taube's charges will find a formidable 
running attack on the part of the Purple 
backfield, with DePasqua and Warner 
leading the running attack, and George 
( adigan taking the kicking role. The 
Sabriaa forward line is also reputed to be 
of powerful strength. 

The Maroon and White team has set 
up an enviable record in football circles, 
having been rated as fifth highest scoring 
machine in the Kast at present writing. 
Wins over Cooper Union, Howdoin, 
Middlebury, Norwich, and W.P.I, have 
boosted its total of points to a sum of 150, 
with a total of IS against. 

An added touch of excitement at the 
football past will be provided by the 
finish of the annual cross-country rate 
between Amherst and Massachusetts 
State, which event is scheduled to cul- 
minate between the halves of the game. 
Amherst, in beating the Tufts harriers 
last Saturday by a 20-20 tally, has shown 
a well-balanced team. According to 
Coach Derby of the Maroon and White 
the run should furnish plenth of compe- 
tition. The probable list of men coni|>etiiig 
is as follows: Snow, Caird, Mason, 
l.dmund, I'arrar, and two runners selected 
from I Ionian. McC.uckian, and Towle. 



HALLOWE'EN 



Candles 
Tallies 
Masks 

Napkins 



Everything for the Night 

Noise Makers Decorated Crepe 
Aprons Nut Cups 

Games Lanterns 

Table Covers Hats 



JAMES A. LOWELL, 



BOOKSELLER 



Now Showing . . 



A particularly fine lot of 

LIGHT WEIGHT SLIP ON SWEATERS 

Priced from 

$2.50 to $4.50 

GOLF HOSE 

$1.00 to $2.50 
F. M. THOMPSON & SON 



M 

No. 

HI 

11 

12 

IS 

14 

15 

10 
17 
IS 
10 
20 
21 

as 
— 

2:i 

M 

88 

lit; 
27 
28 
29 
.'{<) 
81 

.12 

a 

84 

:ih 
88 
40 
41 
42 
4:5 
44 
40 
47 



STATISTICS OF THE 
ASS. STATE COLLEGE SQUAD 



Name 

I'oskett 

Fabyaa 

Mountain 

True 

Ryan 

Sylvester 

Bigelow 

Sibson 

Schaffner 

( .ood.dl 

Smith 

Wood 

Hurke 

Sievers 

Frigard 

Leary 

Cutler 

Griswold 

Clow 



Hurrington Tackk 

White Hack 

Lojko 

Caldwell 

Nourse 

Solomon 

Bourgeois 

Welch 

Hicks Back 

Cummings Guard 



Position Weight 

Tackk 180 

End loK 

laid 188 

Guard 180 

End 168 

Mack l. r ). r . 

laid 180 

(iuard 185 

Gaawd 168 

Bad loo 

Knd 188 

Hack 168 

(iuard 107 

Tackle ISO 

Bach iok 

Center 10K 

(iuard I.X 

Center 1 66 

Tackle 17.', 
2(H) 

165 

(Juarterback 188 

(iuard 168 

Guard 168 

Knd 155 

Center 10X 
Quarterback 155 



Chapin 

Male 

Bickford 

Bush 

Holmberg 



Tackle 

Hack 

(iuard 

Hack 

Hack 



166 
186 

100 

14:* 

105 
145 
100 



CJasj 

';i2 

'.'{2 

':{» 

*sa 

'.14 
•33 

\'S4 

'.{4 
'.14 
•:<2 

'.{4 
•Xi 

':m 

•:i4 

'.14 

\'<2 
•M 
•:u 
':i4 

'.'52 

•:v> 
'.14 
'.'14 

•:v.i 

'.{4 

•:w 

'.'12 

':i2 
■88 
•:*4 
•:v> 

■sa 

'.W 
':i2 



College Drugstore 

W. H. McGRATH, Rag. Pharm. 
AMHERST, - MASS. 



VISIT 

BARSELOTTTS 

All the requirements for the smoker - Pipes, 
Pouches, Smokers Combination 
Ice Cream, Candy, Sandwiches 

This Week at "BUCK'S" 

TOASTED ICE CREAM 
SANDWICHES 






STATISTICS OF THE 

AMHERST SQUAD 



.V.. 
4 

6 

8 
14 
17 
18 
19 
88 
24 
25 
88 
88 
;{<> 
81 
85 
88 
:io 
41 
4.1 
44 
45 
88 
47 
68 
68 
54 
68 
68 
57 
68 
88 
oo 

88 
61 
68 

04 

Bfl 



Same 
Homer 
DeWitt 
I'enhagen 
Krieger 
Phillips 
Murphy 
llogue 
Flint 

Lane 

Mills 

( '.reenough 

Mason 

Cheney 

Reiaus 

Cobb 

Wheeler 

Warner 

A. Ken yon 

Snider 

DePasqus 

Light 

Thompson 

Frank 

Stebbins 

Green 

Curtis 

C. Kenyon 

MacColI 

Partridge 

Cadigan 

Skiles 

Knutson 

Ma lone 

Turnbull 

Potter 

Feinberg 

Si nek 

Painter 



I'osttion 

Hack 
Back 
Tackle 



Weight 
100 
14.1 
210 



Center, G'rd 104 

l iuard 105 

Back 181 

Back 140 

Tackle 105 

Back 168 

Knd 147 

Quarterback 185 

End loo 

Knd 177 

End ir>8 

Back 171 

Knd 180 

(Juarterback 107 

Center 185 
haul 

Fallback 160 

Tackle, Knd 172 

Tackle 175 
Back 



End 
Center 
Bad 
End 



168 

105 

ion 

104 
178 



Center, Crd 168 

Guard 108 

Hack 104 

Guard 103 

Back I7:i 

Hack 184 

Tackle HIS 

Tackk 170 

Tackle 188 

Tackle 1S4 

(iuard 170 



Class 
'.'12 

';i:i 
X 
'.14 

'.'12 
II 

•Xi 
-M 
•M 

•:u 
•;i2 
•;i4 
';i4 

\'U 

•:i4 
•:t:i 

'.14 

':i2 
•:i4 
88 

';<4 
•:i4 
';{;{ 
•:{.'{ 
•;{.i 
■88 
'.'12 

';i2 
81 

•:v.\ 

'34 

':i2 

'.14 

•:w 

'.'{4 

•:{.'i 
•:i2 

'.'!4 



PATRONIZK 



The College Barber Shop 

"M" BUILDING 
M. S. C. 



SANG LUNG hand laundry 

No. 1 Main St. Amherst, Mass. 
REPAIRING ANI> ALL KINDS OF 
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I KUK.i. 

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Our Policy Guaranteed 

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Our New Fall Stock 

of 

Handkerchiefs 

has just been received 



Miss Cutler's Gift Sbop 



MASS. STATK FIFTH AMONG 

LEADING TEAMS OF EAST 



With the failure of Cornel) and Pitts- 
Hurgh to maintain their respective rank 
as top notcliers among the high storing 
teams of the Kast, and the success of 
Allegheny to force its way to the fore, 
the Massachusetts State College found its 
ranking as fifth in the list of high stand- 
ing teams in the Kast, after the results of 
last Saturday's wins and losses were 
compiled. The records of the leading 
teams are as follows: 





W. 


L. 


r. 


F. 


A. 


New York Univ. 


| 








19a 


7 


Columbia 


5 





» 


1H7 





Syraruae 


1 








|8J 


2& 


A 1 It'll if n y 


■ 


1 


.) 


1»7 


14 


Mam. State 


5 








160 


18 


lirown 


6 


1 


I) 


188 


It) 


I isinus 


r> 








57 


!■» 


Cornt'll 


4 








Hi.'. 


fl 


ll.uvard 


1 


I) 





ue 


20 


IVim -\ K .mi. i 


4 


o 





lo;. 


20 


Johns Hopkins 


4 








70 


10 


Fordham 


4 





1 


180 


18 


Tent (lie 


1 





I 


70 


7 


Min knell 


:t 





2 


117 


2M 


Pittsburg 


4 


1 





IV.» 


26 


Dartmouth 


4 


1 


(1 


1&7 


;ik 


ColKate 


4 


1 


(I 


IM 


13 


Lafayette 


4 


1 





120 


10 


Villanov.i 


4 


1 





I1H 


81 


Williams 


4 


1 





H6 


;« 


Wash, and Jefferson 


4 


1 


o 


56 


40 


Navy 


:t 


1 


() 


40 


19 


Army 


I 


1 


1 


IM. 


M 


Holy (toss 


i 


1 


1 


!»H 


20 


Yale 


■» 


1 


1 


fiU 


aa 



< ,11111 lu iii 

Moras 

Freeman 



Halfback 

• -uard 

' iuard 



17:< 

1X11 



'84 
'.14 
'.u 



AMHERS 
THEATRE 



T 



3 Shows Daily, 2.30; 6.30; 8.38 p.m. 
Matinee* 3Sc Evening* 40c 



Price 



^Wednesday, i»i tunei lx 
WILLIAM I'OWH I in 
THE ROAD TO SINGAPORE" 

with Marian Marwh 

Thursday, Oi - (filter 29 



mm DANIKLS In 

"TIIK HONOR 

OF THE FAMILY" 



Friday, October ,tS 

William Haines and Leila llyams In 

"THE NEW ADVKN'I TIRES OF 

GET-RICH-Ol'ICK 

WALUNOFORD" 

Sat., Oct. 31 2 Features 
Kdclle OiiiII.iii A Robert Armstrong 

In "THE TIP OFF" 

ami 

Kay Wray and Victor Marconi 

In "CAPTAIN THUNDER" 



Monday, November 2 
They l>ivc to Make You LaiiKhl 

"GIRLS ABOUT TOWN" 

with 
Kay Francis Joel McCrea 

Lllyan Tashman F.ugene Palette 

Tuesday, November 3 



WARNF.R BAXTF.R & UiMi Mi LOWR 

in O'llenry's Romantic Bad Man 

,'TIIE CISCO KID" 



After the Amherst game 

next Saturday 

make merry at the 

Candy Kitchen 
Sarris Bros. Candy Kitchen Restaurant Inc. 



GIVEN - A HAT 

To the man who makes the first touchdown in the Amherst -- Mass. State game. 

E. M. SWITZER, JR., Inc. 



■• A. C. Library. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 28, 1931 



HI C KEY -FREE MAN CLOTHES 

The men wearing. Hie key-Freeman Clothes are referred to as the "Wise Buyers". You get value in clothes from us. 

Our styles and patterns are the latest . . . everything up to the minute. 

THOMAS F. WALSH 



BAND AT AMHERST CAME 
(Continued from Page 1) 

in full uniform, and will perform under 
the direction of Captain Sumner. 

Rehearsals are held every Thursday 
evening in Stockbridge Hall, and plans 
are already being made for concerts 
which will follow the close of the football 
Mason. The personnel of the band com 
prises the following undergraduates: 

Clarinets: Dunham, Noble, Kozlowski, 
and Weinberger of "M; Bliss, Moulton, 
Trask, bebeshevsky, and Valentine, ':>.*>. 

Saxaphones: Shunian and Townsend, 
';<;{; Henry, Nisbet, and Gertz, '84; 
Eldredge, and bennett, M6. 

Trumpets: Nelson, and Mason "A2\ 
Whitcomb, "A'A; Lister, and Chenoweth, 
'34; Sandford, Riseman, bibbey, and 
Tillson, MS, 

Altos: Kucinski, ':$4; Pclton, and Cross, 

•3r>. 

Trombones: Miner, and Hornbaker, 
«S; MacMackin, "M; Vierling, '35; and 
Bonnemort, S.S.A. '33. 

Baritones: Coombs, '34; Hovey, and 
Bray, '3. r >. 

Bass: Seperski, '34. 

Cymbals: Lucey, '34. 

Drums: Thompson, '34; Feinberg, 
Johnson, Hart well, Snow, and Salanoff, '35. 

Piccolo: Clark, '35. 



ALUMNI NEWS 



FJilL FLOWER SHOW 

(Continue*! from Page 1) ' 

chrysantt-acmums. A se|)arate room will 
he devoted to a dish garden competition 
which is open to all students. It is ex- 
pected tr» at each — inlnff will enter a table 
decoration. There will be other table 
decorations as well as corsages and 
arrangements of native material. Deco- 
rations are not yet completely planned, 
hut it is expected that they will consist 
largely of chrysant hemums. 

In conjunction with the student flower 
show the llolyoke and Northampton 
C.ardners' and Florists' Club is to hold 
their ann ual chrysanthemum competition. 

This year there are to be no vegetable 
garden exhibits. There will probably be, 
however, a Pomology exhibit. 

The general Flower Show committee 
includes: chairman, Benton Cummings 
'Xi; Harold Nelson '83, bois Babb S'32, 
William Perkins S'32, and Ormond 
Williams S':52. The decorations com- 
mittee is. : chairman, George Mooss, S'32 
Celeste Fiore '32, Eric Wetterlow "32, 
Curtis Keyes '32, and Robert Baker S'32. 

On Saturday, November 7, the show 
will be open from 1 to 10 p. m., and on 
Sunday, Novembers, from 1 to 8 p. m. 



COLLEGE ALUMNUS IN OHIO 

SHOWS LOYALTY TO TEAM 



Thursday evening, October 22, a group 
of State College alumni residing in 
Boston and vicinity met at the Univer- 
sity Club, Boston, and discussed plans 
for a Boston Alumni Club athletic 
banquet to be held early in December. 
Those present included I bury M. Walker 
'10, president of the Boston Alumni 
Club, David 11. Hutterick '17, president 
of the Associate Alumni, Dennis Crowley 
'2\), secretary pro-tern of the Most on 
Alumni Club, Bill Doran '15, secretary 
of the Associate Alumni, Red Emery '24, 
assistant secretary of the Associate 
Alumni, Pat Holbrook '25, Dkk Davis 
'2S, Henry Jensen ':!(», Ed Frost '31, and 
John M( (iuckian '31. 

H. Daniel Darling '..I and a victim of 
infantile paralysis is r e por te d as now 

convalescing at the Wcss »n Memorial 
Hospital, Willuahaiii, Mass., and it is 
expected that he will have recovered 
fully by the end of six months. 



SENIOR BADLY HURT 
(Continued from Page 1) 
fact that the sidewalk on Pleasant Street 
opposite Thill ips Street is closed tem- 
porarily till the cement hardens, forces 
the students to walk in the road. Utley, 
endeavoring to cross the street, did not 
sec the crar whicli struck him full in the 
body hurling hi in about twenty feet 
through the air, fracturing his leg and 
rendering m,n temporarily unconscious, 
bystanders arranged a temporary splint, 
and Dr. Durgin and Dr. Radcliffe were 
phoned. Student ■ and workmen lifted 
him into a truck and he was carried to 
the infiran.iry, where he is now resting as 
comfortably as ca n he expected. 



HARRIERS PLACE SIXTH 
(Continued from Page 1) 
with higher results. The gymnasts of 
Sprittgftesld College won the event for the 
third sLinessive year, thereby keeping 
the Den nis O'Cnriiiell trophy, a memorial 
to a former C rim son track captain. The 
event attracted .ldiout BO runners in all, 
representing SpTMgfield, R I. State, 
BowdoUra, boston* College, Northeastern 
University, and IS.U. 



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We call and deliver jrce daily 
Phone 635 SWISS CLEANSERS & DYERS Phone 635 

Oer First National Score 



The CHESTERFIELD 
for every occasion 

— the Fall Parties, the weekends 

in New York, the Junior Prom. 

The correct coat, attractively priced 

at 
$40.00 and $50.00 



CARL. H. BOLTER 

INCORPORATED 

shops at Harvard, Yale, Exeter, Hyannis 



Sidney M. Masse '15 is in the adver- 
tising business. So he is also doing his 
hit in advertising Massachusetts State. 
Here is what the Cleveland (Ohio) News 
has to say about Sid, and it is self- 
explanatory: 

"We don't know Sid Masse of 90685 
Morewood Parkway, but we'd like to 
meet him, if for no other reason than he 
is one of that big army of alumni of small 
colleges who are loyal to the very roots 
of their hair. Masse thinks he has a kick 
coming over telegraphic reports that came 
out of the east about a certain football 
game, and in view of his aforementioned 
loyalty we are of the opinion he has. Me 
writes: 'Under 'Grid Heroes' is cited the 
doings of one Lew Bush, said to be of 
Amherst, who scored three times in the 
game against Middlebury on runs of 80, 
45 and 28 yards. It so happens that Hush 
performs for Massachusetts State College 
that beat Middlebury a week ago Satur- 
day. Massachusetts State is located in 
the town of Amherst in which Calvin 
Coolidge's alma mater holds forth. 

"It is rather tough on an alumnus of 
some distant minor college to refer to his 
seat of learning when the football team 
is not known for its exploits from coast 
to coast. But we Massachusetts fellows — 
of which there are some 101 in Cleveland 
—like to do a little chirping when about 
once in a dozen years the team goes 
gomewhere. 

"The thing that really hurts is this: 
Up until this year the college was known 
as Massachusetts Agricultural College, 
the state college. When victorious the 
Poston newspapers invariably headed the 
account of the game in some manner as 
'Amherst Heats So-and-So,' or 'Amherst 
Aggies Win'; but when we got our nose 
rubbed in the gridiron mud it read 
'Farmer! Routed' or 'Mass. Aggie* 
Plowed Under.' 

"So with the changing of the name to 
Massachusetts State after p etiti o ning 
the statehouse for 15 years the first 
thing I see 'way out here in Cleveland 
where I've resided since 1 ( .»17) is that 
Hush brought glory to AMHERST. 
Some day when Reserve beats Carnegie 
TflCk, I hope the papers in the east don't 
state that 'Cleveland College 1 .it ks 
Carnegie,' or 'Ohio State Routs Scots.' 

"Massachusetts State scored something 
like 120 point! to their opponents' 6 in 
the first three games just as if that 
matters." 

Well Sid Masse, it does matter to you 
and the other KM) Mass. State grads and 
that's why we are setting it forth here. 
As for giving Hush credit for winning for 
AM 1 1 E RST, that's another matter. That's 
the story that came out of your old 
college town, and papers in the middle 
west had no way of knowing the differ- 
ence until you called it to our attention, 
for which we thank you. 



M. S. C. MEN'S MOTTO IS ALWAYS 
LET "DAVE" DO IT 

AMHERST CLEANSERS, DYERS 
and LAUNDERERS 

PHONE 828 Near the Town Hall PHONE 828 



oS 



i 

9 



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Largest Shoe Store In Western Massachusetts 



I 



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JOSEPH GINSBERG 

19 PLEASANT ST. 

Men's Furnishings - Shoes repaired, called for and delivered 

Freshmen, come in and see our selection of shoes, priced moderately. 

Special sale now on leather coats, just what you need for cold weather, 

CALL 984-M 
CARTERS MOULDETTES 

Foundation Garment for Present Styles 
$2.95 and $3.95 

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Amherst, Mass. 

Given Away 

A pair of Bostonian $9. Oxfords 
A pair of Friendly Five $5. Oxfords 

FOR PARTICULARS, SEE OUR WINDOW 

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SPECIAL STATIONERY 

72 sheets of Fine Writing Paper with 
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Ni U si )l ■ « I.i K and 
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AMHERST, MASS. 



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"Cannonette" 
"Munsingwear" or "Vanity Fair" 

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gfo MuBBUt^xtBtttB (HMtaim 



Vol. XLII 



AMHERST, MASS., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 1931 



Number 6 



DR. GILKEY TALKS AT 
FIRST SUNDAY CHAPEL 

\nurica Will Not Turn to Socialism 
.is a Remedy for Her Economic 
and Social Problems Maintains 
Dr. Gilkey 

With the declaration thai "America 
never adopt Socialism or Communism 

refuge from its social ami industrial 

eaval; that American! will never re> 
to the extremes of government that 

European peoples have taken upon 
themselves," Dr. James (.onion Gilkey 
told the State College itudenta in Sun- 

1 1 hapel assembly that our American 
traditions would evolve ■ new tovern- 

.11 us in the near future. 

"The American traditions of private 

perty, individual rights, the right of 

initiative and entr ep re n eurship in in- 

try, will never allow government 

lip of land and public utilities to 
the extent now existent in Russia. 

led with these traditions is the fad 
thai we have no abject and hopeless 
tj such as was prevalent in Euro- 
countries during the reign of the 

m lis." 

(Continued on Page 4) 



OUTSTANDING KM NT 
OP THE WEI K 

State IS, Amherst 12 



GRIDSTERS TO MEET 
SPRINGFIELD ELEVEN 

l inlefeated State Team to Invade 
Springfield This Saturday 

This coming Saturday, the yet umle- 

I Mass. State College eleven will 

undertake to add to its list of conquests 

the powerful Springfield College gridetera 

in a game to be played at Springfield for 

the benefit of the unemployed in this 
pari of the state. There is hardly a 
low of douht but that the sturdy 
urns will face what ought to Ik- a 
eriof team, considering the nature of 
the institution and the fact that the 
Spr in gfield club has three |>otential first 
String line-ups. In any event, the physi- 
• il educationalists may be expected to 
present a team which will average 25 
pounds or over per man more than 
State's aggregate, which averages ap- 
proximately 160 pounds per man. More 
over, it is a fact that the two Springfield 
Weigh 198 pounds apiece and are 
' feel -i inches tall, all of which is not 
St ill conducive to undo optimism. 
A comparison of the outcomes of the 
i niters of the two clubs in view of 
the preceding material tells us little of 
their rightful relationships. The Spring- 
beld eleven has won three games and lost 
One, while the State College has won six 
(Continued on Page 3) 

ECONOMIC SITUATIONS 
SUBJECT OF ADDRESS 



DAIRY JUDGING TEAM 
WINS HONORS IN MEET 

Azor Goodwin M2 Wins Second Place 

in Content and Is Recipient 

of Fellowship 

By consistently placing among the 
leading judgers in all the separate con 
test-, of the National Dairy Intercollegiate 
Judging Contest which was held last 
week at Atlantic City, Atof Goodwin '32 

won sec (.nil place as individual high 

a orer, and a much . oveted seven hundred 

and fifty dollar fellowship lor graduate 
work in dairy industry research. KU-n 

Holder '32, another member of the judg- 
ing team, also placed high among the 
individual high scorers and garnered 

fourteenth place in the competition with 

forty-eight picked student judgers repre- 
senting sixteen colleges and universities 
in the United States and Canada. Edward 
Waskiewica was the third member of the 

team. 

Six scholarships were awarded toward 

a year's work in dairy research, The re- 
cipient of these awards may choose any 

one of the colleges which were entered in 

the contest as the place to take their ad 
Vance degree. Any thesis written or 
result of research becomes automatically 
the property of the associations sponsor- 
ing the meet. The National I >airv In 
dil tries Association and the Daitv 

Science Association were the sponsors of 
the c on tes t . Orval II. Anas of Iowa 

State College with a low net score of 1(>L?.7 
points won the first scholarship. A/or 
Goodwin With 111.2 points received the 
second scholarship and a silver medal. 
(Continued on Page 3) 

Much Interest 
In Flower Show 



Social Union Sponsors 

Eight Entertainments 

Vanity Club Male (.hiartet is First of 
Series Arranged by Committee 

The Varsity Club Male Quarts! of 

Boston will appear ia the In t entertain 
incut of the Social Union seiies for the 
current season, liidav evening, November 

20, in Bowker Auditorium, according to 

the campus calendar schedule. This 
quartet has highly pleased the student 

audiences in pu vi. »us v.. us, and has be 

come almost a regular feature of the 
I niou's programs. 

(Continued on Page 4) 

WESLEYAN TROUNCED 
BY SOCCER TEAM 2-0 

Goals by Jackson and laft Account 
for State College Score 

Another victory was added to the chain 
started by the 1031 Mass. state College 

SOCCer team, when they defeated the 
Wcshva i club by the score of JO, as | 

result of the game played on Friday, 
October 30, at vVesleynn. While the 
Wesleyan team showed remarkable fight 

and stamina, the Slate hooters won the 
Contest due tO clever scouting and finer 

team play. 

The Maroon and White team took the 

Offensive soon alter the start of the hist 

(Continued on Page 3) 



AMHERST FAILS TO STOP 
BUSH AS STATE ELEVEN 
WINS 1 3-12 VICTORY 



DEBATING TEAM PLANS 
EXTENSIVE SCHEDULE 



Debate with N. V. V. Definitely 
Arranged to be Here 



REV. MacARTHUR WILL 
ADDRESS NEXT CHAPEL 



Well Known Churchman to Give 
Address in Chapel Next Sunday 



Annual Exhibition, to Be Held This 

Saturday and Sunday, Contains 

Unusual Features 



N 'iss Winnifred W'ygal to Relate the 
Experiences of Her Extensive Travels 

"in Winnifred W'ygal, associate ex- 
ecutive secretary of the National Student 
Council of the Y.W.C.A., will discusj 
"it* rational questions before the stu- 
'!> nt body at assembly today. 

College representatives who met 

Mia W'ygal at Camp Maqua this summer 

msii.je for having Miss W'ygal 

'""><' to the college. They are enthusi- 

'tiout her work in International 

ea and World Education and 

"re us that she will be an instructive 

n an interesting speaker. Since 

had many unusual experiences 

out the world, Miss W'ygal L 

lined to discuss world problems. 

the distinguished people whom 

* Wygal met on her trip around the 

ntly were the great poet of 

ragore, and Manatma Chandi, 

■he spent a week. 

I every year Miss W'ygal goes to 

1 I Bited States representative to 

I Christian Federation Council. 

intensely interested in stu- 

Miss Wygal is to have dinner 

m of the Y.W'.C.A. cabinet 

- the possibilities of stimulating 

u m international problemsamong 

ibera, 






i. 



Next Saturday and Sunday will find 
the ordinarily prosaic rooms of French 
Hall de< orated with all sorts of flowers, 
entrants in the Annual Fall Flower Show, 

held each year at this time. An unusual 

feature of this show will be the annual 
chrysanthemum competition of the llol- 
yoke and Northampton Gardener's and 

Florists' Club. 

I he c entral feature of the show will be 
an arrangement of these < hrysanthemums 
in their natural habitat. The honor of 
putting on this central piece is decided 
each year by means of a contest. This 
time the winning design was submitted 
(Continued on Page 4) 

Soccer Team to Meet 

Powerful Clark Squad 

Came to Be Played in Worcester 
Today Should be Closely Con- 
tested Throughout 

As a result of the game to be played 
with Clark at Worcester today, the State 
soccer team ought to add the fourth 
victory of the year to its string, although 
the result will not be too < heaply bought. 
Clark so far this season has met several 
powerful teams and has developed some 
(lever players. The Clark fullbacks, and 
inside forward line are the mainstay of 
their team, and outstanding as individual 
players are Philbin <rfb , and liiggin- 

bottom (cf). 

The State squad has been showing 
great improvement this week in practicing 
shooting, passing, and blocking, and 

during Tuesday's practice went through 

scrimmage against the seionds, while the 
•econd* used the Clark style of defense. 
The Clark record so far shows a loss to 
M.I.T., and a loss to Northeastern, a tie 
score against Williams, and a win over 
Conn. Aggies. 

(Continued on Page 4) 



Reverend K. C. Mai Arthur, secretary 
of the Massachusetts Federal ion o| 
Chun lies, will address the next Sunday 
Morning Chapel in Mow ker Auditorium. 
The speaker is well known at this college, 
having spoken at past chapel meeting.. 

He is bead of the Rami Service Com 
mittee of the Federation. 

Reverend Mai. Arthur also speaks to 
the Stockbridge School seniors every 

spring term, delivering s series of lectures 

on "The Place of the Church in Rural 
Communities" in Mr. Smart's Sociology 

Hastes. He is well acquainted with 

religious Conditions in Massachusetts 

communities, and his subject, though un- 
announced, will probably be on a dis- 
closure of such conditions. 



New Y<uk University and the Atneri 
can International College in Springfield 

will be among the Slate College's del.at 

me, opponents, according to a statement 

bv Leonard A. Salter, Jr., Captaifl 

manager oi debating, To date only one 

debate, that with New York I'niversilv, 

lias been arranged to be held on the 
campus. 

The International College is In st on 

the schedule, with a meeting set tor 
February 9th at Springfield. The oppo 

mills will use a mixed team ol two men 
and one woman, according to present 

arrangementa, and it is expected thai 

the State College team will be divided in 
the same way. Tentative plans have also 
been made with Springfield College, 
whom the Massachusetts debaters <|e 

feated last season. The meeting with 

Springfield, though not vet decided upon, 
is intended to lake plan- cailicr in the 

season, 

A southern trip, considerably more 
extensive than that of last year is being 

planned lor the latter pan <>i March. 

I he debaters are scheduled to meet New 

York University in New York lot ■ re 

linn debate, and have tentative agree 
(Continued on Page 3) 

Amherst Defeats 
State Harriers 



FRIGARD PLAYS FINE 

GAME IN BACKFIELD 

l.eary, Smith and Mountain Show 
l|) Well in line 



Caird '.W Wins Second Place as Team 
Receives 21-36 Defeat 



CAMPl S C\IIMi\K 



"J'aeifists should declare openly that they will 
never bear arms or lake part in any military 
smite what so ever."- Kinstrin 



Wedneaday, November 4 
Varsity Socc er , (lark at Won ester. 
3.40 i>. ni. Attejnblr, Winnifml Wyssl. 
7.I.". p. iii. Dchaafaa < lui>, MesmW KMk 

7.00 p. m. Otphew (lull. Memorial BIilR. 
K.OO p. in. Onhestra RsSSBISSt, M'm M<nrlK<- 
Int'Tfraiernity Socrcr, Lower Level! 

7.1." p. in Q.T.V. v< I'.S K 

7 . Ifl p. m. A.S.P. vs. T.C. 
I liursilay. November 5 

I 00 p. iii. Jr. Vanity vs Freshmen I m 

( ountry. 
Band K<-lic;irsal, StOCkbridsC. 
7.11 p. in. [add M e eti n g, Memorial Mall. 
730 p. m. Intcrfr.it. rnity So ■ • r . 

L.C.A. vs A.G.R. 

Friday, November 6 
ss.A. va, A lain ret Jr. Vanity, Crom- 

( iiiuil r\ a) Ainli. r^t. 

Saturday, November 7 

1 p. m. — 10 p. m. Annual Flow.-r Show, 

French 11.11. 
2.00 p. m. Vanity Football, Springfield 

CeOeS* at SiiritiKli'-l'l. 

Varsity Cfooi Country, St. Stephen*, 

Alumni Field. 
Sunday, November 8 
8.09a.m. Sunday Chapel, K. c. Mac- 

Arthur, Secretary of the Masw k 

Federation of Chun aw, 
lioo p. m. Ootng (lull "Weenie Roast," 

OutiiiK < luh ( ahin. 

.i.i.'i p. m. Radio Concert, New York Pbil- 
hariiHiiiK O rch es tra , Memorial Building. 
Monday, November 9 

Var-ity ( raw Country, New Fntdands, at 
P... -ton. 
Tuesday, November 10 

( ollcuiaii Try 
Wednesday, November II 
lay, Artui-ti. e Day. 



Placing five runners among the first 

seven to finish, the Amherst junior varsitv 

( loss-country team defeated the Maroon 

and White outfit on the home COttnjS ol 

2.7 miles a week ago today. Ilouran and 

Alton, coming in third and hftn re- 

s|K( lively, were the leading contestants 

for Massachusetts. The summary: 

Amherst Maanachusett* 

HPP*. 1st Ilouran. M 

( old,. 2nd Alton, oth 

N '"""-. tth McGnchhm, Its 

( MeppO, <illi Schrmk. l.llh 

Slovrew. 7th Cote, I Ith 

Rloasaam, (Hh Miland, ir»th 

Rose. 10th Merrill, 16th 

Edwards, i ith 
lace 12th 
'lime-- 18 minutes, 2 seconds. 

Bush Still Maintains 
Position as Leading 

Scorer of East 



As a result of the thirteen points which 
be scored during the Amherst game, Hush 
still leads eastern Collegiate footliall 

In brief: 



circles as high scorer 

I'layrr and College J'os. (',. 

Booh, Meat State ah 

Winters, l>a\U l-.lkiiu hb 

Garbarfc, Allegheny sh 

CampigHo, W Liberty hb 

J Murphy, Kordham hh 

Ml ' til. Dartmouth hh 

Moran, Syra. Use hb 

l^aiiov. Drew I fh 

Sfadton, Dai Ir EQMna hh 

Hewitt, ( olumhia (|h 

man. Rutgers hh 

Ferrara, Cornell ojs 

WhHan. ( ath-ili. C. hh 

Fishel, Syrai use fh 

Morton. Dartmouth Ojg 

j. Lasnark, N.Y.U. bjb 

Stecker, Army l.h 

' in -man. N.Y.U. hh 

MontgMnei . , ' ottunbia <|!< 

\l ' !..< k<n W. Liberty hh 

Carlin. Ixiyola (Md.) hh 

Davy, New Riv t hh 

MolmherK. M.i-i. State hh 

Fowie, WIUianH ajb 

Foster, P rov i d e fb 

Murray, Holy Cross hb 



By beating Anthers) Colleg Pratt 

Field last Saturday, the Massaclidsetts 
Slate College acquired its sixth consecu- 
tive victor) and retained It '.Hiding as 

one ol the lew ondelealed teams heie in 

the East, Although the content s/ith the 

s.iiuinas was extremely thrilling because 

o| the keen livallV exisline, lielvveeii ( he 

colleges ami th ere f o re ■ game replete 
with thrill,, the true significance oi the 
meeting, howevei . Is seen la the i.h t that 
oui diminutive balfbat k, "I ou" Mush, 
cai i lie stooped regardless of the 

.Continued on l'a£e .1) 

STUDENT CONVENTION 
TO DISCUSS PROBLEMS 

Stute College Men Active in Student 
Volunteer Movement 

Dr Kenyan L. Butternetd, rorenei 

President ol thi, College, Li one ol the 

outstanding men of today hi norM affairs 

who will assist in the leadership of the 
Eleventh <ju.nlreimi.il Convention <>f the 

Student Volunteer Movement. This con- 
vent ion is to lie held at Hiillalo, N. Y., 

beginning Decembe r .'io, i'.i.:i. a few of 
the prominent men besides Dr. Hotter 

held who will had this lonvention are 
Biahop M< Council, Dr. John R. Mott. 

Kirby Page, ami Dr. Robert E, Spear, 

who has spoken on this c.iiii|.iis several 
times in the past few veals. 

Mr. Raymond I'. Currier, Idm ational 

Secretary of the Student Volunteer 

Movement, was on this campus last 
Momlav and Tuesdav He talked to 
several groups and interviewed many 
student concerning the problems which 
confront the world today. Mr. Currier 
was on the stall of Jmlson College, 
Rangoon, Murina, was Y.M.C.A. Secre- 
tary at Indiana, and was Associate 
Professor of English at I raoklin College, 
Indiana, before taking his present |>osi- 
tkm with the student volunteer.. 

This Student Volunteer ( OnvantsOn 
(Continued on Pafta 3) 

BUSY WEEK CONCLUDES 
SEASON FOR HARRIERS 

Varsity Meet with St. Stephens and 
Race Over Freshman Course with 
Kifthty Kntries Outstanding 
on Program 



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With the end of the 193] ( loss ( ountry 
season in sight, Coach Derby, who for 
the past ten v< .its has HUTCSSfully 

directed the destinies of the Maroon and 

While track and harrier Orjtfit* 00 
campUS, has drawn up an interesting 
si hedille as a lilting i lose to the Autumn 

running activitiej. Heading the list of 
attractions is the annual cross country 

meet with the strong St. Stephens aggre- 
gation of Annandale, \. V. This affair 

will take plan next Saturday afternoon 
With (apt. on Don Mason and his Massa- 

chusetts runners acting as hoots to the 

New York men on the MS( .ouise. 
I he race will lie the fourth to l»e run with 

St. Stephens, Coach Derby's charges 

having won two of I lie three events with 
the Annandale represenl.it iv, 

Other items of intena i n< hide a meet - 

iag b et w e e n the complete Freeh and 
Junior Varsity squads on tin- F res hmen 
2.7 mile course, on Thursday at 1:00, a 

rate cm the Amherst course between the 
Stockbridge men and the Amherst Junior 

Varsity squad on Friday, ■ meeting of 
the Maroon and White junior Varsity 

(Continued on Page 3> 



o a 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 1931 



JLbc fl&assacbusetts Collegian 



Official newspaper of 



the Massachusetts State College. 
Wednesday by the students. 



Published every 



Wallace W. Stuart *32 
Managing Editor 



BOARD OF EDITORS 

Frank L. Springkr '32 
Editor-in-Chief 

Oscar Margolin '32 Rial S. Potter. Jr. "32 

Associate Editor t 



DEPARTMENT EDITORS 

Editorial 

Frank L. Springkr '32 

Campus 
Edmond Nash '33 
Athletics Alfrkda L. Ordway '33 

William H. Wkak '32 W Raymond Ward 33 

EUGKNK GURALN1CK '33 



Alumni and Faculty 

Marjorik L French '34 



Feature 
Oscar Margolin '32 



Harrikttk M. Jackson '34 

JOSEPH POLITELLA "34 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT 

Eric H. Wbtterlow Jr. '32 

Huhiness Manager 



Kenneth E. Hodge '32 
Advertising Manager 

Ashley B. Gurnky '33 



Business Assistants 



William A. Johnson "32 
Circulation Manager 

Philip H. Livbrault '33 



Subscriptions *2.00 per year. Single copies 10 cents. 



Make all orders payable to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In case of change of address, subscriber will please notify the business manager 
as toon as possible. 

Alumni and undergraduate contributions are sincerely encouraged. Any com 
munications or notices must be received by the editor-in-chief on or before Monday 
evening. 



®lje praraou 

LOST! LOST! 
Three tonsils and an adenoid at the 
Amherst |Matl Sentimental, not mone- 
tary value. Kinder please return to the 

Pkarooa. Reward, one Invisible Em- 
press Eugenie hat. 

Do you find that your breath c rystalizes 
of a frosty morning? Are you troubled 
with pernicious anaemia of the pocket - 
book? Do you feel tired after an Outing 
Club hike? Do you see stars at night? 
Do you have that "all gone" feeling when 
you examine your last keg of beer? If 
so, you are probably suffering from 
Apedalosis or "limblessness," a popular 
new illness owned and operated by the 
Picaroon, patent pending, all rights re- 
served. Our chemists and biologists, 
working in spotlessly clean laboratories, 
put their heads together and discovered 
this beautiful new disease. Anyone can 
afford to have Apedalosis. Very reason- 
able rates by the day or week. Drop in 
some time and see the Picaroon's new 
fall line of legs and arms gathered around 
the Amherst goal posts. 



CO-ED NOTES 



NOTICES 



The Abbey Show, given annually by 
the freshmen, was held Oct. 88 in the 
Memorial Building. Shirley I'utnam 
announced the various acts. The pro- 
gram was as follows: 
Monologue— "How We Hunted a Mouse," Helen 

Connolly 
Solo Dance — Minnie Genclle-r 
Shirt Skit— Helen Goldberg. Anna Bernstein, 

Virginia Rohbins 
Dance— Ethel Blatchford. Erna Flack 
Harmonica Solo — Alma Marry 
Reading— Tokeyhuntus," read by Bernice Dolan 
willi ttMM characters. 

Curtain— Elizabeth IYrry, Scene— Alma Merry. 
Birds— Elizabeth Obcrg, Ruth Sargent, Maple 
Tree— Loin Daland, l'ine Tree— Alice Dwight. 
North Wind — Mary Louise Allen, Plum Tree — 
Marion Smith. Sun -Cornelia Foley, him 
Tree? — Marjorie Sprague, Brook— Elizabeth 
Harrington, Squirrels— Krna Flack, Ruby Mason 
Situation— Laura Bingham, John Smith- 
Marion Harris, I'okeyhuntus — Lorraine Caverley 
Danger— Marian MacLaughlin. Indian Chief — 
Alma Colson, Holy Father— Helen Streetcr. 
Monologue — Elizabeth Oliver 
Dance — Alma Merry 
Great Impersonator — Eunice Reich 
The committee in charge was Shirley Putnam. 
Eunice Reich, and Alma Merry. 



ELIGIBILITY FOR ACTIVITIES 

All students are reminded of the regu- 
lation by which no individual may take 
part in more than two athletic ami 
academic activities during any one terin, 
may carry more than one athletic <,r 
academic managership, or may take p. 
in even a second activity if he holds | 
letter position in a major varsity sport 
(football, basketball and baseball), ex- 
cept by special arrangement with the 
directors of Athletics and Academics and 
the Dean of the College. 



Entered as second-class matter at the Amherst Post Office. Accepted for mailing at special rate of 
postage provided fot in Section 1103. Act of October. 1917. authorized August 20.1918. 



13-12 

There is no need of being hypocritical about it we are quite enthusiastic about 
State's win over Amherst last Saturday, especially as the game was played on the 
Lord Jeff's field. State's victory was only by the narrow margin of a single point, but 
that made the game more exciting, kept the spectator! on edge, made the players of 
both teams give the best that they had. and also provided a suitable excuse for a bit 
of celebration by the State College students. 

However, let us look into the future a bit. Prospects certainly appear quite 
bright for another pace setting grid team next fall so we shall be expecting another 
win over Amherst. In fact it looks very much as though in the near future, we shall 
consider the Amherst encounter as just another game of football. It has already 
reached that potnl in basketball you note that State starts its 1838 basketball 
si-.ise.n by playing Amherst. When a similar state arrives for football, the adminis- 
tration will have one less problem with which to contend than at present, namely, 
keeping Amherst supplied with goal -posts every other year. 

Now, in our enthusiasm, we are anticipating the day when the Amherst game will 
be merely another game for State College i.l.iyrr* when State will be expected to win 
regularly. 

AND THE BAND PLAYED 

We are proud of the Massachusetts State College Hand after its performances 
both at the mass meeting Friday evening and at the game l.i.-t Saturday. Try and 
compare it to some of the forme, bands which formerly represented the college and 
what a difference is BOted both from the standpoint of quality and quantity. 

We congratulate Captain Sumner upon the results of both his authorship and I 
leadership. We congratulate the band Upon its appearance and vitality. A band 
such as this one is a credit to any college the size oi Massachusetts State. 

AM()N(; THE WHO'S WHO OP FOOTBALL 

In the feature section of last Sunday's Springfield I'nton-Rrpitblkan, we noticed 

this paragraph in the article entitled "Do Football Heroes Make Good on the Grid- 
iron of Life?" and we thought that \ou might like to read it. so here it is: 

"The successful careers of old football men at West Point and Annaixtlis 
WOUM till a large book. Let us limit ourselves to mention of four men who 
achieved their letters before entering the service academies: General 

Peyton C. March, at Lafayette; General Leonard c. Wood, who starred 

at Georgia Tech; Rear Admiral C.eorge Willetts, once famous at Rutgers; 
and Real Admiral C.eorge lloleonili Barrett of Massachusetts State." 

ABOUT COMMUNICATIONS 

It is the policy of the CuJfcfMM to pu blis h comnuinicat ions from students, faculty, 
alumni, or friends oi the college. Ihmcvei, there are certain requirements which 

these communications must fulfill in order to be published. First, the Board of 

Editors must know the name of the author of each communication although the 
name of the rommunicant need not be published in the Collegian . Second, all com- 
munication, should be as brief as possible, preferably less than o<M) words in length, 
and must be typewritten. Third, check jrOUf use of the English language. Take 
advantage of the communication column when you have opinion., that are of interest 

to the campus in general. 



EXERCISE FOR THE EMOTIONS 

The new demand of Teacher's College, 
Columbia University, that the school- 
master of today have a better rounded 
personality, represents apparently a need 
felt in many quarters. At the new Co- 
operative School for Student Teachers, 
maintained by the Pureau of Education al 
Experiments, seminar and studio courses 
for teachers already in service are being 
offered this Fall, one of which is designed 
to give the presumably overstrained peda- 
gogue new command of his body and his 
emotions. This is a course in the dance 
through which the teacher is to learn to 
"enjoy again his body physically and to 
find through a wide range of exercises, 
new kinesthetic possibilities." As a final 
goal he is to express his own emotions 
through the dance his "own way of 
doing and seeing and knowing and 
questioning." 

—Extract f rem th* New York Times, 
October l'.->, 1931. 



INDEX 

There will be a meeting of the edi- 
torial board of the 1933 Index in the 
Index office, Thursday evening at 7:lo. 



COLLEGIAN 

Pecause of the holiday November 11, 
Armistice Day, the Collegian will be dis- 
tributed Thursday afternoon at 4 o'clock. 



Sunday the Y.W.C.A. held an investi- 
ture for the feirls joining and those re- 
joining the organization. It was in the 
form of a candle-light service held in the 
V room. Wynne Caird '32, president, 
presided and spoke a few words iO the 
girls. Sylvia Wilson *88 welcomed the 
new members and a response was given 
by Winifred Fach '35. 

A poem concerning the seven candles 
used in the service was read by Ruth 
Campbell *84. Ruth Gardner sang a solo. 

Mrs. J. Paul Williams was the guest 
speaker and her address was greatly 
enjoyed by everyone. 

About thirty of the new members were 
present, together with Mrs. Marshall. 
Mi.,s Skinner, and Miss Knowlton, guests 
of honor. 



Alas! The Picaroon's imagination fails! 



First rifle practice of the season was 
held on Monday, with Capta in Kelwina 
Lawrence "A2 in charge. Those present 
were Marion Harris, Helen Streeter, 
Mary I.. Allen and Alma Merry, all of "36. 
(Continued on Page 4) 



ATTENTION OF ALUMNI 
Tufts Game Tickets 

Reserved seat tickets for the Tufts 
game, November 21st, will be available 
at the Physical Education Office b< . 
ginning November Uth. The regular 
price of these ticket., is $2. If ordering 
by mail, please include I5c for registered 
mail. All reservations must be acconi- 
pained by check or money order. 
Springfield Game Tickets 

A limited number of tickets for tin- 
Springfield game is on sale at the Physi- 
cal Education Office at SI. 00. These 
tickets admit the holders to a reserved 
M.S.C. section, between the two 45-yard 
lines. 



EDITORIAL POINTS 
Hush certainly has earned his position as leading scorer in eastern football circles, 

especially during the Amherst game. 



That was some ovation which the second team received before the game last 
Saturday, what? 



Building goal posts should be a profitable occupation in Amherst. Last Saturday 
State desired souvenirs, and the week before that, Wesleyan decided to bring home 
some Lord |elf wood. It is quite fortunate that Amherst plays Williams at Williams- 
town. 



Next on the Schedule is Springfield College and they have played but one game 
.luring the past three week.,. It seems as though they ought to be in condition. 

That was a . lever "hidden man" play, or would you call it an attack from the rear, 

which the Amherst cheer leaders used against the State cheer lenders between the 

halves last Saturday. 



Dear Pit anion: 

Astronomically sp ank i ng , your astutely 
idiotic column is singularly lacking in 
mathematical justification. The pro- 
found inanity of your babbling, and the 
unique manner in which comm u nications 
to your column avoid the slightest vestige 
of intelligence are amazing to the well 
ordered intellect. There have been pub- 
lished recently in this embodiment of 
editorial disintegration, several illusions 

of a derogitory nature, to a no tic ea b le 

individual unhumoroiisly referred to as 
"The Flaming Meteor." Understand, sir, 
(if I may so defame that salutation I, that 
I am a very sensitive soul. I repeat it, 
sir (again with apologies to all knights 
and their ladies! a very sensitive soul. I 
resent it. Imagine, if such as you are 
capable of such an achievement of the 
mind, the devastating self-t onse -iousness 
which such aspersions are invoking in so 
delicate a nature as me. It is only by the 
exertion of my indomitable will that I am 
able to show my face, understand me. sir, 
my face, understand me. sir, my face, 
in public places without the most alarm- 
ing pignientarx effects. 

1 so far humble myself as to beg of 
you in the most dignified, yet the most 
appealing manner of which I am capable, 
that you discontinue this addistic abuse 
of my sensibilities. Upon failure to 
observe a decided change in your tone 
and that of Mr. (). Whatana Siam, who 
I hasten to remark, waj most aptly 
named, I shall take upon myself to adopt 
a more physical method of correction. 
You will find. Sir, that the field of Honor 
is fraught with infinitely more dangers 
than the editorial easy chair. 

Trusting that combined efforts of you 
and your cohorts will be able to fathom 
the gently ominous import of this com- 
munication, I remain with no respect to 
you, sir, that most noble of martyrs to 
the red cause, 

The Flaming Meteor 
P.S. The abuv WW dictated to in/ 

sekertary. 11 tin y is enny mistakes in 

spetlin they is his fault. 



ST0CKBRIDGE 



Kolony Klub acted as host to its 
initiates, and a large group of alumni 
members Saturday evening, October 31, 
■I the annual initiation banquet ai the 
club house. Between courses of the dinner. 
President Ralph Stratton S*32, as toast 
master, presented speakers and vaude- 
ville acts. 

Professors C.latfelter, I loldsworth. 
Hubbard, Van Meter, and Instructor 
I). J. ROM attended the affair as faculty 
guests. Among the former members 
present were: Marston Burnett S'l'l, 
Alfred Parker S'2». Louis J. Lautcrh.n h 
S'L'4, Edwnrd P. Donnelly S'2li, Milton 
Reed S'28, Charles R. Pitt S*29, Sumner 
llebblethwaite. Jr. S*30, L. White r 30, 
Ernest Worthington S'30, Henry Zim- 
merman S'30, Lewis Watt S'.'H, C.eorge 
Foskit S':n. and Robert McKcclinic S*31. 

The caterer was Robert McKechnie 
A Co. of Natick, Mass. Mr. McKechnie 
is a K.K. man and a Stockbridge graduate 
of 1931. 



OUTING GLUB 

Next Sunday afternoon at two o'dock 
the Outing Club will hold a "weenie" 
roast on Mount Toby. The truck will 
pick up the members at the Fast Expcri 
meat Station and take them to the 
beginning of the Long Plains Trail, 
picking them up later at the entrance t<> 
Woodbury's Trail in Sunderland, when 
the hike i.; over. Every b ody come and 
have a good time. Maximum charge oi 
forty cent., as usual. 

An all day trip to Haystack Mountain 
on Wednesday, the eleventh, will be 
possible if enough members are interested 
The truck will start at five o'clock Wed- 
nesday nior ling. A maximum charge of 
11.00 will be charged, to include food. 

All interested must sign up with Crawford, 

Margolin, Miss Armstrong or L. Pea- 
All faculty members are cordially invited 
Due to the pressure of exams, the 
Outing Club meeting will be postponed 

to Thursday evening of next week. Pro- 
gram to be announced in chapel. 

ARMISTICE DAY 

A public meeting will be held on Sunday 

afternoon, November 8th, at "> o'clock iii 

the auditorium of the Jones Library 
commemorative of Armistice Daw The 
address will be delivered by President 
William Allan Neilson of Smith Co 1 



J. Paul Williams, student inter-church 
secretary, will give the first of a series 
of monthly talks at the a ss em bly <>" 
Thursday, November f>. 

Colonel Charles A. Romeyn, head of 
the College Military Department, will be 
the Stockbridge Assembly speaker Tues- 
day. November 10, giving the annual 
Armistice Day address. 



More than fifty Stockbridge "old 
grads" were back to attend the Amherst- 
State game Saturday, among them, being 
W insor C. Brown S'29, captain of the 
1928 football team, and now superinten- 
dent of the Shattuck Farina at West 
Andover; Errol F. Cook S'28, with 
Quaker Oats Feed Department, in Spring- 
held; Henry W. Davidson S*28 of Lake 
View Farm, Southington, Conn., and 
Keith Wilcox S'30 and wife, who came 
down from Port I.eyden, N. V., travelling 
over 230 miles to see that game. 



COMPARATIVE TEAM STANDINGS 

Only seven teams have neither been 
beaten nor tied — Davis and Elkiits. 
Syracuse. Massai hus.-tts State. Carnell, 
Harvard, Pennsylvania and Johns Hop- 
kins. Six others, including Fordham and 
Temple, have not been defeated but tied 
at least once. 

Figures for leading colleges follow: 



Dear Mr. Meteor: 

A swell communication. 



Thank* 



Arthur N. Phelon S'30, writes he is 
now located at Palmer, Mass., on the 
Monson State Hospital farm. 
(Continued on Page 4 











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Dcvh & Elkins 


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Syracuse 


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in 




Massachusetts State 


6 








m 




Cornell 


5 








17s 


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Harvard 


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136 


a 


Pennsylvania 


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Allegheny 


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164 


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Fordham 


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Temple 


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I'rsinus 


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Bucknell 


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3 


117 


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New York I'. 


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Columbia. 


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Colgate 


5 


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161 


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Brown 


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Dart mouth 


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holy Cross 


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Yillanova 


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Williams 


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Navy 


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SO 


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Yak 


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Lafayette 


4 


2 







Wash. & Jefferson 


4 


2 







Wesleyan 


4 


2 





4" 





THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMB ER 4, 1931 

J I ST UNPACKED 

Another shipment of corduroy trousers and knickers 
Now $3.40 a pair at 



3 



L A N D I S 



WIIIKRST FAILS TO STOP BUSH 
(Continued from Page 1) 

,.| declaration of the opposition to 
(Ojeck him. That, and the knowledge that 
t(u- State College has a sweet football 

all around, dwarfs the 13*13 victory 
ami the fact that Saturday's conquest 
proved to be the sixth in thirty contests 

the series between the two colleges 

began way back in 'H2 and the first one 
vum mi Pratt Field since 1901. Led by 
,h, meteoric Hush and the plunging 
I M.il. the Massachusetts Pilgrims as a 
unit functioned as no other Massachusetts 
I( ..in! has in a long while. We take oil 
our lats to Captain Foskett, "Freddie" 
\\,i, h, "< >ssie" Hotmberg and the two 

tophomore ends just to mention a few, 
,n<| for our opponents, we cannot refrain 
from saluting the Amherst end, ('. Kcnyon 

f„ r i superb playing, .is well as Hal 

Warmr, their hard-hitting halfback. 

The first half opened as Captain 
Foskett booted the pigskin deep into the 
Lord Jeff territory where, after three 
attempts tO advance the ball failed, De 
i fell back and punted to Hush who 
had hardly started when he was dropped 

C Kenyan who ennw in fast for the 
tackle. Failing to make first down after 
three tries, Welch kicked back into the 
Sabrina stronghold and from then on till 
I of the quarter, both sides engaged 
is i punting duel with the State College 
having the edge. The following period 
proved disastrous for the State contin- 
ent, tor having failed to push through 

[tin Amherst line for a first down after 
Fosketf had recovered De Pasqua's 
fusible on the latter's 90-yard stri|>e, 

[Welch limited to the Amherst safety man 
aIiu began the drive which slowly but 

(tardy gathered momentum resulting 
finally in a tally for the opposing team. 
With De I'asqua bewildering the State 
nun with short passes over the center, 

| .ii ii| with Warner, Kenyon, and K nut son 
sweeping around our end /ones and 

Manting through tackle almost at will. 

on from the south end of the town 

. the ball up to State's two yard 

line where the team held ami took the 

[pigskin from the opponents only to find 



|Y"ii have tried the rest? 

Now try the BEST 

And that's the 

ERST SHOE REPAIRING CO. 

Goodyear Welt System Employed" 



itself with its back to the goal posts after 
Welch had failed to kick the ball beyond 
the o-yard line. The half came to a 
close soon after Warner crossed our goal 
line for six points. 

From the very beginning of the second 

half, State clicked and kept on clicking. 

An exchange of punts followed the kick- 
off, but within a few minutes, a 16-yard 
penalty for holding <»n the part of the 
Sabrinas, placed the ball on the 42-\.ml 
stripe and in the possession of the State 
gridsters. On the next play, Hill Frigard 
saernd the opposin g line as he smashed 
through for a 25-yard gain. Immediately 
following this play the classy Hush 
tucked the ball under his arm, reversed 
his field and after shaking oil some 
would-be tackier* including Del'astpia, 
whirled across the Lord JetT line for the 
initial score for State. His try for point 
after touchdown failed and as the teams 
line up for the kick-olT. the score stood 
fi-all. For about six more minutes of 
play, both sides were busily returning the 
punts of the other team, while in be- 
tween. Frigard and Warner kept pecking 
at the line in their efforts to make up 
the first downs. Then came one of I )e 
Pasqua's rolling kicks straight into the 
arms of the elusive speedster. After 
twice fe v er aiug his field and with "Ossie" 
llolmberg leading the swarm of inter 
ferers who had gathered around Hush as 
he beat his way up the field searching 
out the openings, "l.ou" dodged first to 
the right and then to the left, his legs 
pounding out the tempo to action, and 

at last completed the 65-yard jaunt to 

the goal-line after leaving Del'asqua far 
in the rear. The fourth quarter proved 
to be all Frigard. Time and time again 
State's plunging back knifed through the 
opposing line for big gains. Amherst. 

however, was idle by no means. < lathering 
the mm Ives together on their own 25-yard 
line, the Sabrina* rapidly inarched up 
the field by means of Warner's lunges 
through center and Knutson's end run- 
ning. The climax came in the middle of 
the quarter when Curtis gathered in one 
of the anling passes of Del'asqua and 
fin to our 4-yard line before being tackled 



by Hush. Cadigan then went through 
cent,., for t |„. tally. The point after was 
blocked by l.eaiv and Smith who real!) 
won the game bv this act. The contest 
' losed with State hammering at the 

Sabrina line on their 10-yard stripe. 

I'he summary: 



Mans. State 






Amherst 


Mountain, Is 






lc, C. Kenyon 


Poakett, It 






It, Peiabers 


Sibsoa, Ik 






Ik. Skiles 


Lsmry, c 






c, A Kenyon 


SchaBner, m 






ik. Phillip* 


Burriaetoa, rt 






it. Potter 


Smith, re 






re, Mstna 


\\i b ii. qb 






qb, Greenoush 


Holmbergi llil > 






Ihh. \\ .ii mi 


Hush, rfca 






rhh, kniitson 


1-iin.ml fh 






fl>. DePaaqua 


M.i>s State 


II 





in o a 


Amhecst 





I 


6— 12 


Point altcT 


touchdown 


licisli 


(plair kick). 



SubstltUtio&l Mass. Stat.-: Hi. kford for Sil.son, 

Bievers tor Bontagtoa, White for Hotssbarg, 

Sil.son |,„ m, kford, MohnberK (or Whit.-, Bill lug 
ton for EsWSIS , Lojko for WV1. h. Uickfor.l I.m 
Sihson. AsshSfSt! Striik foi l'ott.r. limner for 

DePasQjaa, Pettsrfsf Bttok, DtPsaoas for Hnsasi. 

Curtis for Mason. Sunk for Potter, CadiKan for 
Kniitson, Mills for ('. Kenyon, Murphy for 
Warner. Ma.loll for Phillips, HoaW for tile, n 
B«SJB, < ol.l, for Murphy. Kefei.e II. A. Swal- 
li.l.l (Brown), t'mpire -K. Martin (Olx-rlin). 
linesman ( . 1- . MeCorniick (Drake). Field 
jii.li;. — A. W. ESSSM (Norwi.h). Time — 12m. 
p eri od s . 



S. S. HYDE 

Optician and Jeweler 

Oculists' Prescriptions Filled. Broken lenses 

accurately replaced 

BIG BEN ALARM CLOCKS and other 

reliable makes 
3 PLEASANT STREET, (up one flight) 



WESLKYAN TROUNCKI) 
(Continued from Pafte 1) 

quarter, and due to Kooci passing from 
the backs to the forwards, and from the 
\\inj;s to the center men, soon had gained 
the first point to their credit. The next 
two periods held much in the way of 
excitement, but no stores. Several times 
during the second and third periods, the 
ball was within srorin", distance of both 
boats, but each time was held cither by 
the goalie, or went oil to the side. 

During the fourth quarter, however, as 
the- ball was being tarried toward the 
Wetieyan goal, one of their fullbacks, 
who should have removed the play, 
missed his kick, and as a result the 
second point was scored. Jackson scored 
the first |M)int, and Lift scored the second. 

All the me mb e r s of the State' team played 

a fine game, and showed the result of the 

week c>i intensi\c' coaching as a prepara- 
tion. The line-up: 

M.B." Wenleyan 



I'll. /.ik. K 

i owing, il» 

I '.illllel. Ill 

llilehi ... k. ihb 

Prays*. > -lib 

Shiiman. Dili 
Koslowski, or 
W.i-ki.-wie t, ir 
Ja. kson, . ! 
Tat, il 
Mae kirnmie, ol 



K. Allen 

lb, < .rnhli 

lb, Galloway 

rhh, Kiant/ 

i iih, Ahreos 

Ihb. I lay. i 

or. Davison 

ir. While 
of, Urooks 

il. Solllvan 
ol, Talbot 



DICTIONARIES 

English French ( '.crnian 

Italian Spanish 



New Edition 
Webster's Collegiate Die ionary 



Three Bindings 



JAMES A. LOWELL, 



BOOKSELLER 



GRIDSTEJUS MEET SPRINGFIELD 

(Continued from Pafte I) 

straight. The former college's one defeat 

was at the hands of an opponent some- 
where near its own size, namely, Rutgers 
who handed the- Springfield yridsters a 
26-0 defeat. Other than that one set 

back, our future- opponents have been 
unscored on, having beaten k.l'.l. :>2 to 

0, Colby .'{.-{-O, and Middlel.ury o»-0. 
And so we feel safe in mying that, even 



OAKES BROS. Sweaters Lead the Field 

Pure worsted in a good weight fashioned by 
hand by experts. You will find that these sweaters 
*ill give you all that you want and more in looks. 
warmth and serviceability. 

Priced at $7.75 

F. M. THOMPSON & SON 



College Drugstore 

W. H. McGRATH, Reg. Pharm. 
AMHERST, - MASS. 



VISIT 

BARSELOTTI'S 

All the requirements for the smoker - Pipes, 
Pouches, Smokers Combination 
Ice Cream, Candy, S andwiches 

This Week at "BUCK'S" 

TOASTED ICE CREAM 
SANDWICHES 



HI'S Y WKKk FOR IIARRIKRS 

(Continued from Page I) 

■quad with the Amherst Freshmen oa 

the latter's course \o\emhe-i 1L\ and a 

race- between the Stockbridge team and 
the- Froth out in on November 19. An 

■flair ol special intere-st is at present 

being planned by Coach Derby, scheduled 

lo take pla.e on Tuesday, November 17 
at 4:(KI p. m . .\t that time .\\\ informal 
race over the Freshman course will wind 
up the cross country season in a grand 
and Kloiious l.uist oi lucwoiks, literati) 
speaking. No less than HO runners will 
Compete, comprising members of the 
Massachusetts and Amherst javees, the 
scpiads of the Freshmen classes of both 

colleges, and the Stockbridge aggregation, 
DAIRY JUDGING TEAM 

(Continued from Puga 1) 

As a team, Massai husetts placed fourth 
and led all the- other New Falkland state 
colleges in the contest. Iowa State 

Co l lege , Ohio state iniversity, Michigan 

State College teams placed before- the 
Massac husetts juduers, and the Univer- 
sity of Nebraska, Iniversity of Vermont 
teams followed. 

Professors Mack and I inclcpiist eoaehe-d 
the team. The drawing of the 1981 team 
has been only surpassed l.y the team of 

'27, which through the- leadership of Loo 

Allen, who was high scorer in the- meet 
ami took first in Judging milk and also 

ice cream, won third place. 



though the team is playing a suiierior 

team, the Pilgrims of the State- College- 
will offer their usual never say die fighting 
spirit which has always e harae teri/ed a 
State College eleven. 



PATRONIZE 



The College Barber Shop 

"M" BUILDING 
M. S. C. 



SANG LUNG hand laundry 

No. 1 Main St. Amherst, Mass. 

•*KPA/KIN<; AND ALL KINDS Of 
WASHING IIONE AT kkasoNAHLK 

I KKI.S. 

Our Laundry First Cluss 

Our Policy CuaranKwd 
NKXT TO THE TOWN HALL 

TYPEWRITERS 

for Sale and Rent 

K' k' w )t * \A 

H. E. DAVID 



DSBATING PLANS 

(Continued from Puga l . 

menu with C.C.N. Y . alas in Now York 
City, The Massachusetts orators will 
then proceed sc.utliw.ud, where they will 
meet Mveral Penneylvania teams, indud 
inn Lehigh University, Lafayette, Penn, 
State College, Bucknell, .mil the Untvat 
sit v of Pennsylvania. 
Candidates lot the- team amet even 

other Wednesdav nielli in the- Memorial 
Building at 7:1ft. The fundamentals of 

debating are now beinf strrsaad. since 

the- subjects lor this veil have not as \et 
been dec idee I upon. The candidates wil 
participate in trials before Piolessor 
Prime in January, when the- various 
teams will be selc-cte-d. With such ex- 
pel ienee-d men as Salter, I'olitella, Folger, 

Caraguuiis, Hill, Dunphy, Doyle, Werner, 

Williams, Warner, ami I Itibli.n.l, t In- 
state College debaters should have ma- 
terial for Otto of the best teams in years. 
All those interested ah- invite-d to 
attend tonight 's meeting in the Memorial 

Building at 7:11J With possibilities of a 

wc, man's team, coed delulers are also 
invited tO be- present. 

STUDENT CONVENTION 

(Continues*! from Page 1) 

will be the most significant sludeiit 

religious gathariai during the- pn-sent 

Academk year. Foill thousand dele- 

K-iicv. from the colleges and universities 

of the United Slates and Canada an- 
expected t, ( pntbci there- to eonside-r: 
(1) The present wen Id situation; (•_>) The 
place of Christ in this world pic tun-; 

'•'ii The present problems facing World 

Christianity; ill |„- future <>! Chnstia.i 
Missions. 

(Continue*! on I'uge I 



AMHERST THEATRE 



Not*: Kntlr* iiutltiorlum r***utrd with 
all n*w ulr-c imhloiu'il u|iholNlrr«d I 
wats. Th* nli mi. ■ I,- in comfort. 



W •■■mii -ii. in . Nov. 4 

KONA MAY OLIVKR in 

"FANNY FOI IV IIKKSFIK" 

A mm km. i ..i h scraanuBBfy famtf 

hllai il) • 1 1 1 1 . i. hi 



Russian 

Ii o wl i , Boxei 

Embroideries 

Carved Figures 



Thursday, Nov. 5 

ANN IIAKI>IN(. In 

"DsWOTKMr" 

wilh I.i-nIi* Howard anil <). I'. Il«-n ul,. 
Friday, Nov. u 



An I- |.i. <.l S|„,,| I,,.,,,. |,,|, mi %■,,,,,!, 

THK SPIRIT OF NOTRK DAMS" 

with 

L«-w Ayers, Sally Hlani , Farr«-ll M< Donald 

Tin- Four llorsi-nie-n 

eMlllrr-Lay<!*n-Sluhl(lr<-hir-<:row|*y) 

ami ii ..ii,. i oi Nun,. Dana i tto i taaroas 
ntsrs .ik ludinn Frank GsffeJaa 



Miss Culler's Gift Shop 



Saturday. Nov. 7 
Klearelo OsffSSS, Mae- t:iark* 
■SMB Summt-rtille-. Norman Foster 
In •'RFCKI.FSS I.IVIM. 

A |K,inii.ii,i |,i. inii/.iiioi, ,,| ,|„. |i,,,.,,| waN 
play "l'|i fc Up 

on tli -l.it;.- 

l-.iinoii- Radio si. us hi Pttaoa 
THK TFXAS RANt.KKS 

Nine- iowUiv ..ii, | .,,«,■!! | |„ .i,||,|| . . „i, ,1,, 1 1,,.,, 

Mon.-Tui-s.. Nov. t, 10 

I I., one .in-l only 

f.RI/l A t.ARIIO 
In th.- snas oi i.i a laat ihk 

CLARK GABU 
in "SI SAN I.KNOX" 

"'■' fall in. i lis. 



Dine frequently at the Candy Kitchen 
and assure yourself of the best in food and 
service for which our prices are right. 

Sarris Bros. Candy Kitchen Restaurant Inc. 



YOUNG MAX 

is what opportunity and which or 



(Continued on Page 4) 



OPPORTUNITY AWAITS A 

(they say, just around the corner. The thing to deeide ., „„ „ , „ na wnlcn corner 

Our new Fall Overcoats certainly offer young men greater opportunity of smart attire than ever before And vou can ask 

most anyone which corner to round to get to this store 

mmmmmmmmmmm E. M. SWITZER. JR.. Inc. 



i 



U. A. C. Library 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 1931 



THEY MAY LOOK ALIKE BUT-- 

An ordinary shoe may look like a good shoe when new. But it's what you don't see that makes a good shoe stay good in 
service. Come in. Select a pair of Miller Cook Shoes. Wear them. Then try to go back to an ordinary shoe! 



THOMAS F. WALSH 



FLOWER snow 

(Continued from Page 1) 

by Celeste Flore '32. It will consist of a 
v.im dI huge bronse chrysanthemums on 
■ raised platform against s background ot 
cedars. The beautiful fiewers aril! be re- 
lected in i pool which will be at the bate 
of i he raiwd stand. 

There will be other display* aside from 
tliis main feature. These exhibits will 
consist <>f table decorations for various 

occasions, such as I lallowe'en ami Thanks- 
giving, thai an- to be arranged by the 
scuioi cum Some very interesting smaller 
displays depicting any scene the maker 
desires t<> show will be put on by students 
majoring in floriculture. 

An inter. -stiiiR class of competition 
open tO the Student body is tO be one ot 

the points of the show. This class is the 
competition for ilish gardens. Some ot 
those which have already been con 

Btracted show some very tine work. 

Classes in the arrangement of native 

har.lv materials are also open to the 
student body. 

Decorations will lie of autumn foliage 
and fruits used in conjunction with the 

exhibited (lowers. 

SOCl.KR TRAM MKKTS CLARK 
Continued from Page 1) 

lbs probable line-up: 

M.S.C. c,1,rk 

Jorczuk. k ■■ , ''"'"-' 

CoaaaU, fii n> ' PhUbta 

flush! ft lb. Il.rw.Ki.t 

Hitchcock, rhb thU ' atMon 

Pruyn--. . Iil> «**• k "V 

Slninmii. Ihb w '- Wah* 

KmlwwtJ.ee or - Halmsrea 

Waakfewks, ir ,r - Dooetedlaa 

Jackson. . f ef. KlfstobottoM 

Taft. il ''• N " i - 1 ' 

Macklmmfc, ot ol.o Toole 



SOCIAL UNION 
(Continued from Page 1) 
Seven other entertainments have been 

imaged by the committee, fully coming 

up tO the high standards of the p.ist: 

Dec. 1, Friday, 7.00 p. m., Arthur Guiter- 

man, I'oet and Reader. 
Dec. 11, Friday, 7.1M) p. in., State College 

Revue. 

Jan. S, Friday, 7.(M) p. m., Hen Greet 

Players hi "Twelfth Ni^ht." 
Jan. 17, Sunday. 3.30 D. m., Symphony 

Francais from the Boston Symphony 

Orchestra. 



SUNDAY CHAPEL SPEAKER 

(Continued from Page 1) 

Stressing the differences in our social 

BtatUS, the speaker pointed out that 

while we have poverty, it is pot so self' 

perpetuating as was that of a certain 

Russian moujik, who worked in the 

wheat held for ten cents a day, and was 
watched from a tower by B telescope 
Observer, whose report would determine 
whether or not the worker would be 

flogged for indolence. Our poverty is not 
so bopeleas .is that of the British worker, 

who cannot protect his family from 
starvation. 

Dr. Gilkey recited I number Of ex- 
periences incurred in his trip through 
Europe this summer as a member of Dr. 
Sherwood Eddy's Religious Seminar 

group. Everywhere signs of social read 

jlMtment were evident. i lomes ot the 
tristocracy, and later of war-millionaires 
ire now being devoted to welfare pur- 
poses by the government. In Roumania 

and Austria, this socialization was es- 
pecially outstanding. 
"In America, the tradition of t$n*resity 

will never permit such abject poverty as 
it to he found ill Kurope," the speaker 
Mated. Speaking tO 4<K) workers, each 
one uncertain of his Job, and making an 

appeal for the 15,000 jobless in the city 

of Springfield, everyone of those -KM! con- 
tributed something. 

"True that we do confront the same 
problems as Furope, the American gov- 
ernment of the future will never be the 

Communism or Social i s m of Europe," 

Dr. < .ilkey maintained. 

STUDENT CONVENTION 

(Continued from Page 3) 

CifTord Tow Ic "."2 is the president of 

the Connecticut Valley Union of the 

Student Volunteer Movement. This 

Union include., the hospital training 

schools, the normal schools, and the 
colleges and universities of Vermont, 
New Hampshire, Massachusetts, and 

Connecticut. The quota of delegates 

from this 1'nion to the t o.ivention is 
about two hundred and fifty. It is 
expected that, with delegates from the 
Y.W.C.A. and the Christian Association, 
at least eight representatives will com- 
pose the delegation from this campus. 



VARSITY CROSS-COCNTRY 

As an added item of interest on I'ralt 
Field at Amherst College last Saturday 

afternoon the finish of the annual cross 

country met between the town college 
rivals took place between the halves of 

the football game, the Purple harriers 
defeating Coach Derby's charges 2i-:*t>. 
Although Dave Caird, dependable Ma- 
roon and White sophomore runner, was 
in the lead during the second lap, Morse 

of Amherst managed to edge his way past 
him, coming in first with a lead of it) 
seconds over Caird's time. The Sabrina 

winner's time on the 4.8 mile course was 
28 minutes tili.'J seconds, while Chase. 
Hill and Opper showed a bit of teamwork 

by appearing at the tape tied for third 
posit ion. The summary: 

Amherst Massachusetts 

lions. It (ainl. 2n«t 

mil. Opper, Chase, 3rd Utaoad, Baow, ota 

NMh, HuppST, 7th l'.irrar. Ilourun. Kth 

Uckwood, Mi Towte, loth 



M. S. C. MEN'S MOTTO IS ALWAYS 
LET "DAVE" DO IT 

AMHERST CLEANSERS, DYERS 
and LAUNDERERS 



PHONE 828 



Near the Town Hall 



PHONE 82S 



Thomas s. guilds 

Incorporated; 



*5*» 



V W 

1 j-^Jl SMART S1IOKS and HOSIERY for COLLEGE MEN and WOMl i| 

W ''"*3r^- 



QUALITY MERCHANDISE PRICES TO SUIT 

275 High Street, Holyoke 

Largest Shoe Store in Western Massachusetts 

mo 



1 
5 
5 



<OI 



JOSEPH GINSBERG 

19 PLEASANT ST. 



CO-EI) NOTES 

(Continued from Page 2) 

Tri Sigma pledges defeated Omega Chi 
pledges in a esciting game Tuesday, 

October 21, with a score of 125-17. The 
Omega Chi team was ahead at the end 
of (lie half, but Tri Si^ma steadily gained 

ground in the hist half. The line-up: 

lEI SK.MA K. IVrry, (apt.. II. Ashley. 
II. Ilaiiis. A. (olson, I. Covoiii. I.. < uveriey, 
1'. (.li.lliill, substitute. 

OMEGA CHI— V. Konkcla, C'apt.. A. Merry, 
||. Ma. 1-aUKlilin. K. Taft. II. Gary, A. I)\vinht, 
K. IlaniiiKton and II. Goldberg, substitutes 



Immediately after assembly, Sigma 

Beta Chi is giving a tea to which ail 

COlkgC nirU are invited. At this time the 
Kills will have an oppor tun ity to meet 

Miss Wygal, the aaasmhly speaker. 



Feb. 5, Friday. 7.IHI p. m. 



Dr. Harlan 



Tarbell, Magirian. 

Feb. H», Friday. 7.<M) p. m.. Professor F. 
A. WaUgh, M.S.C., Illustrated lecture. 

Mar. II, Friday, 7.00 p. in., A concert 
presentation of Cilbcrt and Sullivan's 
' l.ilanthe" by M.S.C. musical organi- 
sations. 



COMPARATIVE TEAM STANDINGS 

(Continued from Page 2) 



Rutgers 
li.i-.toti College 

OuuntUnia 

Western Maryland 
Omuls Tech 

l.cliiuli 

WVst Virginia 

Amherst 

Prtacetoa 

IVnn State 



3 

:i 

I 

l 
2 

2 
2 
1 
1 
1 



:i 
:\ 
2 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 



1 


1 

■_> 










s.", 
65 

n 

85 
.II 
6. r > 
47 
43 
34 
31 



66 
48 
67 
45 
42 
97 
88 
6? 
88 
83 



STOCKBRIOCiE 

(Continued from Page 2) 
Wednesday afternoon, October 2& 
Mi,s Hamlin and the Agricultural Oppor- 
tunities class, composed of the freshman 
Stotkbridge nirls, visited the Village Hill 
Nursery and C.reenhouse in Williamsburg, 
whi. h is run by Mi>s Brigham, a teacher 
of Horticulture at Smith C o ttage , and 
Miss Ward, a graduate „f the Lowthor|>e 

School of Landscape Ar chite c t ure. This 

trip was taken in lieu of a regular class 
and proved to be very instructive. 



WHY OVER-PAY ON YOUR DRY CLEANING? 
We will dry-clean and press your suit or topcoat for $1.00 

We call and deliver free daily 
Phone 635 SWISS CLEANSERS & DYERS Phone 635 



New Hampshire 5 10 Nil ■ 

Springfield 3 1 139 M 

Conn. Allies 2 1 3 27 

Providence 4 2 82 64 

Bates 12 75 37 

Arnold 2 2 3 25 «0 

Maine 3 3 50 ."..l 

Tufts 1 2 1 40 00 

Lowell Textile 2 3 62 52 

Trinity 2 3 51 40 

Rhode Island 2 3 ■ M 

Wotcester Poly 13 1 H M 

Colby '2- * 51 in-j 

Norwich l 4 38 151 

Huston t'niversity 1 •> M 140 

Vermont 15 34 140 

Middlehury 1 » ° :U 174 

Bowdoin C 5 12 126 



Over First National Store 



# ShOeS • • • AT A PRICE 

Never Before Approximated 

$7.50 For Scotch Grains, Saddle 
Straps, and Dress Shoes. 

$9.00 For Custom Shoes. 



1931 VALUES 



Half Hose 



75c For Wool and Lisle Hose. 
$l.OO For Wool Clocked Hose. 

CARL. H. BOLTER 

INCORPORATED 

shops at Harvard, Yale, Kxeter, Hyannis 



THE NATIONAL SHOE REPAIRING 

21 MAIN STREET 

Between Town Hall and Masonic Bulldinft 
HENS' SBOES SOLED and HEELED $1.75 
FII I. SOLES and RCHBI-.K IIE1-IS ii. 

/ adits' Shoes Soltd and Rubber Heels *1.40 

LADIES SHOES HEELED 40c 

All Work Guaranteed 



Men's Furnishing! - Shoes repaired, called for and delivered 
Freshmen, come in and see our selection of shoes, priced moderately, 

Special sale BOW on leather coats, just what you need for cold weather. 

CALL 984-M 

CARTERS MOULDETTES 

Foundation Garment (or Present Styles 

$2.95 and $ 3 . 9 S 

JACKSON & CUTLER 

Amherst, Mass. 

Given Away 

A pair of Bostonian $9. Oxfords 
A pair of Friendly Five $5. Oxfords 

FOR PARTICULARS, SEE OUR WINDOW 

BOLLES SHOE STORE 

SPECIAL STATIONERY 

72 sheets of Fine Writing Paper with 
50 Envelopes to match only 6 9 C 

A. J HASTINGS TaffST AMHERST, MASS. 



Headquarters for Riding Outfits for 
Men and Women at the COLODNY 
CLOTHING CO., 32 Main St., (near depot) 
Northampton. We carry full line of 
Riding Breeches, Riding Boots, and all 
accessories. We are exclusive agents 
for the famous Colt-Cromwell lineof En- 
glish Made Riding Boots and Officer^ 
Boots. We also take special orders for 

LADIES' RIDING BOOTS $10.00 up 

YOUNG MEN'S CAMPUS CORDUROY 
TROUSERS $3.75 and Up 

Come over to llamp and see 
Our Assortments! 




PATRONIZE 

The Sandwich Man 

R. L. BATES, North Amherst 



GO TO 

FISHER'S 

For the Best Values in 
Ladies' Full Fashioned Silk Hose 

"Cannonette" 
"Munsinftwear'or "Vanity Fail" 

SKRVICK WKIGHT OR CHIFFON 

at only $1.00 a pair 

Full Line of the New Fall Shades 



Everything in Hardware 
and Radio Equipment 

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51u> jWanflariuLagtta (gjllggtatt 



Vol. XLII 

SPRINGFIELD STOPS 
FAST STATE ELEVEN 

loot ball IVam Meets First Defeat of 

Season When Gymnasts Hammer 

Out 21-3 Victory 



AMHERST, MASS., THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 1931 



Number 7 



Suffering the first defeat in the 1031 
edition of gridiron hostilities under the 
colors <>f Maroon and White, Captain 
Cliff Koskett and his nun returned to 

campus last Saturday evening alter one 
, mo.-t strenuous afternoons of the 
,n. having met on enemy territory 
powerful Springfield College aggre- 

hi, which out-rushed and OUt-blocked 

Me! Taube's charges to the extent of ■ 
21-3 defeat. The Maroon and White 

supporters, however, find iinineasureahle 

consolation in the fact that the score is a 
improvement over the 57-0 lacing of 

1930 team, and in the fact that the 
.pi, uter of the name was all Massa- 
chusetts, Cliff Foskett putting his trusty 
toe into action for a beautiful 36-ynrd 
(Continued on Page 3) 



MISS WYGAL PRAISES 
DISARMAMENT PLANS 



I ells of World Problems in Assembly 
Talk to Student Body 



OUTSTANDING EVENT 
Of THE WEEK 

Dr. Kadelitle's statement that sni.il 

activities will be resumed alter Friday, 
November 13. 



That the new Disarmament Conference 

nni^t not fail, and that students and 

graduates of colleges possess coruiderabie 

power to influence its sun ess or failure 
u.i- the opinion of Mi.-s \\ innifred Wygal 
Y.W.C'.A. secretary, in an address de- 
livered before State students at the 

Wednesday Assembly. 

"In this modern age the world is tied 
her by radio, by commerce, and l>\ 

ideas," stated Miss Wygal. In commerce 

the life of thriving cities may depend for 
prosperity upon a group of jwople who 
li\e on the other aide of the globe. Today 
inhabitants of Leedi and Lancaster, 
EDgland) are suffering because of the 
cotton boycott of India. Also, (•handi 
ha* created a new force which has aroused 
tin world. The little man of India has 
brought before the attention of the world 
the ideals which the coming generation 
must use in settling disputes if the world's 
people are to gain in culture and progress, 
■aid the speaker. 

The speaker pointed out the aims 
irhicfl should characterize the impending 
in w peace conference. The primary aim 
- to settle differences by an honest 
straight forward diplomatic policy. 

"Since the conference was first planned, 

n new developments have suddenly 

arisen," said Miss Wygal. The first of 

developments is the world wide 

'ii lit- depression. The second fact 

*hich has caused considerable discussion 

ite is the apparent success of com- 

muni-iii Russia's five-year plan, and its 

! to spread. The third fact is the 

(Continued on Page 2) 



ANNUAL FLOWER SHOW 
ATTRACTS ATTENTION 

Many People See Displays Arranged 
by Students at French Hall 

Chrysanthemums in great profusion 
were displayed at the Flower Show held 
in French Hall last Saturday and Sunday. 
Several varieties were shown, among 

which wen- the UU*gC Japanese type, the 
anemone, the (lowered. ,im\ the pompons 
varieties. 

One mom was d.voted cut irely to com- 
mercial growers. The Northampton and 

the Holyoke Florists' Associations atten- 
ded this section of the exhibition. In this 
loom the Chrysanthemums predominated; 

central among the arrangements there 
was a vase of large, pure white ones, with 
several baskets of the smaller varieties 
grouped around it. A large table <»t car- 
nations attracted much attention in tats 

display. 

(Continued on Page 4) 



Debaters Prepare for 

Future Busy Schedule 

TWO More Colleges Added to list of 
Season's Opponents 



Springfield College and the I i.mklin 
and Marshall College have definitely been 
added to the list of opponents of the State 
College debating team this season. The 
debate with Springfield tails for a two- 
man team on each side, and the dis- 
cussion is to be presented before an 
assembly of the entire Springfield College 
student body 00 February »), at 10 a. m. 
The Massachusetts team will meet the 
American International College the sann 

evening. 

(Continued on Page 3) 

STATE GRIDSTERS TO 
MEET WAGNER ELEVEN 



Just How Good is State's 
Soccer Team 

There is plenty of room for dis 
cussion on the merits oj Larr) Bi 

sensational, undefeated BOCCer team. 
I \.n tlv how good the team [a in 

comparison with the college elevens 
throughout the Eastern United States 
leaves a great deal of room for argu- 
ment. We know, anyhow, that it is 

right up among the leading collegiate 
booteis. 

Let us digress for a moment to look 

up their record and compare it with 
others. State has downed two mem- 
ber* of the Little Three Amherst 2-1, 

Wealeyan 2-0. Wesleyan tied with 
Brown. Brown tied with Yale. Yale 
lost to Pennsylvania (considered about 

the best college soccer center in the 
Country ^-2 in two overtime periods. 

Wesleyan swamped the other member 

Of the Little Three, Williams 4-1. 

Brown beat Northe as tern. North- 
eastern beat Bridgewater and Bridge- 
water tied M.I.T. Wesleyan plastered 
Conn. Aggie; so did W or c este r Tech. 

State took them both with Clark ,n\i\ 
l.ord Jelf thrown in. Then i-. Conn. 

Aggie this week and Fitchburg next. 
We give it up. Maybe you ran 

puzzle o.lt the position the Stateis 
Occupy but nevertheless let us be with 
them when they make their lionu- 

appearance against Fitchburg before 
the Tubs game. 



Undefeated State Soccer 

Team Wins Fourth Victory 



Came on Alumni Field This Saturday 

Should Present Little Difficulty 

to Maroon and White Team 



COLLEGE ALUMNI 
HOLD REUNIONS 

First Massachusetts State College 
Alumni Night to Be Cele- 
brated Tonight 



CROSS COUNTRY TEAM 
MAKES GOOD SHOWING 

Two Out of Four Races and Sixth at 
Intercollegiates Comprise Success- 
ful Season for Harriers 

liy winning two out O! tour meets and 
l>\ capturing sixth plait' at the Open 
Intercollegiates at Harvard, the 103] 

Massachusetts State College (loss country 

team led by Captain "Don" Mason, 

Completed its seasonal schedule in a much 
more Satisfactory style than did the 

cross country team oi lasi yaar, The 

tram won the tirst and the fourth meets. 

the premier being the victory ovet 
Worcester and the last being the trounc- 
ing handed to St. Stephens. 

la the initial event, the State li.iiiins 

defeated the Engineers from Worcester 

on the home course bv a margin of si* 

points, the score foe the meet being 28 31. 

Although the meet was won | h,- first tun 
plan-, ||,,' State aggregate tOOh the next 

five plans iii the following on lei : Caird 

Mason, l-.dniond, Tanar, and Sn 
(Continued on IViitc 4) 



low 



MUSIC FOR "IOLANTHE" TO 

BY PLAYED BY ORCHESTRA 



mpaniment to the Gilbert and 

van opera, "Iolanthe,"' which is tO 
n in concert form by the com- 
ROrus sometime during the spring 

term will be played by the college orches- 

thirty pieces. Professor Bigelow of 

College who is directing the 

ently distributed the music to 

hestra members. Edgar A. Sort on 

1 will conduct the State musicians. 

tr s membership is an increase 

previous yean . Members in the 

ra at the present time are: Wetter- 

VlacLean, Miller, Moody, Whit- 

:ton, BatatOne, Bates, Dunham. 

1 ister, I.ibbey, Henry, Miss, 

< lark, Mldredge. Miss Deardon. 
sky, Miss Hast, Sanford. Hart- 
ub, Miss Alber. Sotanoff, Cn 

and Weiii. i. 



After a series of strenuous gridiron 
struggles on enemy territory for the last 
three successive Saturdays, Captain (lift 
Koskett and his Maroon and White 
warriors are welcoming the chance to 
play again on Alumni Field next Satur- 
day afternoon when they act as hosts to 
a none too strong Wagner team. The 
fray is generally eapected to be a mere 
appetiser for the objective game ot the 

s ea so n , that with the strong Tufts eleven 

on the following Saturday on home 

grounds. According to reports, the 

(Continued on Pade 3) 



With twenty meetings in the United 
States and one in Mexico definitely sched- 
uled, and instructors and representatives 
from this college assigned to lead the 
gathering* in the nearby (it ies and towns, 
the first Massachusetts State College 
Alumni Night will be celebrated through 
out the country tonight. The event is 

very significant, insofar as it supplants 

the so-called "World Aggie Night," 
annual gatherings of the alumni under 

the former name of the college. 
President Thatcher is scheduled to 

address the alumni gathering in Wash- 
ington, I). ("., this evening, and the 
Chicago ass em bly which has been post- 
poned to Wednesday, .November IN. 
when the President will be in that city. 

A number of meetings have been set 
forward in their date lor various reasons. 
Beside the meeting in Chicago, that in 
(Continued on Page 4) 



Paul Porter Will Speak 

to the Liberal Club 

lecturer Coming to Campus Friday 
Mas World-Wide Experience 

I'aul Porter, lec tu rer, writer, and field 
secretary of the League tor Industrial 

Democracy, has been obtained lor tins 
campus through the efforts of the Liberal 
Club. Me will be on campus Friday, 
November IS, and will speak at the 
liberal Club meeting. 

I'aul Porter, as h.-id secretary of the 

I. .1.1). since 1988, has visited scores ol 

colleges and civic forums throughout the 

United States. During the summer of 

(Continued on Page 3) 

COLLEGE SUPPORT FOR 
UNEMPLOYED SOLICITED 



STRONG CLARK TEAM 
HANDED 1-0 DEFEAT 

Hooters to \| t .,. t (;,„,„. A(Wk> |t> . |m 

This Saturda) at Storrs, Conn. 



hi saw its 



An undefeated soccer teen 
fourth win <... Wednesday, Dfovembei I 
* rhen ""• M.S.C. l tera defeated the 

I lark team by the scon- ,,f | ,, .,, Ul)| . 

center. Although (lark put up a hard 
-t'u^le. they were unable t„ ,,op the 
skillful state eleven. The only s ,, (| ,. (lf 
the game w,,s made during the n.id.ll, ,,| 
the thud quarter bj Taft 

From the opening -whistle, the State 
fan. took the offensive, and kept the 
''•' ,l "' the (lark territory fa ahnoat the 
entire period. The "pill" wMr^ehod into 
the ( lark net on two occasion during 

(Continued on Page j) 

REV. MacARTHUR GIVES 
SUNDAY CHAPEL TALK 

Personality to He Subject of J. p au l 
Williams' Address V-u Sunday 



Red Cross Drive Comes to Campus 
November 16 and 17 



TEAM STANDINGS 

With the coming of the defeat at the 
hands of the Springfield Gymnasts, tin- 
Massachusetts State College eleven in- 
evitably lost its standing as one of the 
few undefeated teams of the East and 
therefore of the country. Syracuse, 

Cornell, and Harvard emerged victors in 
their respective tussles, while Pennsyl- 
vania and the State College suffered set- 
backs. 'The list of teams in order of 
standing are: 

Points 



NOTICE 

first Student Forum of the year 
d next Wednesday afternoon 
1 in Bowker Auditorium. This 
ie regular assembly hour. 



lr at 


If 


/. 


T 


/• 


.1 


Devil nd Kikin^ 


.S 








an 







1 


ii 





831 


:'..-, 


Cored! 


r, 


a 


o 


233 


6 


Johns Hopkins 


I 


ii 


II 


too 


32 


Harvard 


i, 


o 


II 


1 12 


28 


Fordhajn 


a 


it 


1 


its 


B 


Allegheny 


i, 





1 


171 


■J7 


Temple 








1 




17 


Hut . kiii-11 


i 





3 


134 


SB 


Columbia 





1 





21 1 


10 


Pitt-burg 


1 


1 





21 1 


:-,7 


( 'oliM'.t: 





1 


i) 


its 


20 


Brows 


1 


1 


a 


1 M 




Mam. State 


e 


1 


o 




.-.l 


Xi'H Kanpehire 


r, 


1 


a 


l.'ii 


.-,.' 


Pennsylvania 


■ ) 


1 









Huh ( 


", 


1 


i 


1 13 


22 



(Continued on Page 4) 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 

"All things nmv are to be learned at nmr, >t.,i 
first une thing, then another, not one well, but 
many badly. '—John Henry Xcuin.m 

Thursday, November 12 

4 .00 p. rn. Track, St.iti- Iti-Ihihii vs. 

Amherst Junior Trark and Stati; Junior 

Vanity w AadMfM Pbmsj, 
ANNUAL BTATB COLLEGE ALUMNI 

NIGHT. 
7.00 p. in. Pteai < liih. Draper Hall. 
7.30 p.m. Ontiaa Club, Stockoridet naU. 
Fraternity Boom I'lay-off: 

Alpha BtgoM I'lii \s. Theta < hi 
B.nvl Rehearsal, Sto<kt)ri<l«e. 
t -rill. iv. November l.t 
soi i.\i. BEASON HAN' LIFTED. 
7.:i0 p. in. Literal < lui>. Fael Porter, 

Trawling Secretary of tte League for 

Indu-lri.il l>< mix mi y. Memorial BMk. 
Saturday, November 14 

2.00 p. m, \ir~ity Football, Wagner, 

Alumni Field. 
Vanity Soccer, CosaacticMt Aartadtaral 
( oUegr, Storn, < oaa 
Sunday, November IS 

!( <Ht a . in Sun. 1 iv < haptl, J. I'.nil Williams 

Directoi ot ReligiotM Education, State 
< oOeae 

li'J*> P in- <>:itinn Club, Mount Toby hike. 
Monday. November lb 

Start of Red CroM L Ta e mp k iy m e a t Drive. 
Tuesday, November 17 

OrpbeiM ' kbridpt Hail. 

l.OO [i. m. Tri k Meet, Junior \\,r-il> , 

ln-iiiiien. Storfcbrida»i Amber*! 
l ru-h. Ai the! ' i itiior Vanity. 

Wedncsda) , November 18 
'•i.'jo p. in. Student Forum, 



Two hundred and fifty dollars IS the 
goal set tor the Red Cross drive whieh 

comes on campus on November 16 and 17. 

Plans are well under way for a gre at er 
an<l more successful campaign than ever. 
The money raised will be divided be- 
tween the American Red Cross and tin- 
Unemployment Fund in Massachusetts 

It is hardly necessary tO enumerate the 
(Teal number ol wonderful things t In- 
Red Cross has done. Everyone knows 
the work this organisation does through. 
out the year. In time of flood, tornado 
lire, or any urcat disaster, in fait, thei r 
(Continued on Page 4) 



Using the thirty seventh chapter of 
l/ek.el as his tCSt, Rev. K. C. \|.„ 

Arthur, secretary oi the Maauu^ueetU 
, " 1 "" 1 "" "• Churches, ■ddrnaatid the 
students at Sunday Chapel concerning 

performing the "impossible." 

He slid that the vision of K/eki.l in 

which the old dried bones „i ., fallen 

army were assembled, i lot lied with flesh, 
and made to live agaia, was ., prophet v 

of the resurrection of tin- Jewish nation, 

a seemingly impossible thing, for the 

Jews were then ill bondage la, gway from 

,ll( " ""rive land. Their faith in God, 
however, carried them through, and the 

"impossible" w,.s hiiallv a. , -omplished. 

This prophecy of the dry bonis has 
also been fulfilled by what h.,\,., ,„ t |, e 
past, named SCJUnlly impossible achieve- 
ments. Among these is the abolition of 
human sacrifice, of slavery, of dueling, 
ami of legal piracy. The abolition of 
war may seem Imposelble, but we i an 

accomplish it through faith i n God, 

With the vision >iil| fresh in his mind 

of the battle field of Verdun strewn 

with dried and bleaching bones in I'll'.), 

Mr MacArthur said that God's purpose 

IS loo great to be broken bv w.u, and 
that some of us will live to see the day 
when nations can settle their disputes 
Without taki.iK their beet w.uths for 
i annOfl fodder. 



LEADING SCORERS 

Failure to score a single point in the 

game with Springfield last Saturday coal 

State's diminutive hallback, "l.ou" Mush 

his ranhng as leading scorer on the grid- 
iron squads throughout the country. It 
Kleins as though Winters of Davis and 
Klkins also failed to score, but Campiyho 

oi West Liberty State College ot West 

Virginia scored <',S points to brinv; his 
total up to 110 points, and but five 

points behind the record set by Macaluso 

ol Colgate, last year. Mush maintains 
iiis '.Hi points but is now KCOnd in tin- 
list of high scorers, The standings of the 
players; 





/■ 


C 


;/ 


ftlt 


/ 


/* 


Campisiio, W. Liberty 


lil> 


7 


2i 


1 1 





No 


Boeb, M.i--. State 


hl> 


7 


i.-, 


1. 


(1 


'II, 


.1. Marphr, Pordham 


hi. 


7 


ta 


II 







Garbark, Allegheny 


fi, 


7 


1 1 








si 


Winter*, l>.,vi> Elkint 


hi. 




1 1 


(1 







Mm. hi. - 


hi. 


7 


!.: 








7s 


Ml ' all, Dartmouth 


hi. 


7 


12 


II 


II 


. ' 


Labove, Dresel 


fi, 


7 


11 


1 


o 


SJ 


H'-'a in. ' oltnabia 


-il- 


7 


<) 


10 




07 


Rhode I i.ui'l 


ii, 


i, 


11 


II 




' x, 


Million. Devi) Klkins 


hi, 


X 


10 






an 




fi. 


7 


10 








Wh. 


bb 


'. 


Vi 


o 


II 




( iro unao . 


1,1. 


7 


■t 


1 





.»•> 



PR1SIDSNT TBATGHRR TO 

ATI KM) CONKKRKNCKS 

President Thatcher will be ,„„. ,,( the 

par ti cipating speaker i„ the spur Is I cea* 
ferenee on land utilisation to be betd in 

Chicago November _'() and 21, according 
to an imitation extended by Secretary 

Hyde of the Department of Agriculture. 
He is among the many iwnwniasel men 

m the country who have |„e„ eafced to 
attend and take part in the conference. 

I he scope of the convoi .n n.n ls i«, con- 
sider measures for the mmimtsuig of land 

Utilization relati^,- to our present over. 
prodm tion problems in agriculture 

The President end Director Sieven oJ 

the E ap er trn e Ul Station, will ahn par- 
ticipate in tin- meeting oi the Wo, lotion 
ol Land (.rant Colleges, which i^ being 
held in Chicago on November 17, is, and 

1!». The Association is <ompose,| ,,l li.nl- 

iriK men from all the laud granl colleges 
in the country, and I. .is f., r its purpi 

the correlation if work in rh 
col leg) 



various 



NOIICF. 
Dr. Raddiftc baa issued a statement 

of interest to cm ryone The ><« ial 

•" '-in I..- resumed on Friday, 

November 13. Moreover, if no farther 

ias,s .,f infantile paralysis develop, 

tin- swimming pool will !„• 

Novemlxi :;ii 



open on 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 1931 



Zbe Massachusetts Collegian 



Official newspaper of 



the Massachusetts State College. 
Wednesday by the students. 



Published every 



Wallace W. Stuart '32 
Managing Editor 



BOARD OF EDITORS 

Frank L. Springer '32 
Editor-in-Chief 

Oscar Margolin "32 Rial S. Potter, Jr. '32 

Associate Editors 



Elje prariiim 



Well, the team 
courage Wagner! 



just wanted to en- 



COED NOTES 



— - 



DEPARTMENT EDITORS 
Editorial 
Frank L. Springer 32 
Alumni and Faculty Campus 

Marjorie L. French '34 Edmond Nash '33 

Athletic Alfrbda L. Ordway 33 

William II. VU.ar '32 W. Raymond Ward 3J 

Eugene Guralnick 33 Harrietts M. Jackson 34 

Joseph Politblla 34 
Feature 
Oscar Margolin '32 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT 

Eric H. Wbttbrlow Jr. '32 

Busimss Manager 

Kenneth E. Hodge 32 William A. Johnson '32 

Advertising Manager Circulation Manager 

Buatnev* Assistant* 

Ashley B. Gurnby '33 Philip H. Hvbrault '33 



Subscriptions J2.00 per year. Single copies 10 cents. 



Make all orders payable to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In case of change of address, subscriber will please notify the business manager 
as toon as possible. 

Alumni and undergraduate contributions are sincerely encouraged. Any com 
munications or notices must be received by the editor-in-chief on or before Monday 
evening. 



Entered as second-class matter at Hie Amherst Post Ollice. Accepted for mailing at special rate of 
postage provided foi In Section 1103, Act of October. 1917. authorized Auttust 20. 191K. 



FRIDAY, THE mil 

Legend states that Friday, when it come* on the thirteenth day of the month, 
is a day to be dogged by misfortune. Tomorrow is Friday, the thirteenth of Novem- 
ber, but as yet we ran perceive no great evil about to beset us. On the contra! y, we 
understand that the long-anticipated resumption of social activities is scheduled to 
become effective upon that day. It also seems that these activities will function 
under normal conditions even though another case of infantile paralysis should de- 
velop lure on campus. 

No longer can the co-edi complain about the unrestrained privilege*- of the men 
students with reference to dancing otT campus and no longer will it be necessary for 
the chairmen of dam e committees to be in a perpetual state of worry due to the 

ever-present possibility of ■ cancellation c4 all plant foe a proponed dance. 

NOW yon are free to have campus .lame-. We hope that you will enjoy the dan. . 

after the Tufts game to the greatest degree, eapet bally as it trill be the first all-college 

dame of the J . ar ..ml alto as vc are expecting another Slate College victory. 



OUR STUDENT CHEST 

This coming Monday and Tuesday, we are to have our chance, as students of 
Msasachusetts State, t<< contribute t.. our own student cheat. The proceeds of thii 
el, e-t will be distributed to the K.d Croat and t<> the Committee for Unemployment 
Relief in Macaw husetts. Both of these organiaathmt certainly deserve our support 
and <uir contributions will be used by them to greateat advents 

M.uint Holyoke, Smith, and Amherst already have each contributed thousands of 
dollars this year toward reliel of the teat fortunate We should .1.. our share and we 
cm. With each one doing his share, our student chest quota of 1280 certainly should 
be substantially exceeded. It is up to each one of you, individually, to do your share. 



THEM IS A DIFFERENCE 

There is a great difference between true chut spirit and uncontrollable mob- 

niineliclnc-s. At the .lose of the last assembly, the sophomores attempted to sell 
their posters to the freshmen. As a result of this episode, one chair in Bowkef Audi- 
torium \\..s demolished and the glass in one of the central doors of the auditorium 
was forcibly removed in splinters. 

It seems that the sophomores should be sufficiently well acquainted with Stock- 
bridge Hall to accomplish their bit of high-preatttrc salesmanship without causing 

destruction of college property and also that the freshmen should have reached a 

sufficient state ol mat m it v BO that they would not betray to upiH-rclassmen the 
fa.t that their so-called class spirit is merely unrestrained moh-min.ledness. 



NOW FROM CALIFORNIA 

I'a.h week we receive communications from alumni .stating their attempts to 
have the newspapers of the country designate this college as Massachusetts State 
rather than last year's name Mass. Aggie. Now, one of our alumnae writes that 
she has given the San Fronti$C0 Chronicle the correct name of our college. Evidently 
the Associated I'rcss has been negligent in rc|K>rting Massachusetts Stale as such, 
but we nope that this will be rectified in the very near future. Inasmuch as a "change 
of name yielded a change of heart," the college should receive credit due, that is, it 
should be called b) its correct name, especially in the newspapers of the country. 



It seems to the I'icaroon that the pro- 
fessors on this campiii don't make their 
courses as interesting as they might. A 
little judicious "human interest" thrown 
in now and then for good measure would 
not only serve to keep the students' 
attention; it would even make the 
lectures interesting to the professor, far- 
fetched as that may sound. Instead of 
learning dull statistics about the number 
of hogs in Ioway, it would be interesting 
to learn the inmost feelings of said hogs, 
on the subject of being transmuted into 
rashers of bacon. 

In biology classes, when the time came 
to study the blood circulation, would it 
not be interesting to allow the male 
students to take the pulses of the female- 
students and vice versa? Yes indeed, it 
would be very interesting. 

In mathematics, would it not illustrate 
the curve of probability if the students 
were to engage in a little poker party at 
each class? The professor could kibitz 
around a bit, ju=»t to see that the laws of 
chance were being strictly observed. 

Would not the young ladies be much 
more interest ad in the Home Economics 
department if it were run in conjunction 
with a marriage bureau? Yes, I'm afraid 
they would. 

Would not the freshmen feel much 
more oriented if they were allowed to 
s.ving on trapezes,— just to get a prac- 
tical, working knowledge of how it feels 
to recapitulate phytogeny? Of course, 
some of them don't need trapezes, but 
that's only to be expected in a class that 
size. 

If some bright boy could invent a 
method for exercising while sitting in an 
easy . hair, think how the Phvs. Ed. 
enrollment would increase! 'Note: if 
anybody dors invent such a method, 
don't forget where you got the idea.' 

Just think how it would stimulate 
interest in the botany courses if the 
students wire allowed to wear a sprig of 

mushroom in their lapels! 1 <>r those 

students without lapels, a sin. .11 potted 

plant such as a geranium could be carried 
about in the left hand, or worn jauntily 
in the hatband, giving that natty alpine 
mountain . limber effect. 

The geology department could stimu- 
late interest by arranging rock-throw ing 
contests. Think what an impression it 
would make on | student t>> come in 
contact with real fossil remnants of the 
Eoxoon time. Perhaps in that striking 
bit of rock is gathered all that is left of 
our original protoplasmic ancestor, the 
parent monad of us all. Think of that! 



A football game between the terrible 
Taffy team and the marvellous Marsh- 
mallows was the feature of the evening 
when Sigma Beta Chi held its social for 
all co-eds at the Memorial building last 
Monday night. A balloon was used for 
a football. Marge Jensen ".'A starred for 
the victorious Tallies, who piled up such 
a tremendous score that the officials lost 
count. Other games, dancing, and enter- 
tainments completed the evening's pro- 
gram. Cider and doughnuts were served 
to the guests and to the appreciative 
members of the Collegian staff. About 
seventy co-eds were present, and every 
one of them had a good time. Mrs. Maud 
Marshall and Miss Mary Foley were the 
chaperones. The committee in charge 
included Orriss Merritt '32, chairman; 
Laura Cordon '32, Josephine Eldredge 
"32, and Mabel le Anderson *32. 



STOCKBRIDGE 



On Wednesday afternoon, following 
assembly, Sigma Beta Chi gave a tea in 
the Abbey center to which all co-eds were 
invited. Miss Winnifred Wygal, the 
assembly speaker, was guest of honor and 
the girls had the opportunity of meeting 
her personally. Anne Digny '31 and 
Celeste Fiore '32 poured. The committee 
for the tea were Orris Merritt '32, chair- 
man; Mabelle Anderson '32, Josephine 
Eldredge '32 and Laura Gordon '32. 



The Stockbridge football team with . 
record of one gan.e won, one tied, ani| 
three defeats, starts upon the ■ 
difficult part of its schedule when it 
meets Springfield Frosh, Saturday, ami 
Deerfield Academy next Wednesday. The 
team has been seriously handicapped by 
injuries, four of the players who started 
the opening game being out for the re- 
mainder of the season. A number of q< 
men are coming along in good shape, ami 
it is hoped that a good showing will be 
made in the two games that are left on 
the hardest schedule Stockbridge has 
ever had. 

Among the injured are: Dwight 
Williams, "Len" Burnham, John Martin, 
"Jim" Brandley, "Will" Steria, "Jack'' 
Turner, Warren Skelton, Charles Daw- 
son, "Bump" Charles. With the return 
of Dawson, Charles, and Skelton, the 
team will go to Deerfield with a strong 
chance of winning the objective game of 
the season. 



Several of the co-eds have merited 
riding cards which give them permission 
to ride, with escorts, outside class hours. 
Those holding cards are: Kathleen Mac- 
Donald '34, Elizabeth Taylor '34, Helen 
Rudman '33, Clara Rice '32, Florence- 
King "So, Elsie Healy '34, Pauline Mill- 
berg '34, Eunice Reich '35, and Anita 
Pike '33. 



OUTING CLUB NOTICE 

There will be a short, but important 
meeting of the Outing Club at 7.30 
p. m. tonight. Everyone should be 
pn sent. 



Stockbridge cross-country team de 
feated the Amherst junior varsity on the 
hitter's course last Friday by the sub- 
stantial score of 23-39. Pearson of the 
Stockbridge aggregate led the pack witli 
the time of 14:4P. The Stockbridg. si 
placed 1, 4, 5, 0, 7, while the Amherst 
club scored 2, 3, 9, 11, 14. The following 
list gives the order of finish of the runners 
and their time: 

H. J. Pearson (S) 14:49. Lockwood (A) 
15:27, Edwards (A) 15:35, Dick (S) 15:48, 
L. E. Pearson (S) 15:47, Batchelder (S 
16:00, Jaeschke (S) 16:05, Hagelberg (S, 
16:07, Chieppo (A) 16:15, Mistarka (S 
16:30, Moore (A) 16:34, Perkins (S) 
16:30, Koistinen (S) Ki:40, Rose \ 
16:55 



These are }USt a few suggestions which 
I am handing out tree. Until the faculty 

tees tit to an upon my suggestions, the 

Picaroon has taken it upon himself to 
educate the students. 



FROSH DEFEAT JR. VARSITY 

CROSS-COUNTRY TEAM 

Last Thursday, the Frosh cross-country 

team defeated the junior varsity on the 

Massachusetts course, there being thirtj 

nun participating in the race, 23 being 

freshmen ami seven being upper classmen. 
Two fre sh men, Casey and Gillette, tied 

for first place, their time being 14 minutes 
and 14 seconds. The list of men partici- 
pating and their individual times are as 
follows: 

Casey (1) 14:14. Gillette (F) 14:11, 
Murray (F) 14:37, Blackburn <F> 14:53, 
Crawford <J.Y.> I5s01, Little (Fi 15:05 
Girka (F) 15:07, Alton (J.V.) 15:09, 
Madd.n (¥) 16:10, Strickland (F) 15:15 
Ramsdell (F) 15:28, Premise (F) 15:42. 
Edney (J.V.) 15:42, Allen (F) 15:58, 
Willard (F) 15:59, Seecord (Fi 16:04, 
Smith (F) 16:05, Cole (J.V.) 16:08, Trask 
iK.i 16:14, Sumner (F) 16-14, Coleman 
1 1636, Cmss (F) l'"-:29, Merrill (J.V.) 
1632, Hiland (F) 1»'>:40. Foxhall (F) 
16:40, Blake (F) if. :-4»». Harlow (F) 16:54, 
Lucey 'J.V. 17:04, Schenck 'J.V. 17:04, 
Simmons (F) 17:19 



Mr. Thomas \Y. Caless, owner of 
KalerOK Farm, West Concord, Mass., .ml 
a graduate of the Stockbridge School of 
Agriculture in the class of 1925, has just 
been awarded a special rash prize of $100 
for the best all-round pen of White 
Plymouth Rocks iii the 2()th Annual 
Storrs, Connecticut Egg Laving Conteal 

for the year ending October 23rd. 

This contest is open to all White 
Plymouth Rock breeders of the world, M 
the award i- of national, even inter- 
national significance. Not merely nunv 
!ai i is considered, but also 
exhibition quality, si*e of egg-, si/' 

birds ami longevity. Mr. CaleSS 1 |»:i 

scored 996 ou1 of a possible looo points. 
In a few years Mr. Cales.s has risen to the 
forefront of rank among White R 
breeders. While at Amherst he majored 
in the department of poultry husbandry. 



EDITORIAL BRIEFS 

It seems that the subject of conversation for the month in Amherst is the relative 
merits and provincial misnomers of our favorites— squash and pumpkin pies. 



Mid-term exams are just one jump ahead of finals— during mid-terms we have 
fully as many exams as during finals with the regular incidence of classes in addition 
to examinations. 



Next Wednesday afternoon, we have the first Student Forum of the year. It 
will be what you make it it is your Oppor tun ity to offer suggestions for improve- 
ment of relations b e t ween students, students and faculty, and Students and the 

administration. 



Don't forget the student chest drive Monday and Tuesday evenings. 



7 A FRESHMAN AND A CO-ED 

It is a merry rah-rah boy, 

And he stoppeth a co-ed 

On P leasant Street before the^'Dorm" 

And this is what she said: 

"By thy freshman hat and studious look 

Who do you think you be? 

The Abbey doors are open wide and early 

I must be 
Within or else the matron will come out 
and look for me." 

He held her with his glittering eye, 
His courage rose and fell. 
"Hold off! Away, you beardless frosh! 
I'm a mighty Senior's Belle." 

"My pretty lass," the poor boy spoke, 

"I stopped you but to see, 

If there will be a test next time 

In Serex' Chemistry." 

H.M.J. '34 



Louis J. Lauterbach S'24 is superin- 
tendent of the large estate (Nushtta 
Farm) belonging to the widow of the 
late Admiral Francis T. Holies at Mtrn- 

stable, Ma. . This estate comprises about 

kid acres with one-quarter mile of shore 
line, and twenty acre of cranberry bogs 



Frank W. Putnam, Jr. S*2fl is conduct- 
ing a suc-e.-sful poultry business at 103 
Webster Park, West Newton, Mass. He 
waj on the campus Saturday, October 31, 
for the fir.,t time since graduation. 



INTERFRATERMTY SOCCER 

Now that the interfraternity soccer 
league has begun in earnest, the men who 
have been loafing around the various 
houses waiting for something exciting to 
happen, will have a good opportunity to 
rid themselves of the stiffness in their 
joints by participating in the fraternity 
games. Last Tuesday Sigma Phi Epsilon 
defeated Kappa Epsilon by the score of 
2-1, Raleigh and J. Wood tallying the 
points for the winnera and Astore making 
the goal for the losers. At the same time 
when the aforesaid game was being 
played, Kappa Sigma decisively defeated 
Delta Phi Alpha in a comparatively easy 
game, the count being 2 for Kappa Sig, 
and for the Delta Phis. "Phil" Stephens 
was the outstanding player scoring one 
point while Stewart scored the other. 

On the evening following, "Ham" 
Nelson and P. Wood hit their stride to 
chalk up a goal each to conquer Q.T.V. 
which failed to score. While the Phi Sigs 
were doing their stuff, Alpha Sigma Phi 
and Theta Chi dragged a rather slow 
game out to two overtime periods of 
(Continued on Page 3) 



Samuel S. Mitchell S'28, formerly of 
{Salem, rejiorts he is still greenkeeper at 
the Lawsonia Country Club, Green L.ike. 
Wisconsin, where he has been located 
since graduation. "Sam" brought hi* 
wife and son back to New England for 
the winter. 

The Mitchell family have some repu- 
tation for knowing "greens." S.un - 
father has charge of the Kernwood 
Country Club course at Salem and his 
brother, a graduate of the 1931 Green- 
keeping Winter Course, looks after the 
golfing plant of the General Electric Co. 
at Schenectady, N. Y. 



DISARMAMENT PLANS 
(Continued from Pafte 1) 

influence of the above two on war debts 
and German reparations. Fourth ■ 
England's change from a labor to -i 
national government and discard of the 
gold standard. Other nations have «sof 
followed England's latter move. 






is the China Manchuria question, ana 
India's bid for independence. 

Miss Wygal concluded by pointing out 
ways i.i which students may assist tin' 
impending peace conference. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 1<M1 



AMHERST AGENT 
for MARK CROSS GLOVES 



PIGSKIN MOCHA DEERSMN CAPE 



27th Year 



L A N D I S 



27th Year 



MKINGFIELD DEFEATS STATE 
(Continued from Pag* 2) 

placement kick over the crossdiar for the 

; |1\ of the fray. Great credit goes 

, u ti aew coach, Mel Taube, who has 

IK transformed a Mass. State 

. , -Weill which has been none too 

: i the past few years into a clashing, 

j Notre Dame unit, able to win 

ufiicult games in a row and scoring 

; .,l defeat at the expense of a Spring- 

ml,| squad which is admittedly out of 

tte College class. 

lUghOut the fray Louis Hush, higli- 
t ;t scorer in the nation, was kept com- 
pletely sewed up in his own territory by 
a highly coniniendahle Red and White 
I defense system. During the first quarter 
Kin waj kept completely within 
iy grounds. A punting clued between 
Freddy Welch of MssaachusettJ and 
,111 Knowlton of the opponents re- 
Isulted in the advance of Mel Taube's 
;ers to the Springfield 40-yard line. 
I At this point repeated rushes on the part 
of Ossie llolmberg and Rill Frigard 
I netted but five yards more, and the 
Maroon and White quarter called for a 
placement kick, with Foskett as the chief 
actor. The kick was low, however, and 
I more punting followed until the State 
blavers again came within firing distance. 
A repetition of the placement kick was 
lulled, and this time Cliff lifted the ball 
[in a perfect arch over the cross bar, the 
flying high, wide and handsome 
I against the wind a distance of 40 yards. 
In the second period the Springfield 
[players evened things up by staging at 
power that was expected of them, 
two of their three touchdowns. 
lie Red and White hirds, Owl and Hob 
! each crossed the last stripe for a 

I Owl Hitting his way through the 

Inisetts line on a final distance of 
i<\ yards, and Hob White snatching 
. KnowltOSl'l pass out of the ether 
Lri'l flying 30 or so yards for a score. 
■iel, downs, Hoh Wiiite staved on 
| nid and made both conver>ions, 

at the half being 14-3. 
Springfield again felt the scoring urge 
I third epiarter. Continuous line 



|V< u have tried the rest? 

Now try the HEST 

And that's the 

I AMtlCRST SHOE REPAIRING CO. 

Goodyear Welt System Employed" 



plunges on the part of the \<vi\ and White 
giants forced Welch to punt almost con- 
tinuously. It was after one of these 
beautiful .".0 yard punts that Hob White 
established himself as the hero of the 
clay. With perfect interference he added 
to the glory of Springfield by racing 70 
yards for another tally, after which he 
kicked the ball neatly over the cross bar. 
During the final chapter of play attempts 
were made by Frigard. llolmberg and the 
indomitable Murray Hicks to get Hush 
out in to the open through the medium of 
lateral passes, hut to no avail against the 
Gymnast defense, llolmberg made some 
sizeable gains and Frigard was in the thick 
of things every minute that he played. 
To Murray Hicks gens the honor of 
being the outstanding defensive and inter- 
fering back of the Maroon and White 
back-field, turning in a noble piece of 
work as Frigard's substitute. The fans 
were brought to their feet time after 
time as the rangy I licks slapped runner 
after runner into the dust, earning again 
the sobriquet of "Cut-down" Hicks, a 
name which he merited during his foot- 
ball regime as a sophomore, the year 
when he made tackle after tackle with 
a broken shoulder in the Tufts game. 

The game was replete with fumbles 
and penalties, both teams fumbling 
several times, and Springfield meriting 
the majority of penalties, some of them 
15-yard setbacks, in spite of the fact 
that the institution goes under the name 
of the Springfield Y.M.C.A. College. The 

summary: 

SpringHeld Muu. State 

Diaper, Freeman. Window, le re. Smith 

ciiinev.lt rt, Bnrrlsatoe. IBusii 

Hall. S.'1'arian. Stanford. Ig rg, .Sil.son, Hiekforcl 
giwrinsk y. cjuirk. l'arkhurst. c c, la-ary 



|. Fowler, Connors, in 
Halt, rtnSglM. II 
Wil-on, Kinney, re 
!< White, Meyers, q.b 

Owl. Brows, lab 
Know lion. Shield*, rli!> 
Hawka, fb 

Springfield 21, 



!w. True, Cummins* 
It, Posketi 

le. Mountain 

qb, Welch, l ojko 

rlil.. lin-li 

Hili, llolmberg, M. White 

lb. Frigard. Hick* 

Matt, state ;i. Touch- 



down* K. White g, Owl. Point* atiei touch- 
downs— k. White :s. Goal boa the Bald -Foaketi 

(|.l.n etnent I. Keferee -Waters of WPsIeyan. 

Umpin McGtath of ("nliiiiilii.. Fiehl jinlne 

Wall of Georgetown. Miminan Gamin of 
1 ordh.uu. Time -lj-ininute quarters. 



S. S. HYDE 
Optician and Jeweler 

Oculist*' Prescription*, Filled. Broken lense* 

accurately replaced 

BIG BEN ALARM CLOCKS and other 

reliable make* 
3 PLEASANT STREET, (up one flight) 



COLLEGE SUPPORT SOLICITED 

(Continued from Page I) 

services are generously given. Hut their 
work does not stop with visible mani- 
festations, it goes on forever in a quiet, 
unassumming way. 
Unemployment has been keenly felt in 

New England, and it seems tilting that 
students on this campus, since inosi ol 
I hem are from Massachusetts cities and 
towns, should help relieve the suffering 
in this state. 

It Seems wise, therefore, that the 

money raised in this coining campaign 

be used for these two purposes, 

A general committee, of whom Frank 
Springer '.'il' is chairman, with the help 
<>f Mr. J. Paul Williams, has charge of 

the drive. 

Chairmen of the \arit»us committees 
connected with the elriv t- are as follows: 

solicitations, Mary Black '.!l'; publicity, 

Wynne Caird *32; gggignments, rlarriette 
Jackson '34. 
The campaign will he- concentrated in 

two evenings, Moinlay and Tuesday, 
November 1 « » and 17. It is hoped thai 
each student will cooperate with tin 
solicitors and help reach the- goal of |2fiO. 

CLARK TEAM DEFEATED 
(Continued from Page 1) 

that epiarter, hut one wag not e (Minted, gg 
the referee- ealle-d an offside play. The 
score came when I'rtiyne hooted g |oog 
shot in front of the goal, and Talt pushed 
it home. 

For the next three quarters, the ball 

was carried up and clown the field, with 
no s aires resulting. On at least two more 
occasions, (lark should have heen moiccI 

on. hut each time- offside plays were 

called. (lark received not more than 
three char shots at the goal during the 
entire game, due- to the t.ic t that their 

system of play could not get through tin 
strong defense employed l>\ "Bri 
Booters." 

Hitchcock, Mackimmie, Count II, am! 
Cowing wen- outstanding for the winners. 

Hitchcock tlid an especially line job ol 

covering Higginbottom, the best player 

on the- Clark line-up: 

The line-up: 



DEBATERS PREPARE SCHEDULE 

Continued from Page 1) 
The Franklin and Marshall engage 
Bienl is to take place on March L.'.'!, al 

Lancaster, Pennsylvania. The topii fa 

discussion as now agreed upon, is. "Re 

solved, that Capitalism, as ,i sWcin of 

economic organisation, is unsound in 
principle." 

The M.S.C. debaters have already 
begun their practice debates of the 
various desirable subjects. The next 
meeting of the group will be held in the 

Memorial Building at S p. in. on We.ln, s 

da) evening, Novembei is, when poli 
tella ami Dunphy will debate the affirm- 
ative aspect of the capitalism question 
against Caragianis ami Hubbard. 



$1.00 $1.00 $1.00 

I here are several hundred titles — Here are a few very good ones 



Art of Thinking by Dimnet 

Oxford Book of American Verse 

Complete Works of Shakespeare 

"ur Business Civilization 
by James Trusloe Adams 



< treat Short Stories of the World 

American Oxford I dictionary 

This Believing World: a simple account 
of the great religions of mankind 



The World's Bestdoved Poems 
Come in and sit in one of our easy chairs and look them over. 

JAMES A. LOWELL, - - BOOKSELLER 



M.S.C. 

Jote/ak. g 
Council, fb 

Cowing, fb 

I lite he oi le. elili 
I'rtiyne, rhb 

Shuman, Ihb 

Ko/lowski, or 
\\ askieM ii /, it 
Jackson, cf 
Lilt . il 
Mackimmie, ol 



Clark 

orn >t 

lb. Philbin 

fb, Harwood 

rhb, Benson 

i hb, Roy 

Ihb, Walsh 

or, I [olmgri n 

ir, Donabedian 

if, Higginbottom 

il. Anish 

..I, OToole 



(.KIDS II US TO MEET WAGNER 

(Continued from Puge 1) 

Wagner aggregation, representing a mwlv 

organised institution on statcn [gland, 

New N ork, was successful in gaining a 

i> ii win over Coopet Union, ti„. urner 
out tit having been decisively white 

washed by Mel Taube's men in the first 
game of the P.Cll season, on Alumni 

Field. Other reports indicate that Wagner 

held the Arnold School of Physical Edu- 

I at ton team to ,, ~ () ^ ,,, t . 

Despite the injuries sustaine.l by 

Freddy Welch, varsity quarterback, and 

(>ssie Holtnberg, fast stepping hall, both 
ol whom fell the brum of the Springfield 

N .M.C.A. college spirit of roughing things 

up last Saturday, the Maroon .m<\ White 

gridsten gre in hopes of reaching in this 

next game (he- climax of the scoring 

habit which has put |1„. team so well Up 
in the- list of tin- nation's high set. itng 

mac nines. 



ALUMNI HOLD REUNIONS 

(Continued from l>ag* 1) 
Danvers, Mass. which Prolessor Sc.u 

to addles,, is postponed to Novembei i ( .»; 
thai iu Concord, Mass., which Professor 
W.uigh i> t,> address, and that in I'hila- 
delphia, are to be held Nobember l». 
These members ol the college staff will 

had the various eaoiips tonight! SeCTS- 

tarj Hawley, thai in New Haven, Conn.; 
Processor Scars, that iu Hartford, Conn.; 
( oach Taube, in Northampton; Professor 
McLaughlin, in Springfield; En Grsyson, 
in Worcester; ami I'loiessor links in 
Providence, R. I. Gronpe are also gchsdV 
tiled to meet m Fresno, ami Lee Astasias, 

Cal.j Denver, Col.; Miami, Ha.; Auburn, 
Me.; New Brunswick, N. J.; Columbus, 
<>.; Slate College in Pennsylvania; Biat 
tleboro and Burlington, \t.; ami Los 
Mo. his, in the eonnlis oi Msxico, Other 

gatherings, though not yet determined 

upon, will probablv be held in Berkeley, 
CaL; Stamford, ('■ .; Fitchburg and 

(.rcciilield in this state; Da\|.m, Ohio; 
and Montreal, in Canada. 



PATRON! ZE 



The College Barber Shop 

44 M" BUILDING 
M. S. C. 



Special Buy on Corduroy Trousers 

LIGHT GREY ONLY 

BEST QUALITY 

LAST YEAR'S PRICE $4.:,0 

A lot of 30 pairs at 
2.95 



Conn. Ag'^ie is to be met this Satur- 
day at Storrs, Conn. The outcome should 
be- \ ictory, according to all paper figuring, 
but it will not be a "walk-away." Clark, 
Wesleyan, and W.P.I, have taken Conn.. 
but St. Stephens was recently defeated 
by them, and Conn. Aggie always has ,, 
hard lighting team. 

College Drugstore 

W. H. McGRATH, Reg. Pharm. 
AMHERST, - MASS. 



SANG LUNG hand laundry 

No. 1 Main St. Amherst, Mass. 
REPAIRING AM) ALL KINl»s OR 
wa.miim; iminI'. at kk a son. \ hi i 
MUCKS. 

Our I .■uii.l,> Flrn Cluaa 

Our Pulley GSSHMMSSS' 
NBXT TO TIIK TOWN HAM. 

TYPEWRITERS 

for Sale and Rent 

*.' *.' V.' *1 Jt A 

H. E. DAVID 



INTKRFRATKRNII V SOCCKR 
(Continued from Puga J) 

three- minutes each only to find al the 

end of that time- thai neither dub could 
I'tcak the tie of 1-1 which was the score 
at the en. I of I he name Kil.be and 

I lam lid wire the seiners. Thursday, 

Lambda Chi Alpha defeated Alpha 

Gamma Rho in the best assies of all, 

the sere of III being an indie.it ion ,,f the 
closeness of (he contest, "I'liil" Warren 
scoring the on,- |«iint . Tonight, Alpha 
Sigma Phi will meet with Theta Chi to 
play off the tie incurred last week. 



All Not* Bs-Lss Issej 
Tin- i Itiaasta n GsssfSM 



AMHERST 
THEATRE 1 



Tlmrsiluy, \„ v . \i 



ll.ir.lle All.riuhi. Mjrm, |.„ y 

Maassea OT ai tosa , TummmOUk^mm 

l» "SK1I.IM." 
UMed c barlie < i,,,.,. , ,,, M1 .,| y 

Spa i.ii 

Ii' ". Ii T.ilki. - .a |jo |. in. 

"SOUS LBS Kills D|. PARIS" 



lrl,l;i>, \„v. |.i 



John ■sftysBSM in 

"llll IfAO GRNtl s" 

wlih Marion \l.trsh 



New Playing Cards 

Tallies, EnsemMes 

Prizes 

etc. 



F. M. THOMPSON & SON 



VISIT 

BARSELOTTI'S 

All the requirements for the smoker- Pipes, 
Pouches, Smokers Combination 
Ice Cream, Candy, Sandwiches 

This Week at "BUCK'S" 

TOASTED ICE CREAM 

SANDWICHES 



Miss Cutler's Gift Shop 



Saturday, Nov. II 2 I V.iOir,-, 

Sue Carol and R<UK TsSSSSf 

In "(iRAKI'' 

.iii.I 

Frank Fay ami I aura I al'lanU- in 

"'.oil's (.III io WOMEN" 



Monday, Nov. Id 



Km Ii Chain-rlon in 
•OM.i. a LADY" 



Tuesday, Nov. 17 

P*rl lahr and Charlotte (.rcrnuood 

in the in ii ~i. ..I m< . . 

"PLYING UK. II" 



PATRONIZE 

The Sandwich Man 

R. L. BATES, North Amherst 



Dine frequently at the Candy Kitchen 
and assure yourself of the best in food and 
service for which our prices are right. 

Sarris Bros. Candy Kitchen Restaurant Inc. 




HEYWOOD SHOES 

You've a right to demand Smart Appearance, Sturdy Construction and Lasting Service in your footwear. 

You'll find just these qualities in Hey wood Shoes. Price $10.00 

E. M. SWITZER, JR., Inc. 



M. A. C. Library. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 1931 



THEY MAY LOOK ALIKE BUT-- 
An ordinary shoe may look like a good shoe when new. But it's what you don't see that makes a good shoe stay good in 
service. Come in. Select a pair of Miller Cook Shoes. 



Wear them. Then try to go back to an ordinary shoe! 

i i< i i i \l>e BY NITTLITON 



THOMAS F. WALSH 



CROSS-COUNTRY TEAM 

(Continued from Page 1) 

with "(.it" Towle taking tenth place. 

The Wesleyan meet which wu run oil 
on the Nutmegger'e course was lost to 
state becautc "Davie" Caird, who was 
leading the race up to the two mile 

mark, lost his way when the indicator* 

confuted him as to the proper way. The 

score for the contest was 24-33 with 

Captain Mason tying with Snyder and 

Mac ten of the opponents for second place, 
while I'arrar and Snow tied for fourth 
plate and Kdinoml, Towle, ami Mc« 
Cuckian placed seventh, twelfth, and 

thirteenth respectively. 

Out of the following Colleges: Spring 
field, K. I. State, Howdoin. Boston Col- 
lege, Northeastern, and Boston Univer- 
sity, the Massachusetts harriers placed 

sixth ill the Open Inten olle^iates at 

Harvard October -'<> at Cambridge, and 

out of '.Ml runners, Snow finished in 22nd 
place, Caird L'oth, Mason :j.">th, l'atrar 

46th, and Edtnond 47th, the remaining 

etghl men of Coach Derby's auun'natc il " 
finishing with higher results. In the meet 

with the Sabrinas which took place be- 
tween the halves of the football game, 

the State harriers lost to the I'urple 

aggregate to the score of -I -36, although 

Caird w.is beaten to the tape In MoTSC 

by a scant ten seconds. Half way around 

the course, Captain Mason was seized by 
a stitch in his side, thus making it im- 
possible for him to finish the race, hut 
Snow and F.dmond tied for sixth place 
while I'arrar and llouran came in to- 
gether to capture eighth place. 

The last meet of the season was run on 
the State College course against St. 

Stephens. Captain Mason leading the 

Maroon and White to the 17-45 victory. 
Caird and Snow tied for the next place, 
while Edmoad and Hammond added to 
the win by tying for fifth place. Towle 
took seventh and I'arrar who was CUttght 
short of breath on IVexy's Hill came in 

eighth. 



I 



.11 



second visit to the countries of the 
ll.cst in t hrce \e.n . 

If you want to hear an Interesting talk, 
cio tome good thinking, and take put in 
a lively discussion, come- to the Liberal 
Club meeting Friday night, 8 o'clock, at 

Mr. J. Paul Williams' home in North 
Amherst. Transportation will be pro- 
vided from the Memorial Building at 
7:30 p. in. lie- sure to leave your name 
with Mr. Williams if you plan to attend, 
and be sure to attend; you will not be 
disappointed. 



TEAM 


standing; 






(Continued from Page 2) 






Williams 


8 


1 


1 


122 


.'.2 


Army 


5 


1 


1 


11. 'J 


88 


Springfield 


4 


1 





100 


M 


Vale- 


8 


1 


2 


111 


(>;> 


New York t'niv. 


8 


2 





908 


2 s 


l..il.i\et(e 


8 


2 





1 12 


1<) 


Bates 


4 


•j 





78 


:i7 


Dartmouth 


1 


2 


1 


108 


n 


Yillaliova 


4 


2 


1 


138 


88 


Navv 


:i 


2 


1 


SO 


88 


Maine- 


4 


:i 


() 


70 


88 


BoatOO Collcne- 


4 


:t 


(1 


M 


81 


Wash, and Jefferson 


4 


I 





88 


88 


\\ r-lc-yall 


I 


a 


(1 


47 


88 


Rtttget - 


:< 


:< 


1 


88 


88 


Amherst 


2 


i 





N 


7:i 


Prim •ton 


I 


."* 





11 


107 


< oiin. asbIsi 


2 


2 


3 


•27 


1 


Tufts 


2 


2 


1 


10 


80 


Trinity 


2 


4 





.-,7 


7:5 


Colby 


2 


4 





51 


101 


Wiiii i-<te-r l'oly 


1 


4 


1 


SB 


70 


MkkUebury 


2 


5 





88 


1K0 


.Norwich 


1 


5 





II 


188 


BWSSa t'nivcrsity 


1 


1 





:ti 


07 


Vermont 


1 


6 





M 


1 17 


Howdoin 











12 


l«8 



LIBERAL CLUB SPEAKER 

i Continued from Page 1) 
1930 he m, tele an extensive invest iK.it ion 
of unemployment in the steel mills 
factories, and shops of Pennsylvania and 
New Jersey, ami in the p revious year was 
in the thick of the dramatic textile strikes 
in C.astonia, Marion, and Klizabet hton, 
as the Southern representative of the 

E mergen cy Committee for Strikers' Re- 
lief and as correspondent for the Nation 
and the NtW l.nidrr. 

In October 1981 he returned to America 
from a first hand study of social and 
economic problems in Japan, China, 
Manchuria, Korea, the Soviet Cnion, 

Poland, Germany, and England his 



Mr. Williams Next Sunday 

J. Paul Williams, M.S.C. director of 
Relinious Education, will be the sjieaker 
at next Sunday's chapel exercises. Mr. 
Williams is well known to the student 
body with the exception of the freshmen 
for whom this will be the first opportunity 
to hear him. His subject will concern 
the respect we have for personality. 



Interesting Chapel Programs 

Several intereitins programs have filled 
the last two chapel periods. Friday 
morning chapel November 8, featured 
local talent, when Mr. Robert Ouirk, 
principal of the Amherst Junior High 
School, presented a musical program. 
This talented singer gave three selections 
the most BOtabk of which was "The 

Rosary." 

Capta in Carroll Bryant, field repre- 
sentative of the National Red Cross 
came before the student body, Monday, 
November '.». His purpose was to explain 
the work of the organization, and to 
inaugurate officially a Red Cross drive 
for money contributions to be held at 



WHY OVER-PAY ON YOUR DRY CLEANING? 
We will dry-clean and press your suit or topcoat for $1.00 

II V mil and deliver free daily 
Phone 635 SWISS CLEANSERS & DYERS Phone 635 

Over First National Store 



ANNUAL FLOWER SHOW 
(Continued from Page 1) 

The large hall containing the bulk of 

the exhibit was very colorful. Chrysan- 
themums in almost every conceivable 
hm- tilled the major part of the span. 
Ihic- again were the white flowers fea- 
tured. They were arranged In a vase of 

contrasting color against a background of 

cedars and surrounded by plants from 

our own conservatories. Below the vase 
was a pool filled with aquatic plants. 
This exhibit was most tastefully arranged 
and was the subject of much discussion. 
Credit is due to Celeste Fiore '.'i2 and 
Gilbert Y. Whitten "A2 for the originality 
of their labor and thought on this exhibit. 
Naturalistic planting shown by W. N. 
Perkins S.S.A. '33 and G. H. l.owrie '32 
was commented upon favorably. It was 
exceedingly well clone and revealed the 
fact that the designers were capable of 

r epr oducing scenes from nature. Stuffed 

animals added to the effectiveness of the 
display and helped create a woodbine! 
atmosphere. 

Soft blue made a pleasing background 
for a dull green vase filled with yellow 

chrysanthemums, and it was accentuated 

by a gilded frame. This arrangement was 
the work of H. Weidlich S.S.A. U. 

Table decorations also came iii for their 
share of interest. These were also the 
result of the handiwork of Celeste I'iore. 
She used a low green bowl and arranged 
several sprays of asparagus with bronze 
button chrysanthemums, This display 

was awarded first prize. A graceful com- 
bination of red carnations and asparagus 
belonging to John Kileen '.V2 rece i ved 
second prize. Third prize was awarded 
to Eric H. Wetterlow "A2, who used 
bronze chrysanthemums of the small 
flowered type for the center of his table. 

Miniature gardens interested many, and 
the entries in that class were numerous. 
I). Scott '33 displayed an unusually beau- 
tiful Japanese garden consisting of ex- 
ceptionally well chosen plants ami a 
pleasing arrangement. 

The Upper hall was devoted to fruit, 
with an emphasis on apples. Most of the 
varieties grown in this section of the 
country were on display. In one corner 
were fourteen unnamed .-.pecimens, which 
gave those interested an opportunity to 
test their knowledge of the various 
varieties. Methods of packing apples 
were also shown. 

Professor Chenoweth, head of the de- 
partment of horticultural manufactures, 
won the prize guessing correctly the un- 
named species of apples. Donald P. 
Muroney S.S.A. "31 won a prize for 
guessing correctly the number of petals 
on a chrysanthemum. 

The success of the Flower Show this 
year must be attributed to Benton P. 
Cummings *33 and his committee, for 
through their efforts in the preparation 
and execution of this exhibit more than 
one thousand jicople have been able to 
set the type of floriculture available on 
this campus. 



M. S. C. MEN'S MOTTO IS ALWAYS 
LET "DAVE" DO IT 

AMHERST CLEANSERS, DYERS 
and LAUNDERERS 

PHONE 828 Near the Town Hall PHONE 828 




Thomas S. Childs J 

Incorporated i 

SMART SHOES and HOSIERY for COLLEGE MEN and WOMEN j 

PRICES TO SUIT i 



QUALITY MERCHANDISE 

275 High Street, Holyoke 

Largest Shoe Store in Western Massachusetts 

UOS08. 



1 



"OB 



JOSEPH GINSBERG 

19 PLEASANT ST. 

Men's Furnishings - Shoes repaired, called for and delivered 
Freshmen, come in and see our selection of shoes, priced moderately. 
Special sale now on leather coats, just what you need for cold weather, 

CALL 984-M 
CARTERS MOULDETTES 

Foundation Garment for Present Styles 
$2.95 and $3.95 

JACKSON & CUTLER 

Amherst, Mass. 

Given Away 

A pair of Bostonian $9. Oxfords 
A pair of Friendly Five $5. Oxfords 

FOR PARTICULARS, SEE OUR WINDOW 

BOLLES SHOE STORE 

1932 DESK CALENDARS & DIARIES 
A 1931 Desk Calendar free with your 1932 Desk Calendar. 

A. J. HASTINGS tm 7SSS£T l AMHERST, MASS. 



#7-5° * ' ' 

FOR SHOES THAT HAVK ALWAYS 

BEEN YOUR DESIRE. 

$9.00 For Custom Shoes. 

WING UPS PLAIN TOES 

DRESS SHOES 

CARL. H. BOLTER 

INCORPORATED 

shops at Yale, Harvard, Exeter, Hvannis 



Headquarters for Riding Outfits for 
Men and Women at the COLODNY 
CLOTHING CO., 32 Main St., (near depot) 
Northampton. We carry full line of 
Riding Breeches, Riding Boots, and all 
accessories. We are exclusive agents 
for the famous Colt-Cromwell lineof En- 
glish Made Riding Boots and Officers' 
Boots. We also take special orders for 

LADIES' RIDING BOOTS $10.00 up 

YOUNG MEN'S CAMPUS CORDUROY 
TROUSERS $3.75 and Up 

Conic over to Hamp and see 
Our Assortments! 



the College November 16 and 17. Capt 
Bryant's speech was made exceedingly 
interesting by his narration of his main 
expi ricnecs as relief head of his organi- 
zatiem. 



Tilt NATIONAL SHOE REPAIRING 

21 MAIN STREET 

Between Te>\vn Hall and Masonic Building 
HENS' SHOES SOLED and HEELED 51.7S 

FCI.L SOLES and Ki HBI.K IIEEUS S2.50 

I. adits' -hoes >oled and Kubber lletls M.40 

LADIES SHOES HEELED 4<K' 

All Work Guaranteed 




FI SHER'S 

are n U tkowi»t a big ass<rtment of 

SILK UNDERWEAR 

at SI. 98 and $2.95 

Pastel Satin and French Crepe, 

Lace Trimmed in 

Step-ins. Dance Sets. Panties, Slips 

Petticoats and Pajamas 



Everything in Hardware 
and Radio Equipment 



ATWATER-KENT 



AND 



i»"> 



IV.i Rose, Lt. lilue. Pale Flesh 



MAJESTIC RADIO 

THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 

THE WINCHESTER STORE 



gjtg maflaarfrttflgttB (Mlpntatt 



Vol. xlii 



AMHERST, MASS., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 1931 



Number 8 



SOCCER TEAM WINS 
OVER CONN. AGGIES 



tndefeated State College Booters 

|>efeat Opponents in 5-1 Sweep. 

To Play Strong Fitchburg 

Team This Saturday 



The undefeated Massachusetts State 
College soccer team added Connecticut 
AggW to its list last Saturday at Storrs 
with a hard earned 5 to 1 victory. The 
attack of the Maroon and White failed 
Xo inaction during the first half and many 
■coring opportunities were missed. Com- 
ing back in the last two periods the 
St iters whipped the leather through the 
I Hiiiiecticut goal four times. 

Herb Forest, who played his first full 
game this season for State was the in- 
dividual star of the game. Besides two 
t goals scored himself, he was in- 
strumental in the scoring of two others 
whin he twice passed to Bob Jackson, 
who concerted both opportunities into 
Captain Eddie Waskiewicz 
(Continued on Pag* 4) 



Great Artists Secured 

by Co-operative Plan 

Advantages Offeied to Both College 
Students and Townspeople 

i Ine of the finest, and perhapa the most 
lions of plans whereby the town resi- 
dent! ami the students of both Amherst 
and the State College will be able to 
obtain the finest in classical and ]M)pular 
musk entertainment, is being brought to 
.Mention of the community during 
this ueek. The idea has been SUCO 
fully worked out in 1-° other cities and 
tOWU of the United States and Canada. 
Recognizing the fact that "gcxxl music 
isa necessary factor in the artistic gro wth 
and development of the country," the 

mbia Concerts Corporation <>f the 
Columbia Broadcasting System, aa <>i- 

latioa controlling practically 901 of 
the contemporary artists, has evolved i 

ni'inity C on c ei t Association l'lin 
whose purpose is to make "c o ncerts 

blc on a basis which eliminates all 
financial risk on the part of any person, 
group, or organization." 

I ' Association is organized on the 

membership plan, whereby each member 

pays five dollars in annual dues. The 

have been reduced to $2.~M for 

Kudents for both colleges to p r esent a 

ter opportunity and inducement t < » 

o the concerto. Membership permits 

member to attend all the concerts in 

any rity or town in which the concert is 

rored. This reciprocity makes it 

iWe for one to attend as many con- 

- as he chooses in the cities within 

anil outside of his own community. 

Among the cities in New England now 

sponsoring the movement are: Springfield, 

(Continued on Pag* 2) 



SUNDAY CHAPEL LED 
BY J. PAUL WILLIAMS 



R»1is>ious Director Tells of Wrong 

Conditions and Creeds Leading to 

Kxploitation of Personality 



ipect for human personality is the 

k of human relations," stated J. 

•«il Williams in last Sunday's chapel 

"Confucius expressed the same 

•entiment of do not do unto others as 

■ild not have other.-, do unto you. 

ateat thinkers ine biding. Jesus. 

• us. Socrates. Plato. our own Dewey, 

an d a host of others have taught the 

< iple," said the speaker. 

(Continued on Page 4) 



NOTICE 
BENEFIT SHOW 

^•'Xt Friday night at 10:."{(), there 
c- a special showing of Richard 
' "The Secret Service" at the 
rat Theater. The proceeds of 
:"rmance will be used to aid 
yment in Amherst. The State 
• Band will piny. Admission 40c 



Bernard Clausen Will Give 
Sunday Morning Talk 

Pastor of New York Baptist Church 
to Speak in Chapel 



Reverend Chancellor Bernard C. 
Clausen of the First Baptist Church in 
Syracuse, N. V. will be the Sunday chapt 1 
speaker for November 22. Those who 
heard Rev. Clausen's address last Novem- 
ber will welcome his return to this campus 
and remember him as one of the a ost 
interesting speakers of last year. His 
address on applied anger, and his clever 
reference to the degree of Master of 
Anger won the whole-hearted approval 
of the students. 

Rev. Clausen studied at Colgate, 
I'nion Theological Seminary, and Syra- 
cuse University. For three years he was 

asMMant pastor at Mt. Vernon, N. V., 
and for two years pastor in Hamilton, 
N. V. Since 1920 he has been the peatOI 
of the First Baptist Church of Syracuse, 
N V. 

During the World War he was a chap- 
lain in the 1'niteil States N,i\y on boarel 
the U.S.S. North Carolina. 

Rev. Clausen, in addition to being a 
speaker of note, is a writer of no small 
capacity. He has written several ex- 
ceedingly interesting as well as instruc- 
tive books. Among the books of which 
he is the author art'. "Preach It Again," 

"The Miracle of Me," 'Ten Portraits of 
the Twelve," "The Door that Has No 

Key, Fhe Technique of a Minister." 

"Pen Portraits of the I'rophet-," "I'm 
Pictures in the I'pper Room," ami "Pen 

Pictures on Calvary." 



TUFTS INFORMAL WILL 
BE GALA CELEBRATION 

College Inn Orchestra to Furnish 
Music for First Big Dance of the 
Season. To Be True Sport Dance 



It's true. We're going to have one at 
last. Everyo n e will !«• there! In l.ut. 
the men from Tufts and the girls from 
Jackson are to be our guests and 

Oh, you want to know what it is? ami 
how? when? why? Weil, you must have 
heard rumors of a Tufts Informal, that 
it's n"i"k to be | really good one. Come 

to the Drill Hall Saturday night at eight 

(Continued on Page 3) 



TEAM STANDINGS 

As a result of the game with Wagner 
last week and the subsequent 77 point- 
the Massachusetts State College eleven 

annexed fifth place among the lending 
colleges here in the K.i-t. Previous to 
this game the State College was in 
fourteenth place. Harvard is the only 
unbeaten and untieil college football 
team in the East and leads the list of 
high scoring colleges. 

Figures for leading colleges follow: 

Points 





w 


L 


T 


F 


A 


Harvard 


7 








149 


26 


Fordham 


6 





2 


192 


22 


Allegheny 


6 





2 


171 


27 


Bucknell 


5 





3 


\:u 


34 


lissi State 


7 


1 





243 


.'.I 


Pittsburgh 


7 


1 





M0 


37 


Syracuse 


7 


1 





838 


81 


Columbia 


7 


1 





223 


28 


Colgate 


7 


1 





214 


27 


Cornell 


6 


1 





838 


20 


Pennsylvania 


a 


i 





iii 


81 


\\ illi.ims 





1 


1 


Ufi 


81 


Temple 


6 


1 


1 


108 


30 


Vale 


1 


1 


■ 


144 


6.-> 


Lafayette 


1 


-' 





17.". 


19 


Brown 





1 





lt'»:j 


74 


Dartmouth 


•j 


• 


1 


210 


7s 


N'l-v Ye,rk t'niv 


.*, 


■1 


1 


I'll.". 


88 


Holy Cross 


."> 


2 


1 


143 


33 


Army 


j 


2 


1 


118 


81 


Villanova ' 


4 


2 


m 


1 88 


88 


Boston College 


."> 


a 


(> 


81 


61 


Wesleyan 


4 


a 





47 


88 


Ratten 


4 


a 


1 


111 


Hit* 


Washington & Jefferson 


4 


4 


ei 


71 


80 


Navy 


3 


a 


1 


4d 


88 


Georgetown 


3 


4 


1 


88 


7} 


\\V-t'-rn Maryland 


2 


a 


a 


Lis 


01 


( ariugie Tech 


'■', 


4 





7« 


0<* 


Lehigh 


1 


.'> 





88 


130 


West Virginia 


a 


.'» 


1 1 


88 


108 


Amher-t 


2 


."> 





s:j 


too 


I'rimeton 


1 


6 





41 


113 


I'cnn State 


1 


7 


(1 


; ;* 


130 


New Hampshire 


7 


1 


( 1 


i 38 


88 


Providence 


8 


■} 




: .> 


88 



(Continued on Page 4) 



STATE TO MEET 
TUFTS SATURDAY 



Two Elevens, Traditional Rivals, to 

Battle on Alumni Field. College 

Band to Be Featured 



With the enviable record of seven sub- 
stantial victories and one inevitable de- 
feat to their creelit, the Massachusetts 
State College Pilgrims clash with their 
traditional rivals the Jumbos from Tufts 
College this Saturday on Alumni Field. 
The chances of the first victory in five 
years seem to be very good, although 
there does not appear to be any indication 
that the game will prove to be a walk- 
away for the State eleven. 

Previous to the fall of MM, both 

teams bad won an even number of games, 
but the succeeeling five years have been 
exceedingly fruitful for the Jumbos. In 
1'.127 ami '2S the Jumbos WOO by large 
Scores; in *28 the score was .'ilMl, in the 
following year the teams fought to a 
i Continued on Puite 3) 



Paul Porter Addresses 

Friday Morning Chapel 

Campaign Rally for Relief of Un- 
employed Held During 
Monday Chapel 



Morning chapel exercises over the' past 
week-enel featured a talk by Paul Porter, 

traveling secretary for the- League for 

Industrial Democracy, and s campaign 
rally conducted by the student commit- 
tee in charge of the Unemployment Red 
Cross Fund Drive on campua. 

Paul Porter pointed <>ut the ills of the 
present soeiai order. He stnss<-ei the 
(act that the most outstanding criticism 
of the capitalistic system was a Inch of 

planning, and mentioned the fact that 

in a laml of plenty people are starving, 

and that unemployed coal miners in 

(•Continued on Pag* 4) 



FROSII EASILY WIN 

ANNUAL ROW PULL 

An item of interest b et wee n t In- halves 

of the game last Saturday afternoon was 

the annual Soph -I rosh six-man rope 
pull, of which the freshmen were a< i burned 
the winners <>f the 1931 edition after two 
minutes e>i straining and tugging on both 

sides. The names of the ropemen are- a- 

follows: 

Freshmen Colraan (dans captain, an- 
chor man i, Carr, Bray, Moulton, ("um- 
mitiKS, Yeerling. freshman coach Wil- 
liam Tyler Smith '33. 

Sophomores Ibngham 'anchor BUM), 

Lucey (Capt, conch), Call, Thompson, 

\\ . W., Sturtevant, Thompson, W. H. 



Valuable Art Exhibit 

Shown in Mem Building 

Colorful Ocean Scenes by C. P. Funis 
Now Being Shown in Memorial Hall 



Valued at a total of over fifty thousand 

dollars, and presenting rich bold masi u 
line scenes, the art exhibit in the lounge 
room of Memorial Hall will in all proba 
bility be the Outstanding campus art 
showing of the year. Manv of the- paint- 
ings are priced at two thousand dollars 
apiece, tad the majority of those remain- 
ing at one thousand ami over. It is 

easily the me>st valuable exhibit ever to 
be held on campus. The canvases are 
hugS and powerful in their presentation 
of subject matter. They grVSJ one the 
impression of oils most generously ami 
thickly a p pl i ed. There is neithing "goody, 
goody" or .sentimental. The scenes are 
as rugged as the sea coast anel men the\ 

are supp o se d to repres en t. The men have 

muscles; the waves power. George Pear- 
son Knnij does not present beauty hiel- 
elciu-d by clouds neir moonlight shining on 

lapping navee. His presentation of sea 

siih- miiiis is rOUgfa ami natural with 

plenty of vigorous bright color. 

Mr. Lnnis is a well known American 

artist ami teacher of art. He has a 

summer homo in Montague and is a 

person, il liiemel eif ProfinSOf Waugh 

through whom the loan of the paintings 

were obtained, Although an admirer of 
the Connecticut Valley's scenic beauty, 
Mr. Ennis for the most part paints coast 
set-iie,. Dining the summer he COOdttCtS 

an art school in Maine, lie recently 

(Continued on Pita* 3) 



JUDGING CONTEST IS 
WELL ATTENDED HERE 

Cups and Prizes Awarded to Winners 
in Interscliolastic Judging Meet 



CAMPl'S CALENDAR 



"Dotst thou lute life, then do not squander 
time, for that is the stuff life is made of " 

— Pour Richard 



Wednesday, November 18 
2 00p m BtSckMdai Football, DeerfieM 

Academy, there 
7 IK) p in K O Club Met-ting, fHim 8llsstl1ssa 

Hall 
SIM) j) m Debating Club MeetinK, 
Memorial KnildiiiK 

BOOn m OrnhcBs Cteb, Steckbridee Hall 

s 80 fi m Orchestra toh uiwl st<>< kbr ld ge 

trail 

Thursday, November 19 
".'.op m Bud BtetaansL. Btockbrids* 

Hall 

Friday, November 20 
Junior ( hi-- !5an<iu<-t. I^ord Jeff Inn 
7 oo p m Sm iul I'nion, The Vanity 

Qaartet, StKkbrlds* UsH 
lOSOp m Benefit show. UacmpioyBKai 
Kr-H'-f. Anthem Theatre 
Saturday. Nov ember 21 
lOOp m Vanity S o cc e r. Fitchburg 

Normal, ben 
2 on i> m Vanity Football, Tuft-. ii»r>- 
p m Informal Daace, QrUJ H a |i 
Sunday, November 22 
9 10 a m Sunday Ca aa a t . Rev Bernard 
C ( lau-'-n. lir-t Hapti-t Church, 
SytacuJe, N V 
800 p m Oattes Crab Hike 

'.', HO p m Radio CeMCSR, New York I'liil- 

banamaV Orcheatn, Memorial Hall 
Tuesday, November 24 

BOOp m Choru- K'l,e.ir-al. Memorial Hall 
Wednesday, November 25 

lL'.'iOp m Thanksgiving Reress 



\tie niliil by 347 stiieU-nts .mil I not me 
t'uv from various high and secondary 
schools throughout the state, the Maass 
cbusetts State Cdknsj Istorachotaata 

J 1 1 « I k > ' > K Contest held last liiilav an. I 

Saturday, proved te. be unusually sm 
ceaaful. Four Interscholnatic School Cups 
were awarded to the winning teams, who 

are t'i holel them for one vcar. The ■ bool 

winning the cup lor three years, is to l><- 

allowed permanent possession of it. 
(Continued on Page 3) 

LEADING scorkrs 
By whirling down the field to score five 
touchdowns and con seq uently .'in |Kiints, 

the elusive- "l.ou" Mush strengthened his 

position as second highest scorer in the- 
country but fell short of overtaking 
Cnmpiglio of West Liberty State Teach- 
ers College by 20 points, although there 
is hardly a shallow of doubt Imt what 

Hush would have made' up the deficit 
had Coach Tauhe thought it wise to 

allow the diminutive halfback to play 
the whole game. 

Records of the leading scorers fedlow: 
G T Pat Fid T 



WAGNER OVERWHELMED 
BY MASS. STATE 77-0 

Hush Leads Scorers wiih Five Touch- 
downs While S> Hester and llolm- 
I ollow with A and 2 Respectively 



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Running up the highest score ever 
aggregated by a Maaaarhissjlla Mate 
College eleven, a Maroon and White 
squad of Rod Granges, Barry Wboda, 
and "ga l lopi n g ghoata" of Notre Demo 
calibre took complete ami da cie rve con- 
trol of the situation on Alumni Field last 
Saturday afternoon and left a somewhat 

bewildered Wanner team on the short 
end of a 77-0 margin. The Gfwsfl and 

White Wn gn o ri tea looked actually una* 

geroue elm inn the Opening minutes of the 
fray, but the nimlile- Hush, the UMpUwd 
Tuffy Sylvester, anel an ever elc|>enelaUe- 

»>>m,- Hotmberg, tngathai with Don Smith 
and Ed Clow, held a convention and 

manufai tured twelve torn JMJOWBS before 
the final whistle, the further efortO of 

the New York team resulting in nothing 

Continued on Page .1) 

Students Srage Drive 

to Help Unemployed 

$250 is (;<»al Set for Campus Drive 

Last Monda) night found 1106.25 la 
contributions for the Red Cross and I'n- 
emptoymenl Fund as s result of the frel 
nighi of the student drive on this campua. 

1 !| is am it was reported by nineteen of 

the fort) five solicitors which ««-te- sent 
out. The outstanding event of the fn-t 
nighl was a iiki, contribution from Phi 
Sigma Kappa of .fL'J. 

Due to thee line nl ft omiiiii e|e -pi COBSOB, 
fumls ate needed foi Ucd Cross ami 

Unemployment Funds more than evet 

hele.ie-. Hie e oiimiit tee- in e li.,t K e- of t | u - 

drive has made every effort to make the- 

<lli\e- a slleee s. \, s ,,.„ |,,„ k t |„. U()| | ,,| 

1280. 

Three morning chapel programs were 
given over to the drive. The inst was a 
talk l.\ (..plain Cnroii Bryant, held 
representative of the National !<•-.( Cross; 
the second waaa rtisrussiou of the unem- 
ployment situation l>y Paul Potter, and 

the third, last Monday, was s program 
■ -i students on which Wynne Caird, 

I >se ,ei Margolin, and < lifford Towle spoke. 

The dn\< was re ,n. i ii, i,-,| i, y the follow* 

ing committees under the direction of 

Mr. J. Paul Williams: 

General chairman, Frank Springer. 

Aasignmcnl committee: ll.nn.it,- 
Jackson, chairman, Ralph Stratton, 
Lawrence Sc h en ck , Helen Merrttt, 
Francte ( iM,k, Elinor (and.-, c.-ii., i.,,,. 
binder and Francis Woodbury. 

Publicity committee: Wynne Caird, 

ehiirman, Hill Ma K er ami Eunice Reich. 
SoUdtntioo committee: Mar\ I'.laek, 

chairmnn, and Ovid Hoagaboom. 

DR. G. E. VINCENT 
TO ADDRESS ASSEMBLY 

Noted Kducator tt» Speak at Phi 
Kappa Phi Assembly, December 2 

Dr. George Edgar Vincent, e past 

preside.it oi th.- Rockefeilei Foundation, 

and an outstanding |>ersoiialit \ in edu- 

catkmal activities, "ill ad md 

s. hoiarship Day assembl) m Bowknr 
Auditorium on D ec emb e i 2, according 
to an announcemem from the President's 

olln e 

As outline. i by President Thatcher at 
the inauguration of the Scholarship Day 
assembl) last ye-..r, the purpose of the 
event is to dignify the aims of, and to 
recognise the- rewards of high scholastic 
attainment to the end that encourage- 
ment to greater endeavor may result. 
The program will consist of Dr. Vincent's 

(Continued on Page i) 



OUTSTANDING EVENT 
Off THE WEES 



ll.-m .forth soronti.s on this < .im- 
pels will be c l o s ed , win. h places them 
on the- same- be*ii as the fraternities. 



t 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 1931 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 1931 



TEbe Massachusetts Collegian 



Official newspaper of 



the Massachusetts State College. 
Wednesday by the students. 



Published every 



Wallace W. Stuart '32 
Managing Editor 



BOARD OF EDITORS 

Frank L Springer '32 
Editor-in-Chief 

Oscar Margolin '32 Rial S. Potter. Jr. '32 

Associate Editors 



Alumni and Faculty 

Marjorib L French '34 
Athletics 
William II. Wear '32 
Eugene Guralnick 33 



DEPARTMENT1ED1TORS 

Editorial 

Frank L. Springer 32 

Campus 

Eomond Nash '33 

Alprbda L. Ordway '33 

W. Raymond Ward '33 

Harrietts M. Jackson '34 

Joseph Politblla '34 

Faatura 

Oscar Margolin '32 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT 

Eric H. Wetterlow Jr. '32 

Business Manager 

Kenneth E. Hodgb 32 William A. Johnson '32 

Advertising Manager Circulation idanottr 

Business Assistants 

Ashley B. Gurnby '33 Philip H. Hvbrault '33 



Qtye fHrarmm 

A lot of people will probably go swim- 
ming when the pool opens on the 30th, 
just because of the novelty of swimming 
in November. Others will go because of 
a sincere desire to become junior life 
savers. Still others will go to learn how 
to swim. Among the last named will be 
yours sincerely. Everybody come, and 
help drown the Picaroon. 



NOTICES 



Subscriptions $2.00 per year. Single copies 10 cent*. 



Make all orders payable to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In case of change of address, subscriber will please notify the business manager 
as soon as possible. 

Alumni and undergraduate contributions are sincerely encouraged. Any com 
munications or notices must be received by the editor-in-chief on or before Monday 
evening. 



Entered ai second-class matter at the Amherst Post Office. Accepted for mailing at special rate of 
postage provided for In Section 1103, Act of October. 1917. authorized August 20. 1918. 



AN OPPORTUNITY 

For years, State College students have lamented the fact that great musicians 
and well-known musical organizations, with few exceptions, have failed to appear 
in Amherst. Smith and Mount Holyoke colleges have their regular series of con- 
certs, but distance, price of admission, and the lack of ample seating space have 
caused most State College students to refrain from attending these concerts. 

Now a group of citizens of Amherst have organized for the sole purpose of pre- 
senting to both the townspeople and the college students music at its best. Pro- 
spective artists are of the highest caliber, having excellent international reputations, 
and guaranteeing the best in classical musical presentation. 

These p r ospective concerts will be presented in Amherst, thereby eliminating (In- 
frequently prohibitive effect wliiih distance has had upon the attendance of Smith 
and Mount Holyoke concerts by State College students. With season tickets being 
made available t<> student- at half the rate which the townspeople must pay, we 
teel that the committee in charge of this project is doing its part in attempting to 

foster the attendance by State College students of concerts of the highest type. 

Here is the show-down. Many of the student body claim to be lovers of the 
better class of music. Now, it seems that you will be given an opportunity to par- 
tially satisfy that desire and you must do your part. Subscribe to the concert sene>, 
attend and appreciate theec concer t* , and show sufficient interest so that the com- 
mittee will consider its efforts are not in vain. 



ABOUT OURSELVES 

Possibly you are not interested in the substance of a talk being delivered at week- 
day or Sunday Chapel or assembly on Wednesday afternoon. Refrain from reveal- 
ing your boredness by coughing or sc raping your feet. Consider the speaker, he is 
having, undoubtedly, a more distressing time than you are. As a means foi making 
yourself appear interested in what the speaker is saying, you might analyze the 
speech or its delivery and notice where they may be improved. In addition to being 
courteous, attention of the audience upon the speaker in conducive to better delivery 
ami clearer thinking on the part of the speaker and it also whets the thinking power 
of the individual in the audience. Try it sometime and see what you think. 



AT THE FORUM 

A Birds-eye View 

of an Antiquated Custom 

By The Picaroon, 

Vestigial Professor of Archaeology 

A deep hush came over the waiting 
assembly as Caius Hansus Brinkus 
wr appe d his Turkish toga about his manly 
form and rose to speak,— a hush broken 
only by the rhythmic sound of air being 
forced through the lu-ity adenoids of the 
assembled multitude. Everyone seemed 
asleep. Everyone was asleep. Everyone 
knew what was coming. 

"Friends," said Caius Hansus, "we 
are met again on that most impressive of 
occasions,— the Student Forum. You are 
now to have the opportunity to air your 
grievances in public. Speak now or for- 
ever hold your peace!" 

Thereupon rose up Folius Flavius, who 
was being paid to stay awake. "Citizens!" 
he cried. "A great civic wrong is being 
perpetrated! Do you realize that of all 
those hoary greybeards who are elected 
to the Senate each year, none are females! 
Furthermore — — H 

Herbus Sylvanus arose waving his toga 
wildly and shouting, "Unaccustomed as 
I am to public speaking ! 

"I object!" shrieked Erikus VVettus, 
the Yisigothic delegate. 

"Down with chapel!" gnashed Clifon- 
ius Fauscus Romanus. 

"Ever hear the one about the two 
salesmen?" roared Auscus Marcus Linus. 

(.illus Wittus stood up, and his voice 
trembled with emotion. "Fellow citi- 
zens," he moaned, "e pluribus unum! Do 
you think it sets a good example for the 
freshmen if the members of Adelphia use 
their neckties as handkerchiefs?" 

Suddenly a single sleepy voice arose 
from the vast dormant multitude. It 
said, "Would you gentlemen please make 
a little less noise? You see I'm slightly 
troubled with insomnia, and so " 

It was then that Caius Hansus brinkus 
was heard to make that famous remark 
of his: "In my opinion, Delenda est 
Forum!" 



JUNIOR CLASS BANQUET 

The Junior Class Banquet will be held 
on Friday, November 20, at the Lord Jeff 
Inn, Amherst. The program will begin 
at six-thirty in the evening. There will 
be dancing after the banquet. 

Professor and Mrs. C. H. Patterson 
and Professor and Mrs. A. A. Mackimmie 
will serve as chaperons. Tickets may be 
obtained from Nelson Beeler, Ruth 
Yogel, Jack Crowell, or Ed Harvey, all 
of the class of '33. 



ST0CKBRIDGE 



BASKETBALL ASSISTANT 
MANAGER TRYOUTS 

All sophomores interested in trying 
out for the position of assistant manager 
of varsity basketball for the coming 
season should see Eric H. Wetterlow any 
afternoon (except Sunday) in the Physi- 
cal Education Building. 



"CLOSED" SORORITIES 

At last, the co-eds have been permitted to organize into sororities which will 
have the privilege of electing to membership only those girls whom the sorority- 
desires. In other words, they will enjoy the privileges and worries of the fraternities. 

Now that sororities are "closed" and now that the co-ed population has so far 
exceeded the capacity of the Abbey, we think that the formation of sororities is a 
notable step in relieving this congestion at the Abbey as it is only logical that the 
co-eds eventually will desire to occupy their own sorority houses. 

Closed sororities should not breed a greater number of clique* than now exist 
and is quite probable that the girls residing off-campus will be brought in closer 
contact with a larger, yet intimate, group of girls by means of the sororities which 
are to be formed in the very near future. 



NO COLLEGIAN NEXT WEEK 

Because of the Thanksgiving holidays, 
there will not be any issue of the Collegian 
next Wednesday. The next issue of the 
Collegian will be distributed on Wednes- 
day afternoon, December 2. 



The A.T.G. Club held its twelfth 
annual initiation banquet at the Hotel 
Northampton on the evening of November 
12. Greetings from the seniors were ex- 
tended to the new members by L. Ivan 
Bruce Jr., S'32, to which John M. Turner 
S'33 responded for the initiates. An in. 
teresting and enjoyable program, with 
Professors Ralph A. Van Meter, Victor 
A. Rice, Rollin H. Barrett and Instructs 
Harold W. Smart as faculty speak 
was interspersed with musical numbers 
and special features by members of the 
Club. 

The following permanent class officers 
were elected on November 4, by the claaj 
of '33, Stockbridge School: President, 
John If. Turner, Jr.; Vice-President, 
Carl A. Frank; Treasurer, Barbara E, 
Desoe; Secretary, Raymond A. Sim- 
lander. 

Members of the Stockbridge Student 
Council: Wilbur R. Steria, Frank A, 
Small, Alfred B. Jaeger, and John It, 
Turner, Jr. 



OUTING CLUB NOTICE 

There will be an Outing Club hike this 
Sunday, leaving the East Experiment 
Station at 2 p. m., and having as its 
objective Mt. Tom or the East Holyoke 
Range. 



COED NOTES 



EDITORIAL BRIEFS 

Imagine the mud-slinging and hair-pulling that will take place at the Abbey 
during rushing week. 



Bush has to score 21 points against Tufts for a new high scoring record, 
he will make them? 



Think 



After long controversy, the co-eds are 
to have regular sororities. The three 
societies, Sigma Beta Chi, Lambda Delta 
Mu, and Alpha Lambda Mu, will become 
recognized individual sororities. A gruop 
already existing, wnich consists of mem- 
bers from each sorority, automatical ly 
becomes an inter-sorority council. Rush- 
ing for members from the sophomore and 
freshman classes will be underway a* 
soon as regulations have been agreed 
upon. 



Through the courtesy of Proftssof 
Warren K. Green of Amherst College 
two trips to the astronomical observa- 
tory have been arranged for this week; 
weather permitting. On Tuesday eve. 
ning forty senior students will ha\t a 
chance to see the moon — and some 
stars — through the large telescope, the 
lens alone of which is valued at about 
160,000 and on Thursday evening another 
group of fir^t-year men will go star-gazing. 



The Stockbridge-Deerfield game will 
be played on Wednesday, November IX, 
instead of Friday, November 20, as 
originally scheduled. A committee o| 
the Student Council is in charge of 
transportation plans to move the entire 
student body to Deerfield. Afternoon 
classes will be suspended on that date. 



Leon Pearson S'32 was the suc< 
contestant for the position of editor in- 
chief of the 1939 year book, "The Short- 
horn," and work has been started with 
Professor Rollin H. Barrett acting as 
facultv advisor to the Hoard. 



That was quite a track meet we had last Saturday afternoon on Alumni Field, 
what do you say? 



We understand that the football team went on strike last week because the soccer 
team received more noticeable publicity than did our gridsters. So we slapped their 
wrists and sent them up against Wagner. 



So Captain Sumner has written a new Massachusetts Song and the State Hand 
will play it as a part of the premiere concert at the Benefit Show, Friday night at 
!()::;< I in the Amherst Theater. 



Looks as if we would have to build an annex to the song book. 



Ni 



re talkin' turkey — no Collegian next week because of the holidays. 



PICAROON LECTURE NUMBER ONE 
The Romance of Chemistry 

A thrilling tale of elemental conflict. 
This soul stirring story describes modern 
life among the elements. Its frank utter 
sheer stark realism is simply terrific! It 
is nauseating! A half teaspoonful taken 
in a glass of water is as bracing as a sea 

voyage. 

The Massachusetts Collegian 

Jeffrey T. Calcium was out taking a 
walk around his orbit. He was thinking. 
He thank and thank. His wife. Ester, 
was getting a bit eccentric and stand- 
offish of late. Jeffrey didn't know what 
to make of it. He had always tried to be 
a good husband. Of course there had 
been that little affair with Ethyl Alcohol, 
but it had been only a passing fancy. 
Jeffrey smiled ironically as he thought of 
the sheep's eyes which Ester used to cast 
at him. Now she grew ox-eyed whenever 
Barry M. Chloride came to call, and 
Jeffrey, though a solid respectable citizen, 
was still capable of jealousy. Although 
not an effervescent individual, he was 
still active, — at least more active than 
old man Magnesium who lived in the 
next orbit. 

Suddenly he turned a corner and came 
face to face with Ester. She smiled 
acidly, arousing everything that was base 
in his nature. "I suppose you have been 
out with your affinity again," he said 
brutally, forgetting her ethereal beauty, 
forgetting everything except his rage. 

"It's been so dull for me ever since we 
moved into th.it new aqueous solution," 
she murmured. She looked quite normal 
and calm. 

He reacted to that at once. "My 
dear," he said, "I am going to set you 
free. Free as Hydrogen. Free as Oxygen. 
Good-bye, cruel woild!" 

He raised his pistol and blew himself 
to smithereens, a smithereen being the 
smallest known particle of matter. 
The End 



After assembly this afternoon, Lambda 
Delta Mu sorority will serve hot choco- 
late and cakes to all college girls in the 
Abbey center. All coeds are invited for 
an informal good time to promote better 
acquaintance among the girls who have 
had so little opportunity to know each 
other. 



Prospects seem to indicate that there 
will be a good rifle team this year. Zoe 
Hickney '32, captain of the rifle team, 
shot 60 out of a possible 50 at rifle prac- 
tice last week. 



Tonight the freshmen girls will have 
supper on Prexy's Hill at 5 o'clock. A 
general get-together will be held to 
make plan., for discussion groups. Wini- 
fred Fach has charge of the entertain- 
ment, Alma Merry will take charge of 
the fire, and Alma Merry and Eloise 
Kellogg are hostesses. 



Basketball practice will start some- 
time this week. There will be a game 
between the sophomores and freshmen as 
soon after Thanksgiving as possible. 



STOCKBRIDGE ELEVEN TOPPLES 

GYMNAST YEARLINGS TO 

7 TO 3 DEFEAT 



All the "dope" was upset last Saturday, 
when Stockbridge crashed through with 
new life, to beat the Springfield Frosh in 
football by the score of 7-3 during a 
"Dick Merriwell" game played at Spring- 
field. Stockbridge went into the game 
with an entirely new line-up, and was 
losing until the last minute of play, when 
Jaegar, a sub who had been playing for 
two minutes, caught a forward from 
Skelton to win. Garvoni scored the field 
goal for the young gymnasts by a kick 
from the twenty-yard line. The new- 
line-up for Stockbridge: 

Kovar re, Charles rt, Ek ig, Martin c, 
Carpenter lg, Small It, Keith le, Robinson 
hb, Frank hb, Skelton qb, Faczszewski fb. 

Saturday's win has put new life and 
hope into the Stockbridge team for their 
objective game with Deerfield on Wed- 
nesday at 2:00. 



GREAT ARTISTS SECURED 
(Continued from Page 1) 

North Adams, Lawrence, Brockton, I.im- 
ell, and Taunton, in Masssrhlia 
Waterbury, Norwalk, Bridgeport, and 
Middletown in Connecticut; Providence, 
and Woonsocket in Rhode Island; Con- 
cord and Nashua in New Hampshire; 
Augusta, Lewiston, and Bangor in Maine. 
A pamphlet issued by the Corporation 
state, in explanation of the plan: "This 
membership is secured in a one wedl 
membership campaign starting on Mon- 
day morning and ending Saturday night. 
During this week, every citizen is in- 
vited to join the Association. At the end 
of the campaign, the membership 
closed and no one can join for another 
year. Every dollar paid to the Associ- 
ation is spent for artists, musical attrac- 
tions, and the attending local ex]" 
incident to their presentation in concert 
Only members of the Association <an 
attend the concerts, as there are no liagk 
admissions sold for any attraction under 
this plan — a concert presented on the 
basis of ticket selling and single Ba> 
missions has always meant, and always 
will mean financial risk. The success of 
the Community Concert Association is 
assured by the fact that a membership 
must be secured during membership 
week which will make possible a minimum 
of three major concerts, or the association 
will not function." 

The establishment of the Concert 
series in Amherst will make av 
such outstanding artists as Galli-t urn. 
Jeritza, Rosa Ponselle, Sigrid I ' 
Richard Crooks, Martinelli, John Mo 
Cormack, Lawrence Tibbett, 
Heifetz, Harold Bauer, Serge ftokonefi 
and many others, beside symphony 
ensemble groups and special entertainer? 

The movement has attracted constO* 
able attention in the community among 
students and residents. Supporting the 
plan is an organization consisting of tn* 
following: Frank A Wattgtl l'r 
William .'. Bigeknr, Srat Vfca-rri 
Mr Mich) i v, Maker itcoml 
President; k ( . Gowaa jr., rl 
President; ' .. Uwrenct .V I i 



Secretary and Correspunc 

E. Nestle, Tr( ,r urei 



art" 






Instant Service on Cleaning, Pressing, and Mending. 

J 1ST PHONE 8 11- W 
EST. 1904 L A N D I S EST. 1904 



TUFTS SATURDAY 
(Continued from Page 1) 

scoreless tie, and in 1930 the Tufts aggre- 
rolled over the then Aggies to amass 
42 point! against the latter's 0. We feel 
,l,,t those days have gone forever and 
that the game this Saturday will clear up 
t j,i, situation for most of us. 

■v) far this year Tufts College has won 
three games, lost two and tied one, but 
the only club that the Jumbos have 
played that the Pilgrims have met is the 
Polar Hears from Bowdoin who have 
{ailed to win this fall. The Jumbos beat 
this team last Saturday to the score of 
j; a, while earlier in the season State 
took the Polar Bears' hide to the tune 
oj 32-6. Hut a comparison of these 
icoret means next to nothing since 
Bowdoia has strengthened considerably 
with the passing of the football season. 

This Saturday the State gridsters will 
have to watch Clayman Kennedy and 
Clark in the backfield and in the line 
Captain Knapman, Staffon, Cole and 
Elswoith will bear close scrutiny. On 
the other hand the Jumbos will probably 
concentrate upon checking "Lou" Hush 
,iiu 1 "Ossie" Holmberg in the State back- 
held while the opposing line will have all 
it can do to stop "Bill" Frigard from 
tearing them to pieces in the course of 
i ;,, miter bucks. The Tufts game will 
neaa the curtain for Captain Foskett, 
Holmberg, Goodall, Welch, Sylvester and 
Burrington, as far as their playing on 
future State teams is concerned. 

An added feature to the afternoon's 

■ le will be the playing of both the 

Tlrftl College band and the Massachu- 

Kttl State College band. Last year 

Captain Sumner and the Maroon and 

White musicians were the guests of the 

d education department at the 

ruftl M.S.C. game at Medford, rceeiv- 

inj there applause which, if anything, 

g re at er than received by the Tufts 

ition. This year Captain Sumner 

has made special arrangementa to con- 
tinue the high standing of the l'.tol band 
on the football field. Songs of the vari- 
ous universities, the rhythmic "On the 
Mall," and the difficult "Stars and 



You have tried the rest? 

Now try the BEST 

And that's the 

AMHERST SHOE REPAIRING CO. 

"Goodyear Welt System Employed" 



JUDGING CONTEST 
(Continued from Page 1) 

Formerly held in connection with the 
annual High School Day, the Judging 
Contest has been conducted independ- 
ently of this event for the past two 
years. Last week's event was divided 
into five distinct parts, consisting of a 
live stock, poultry, fruit, milk, and 
vegetable judging. 

In the live stock judging, Weymouth 
High School won first prize attaining to 
1331 out of 18(K) possible points; Monson 
High was second with 1278, and Westpark 
High was third with 1361. Sanderson 
Academy of Ashfield, won the fruit con- 
test scoring 3670 out of the 42(H) possible 
points; the North High School of Wor- 
cester came out second with 3480 points, 
and the Essex County Agricultural School 
third with 3470 points. 

The Jamaica Plain High School won 
the vegetable judging cup, amassing 1172 
points out of the 151)0. Essex Aggies and 
Hopkins Academy came second and third 
with 114") and 1124 points respectively. 
In the |)ou!try content, Weymouth High, 
the Hristol County Agricultural School, 
and the Norfolk County 4-H Club were 
awarded the three prizes. Judging milk- 
products, the Norfolk County 4-H Club 
scored 201.45 points, winning the first 
prize, the Jamaica Plain and the Bristol 
Aggie entries scoring 302.13 and 31646 
points, in that order. 

Medals were also awarded to the in- 
dividuals winning first, second, and third 
places in each, the live stock, fruit, milk, 
poultry, and vegetable judging contests 

Stripes Forever," will be featured in 
■pedal arrangements by the 46 piece 

Maroon and White organization, while 
the 40 -piece Tufts band will eome pre- 
pared with a sjiecial repertoire of Tufts 
melodies. At this event also Captain 
Sumner plans to play for the first time 
a new football march which he has 
written in honor of the new campus spirit 
which has come in with the change of 
name. This piece is being arranged for 
the band by W. Grant Dunham '.'54, solo 
clarinetist of the organization. 



S. S. HYDE 
Optician and Jeweler 

Oculists' Prescription! Filled. Broken lenaa 

accurately replaced 

BIG BEN ALARM CLOCKS and other 

reliable makes 
> PLEASANT STREET, (up one flight) 



THANKSGIVING CARDS 

For Mother — — To the Folks at Home 

CONUNDRUM PLACE CARDS 

NUT CUPS — TALLIES 



CHRISTMAS CARDS 

With your own name 

EDGAR GUEST CHRISTMAS CARDS - BOXED 

JAMES A. LOWELL, - - BOOKSELLER 



Special Buy on Corduroy Trousers 

LIGHT GREY ONLY 

BEST QUALITY 

LAST YEAR'S PRICE $4.50 

A lot of 30 pairs at 
2.95 



F. M. THOMPSON & SON 



WAGNER OVERWHELMED 
(Continued from Page 1) 

more than a fiasco. Representing a coin 
paratively newly-organized and small 
college, the Wagner players are to be 
admired for their spirit of sportsmanship 
and courage, every one having left the 
field smiling in the face of an over- 
whelming defeat. 

Perhaps a bit too confident at the out- 
set, Mel Taube's second team, which 
plaved during the first half, found it 
rather difficult to function smoothly, 
and the Green and White contenders 
approached scoring distance shortly after 
the start of the game, Green of the 
visitors blocked Sylvester's punt and 
recovered on the 23-yard line. After a 
return punt however, Louis Hush, Murray 
Hicks and Sylvester alternated in plough- 
ing through the none- too-strong enemy 
line, Tuffy Sylvester climaxing the march 
with a final .'{4-yard run through left 
tackle for the first score. 

During the second stanza the Maroon 
and White contingent fell into stride and 
made the score .Jl-0 at the end of the 
half. The surprise touchdown of the 
game came when Ed Clow, alert tackle 
and one of the promising sophomore 
timbre, took advantage of a Wagner 
fumble, racing .'15 yards for a score be- 
fore the fans were well aware of what had 
happened. After this Louis Hush broke 
into the o|>en twice on 18 and 21 yard 
runs for scores, and lopped the list later 
with six more points by the air mail 
route. Tuffy Sylvester made the con- 
version after the first of these scores, he 
and Hush having failed to convert the 
points for the rest of the touchdowns 
during the half. 

During the third period the Maroon 
and White "A" team chalked up four 
more touchdowns, l.ouis Hush account- 
ing for two on 20 and .!1 yard jaunts 
before leaving the game, ( fssie Holmberg 
ploughing through right tackle for an- 
other, and Don Smith, a sopjioinore and 

former all-Near England High School end, 
recovering beyond the goal line a punl 
which he had b lo ck ed. Cliff Foskett 
made good on two out of four tries for 
|K)ints after touchdowns. 

Not to be outdone, the third State 
team entered the fray in the final cpiartcr 
and brought the score out of the fifties 
into the seventies when ( >ssie Holmberg 
intercepted a Wagner pass and raced 
80 yards over the last stripe, after which 
Tuffy Sylvester found room in his bag of 
tricks for two more touchdowns, the 
latter on a .'50 yard jaunt through the 
center of the line. A pass from Ossie to 
Solomon netted the first conversion 
Tuffy 's placement was a failure on the 
second but a success on the third. The 
summary: 



College Drugstore 

W. H. McGRATH, Reft. Pharm. 
AMHERST, - - MASS. 



VISIT 

BARSELOTTI'S 

All the requirements for the smoker- Pipes, 
Pouches, Smokers Combination 
Ice Cream, Candy. Sandwiches 



This Week at ' 'BUCK'S" 

TOASTED ICE CREAM 

SANDWICHES 



PATRONIZE 

THE SANDWICH MAN 

R. L. BATES, North Amherst 



DR. G. E. VINCENT 
(Continued from Page 1) 

address, announi einent of the Phi Kappa 
Phi elections and scholarship groups, and 
the recipients of the Public Speaking, 
Grinnell, Hill, and Academic prizes. The 
assembly will be attended by the entire 
faculty, arrayed in caps and gowns. 

A prominent authority in educational 
and sociological circles, Dr. Vincent has 

<i Ph.D. degree from the University of 

Chicago, and an 1.I..D. degree from Yale 

University and the University of Michi- 
gan. In his brilliant career, Dr. Vincent 
has been an editor, a traveler in Europe 
and the Orient, President of the Chau- 
tauqua Institution, Dean of the I'niver- 
-ii v of Chicago, President of the Univer- 
sity of M inn esota, and President of the 
Rockefeller Foundation from 1 * » 1 T to 
1020. He is also an ex-president c»f the 
American Sociological Society, author of 
"The Social Mind and Education," and 

the co-author of an "Introduction to the 

Study of Society." 



Maaa. State Wuftner 

Ryan. Solomon, Goodall, le re, Rom 

Mountain, Fabyan, FosLctt, It 

rt, Nillsen, Rapp. Marino 



TUFTi INFORMAL 
(Continued from Page 1) 

O'clock and celebrate the attenioon's 

victory by daaciaa, t<> music- brought by 

the College Imi Orchestra from Holyoke. 
bins is the- first big informal, a chance to 
make up for all the- lost hours ot dancing 
Ibis year. |,t's not forget the enthusi- 
asm and high spirits from the game-. 
Bring them along with the girl and a 
I1.AO and become part of t he at hlet ii ally- 
minded crowd that will fill the Drill 
Hall. Ol course, this is a sport dance. 

To be sure, the committee Herbert 
L Forest "32, Prank I Springer '.'(2, 

Gilbert V. Whitten '82, and Edward W. 

Harvey '.{.{ haven't disclosed the- plain 
for decorating the hall, but we ma\ as 
well be- prepared to dodge soccer balls 
and footballs, and find the orchestia 
behind goal posts and hear the referee's 
whistle be t we en dam ci. 

To complete the athletic- idea, Prof, 
and Mrs. Curry S. Hie ks and Coach and 
Mis. Melvin II. Taube- are ex|>ectcd to 

be- chaperonea, 



Clow, Chapin, Cummings, lg 
Hurke, Cutler, Bourgeois, c 
XjsWtf, Griswiild, True, rg 
Nourse, Burlington, rt 
Silvers, Smith, re 
Lojko, qb 

Hush, Sylvester, lhl> 
Sylvester, HoIuiImtk, Hale, rhh 
Hicks. Wood, fb 



rg. Taut in.iN 

c, Esposito, Voigc's 

Ig. M.l/Zrl 

It, Green, Wintgen 

le, Swartwout 

qb, Carry, Meyer 

rhb, Smith, (arty 

Ihl), Lagner 

fb. Si. Uri 



s.ore — Mass State 77. Wagner 0. Touch- 
douiiH ■ Hush 5, Sylvester 3, Holmberg 2, Smith. 
Clow. Points after touchdowns- Foskett 2, 
Sylvester 2. Solomon. Referee — J I' Wbalen of 
Sptingfield I'mpire — J K Farrell of MIsBSBM 
Linesman— W L Stearns of Springfield. Tim. 
15-minute quarters. 



PATRONIZE 



The College Barber Shop 

"M" BUILDING 

M. S. C. 



SANG LUNG hand laundry 

No. 1 Main St. Amherst, Mass. 

REPAIRING AND AI I. KINDS OF 
WASHING DONE AT REASONABLE 
PRICES. 

Our Laundry First Claaa 

Our Policy Guaranteed 

NEXT TO THE TOWN HALL 

TYPEWRITERS 

for Sale and Rent 
K' * *.' u x A 

H. E. DAVID 



VALUABLE ART EXHIBIT 
Continued from Paget) 

re-sinned the- position as director of the- 
Grand Central School of Art in New York 
City to take charge of a new school in 
Sarasota, Florida. Mis art education has 
lieen received both in America and a- 
liroad. 

Paintings of especial interest are: 
"Shipmates," "liass Island Ledges," 

"Eateriaf Harbor,' 1 "old Sottiai 

Wharves." 'Tamtini, the Hull," "Blue 
and Silver," and "Last port." 



Small Zipper 

Purses 

in 

Leather, Silk, Wool, etc. 

./;/ cxi client small gijt 



Miss Cutler's Gift Shop 



AMHERST 
THEATRE 1 



Thursday, Nov. 19 

■Jam kJca'i Prise PaUtasf Dnuna 

"STREET SCENE" 

with Sylvia Sidney and William Collier Jr. 

Friday, Ne»v. 20 

RICHARD 1)1 \ In 
"SECRET SERVICE" 

■pa i.il ll.iii-lil JVrfonn.uii.' a| 10. )() p hi 
I'Iim mis to tin- N'ccly i,f AmiImTsI 

Saturday, Nov. l\ 

2 Features 

/.tin- c tfsy'i 

•RIDKRS Of THE PURPLE SAGE" 

. i ii'l — 

Dolorva CeMtello in 

"EXPENSIVE WOMEN" 

with II. R. W.irn.-r 

Monday, Nov. 2.\ 

GEORGE BANCROFT 
In "RICH MAN'S FOLLY" 

Tuesday, Nov. 24 



Gary Cooper and Cluudette Colhert 
In "HIS WOMAN" 



Today 



. Irene Dunne In 

•"CONSOLATION MARRIAGE' 



Roll On, State, Roll On! 

. . . and then celebrate the close of this 
splendid football season by gathering 
at Sarris' Candy Kitchen where there is 
always a good time. 

Sarris Bros. Candy Kitchen Restaurant Inc. 



BEAT TUFTS! 

Our best wishes to win this game and complete the best season in years. 

E. M. SWITZER, JR., Inc. 















II. A. C. Library. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 1931 



YOU WILL NOT REGRET LATER THE SAVING YOU WILL MAKE ON YOUR NEW HICKEY-FREEMAN SUIT 

For, every saving in cost that's presented in the new Hickey-Freeman Clothes for Fall is economically sound - - made 

possible by the natural conditions of general business and not by any unnatural steps 

to lower the standard of tailoring quality in the garment! 

THOMAS F. WALSH 



SOCCER TEAM WINS 
(Continued from Page 1) 

.scored his first fcoal of the season when 
he nave State the lead in the third <|uarter. 
The work of the State wingiue-n, Jimmie 
Mackiinmie and Forest, gave the inside 
forwards humerous chances for goals. 

State had the advantage of a strong 
wind in the first quarter and swarmed all 
over the home team defense. Midway 
through this period Bob Jackson took a 
pass from Herb Forest to score from a 
difficult angle. A letup in the second 
period that caught the State defense 
sleeping accounted for Connecticuts' only 
goal when Mason made the best of the 
opportunity. 

A determined State team launched a 
go*] scoring attack in the last two periods. 
Shortly after the start of the third period 
Captain Fddie Waskiewicz banged in the 
prettiest goal of the game. A right foot 
drive from twenty yards out gave the 
Aggie goal tender no chance whatsoever. 
Soon afterwards Herb Forest leaped into 
the air to block a kick of the Connect icut 
goal tender. The ball rolled over the 
gOftJ line to make the score read :i to 1. 

The ball was continually being worked 
up in front of the Connecticut goal 
mouth and the State forwards had several 
scoring chances. Forest centered to 
JacksOfl, who headed the ball around the 
fullback to score. The final goal came 
when Jackson passed to Forest who 
. naked the ball into the rigging 

The summary: 



TEAM STANDINGS 
(Continued from Page 1) 



Hates 

Bpriasaatd 

Tufts 

Lowell Textile- 

Rhode- I ,l.iu.l 

Maine 

Arnold 

((inn Auni'--. 

Mieldleliury 

Worcester Tech 

Trinity 

Colby 

Norwich 

Vermont 

Boston Univ 

Bowdoin 



B 


2 





82 


43 


4 


2 





173 


55 


:i 


2 


1 


59 


66 


4 


3 


P 


98 


52 


4 


3 





96 


59 


4 


3 





70 


53 


2 


2 


3 


23 


40 


2 


3 


3 


27 


84 


3 


5 





78 


IM 


2 


4 


1 


32 


70 


2 


4 





57 


73 


2 


5 





57 


108 


1 


8 





44 


191 


1 


7 





46 


160 


1 


7 





34 


79 





7 





18 


159 



Hodsden, Connell, lfb 
Cowing, rhb 



lfb, Wissenger 
rhb, Brigs*), Swann 



M.S.C 
Jot) zak, g 
W.iskiiw i< z, il 
Taft. ir 
Jackson. . 
Forest, or 
Mackiinmie, ol 
l'niyne, Talbot, cfa 
Warns, Stomas, rh 
Hitchcock, ih 



Connecticut 
g, Lnchlwibarg 

il. Sl.nnlMi. Tiirne-y, Wood 

ir, tiiiuK. Bkublllakai 
i , Uaaoa 

(il, Aiiild SM 

ol, Cote 

Ch, Turville 

rh, Fanan 

Ih, Clark 



This coming Saturday, at 1.00 p. m., 
the so far undefeated State hooters will 
run into what will probably be the 
toughest game of the season, when they 
meet the Fitchburg Normal soccer club, 
here. The "teachers" have a young, self- 
made team, but they can in no way be 
judged too lightly. Jimmie Hammond, 
inside right forward for the visitors, and 
also their coach, played inside right 
for the kaffies of Fall River, when that 
team won the National Amateur Soccer 
Championship of the United States, last 
year. 

Fitchburg plays a hard, rushing game. 
Si far this year they 'nave overcome the 

Harvard J. V.'s, Bridgewater Normal, 

and Durfee Textile, while they lost only 
to a strong New Bedford Textile eleven. 

Larry line's hooters, however, should 

complete an undefeated season. The 
State team is in tine condition, and with 
all the seniors in for their last game, a 
win should be brought about. It will DC 
hard fought and strongly contested every 

toot of the way, l>tit a victory is due. 



AT BOLTER'S 

Special Purchase Week 

Begins MONDAY, NOV. 16 
and Ends SATURDAY, NOV. 21 

An opportunity to buy 
apparel that is new, correct, and 
of the quality maintained by this 
shop. Avail yourself of this unusual 
chance, because values such as 
these will not last. 

A few of the items offered 



SUNDAY CHAPEL 

(Continued from Pafte 1) 

"This ideal implies recognition by man 
that every other human being is of value, 
not for his worth as a machine, but for 
his personality alone and should be pro- 
tected from exploitation," stated Mr. 
Williams. Yet Reinhold Niebuhr has 
truly said, "That every man has the sin, 
in a more or less degree, of claiming for 
himself privileges which he will not grant 
unto another," the speaker continued and 
said that in our present social creed of 
laissez faire and devil take the hindmost, 
machines and corporations are placed 
ahead of personality, that our country 
with its wealth and code of democratic 
freedom has enslaved over a million child 
workers, and that every effort to pass 
legislation limiting this number has met 
with strenuous resistence by the dividend 
and profit seeking corporations. 

"Society seems to require that some 
men do not live at all," said Mr. Williams. 
The speaker explained the statement by 
saying that, our society defends the right 
of employers to discharge workmen for 
any reason whatsoever, and that in a 
land of plenty, people are starving. 
Records show that in the city of Detroit 
four people die daily because of starva- 
tion, and the granaries of the nation are 
bulging with cheap wheat. Unemployed 
coal miners in West Virginia who live 
Over coal mines are threatened with cold 
and freezing homes this winter. 

"Another manner in which the ideal 
professed by so many is broken, is shown 
>y the intense race prejudice in the 
world," said Mr. Williams. The s|>caker 
talked further on this point by giving as 
examples, the death of Judith Hcarcott. 
former Y.W'.C.A. secretary and teacher 
in a negro girl's school, the "Jim" Crow 
law, and the 1919 Fast St. l.ouis massacre 
"! Marks. Mr. Williams concluded this 
phase of his discussion by quoting a 
statement of II. G. Wells, "There is no 
thing more evil than race prejudice." 

J. Paul Williams finished by saving 
that most students shun the farts and 
desire a faith painted in rosy colors, that 
they take the easiest way OUt by re- 
maining indifferent, but that there is a 
second way, bv gaining knowledge of 'he 
facts and by aligning themselves witr the 
group trying to bring justice to the world 
of men. and by rem lining firm to ideals. 



M. S. C. MEN'S MOTTO IS ALWAYS 
LET "DAVE" DO IT 

AMHERST CLEANSERS, DYERS 
and LAUNDERERS 

PHONE 828 Near the Town Hall PHONE 828 



9 

D 
{ 
9 



B 



Thomas s. childs 

Incorporated 
SMART SHOES and HOSIERY for COLLEGE MEN and WOMEN 

QUALITY MERCHANDISE PRICES TO SUIT 

275 High Street, Holyoke 



Largest Shoe Store in Western Massachusetts 



«**« 



' 



JOSEPH GINSBERG 

19 PLEASANT ST. 

Men's Furnishings - Shoes repaired, called for and delivered 

Freshmen, come in and see our selection of shoes, priced moderately, 

Special sale now on leather coats, just what you need for cold weather. 

CALL 984-M 

CARTERS MOULDETTES 

Foundation Garment for Present Styles 
$2.95 and $3.95 

JACKSON & CUTLER 

Amherst, Mass. 



SUITS, formerly $35.00 

Harris Tweed Jackets 

Shoes $5.95 

Pigskin Gloves 

Half Hose 

Shorts 

Shirts 



$24.75 

16.75 

Ties .79 

2.95 

55c 2 for 1.00 

69c 2 for 1.25 

1.39 3 ** 4.00 



CARL. H. BOLTER 

INCORPORATED 



PAIL PORTER AT CHAPEL 

(Continued from Pafte I) 

West Virginia are freezing. He ur^ed 
the students on campus to do their ut- 
most to make the Red Cross drive a 
success. 

Chapel on Monday morning was con- 
ducted by the student committee in 
charge of the drive for the student chest 
on campus. Oscar Margolin '32 intro- 
duced the speakers. Gifford Towle *32, 
who is president of the Christian Associ- 
ation, spoke on the need of funds for 
unemployment relief. He pointed out 
that although the depression was nation- 
wide, Massachusetts was particularly 
hard hit, and that workers in the indus- 
trial cities .ire in need of assistance. Miss 
Wynne Caird *33 spoke of the value of 
the Red Cross and asked that each one 
find a way to help. 



THE NATIONAL SHOE REPAIRING 

21 MAIN STREET 

Between Town Mull and Masonic Building 
HENS' SHOES SOLED and HEELED 
Fi'LL SOLE* and HI HBER HEEl£ 
I. adits' >koes >oled and Rubber Heels 
LADIES' SHOES HEELED 



$1.75 
S-2.50 

>l 40 
40c 



All Work Guaranteed 



FISHER'S 

are mnv showing a big assortment of 

SILK UNDERWEAR 
at $1.98 and $2.95 

Pastel Satin and French Crepe, 

Lace Trimmed in 

Step-ins, Dance Sets, Panties, Slips, 

Petticoats and Pajamas 

Colors: Tea Rose, Lt. Blue, Pale Flesh 



Given Away 

A pair of Bostonian $9. Oxfords 
A pair of Friendly Five $5. Oxfords 

FOR PARTICULARS, SEE OUR WINDOW 

BOLLES SHOE STORE 

PRINT-WRITE STATIONERY 

Name and address printed on the stationery and enveloj>es 
KM) sheets and 1(X) envelopes $1.50 per box 

AMHERST, MAS? 



A. J. HASTINGS 



NKWSDKALKR and 
STATIONER 



WHY OVER-PAY ON YOUR DRY CLEANING? 
We will dry-clean and press your suit or topcoat for $1.00 

We call and deliver free daily 
Phone 635 SWISS CLEANSERS & DYERS Phone 6< 

Over First National Store 

COLODNY CLOTHING COMPANY 

32 MAIN ST. (Near Depot) NORTHAMPTON 

AW Full Line of Ski Coats, Leather Jackets, Riding Boots 
and Breeches for College Men and Women! 

Corduroy Trousers — Sweaters — Golf Hose. 

Also, Suits, Topcoats, and Overcoats. 

Carfare Paid on Purchases of $10.00 or over 



Everything in Hardware 
and Radio Equipment 

ATWATER - KENT 



AND 



MAJESTIC RADIO 



THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 

THE WINCHESTER STORE 



®ltg iWaaaarfrttBgttH fflcUpgtatt 



Vol. XLII 

UNDEFEATED B00TERS 
WIN OVER FITCHBURG 



AMHERST, MASS., WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 2, 1931 



Number 9 



Successful Season Completed 
Soccer Team with Overtime 
Period Win 2-1 



bv 



By defeating the Fitchburg Normal 

i team to the tune of 2-1 on the 

borne field, Saturday) November 21, the 

Mats. State booteri BUCCessfuly completed 

an undefeated, untied season. Fitchburg 

Kitted one of the hardest foughf 

battles ever seen bera, and due to a tie 

at the end of the regular playing 
period the game had to go to two over- 
time periods. Jackson and Kozlowski 

i I for the winners, while Bishop 
I lor the "teachers." 

I ram the start of the first period, until 

the quarter whistle, the ball was almost 

continually in front of the Normal School 

mouth. Scores, however, seemed 
(Continued on Pafte 4) 

ARTHUR GUITERMAN TO 
BE AT SOCIAL UNION 



America's Apostle of Humor to Speak 

Friday Evening at Bowker 

Auditorium 



\iiliur (iuitcrnian, "America's humor- 
oui poet," will entertain at So* ial Union 
in \t Friday night at 7 o'clock. Ever 
■hue he received his HA. from the 
College of the City of New York in lK'.U, 
Mr. < iuiterman has been active as an 
editor, writer, and lecturer. 

For fourteen years he did editorial 
work on the Woman's Home Companion, 
and the Literary Digest, and from 1912 
to 1918 he lectured on magazine and 
newspaper verse at the New York Uni- 
versity School of Journalism. He has 
contributed ballad and lyric verse to 
main magazines, and was the author of 

"Rhymed Reviews" in Life. 
Among Mr. Guitermaa'a books, many 

of which are composed of humorous 
poetry, are the Laughing Muse, The 
Mirthful Lyre, Ballads of Old New York, 
A Baited Maker's Pack, The Light 
• ■uit.ir, and Song and Laughter. 



Senior Class to Hold 

Frolic at M Building 

Entire Building to Be Open to Seniors 
and Seniors Onlv 



Immediately after the Social Union 

•uncut next Friday evening, the 

will have their initial Senior 

Frol ti Memorial Hall. That night the 

ors will have full possession of the 

M" Building as the upper Boor will be 

Used for dancing and an entertainment. 

tables will be available <>n the main Boor 
for bridge, pinochle, and poker, and the 
alleys lor howling and the tabl< I for pool 
W b il l ia rds in the basement have ,il-o 

{aged for the evening. There 

BO) be any charge lor any of the 

tainment that night. Refreshments 
• served. 

lliis Frolic is for seniors and seniors 

only. It is e xpect e d that E. Hilding 

Wetterlow, Jr., that doughty senior 

master of melody, will manage to saw 

kind of a tune on his bass viol. 

'wis ey, that renowned prexy ol the 

Rusty Oysters is also going to crash 

with something that she is con- 

Also, another primus doimus in 

<rm of Phil Connell. the 1933 banjo 

i. is planning to strum a bit of 

ntalism. Seniors seem to be in 

W ., big evening. 



OUTSTANDING EVENT 
OF THE WEEK 



ine passing of Rabbit No. 10, more 

1 arly known as "Ella," who "went 

last Sunday morning after 

i ling five inoculations by a 

senior in search of a serum 

ng amboceptor against Salmon- 
pultara. Another martyr to 
and publicity. 



Football Team 

Tied by Tufts 

Traditional Rivals Battle to 7-7 lie 



Line Holds on One Yard Line for 
Four Downs 

Two Saturdays ago, oa Alumni Field, 
the Massachusetts State College gridiron 

warriors brought to a close a very en- 
viable season, when they tied a much 
underrated lighting Tufts College eleven 
in the objective game of the year, the 
SCOre for the game being 7-7. Ilolmberg, 
wearing the maroon anil white for the 
lad time, after playing three years on 
varsity St.ite grid teams, proved to be 
the outstanding man on the field, not 
only because he ll.e-hed through the 

opposing lines for il yards for the State 

touchdown, but also because he played 

clean, heads-up football throughout the 

entire game, both on the offense and on 
the defense. "Lou" Hush who failed to 

add to bis score by any substantial gains, 

lucked the point alter touchdown, while 

"Bill" Frigard was potential in his line 

plunges and tenter bucks. dayman, 

quarterback for the Jumbos, scored all 

ol the points lor his team when he went 
Over for the Tufts' touchdown and 

shortly afterwards kicked the point. 

"Lou" Hush o p en ed the game when In- 
clined Kennedy's kickoff from his own 
15-yard line to the teVyard stri|>c where 

(Continued on Page 3) 

BASKETEERS TRAIN FOR 
DIFFICULT SCHEDULE 



Capt. Foley and Houran Only Two 
Lettermen on This Year's Squad 

lacing the stillest schedule that a 
State College basketball team has ever 
come up against, the 1931 Pilgrim basket 
cers led by Captain "Jack" Foley have 
already begun the season's practice in 
earnest ami have lor the past week and a 

half been devoting every afternoon in 

play co nsist ing Of passing and shooting 

the ball. Up to last Monday, the work- 
outs were entirely in the hands of Foley, 
who was supervising the practices In the 

absence of Coaeh "Freddie" Kil.-rt. lb- 
took charge last Monday, however, and 
has been for the past few days making 
the exercises more strenuous in order to 
whip the men into top-notch condition 

for the opening game. 

Seventc n men are at the present time 

on the squad; there being two of I. -I 

year's lettermen, namely. Captain Foley 
and Houran; s. \eral veterans, Ahlstrom, 
Fawcett, Hanson, lli'ks and Stewart; 

six members of the freshman team, Hush, 

Fletcher, Frigard, Si'-vers, Lojko, and 
Zelinski; in addition to Pruyne, Merritt, 
Tikofski and O'Donnell. These seven- 
teen men have formed the nucleus of the 
Massachusetts State College squad which 
will meet Amherst Coll e g e in the first 
game of the season. Incidentally, this 
will be the first indoor contest to be 
played in the eage. The schedule this 
year includes four new teams, namely: 
Syracuse, Vermont, Providence and 

(Continued on Page 3) 



R(K;ER BALDWIN, NOTED 
LIBERAL, TO BE IN 
AMHERST NEXT SUNDAY 

Roger Baldwin, director of tin- Ameri- 
can Civil Liberties Cnion. outstanding 
liberal ami worker for free Sp ee ch , will 
deliver an address next Sunday evening 
at the Unitarian Church on the topic, 
"Constitutional Rights in 1931." He 
will speak at 6:15 before a meeting of the 
Students' Forum of that church. The 
meeting will be attended by members of 

the M.S.C. Liberal Club in addition to 
the regular attendance of these Sunday 
evening forums. 

It is not often that M.S.C. students 
have an Opportunity to meet in an inti- 
mate fashion a speaker of such note as 
Mr. Baldwin. He is here through the 
efforts of the Progressive Forum of 
Northampton, and his schedule includes 
addresses to that group and to the 
Amherst College Liberal Club. 



REV. CLAUSEN GIVES 
ADDRESS AT CHAPEL 

Explains How Slang Phrases May 
"Reveal a (ieneration" in Inter- 
esting Talk at Sunday Chapel 

Res. Bernard Clausen, pastor of the 

First baptist Church of Syracuse, NY., 

opened his address at Sunday chapel on 
November 23 with a little incident con 

cerning Ernest Seton Thompson cm the 

interpretation of language. Mr. Thomp- 
son, author of "Wild Animals I Have 
Known," OaOS stated in a lecture that 
wild animals have a language they speak 
to one another, and he added that he 
believed he could understand what they 
said. A gentleman in the audience spoke 
Up and said, "The next (inn- you see a 
skunk you ask him what's the big idea?" 
Now, continued Rev. Clausen, it takes 

experience- to be able to tell "what's the 
bis; idea," and it takes similar expet iene e 

to tell what's the- big idea ol a generation. 

You cannot tell it from literatim-, and 
only slightly from music-; it is rather the 
slang phrases that reveal a generation. 
(Continued on Pafte 3) 



Seminar Arrant 
Discuss J 



;ed to 
disarmament 



Christian Association and Y.W.C.A. 

Cabinets to Have Charge of 

Conference 

On the afternoon of Tuesday, Noveni 

ber 94, the Cabinets of the Christian 

Association and the Y.W.C.A. met in the 

office of President Thatcher to discuss 

with him the possibility of holding a 
seminar or conference on some problem 
of interest to thinking students. 

The problem of world peace- and dis- 
armament was chosen for the subject of 

the conference, and the date was set at 

Friday, Saturday, and Sunday, January 
lo, Hi, ami 17. Reinhold Niebuhr, Chap 

ter President of •' League lor Industrial 

Democracy, Editor of the World To* 

morrow t and one of the- most outstanding 
liberals in the American pulpit, will COfl 
elude the conference with an address in 

Sunday Chapel. <>t!ier speakers will le 
obtained iiom nation wide- organisations 

to present both sides of the- question, ami 
a large part of the time will be givt n Over 

to group discussions. 

President Tbatc le r has taken an active 

interest in the work ol the Y.W.C.A. 

ami the- Christian Association, ami is 
meeting with the committees of each 
cabinet and representatives of the Stu 
dent Committee on Disarmament to dis 
further pl.m-.. Charlotte Miller '•';;; 

is the chairman of the Y.W.C.A. Con 

b rem e Commit tc-e, John Mac Lean '32 
the- chairman of the Christian Association 
Conference- Committee, and Ray Ward 
'.;.'! is chairman of the- Student Committee 
on I Hsarmament. 



CAMPUS CAI.KNDAR 



"There it no surh thinn as abslrmt morality. 

\\ < <Iiu-mI:i\, DecemlxT 12 
7.00 p.m. Orpheus ( lub Meetias. MenarHU 

Hall. 
X.00 p. ill. tMmttttS < \n\> Me-.titiK, 

Memorial BnlkUas. 

s.cki p. in. em beetra Rehearsal, 9U» kbridsc 
Hall. 
Thursday, December 3 

G.-'iO I), in l're-s- (In!) McotiriK. Draper Hall. 
7.16 p.m. Physic* CtSh Mist lug. Phy a k s 

Build tag- 
7.16p.m. Index Board Meeting. Index 

nnVi 

7. .'JO p. rn. Fernald Club Meeting, Sp eake r, 
AshUy Curacy '•'{'{, Entomology lildg. 

S.'.O p. in. TryouU for the Roister Doi-ti.-rs 
Pleach Play. Bowker Auditorium. 
Friday, December 4 

7.00 p. SB. Sot ial Cnion, Arthur Guiterman, 
"America's Hn mo row Poet.' 

s .'id i). in. Senior 1-rolk. Memorial Hall. 
Saturday, December 5 

2-."< p . m. W.SC.A Dance, Memorial Hall. 
Sunday, December 6 

i.lOs m < h.<p' I. Jay T. Stocking. Pilgrims 
Congregational Chun h, St. lyrmis. Mo. 

2.00 p. m. (Juting Club Hike- to Mt. Sugar- 
loaf. 

I.16D.BS. Radio CoBCCft, N'.w York Phil- 
harmoni' Or< h 

4.00 p. rn. Coed Chri-tiria-, Party, Y Room. 
Tuesday, December 8 

8.00 p. in. < boros. 



Quartet Pleases 
at Social Union 

Vanity Cluh Ouartot Afcam Rocoivt'd 

with Acclaim as Social Union 

Season llcftins 

That delightfully entertaining font 

some- of singers, the Varsity Ctttb <Ju.ntet . 
again sang their way into the- memoiv of 
pleasantries of all who were gallieied in 

Bowker Auditorium for the first concert 

of the Soeial Union season on Friday 
night. With a personality other than 
that of the professional kind, the Quartet 
sang pieces of nie-rit uith all the dis 

crimination of grand opera. The- numbers 
ranged from the "Liebestraume" of Lisxt 
to a popular modernistic piece- called 
"Happy Feet," and though each numhei 
was treated differently tin- entire program 
was given with .is great cue- ami color as 

possible-. The Versatility of the group 
was very evident, and justly so when the 
individual singers are considered. They 
are: Norman Arnold, tenor; Robert 
Isensee-, liass; Clifton Johnson, te-nor; 
and Ralph Tailby, baritone-. 

One ol the features of the evening was 

an organ solo by Mr. Weielner, the- pianist 
for the- Quartet, for which he- chose a 

complex medley eif numbers known col- 
lective!) as "The Bouquet of Kejses." As 

an encore Mr. Weielner played a charac- 
teristic selection (ailed "The Klfs," 
written by a French composer. Another 
(Continued on Page 3) 

REV. STOCKING WILL 
GIVE CHAPEL ADDRESS 

Well Known Religious Leader and 

Author to Speak at Next 

Sunday Chapel 



From St l.ouis, Missouri, comes (he- 
speaker who will address this Sunday's 
chapel and he is Rev. Jay T. Sten king ol 
the Pilgrim's Congregational Church of 
that city. At one time Kev. Stocking 
was a student of Amherst College- and 
graduated from our neighboring insti 

tut ion in is 1 .!.",, lb- has, aJso, received 

degrees from the- Yale- College School of 

Divinity and the University of Berlin. 
He is recognised as a forceful speakei and 

lias a nation wid«- reputation. Uev. 

Stocking has held the pastorate ot nearby 

eities, New Haven, Uc-llows l-'alls, \t., 
and Newtonv ille, Mass., and is well 

known locally, lie i> a member of 
several clubs which include the Cosmos, 
Fortnightly, and the- Missouri Athletic- 
Club. He- has won I'hi Beta Kappa 
honors. Also, Mr. Stocking is the author 
ol several books among which air: 

"Dearest spot on Earth," "City That 
Never Was Reached," ami "Querj 
Queer." 

FROSH-soiMl FOOTBALL 
GAME RESULTS IN 

SCORELESS IIK 

Tin- freshman ami sophomore- football 
teams battled to a III! tie- in the- annual 
inte-re lass game played Tuesday afternoon, 

November 24. About 200 spectators, 

mainly freshmen ami so pho mores, wit 

nessed t be game. 

At the be-ginning of the game- there 
were no varsity players in the- sophomore 

line-up. The freshmen sralined through 
the- sophomore line. When a touchdown 

se-e-med imminent, however, almost tin- 
whole- sophomore team was replaced by 
varsity men. The- varsity players slowed 
tin- freshmen's advance considerably but 

were- ne»t able to gain lime h grounel 
against theni. The Iri-shmaii team ane| 
the- varsity team of the- sophomejres 

seemed fairly evenly matched. 

Tin- sophomore line was again without 
varsity players when the second hall 
began. Again the freshmen gaine-el rapidly, 
ami again the- varsity men were- sent in. 

Hoth sieles made some spectacular gains, 
but neither made- a te,ue hdown. The 
sophomores tried t *> kick a held goal, 

but the- ball went wide. Re>d Ciimmings. 

of tin- freshman team, intercepted a 
sophomore forward pass ami almost got 
away with the- ball. The game- ended 

with nei s( me-. 



GRIDSTERS CONCLUDE 
SUCCESSFUL SEASON 

I isi of Seven Victories. One Defeat 

and One lie CHffsj l'MI <; r id 

Team Knviahle Record 

With a moral vie ten v over Tufts 

marking the completion d the 1931 State 

grid season, the Maroon ami White- lout- 

ball fans from coast to i oast are beginning 

to sit up and take not in- eel the- fact that 
Captain (lilt Foskett and his squ.nl have- 
timieel in a giidiieui leeeinl this vear 
thai is, to sav the least, enviable. Mm h 
ol the- eiedit is to be given to the new 

coach, Mel Taube, who was g r oo m ed 

under the Notre Dame I'linliie system 
and who eaine to the- State College earn 

p"s this fall after several successful 

seasons as lieshinan football COSCb at 

Purdue University. Under his tutelage 

the team tlii:, vear became- one- e»f tin- 
(Continued tin I'age 3) 

LARGE CROWD ATTENDS 
INFORMAL AFTER GAME 

Many Tufts and Jackson Students 
Are GejSBjgn at Dance Held 

After Tufts Game 



Altll Weeks Of mi so, ial I. livities. t he 

Tufts Informal was keenly anticipated 

and joyfully welcomed Saturday evening, 
November 21, in the Drill Hall. This 
dance- came- as a fitting close- ol a most 
Successful football season, and although 

the tic- sceire of the- 'lulls g. • pn vented 

it from being a v i. ten y dam e, the- pleasure 

and entertainment of those- attending 
was not diminished. 

Invitations vveie extended to t lie 
students of Tufts and Jackson ( olleg.s, 
with the- result that a large- number from 
both institutions we-re pre-sent. 

Simple but attractive decor a tions e»f 

College b an ners ami football se cms served 

to cover the ban- interior ol the Drill 

Hall and helped produce a football 

atmosphere. The lights cov er ed with 

shaele-s ot colored crepe paper east a 

soil ghiw over the dam ing e ouplis. 
e ..11 1 in u. ■ l on l'.,i>i- &> 

Press Club Formed as 

New Campus Activity 

Ne\l Meeting of Club to lie Held 
Thursday, Dec. .<, in Draper Hall 

At a uppe i meet mg in I taper 1 1. ill on 
November I- a campus Press Club was 
organized. Several members e,i tin- 
boards oi undergraduate publications, 

othei siii<|inis, i.nultv m embe rs and 

loeal reporters showed interest in the 
c lub. Meetings an- to be- helil eveiv two 
weeks during the winter months. 'I his 

lust meeting afforded an opportunit) b>r 
the members to hem i talk by M 
Elizabeth Met ausiand, ol the stall of 
the Springfield Republican, nw the subject 

of interviews ami interviewing. Miss 

McCausland gave- an interesting sccount 
of her experiences and mentioned several 

things about her work whiih were e,f 

special interest t « * her hearet i 

I In- club w.i*. organized under the 
direction e,f (, ( e,rge- Oleson, Extension 

EditOf for the- College- ami lor this 

tin- following officers wen- elected: Robert 

Howes '.;.'!. president, Joseph I'olilella 
(Continued on Pafte 3) 



APTITUDE TESTS 

FOR PRE-MEDICS 

Tin- medical aptitude tests () f the 
American Medical Association will be 
given at the- Massachusetts s.ate- 
Co liege- in Room 317, Stockbrtdgc 
Hall, at :} p. in. on Friday, Dec 1 1 
Dr. Harry N. (.lie k of tin- Department 
of Education will have charge of 

giving these- tests %\ State- College. 

A charge "I S1.00 is made of ali stu- 
dents liking this examination. All 
students interested should see Dr. 
( .Ik k immediately for particul 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 2, 1931 



Zbc flfeassacbusetts Collegian 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 2, 1931 



Official newspaper of 



the Massachusetts State College. 
Wednesday by the students. 



Published every 



Wallace W. Stuart '32 
Managing Editor 



BOARD OF EDITORS 

Frank L. Springbr '32 
Editor-in-Chief 

Oscar Margolin '32 Rial S. Potter. Jr. '32 

Associate Editors 



DEPARTMENT EDITORS 

Editorial 

Frank L. Springer '32 

Campus 
Edmond Nash '33 
Athletics Alfreda L. Ordway '33 

William II. Wsas '32 W. Raymond Ward '33 

EUGENE GURALNICK 33 HARRIETTS M. JACKSON 34 

Joseph Politblla '34 
Feature 
Oscar Margolin '32 



Alumni and Faculty 

Marjorib L. French '34 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT 

Eric H. Wetterlow Jr. '32 
Business Manager 



Kenneth E. Hodge '32 
Advertising Manager 

ASHLBY B. GURNEY '33 



Huttlnebt* Assistants 



William A. Johnson '32 
Circulation Manager 

Philip H. Liver ault '33 



Subscriptions «2.00 per year. Single copies 10 cents. 



Make all orders payable to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In case of change of address, subscriber will please notify the business manager 
as soon a9 possible. 

Alumni and undergraduate contributions are sincerely encouraged. Any com 
munications or notices must be received by the editor-in-chief on or before Monday 
evening. 



Bttte/ed m Mcond-clMa natter at Um taken t Poet < NBe*. Accepted ha maiUni el epei ed rate <>f 
pottage provided f<>i in Section I i":t. Ad "t < '• inher, 1917, eataortaed Aacuet SO, 191X. 



Sty* pramnn 

'And the Greatest of These—' 

The Football game 

That in the name 

Of Charity is played 

Deserves support 

For 'tis a sport, 

The unemployed to aid. 

When guarantees, 

( Mlicial's fees, 

And other bills are paid, 

The unemployed 

Are overjoyed, 

Their hunger is allayed, 

By hearty fare 

Of nice hot air 

And that's all, I'm afraid. 



CO-ED NOTES 



STUDENT OPINION, TRUSTEES, AND R.O.T.C. 

Early in January, the tenth or eleventh of next month, we believe, the Board of 
Trust* > of the College are t<> imct and it i> expei ted thai the petition which has been 
circulated among the student body during the pari yea* will be presented to the 
trustees for their consideration at thai time. 

With great enthusiasm, a formidable number of students of State College have 
been very buaj in establishing a campaign to remove the required element of the 
basic course in military science and tactics as presented at Massachusetts State. 
Their campaign to place all <>t the courses of military >< ience .is taught on this cam 

pUfl upon an elective basi-> has resulted in the petition signed by many of the nuiti- 

bers <>t tli>' student body. 

In addition to this petition which IS a definite, tangible hit of evidence which 

states the reelings <>f mam students upon this matter, the broad, yet vital, question 

of disarmament appears to he the center of conversatM f Liberal Club meetings, 

"V" conferences, intercollegiate discussions, and the proem Manchurian situation 

i- commanding attention by providing material for student speeches in the various 
course-, in public speaking which are conducted here on campus. 

In other words, State student* are becoming "w.u minded" they are consider- 
ing the cause* of war, the sufferings due to the presence of war, and reviewing the 
results of war. Surely the opinions of students who have been enlightened by current 
conversation, press, and lecturers shotted be given much consideration when the only 
direct association with war which the students of today lay claim is being judged hy 
them. The required basic coarse in military science and tactics is considered hy 
many students to constitute an unjust requirement which has a detrimental effect 
upon the mental orientation in worhl-mindedness of the lower classmen. Other 
students, usually those electing the advanced courses, consider that compulsory- 
military training is and should be a legitimate requirement. 

Well-founded student opinion should carry considerable weight with the trustee* 
when they take this matter of compulsory military training at Massachusetts State 
under consideration. Student opinion briefly, logically, and correctly stated by 
means of communications to the Collegian should present to the trustees a sane out- 
look upon this problem and accordingly present a hroader foundation upon which 
they will base their decision. 



BOOKS ON RESERVE 

Evidently, there is considerable confusion concerning the action taken at the 
last Student Forum with reference to punishment for removing hooks which are on 
reserve at the library without jKTinission. 

First, infringement constitutes the deliberate removal of a book which has been 
placed on reserve at the library and the failure to return that book to the library at 
the time specified. It is permissible to borrow a reserved book from the library at 
closing time but that book must be returned to the library at the next opening time. 
For instance, if a book on reserve is borrowed on a Thursday evening at closing 
time, it must be returned to the library at 8:30 Friday morning and not whenever 
the borrower gets around to it. 

Second, the matter rests with the students. The co-operation of each and every 
student in keeping reserved books available for all members of the class during the 
hours which the library is open will eliminate any necessity for punishment. This 
present system will remain in vogue for the remainder of the term, at least. 

Third, if, at the end of this trial period, certain members of the student body lack 
ability to co-o|>erate, it will be deemed expedient to assess each me mb e r in the class 
suffering the loss of the book a proportionate amount in order that the book can be 
lepl.K ed. 

In other words, play fair and co-operate with each other and much embarrass- 
ment will DC avoided. 



Picaroon Lecture No. 2. Botany. 

"So easy that even college students 

can understand it." The Massachusetts 

Collegian. 

LITTLE ACETABULARS 

A wistful story of thwarted desire 
among the Chlorophyceae. Everybody 

who reads this Story is bound to feed 
wistful. 

It was a warm sundiiny spring day by 

the shores of the Mediterranean. Little 
Acetabulars yawned and rubbed his 
eyes, an action which, as Mr- Dodgson 

might have observed, was vny, very odd, 

for you see, 1 nth- Act tabularia had neither 

mouth to yawn with, nor eyes to rub. 
Indeed, even if he had had eyes to rub, 
he had no lingers with which to rub them. 

Hut little Acetabulars didn't know about 
these difficulties, as he had been born 
yesterday, and besides was very green, 
(a characteristic common to all the mem- 
bers of the daSS of chlorophyceae to 
which he belonged , and in his ignorance, 
lie went right ahead and yawned and 

rubbed his eyes. Then he became wick 

aw. ike, thereb) proving that he wasn't a 
college boy. 

Day. passed. Little .Vetabularia grew 
to vigorous young algachood. So he 
popped the question to a nice young lady 
.Vetabularia who lived across the way. 
and Jack in the pulpit joined them in the 
holy bonds of matrimony for half price, 
as business was getting dull oa account 
of the depression. So these two became 
one, and retired to their house in the 
country wlitre they Spent the winter in 
ways which wouldn't interest you any- 
way. In the spring, little .Vetabularia 
came out of his shell and grew and grew 
(which shows what a good influence a 
wife can be . 

Summer passed. Little Acetabularia 
became very crusty. Having stocked a 
snug little cellar, he retired into it leaving 
his upi>er story unfurnished and unin- 
habited (getting to be more like a 
college student, isn't he?). Next spring, 
he came out of his retreat, and again he 
grew, this time branching out widely in 
so many whorls that he became dizzy, 
(thus indicating even more strongly his 
potential ability to be a college boy). 
Finally the branches dr opped off and his 
head began to swell. (Ah! At last he has 
become exactly like the rest of us!) 
Then his head burst and the contents 
were scattered far and wide. 

"Woe! Woe!" wailed little Acetabularia 
realizing that he was now but the shell 
of his former self, "all that work to be 
done over again!" 

The End 



On Sunday, Nov. 22, YAV.C.A. Cabi- 
net held retreat at the home of J. l'aul 
Williams in North Amherst to discuss 
plane for the year. Eighteen members 
were present, each one with c riticism s 
and suggestions for "Y" work. An ex- 
cellent dinner was served at I JO by Miss 
Helen Knowlton assisted by the girls. 

Foremost among the activities planned 
is the annual Christmas Party for all 
co-eds, sponsored by Y.W., to be held 
next Sunday afternoon from four to five 
in the "Y" room at the Abbey. Dorothea 
Knopp, German exchange student is to 

be asked to attend. IMans are made for 
carol singing and refreshments. Instead 
of the usual exchange of ten cent present -. 
a collection of dimes will be made from 
all the girls to be used to help a local 
family in need. In this same line is the 
collection of cast olT clothing which Y.W. 
is now making for unemployment relief. 

Next Saturday afternoon from two to 
live is the time scheduled for the annual 
W.S.G.A OO-ed dance at the Memorial 

Building, All co-eds are urged to come; 

short items of entertainment will till in 
between dances, and refreshments will be 
served downstairs. The orchestra has not 

yet been decided upon. Women members 

of the faculty havi been invited to attend. 
The dance is in charge of the W.S.'i.A. 
Council. 



STOCKBRIDGE 



j. 



NOTICES 



The annual poultry competition 
held last week in Stockbridge Hall and 
at the Poultry Plant. There wer 
(lasses of poultry work and three > 
seniors and fourteen Stockbridge senior 
entered birds in the contest. 

The results: 

Judging 1st, E. Donaghy M.S.t 
2nd, W. Libby M.S.C. '83; ^rd 
Faszczew ski S.'32. 

Capons 1st, J. Faszczewski S 
2nd, J. Queen S.'.'tt; 3rd, 11. Clark S j 

Fattening 1st, J. (Jueen S/32; 
F. Dyer S.*32; 3rd, F. Keohan S.'.iJ. 

Roasters — 1st, II. Clark S.':i2; 2m], 
P. Kaeeland &V32; 3rd, J. Queen s. _> 

First, second, and third places in i 
(lass vOfl a capon, roaster, and oat 
dozen eggs, respectively, as prizes. 



Thirty couples attended the Kolony 
Klub "Vic" dance after seeing the M.S.' 
vs. 'lulls game on Saturday, Nov. 21, 
Professor and Mrs. Clatfelter and In- 
structor and Mrs. Tuttle were preset 

chaperones, The presence of n 

alumni added to the -U' cei - of the da 



OFFICERS 
OF THE CLASS OF 1933 

President Carl Clancy 
Vice-President Sylvia Wilson 
Secretary Ona Munson 

Treasurer Nelson Peeler 
Captain Daniel J. Leary 

Sergeant-at-arms -Fred Taylor 



EDITORIAL BRIEFS 

We understand a number of our orgeous juniors wore their new uniforms home 
during the holidays so that fond mammas and papas could have the thrill of having 
a real major, uniform and all, adorning the family circle. 



And some wise cracker once said "Vanity, thy name is woman. 
get that way? 



How does he 



Now that the pool 



open 



we give you our permission to drown the Picaroon. 



After looking over the finances of the charity football games during the pas! 
week or so, it seems to us that after those associated with the contests receive their 
shares— and they are pretty large shares, too — there isn't very much left for charity. 



OLD MORALITY 

.1 study in brawn 

There was a young man from the West, 

Whose record was far from the bet; 

He studied all day, 

In a desperate way, 

But he couldn't keep up with the rest; 

So he studied all night as well, 

Till his nerves were all shot to pieces 

And he jtarted to bark and to yell, 

Like a bevy of nephews and nieces. 

The moral is easy to see, 

It's as plain as plain can be; 

If you Jtttdy all night, 

And never get tight, 

You're sure to get housemaid's knee. 



Buffalo Convention 
Mary Black, Gifford Towle, and Ray 

Ward are heading the M.S.C. delegation 

to the Quadrennial Convention in Buffalo, 

N. V., Dec. :;<) to Jan. .".. There is still 
transportation available for a few more 

delegates. If you are interested, see Mr. 

J. Paul Williams or Cifford Towle. 

Fernald Entomological Club 

l'ernald Entomological Club meeting, 
Fernald Hall, Thursday, Dec. o at 730 

p. m. "The Insect Menace' 1 by L. o. 

Howard, reviewed by Ashley B. Curney 
':;:;. 

Roister Doister French Play Tryouis 
TryOtttS for parts in Augier's "Le 
Geadre de Monsieur Poiricr" will be held 
Thursday, Dec. '.i at 8.:*0 p. m. in Bowkcr 
Auditorium. Those who have not already 
prepared the necessary passages will find 
plays on reserve and details posted at the 
library. Ability to read and p ro nou n ce 
French of fair difficulty is required. Try- 
outs are open to all. 

Indoor Track Notice 

There will be a meeting of candidates 
for the varsity and freshman track teams 
in the cage on Thursday, December 'A, at 
3:45 p. m. 

Informal practice will be held until the 
Christmas recess and regular practice 
will start on January 4. 

All men who expect to be candidates 
are asked to report at this meeting so 
that arrangements can be made for 
equipment. 

A similar meeting is called for Stock- 
bridge School candidates in the cage on 
Friday, December 4, at 4.15 p. m. 

Physics Club Meeting 

There will be a meeting of the Physics 
Club Thursday, Dec. 3 at 7:15 at the 
Physics Lab. Ralph Nickerson will speak. 

New Course in Sociology 

A new course in Sociology is to be 
offered during the winter term. Sociology 
83 Conservation of the Family for 
seniors, juniors may elect. 3 class hours, 
(red its 3. Professor Skinner. This class 
is scheduled for Monday, Wednesday, 
and Friday, 11:30-12:20. This course is 
open to both men and women. 



ALUMNI NOTES 



w'23 James S. Hubbard is room clerk 
at the Hotel Douglas, Newark, N. J. 

'25 Lev. ie Keith is sah-s engineer with 
the Pierce-Ferry Co., plumbing and hi 
ing engineers at 236 Congress St., Boat 

*27 Bob Hurrell is at present sta- 
in Australia in connection with for 
parasite research on the Japanese l>< 

and the oriental fruit moth. 

w'28 Aaron Cromack is in the army 
air corps at Luke Field, Hawaii. 

'.;il Palmef 1 >uv is working on highwa) 
((instruction with the Mass. Dept 
Public Works. His home is at 91 Church 
St.. W'atertown. 

"20 Alfred A. Clough, whose home it 
at 35 Hawthorne St., Rutherford, N. J . 
writes that he visits frequently wit! 
(■eorge Apst y 20 and Allen Boycc -0 
both of whom live near Rutherford. 

'30 Maurice Suher refereed the eocotl 
game bctwecnW'orccstcr 'Tech and Massa- 
chusetts State on October 3. 



Tryouts for Track Manager 

All freshmen interested in trying out 
for the position of assistant manager d 
varsity track report to Ed Harvey on 
Thursday, Dec. 3 at 3:45 p. m. in the 
cage. 

Outing Club Notices 

Sunday afternoon there will be a trip 
to Sugarloaf and North Sugarloaf. Meet 
at the East Experiment Station at two 
o'clock as usual. This will be the hi?' 
Outing Club hike of the term. L\ try- 
body come. 

The regular monthly meeting of the 
club will be held on Thursday of next 
week. Speaker to be announced. 



Dear Pic: 

Fools may come and fools may go, 
but you go on forever, — unfortunately. 

— Just Another Admirer 

Dear Ad: 

I'm goin' right out in the garden an' 
eat worms. 



RADIO CONCERT 

Arturo Toscanini, leader of the U 
Scab Orchestra in Milan, and an inter- 
national figure in music, will conduct the 
New York Philharmonic Symphony or- 
chestra in its weekly concert at 3.1* 
Sunday afternoon. The concert will he 
heard on the radio in the Memorial HsU 
from 3.15 until 5.15 All studen 
invited. 



THE POEM OF THE MONTH 



MOUNT TOBY 

A sad gloomy day; 

Yet Toby to the northward 

Smiles through the soft haze. 

Author: Arthur C. Parker '33 
Judge: Professor Prince 

Note: This poem i9 in the form of a Japenese holclcu, which consists of three lines, of tfrt, 
seven and five syllables respectively. Manuscripts to be submitted for this month's contc-' 
must be left in Mr. Rand's office by December 15. 



FUR COATS — CLEANED - GLAZED - REPAIRED 

PHONE 8 1 1 - W 

L A N D I S 

CLEANERS & DYERS 



(KIDSTERS CONCLUDE SEASON 
(Continued from Page 1) 

mod Miioothly-functioning outfits ever to 

, nt the institution, having practi- 

rsed List year's results of eight 

iti and one victory by defeating 

ivety seven segregations, tieiag with 

.1 losing to another. The record 

, i-un includes a sum total of 260 

cored against opponents as com- 

with 58 points in favor of contest- 

teams, a result which is in itself 

the highest in the nation. Another 

hit of interest is concerned with the 

il rise of I.ouis Hush, the sopho- 

halfback who was long of America's 

orers during several weeks of the 

in, and who is, at present writing, 

h Bob Monnett of Michigan State 

i.l honors. Uush romped a dis- 

| 1,620 yards for twenty touch- 

ml made 7 conversions for a total 

points, while Ossie Holmberg, a 

! o has played a smashing oil 

ill season, ploughed spproxi- 

1. ,68 yards lor nine touchdowns. 

defensive players were < apt. 

'32, Schaffner '.'M, and Don 

'34. 

nam made a beautiful start of 

n by whitewashing the Red and 

<ii Cooper Union t<i the tune of 

and Holmberg played stellar 

in this game, and Frigard "34, 

in -i:ibei of B family line of foot- 

: , also showed up well. Murray 

\\nk-~, besides ploughing over the last 

line for a score, gave evidence ol 

thing defensive work and sp 
i blocking which he was to con- 

K : "II. 

i ident of victory because of a 46-0 

the previous year, the Bowdoin 

ITS invaded the campus full of 



You have tried the rest? 

Now try the BEST 



And that's the 



AMHERST SHOE REPAIRING CO. 

1 ioodyeaf Welt System Employed" 



fi«ht and spirit. After I.ouis Hush, Wood 
and Captain Foskett had given them an 
active afternoon of it, however, the 
visitors were forced to drag themselves 
off the gridiron on the disappointing side 
of a :i'2-C> defeat. 

This score was repeated the following 
Saturday when the Middlehury aggre- 
gation received a decisive beating at the 
hands of Mel's charges. During this fray 
the Maroon and White gridsters gave 
evidence of the sinontlilv-fuiictioniiiK 

teamwork which the coach had developed 

up to this point. Hush scored three 
touchdowns as his special menu, and the 
final score was 33-6. 

Ofl the following week-end, a surprised 
Norwich eleven could do no more than 
chalk up si\ points against the inspired 

air-mail attack of the State team, the 
result being :;.;-ii. On October 24, the 

Worcester Tech outlit proved too st . 

to be caught in a fiasco, but t'liti Foskett 
; tiie game with a beautiful plai e 
men! field-goal. The climax of the season 

Came when the elusive I.ouis Bush scored 

13 points after spectacular open held 

running to defeat Amherst 13-12. In 
tiiis fray Frigard played his best game of 
the season. Captain Cliff Foskett saved 

Maroon and White from a shutout in 

the Springfield game the week following 
\<\ again putting his trusty toe into action 

for a placement goal, hut the -ore lor 

the giant city players became 21-3. Re- 

venge had its sway, however, in the 
following contest, for a inuchd>ewildered 
Wagner outfit returned to New York after 
a 77-0 shutout, A 7-7 tie was the result 
of the objective game of the year, that 
with Tufts, hut in comparison to a 42-6 
punishment the ye ir before the team did 

a most noble piece ol work. 



S. S. HYDE 

Optician and Jeweler 

Oculieta' Prescriptions Filled. Broken lensc 
accurately replaced 

BIG BEN ALARM CLOCKS and other 
reliable makes 

3 PLEASANT STREET, (up one flight) 



FISHER'S 

Here s a New CORDUROY PAJAMA 

One piece, V neck, long sleeves, wide pajama trousers 
In pastel shades: green, rose, orchid, rust and purple at only 



$3.98 



RKV. CLAUSEN Al CHAPEL 

(Continued from Page I) 

"Skidoo," the expression ot Ivoosevelt 's 

day, was significant ill that it nut a 

mood that had a need for it. Then, the 

volume ol words (oining from Washing- 
ton had increased during Wilson's office, 

and a new expression "applesauce" arose. 
The common saying of Harding's time 
was one which can scarcely lie spelled or 
translated, / ( // kahl'ible, "I should worry." 
He continued, the lust temper ol a 
generation is the temper the people un- 
wittingly give in their common language. 
Take "Well, for crv ing out loud!" What 
do, s it mean? Subtly it meets a need in 

our temper and expresses it. 

"Slang." said Rev. Clausen, "is im- 
portant for what it doesn't s.iv." It 
start- out like profanity, and just steers 
o| ii. \\'e are a generation that likes 

that sensation. Similarly, the newest 

dramatic device, the "blackout," speeds 
the action up to a certain point and 
then the lights go out, leaving the rest 

to the imagination. Thest d< v i. ei plav 

oa a tendency which might to be fought. 

A baby cries out Ion,!, i- gtten 

tion, and gets results. As lie grow otdt r, 
this becomes wheedling and nagging at 

|mi. nts for the results he wants. Hut the 
world doesn't give him all he wants, so 

he keeps oa (i \ ing so that against i ii 
cumstances he will not appear to be the 

failure In 

Crying out loud doesn't do any good. 
In war time there was some excuse lor it, 
hut we h.nl just the reverse men gloried 
in difficulties and dangers. What has 
happened to that spirit ' 

Russian hooks, he continued, an- ot 
two kinds, pessimistic ones written by 

American travellers, and optimistic ones 

written by Russians. Both are right, but 

the Russians .ire lighting for something, 
so that doing without things i-, of litth 

i on-, .in, nee to them. 

Have we nothing to battle foi i 

government, a business, a man with a 

mind open to s. iem c and < iod? Is there 
nothing in Christ's ; l.-.i thai when storms 
swell over you, there is still a chain e to 
show the stuff you are made of? 

"Only the soul that knows the mighty 
grief can know the mighty rapture," he 
quoted. Il.ivc we none of the courage ol 
the Spartans or of Napoleon's soldier 
boy? Is there none of that shame at 
whining left? To muster spiritual foi ■ - 
and brave the material lories around 
you that is religion, he stated. 



BOOKS — BOOKS — BOOKS 

For All The Family 



Christmas Cards 
Line - A - Diaries 
Beautiful Writing Paper 

JAMES A. LOWELL, 



Bibles All Prices 
Jig-Saw Puzzles 
Mottoes - Book Ends 

BOOKSELLER 



Nothing Better for Campus Wear 

than a Leather Coat 

Warm, durable and good looking 
Priced to fit all pocket books. $9.00 to $22.50 
We have sold OAKES SWEATERS for twenty five years. 
We believe they are the best sweater a man can buy at any 
price. They are particularly attractive this year when you 
can buy a heavy all wool sweater at $7.75. 

Other good all wool sweaters at $5.00. 

F. M. THOMPSON & SON 



THE NATIONAL SHOE REPAIRING 

21 MAIN STREET 

Between Town Hull and Masonic llull.lliiu 

W/..W SHOES SOLED and HEELED $1.75 

FULL .SO/./..S and hi Jilil.K HEELS 12.50 

ladies' Shoes Soled and Kubber Heels $1.40 

LADIES SHOES UEELEU 40c 

All Work Guaranteed 



QUARTET IM.EASKS 
(Continued from Pug* I) 

interesting and phasing deviation of the 
program was a series of sonys commencing 
with a solo by Mr. Arnold and increasing 
hy one voice until the Huartet was com- 
plete. This aii.iiigement offered an 
Opportunity to judge the singers individu- 
ally and to Understand the merits of a 

quartet as compared with the othei 

tonus o| group singing. The song the 
trio sang was the engaging number 
"Dinah" which was enjoyed so will |,v 
the aujlience that .u\ encore of the same 

number was necessary. Mr. Tailby's 

voire was especially titled to sing the 

famous nunil.ei "Did Man River" from 
"Show boat" which was anotbei request. 

Requests were granted ,,s gi aioiislv as 
possible, the group singing "Did Miss 
Hannah" which made such a hit last 

year, Encores were given after almost 
ever) number which were as enjoyable as 
the scheduled pieces. The program was 
changed somewhat from the original 
arrangement hut everyone agreed that it 
was for the better entertainment of the 

illdieili e 

This Quartet will he gracefully and 
heartily welcomed next yen if they an 
to he included in the Social Union pro- 
gram for next season, lor the audien. e 

was reluctant to acknowledge the end oi 
the program, The finale as an encore 
was the inimitable "Rosai y ." 

CROWD ATTENDS INFORMAL 

(Continued from l\igf 1) 

Moie tli. m two hundred couples, a 
record attendance, were present to enjoy 

dan.ing from eight to eleven lorlv live 

to music furnished by Nemki's College 
bm < hrchestra ol I lolyoke. 



PATRONIZE 



The College Barber Shop 

"M" BUILDING 
M. s. c. 



SANG LUNG hand laundry 

No. 1 Main St. Amherst, Mass. 

kkpaikinf; am) all kinds op 

wasiiim; i>onk at ki asonmii k 

PRICKS. 
Our Laundry First Class 

Our Policy Cuarantmd 

NEXT TO TIIE TOWN HALL 



Chaperones toe the dame, in hajsning 

With the football idea, were I'lofcssor .11(1 
Mis Curry S. Hicks and Coach and Mis. 
Melvin Tauiic. 

I he Informal Committee consisting of 
Herbert Forest '•>-. chairman, Keaaetli 

Hodge 'St, (rank Springer '.il!, Gilbert 

Whiitcn ':;:•, and Edward Harvey "88, 

had charge ol this allaii whieh won the 
whole hearted ami cut husiast ie approval 
ol the students. 

BASKBTEBH8 TRAIN 

(Continued from Page I) 
Middlebury, with six. home games and 
eight games to he plaved on foreign 

courts. The 1931 schedule is u follows: 

J. hi. St Anili. i i ii \l 8 ( 

1 1 Trinity .a \is.i , 

Hi ( • >iiii Amies •'< Sl,, i I ■ 

.'in \v p.l ,i Wore 

"> U. It \ .hi a vti.i.ii, town 

(I II. million ,,( M si'. 

in SprincfiaM si UJB <". 

U Middlebury .a Middlebury 

i'i I '■ "i V en H e Burlington 

17 Willi. mm ,k WUUnautowa 

-'<> New ii.iuii, inn- .a \i i 

'J I S) in il <• .il Syi i 

m Tnii, ..i Medford 
l Providence, .a \i i 



Peb 



Mar. 



PRESS (III; FORMED 

(Continued from Page I) 

■ : I. •• i' e president ; and Ruth Campbell 

'■'! I, sc( lei. ii v . 

I here will be a Meeting ol the I'm 
Club ill Drape. Hall. I huisdav , I lie. Ii. 
Members may eat a i.ileteiia Mippi r lo 

gether upstairs before the meeting. All 
those not eating in the . afeteria should 
he present by 7.15 p. m. The guest 

speaker will be from the stall ol a Spi ing- 

Ik Id paper. All persons interested in .my 
type ol newspaper work an- cordially 

IIIV ileil. 



TYPEWRITERS 

for Sale and Rent 

kf *T a? * vc Vi 
H. E. DAVID 



College Drugstore 

W. H. McGRATH, Reg. Pharm. 



AMHERST, 



MASS. 



VISIT 

BARSELOTTI'S 

All the requirements for the smoker- Pipes, 
Pouches, Smokers Combination 
Ice Cream, Candy, Sandwiches 



DINE AND DANCE 



AT CLUB DEADY 



PATRONIZE 

The Sandwich Man 

R. L. BATES, North Amherst 



Now for 
Christmas 

Greeting Cards - Personal Cards 
Wrappings, etc. 
and an 
I 'p-to-date Stock of Gifts 



AMHERST 
THEATRE 1 



Trm rmlay, !>««-. .1 

V ivi.l I >l .101.1 ill ( ,i i.lir.in' 

'•TOUCHDOWN" 

Willi 

Ki. Ii.ml Vil.ii IVilitv Shannon 

Jack U.ikli- Kt-itls T—SSy 

Friday, l>«. 4 



Miss Cutler's Gift Shop 



I.AWKKNCK II Hill IT in 

"THE CUBAN I.OVK ■ONC" 

with l.upe V «-|,./ and I ,ll.i ll\.ims 

Sat., !»«■<■. S, 1 Features 

I i|ns., I noli Vic-tor Mci.uftlen 

in "WICKED" 

— i a I' iturc — 
Slim Summer* III.- 

in "FIRST TO FIGHT" 

f.anft <:<imeily Foi Nevm 

Mon.-Tum., l>ec. 7-H 
EDDIE CANTOR 

in his I. uitcli riot 

"PALMY DAYS" 

witli Charlotte OreenvuHKl 

Wed., It,-, 9 



I.IKs.i I .itxll and Lionel Harrymore 
In "THE YELLOW TICKET" 



Last 
Times 
Today 



James f.ugney and 
Joan lllondell 

In "KLONOE CRAZY" 

Laurel and Hardy 
in "Ol K WIFK" 



.sr 



THE CANDY KITCHKN 

IS A GOOD PLACE 

IN WHICH TO 

EAT 

Sarris Bros. Candy Kitchen Restaurant Inc. 






MT. ROCK FLEECE OVERCOATS, 
are selling at their lowest price in years. You can now buy this wonderful overcoat for $45.00 

A large assortment awaits your selection at 

E. M. SWITZER, JR., Inc. 



) a D ■- a 



M. A. C. Library. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 2, 1931 



YOU WILL NOT REGRET LATER THE SAVING YOU WILL MAKE ON YOUR NEW HICKEY-FREEMAN SUIT 

Per, every saving in cost that's presented in the new Hickey-Freeman Clothes for Fall is economically sound - - made 

possible by the natural conditions of general business and not by any unnatural steps 

to lower the standard of tailoring quality in the garment! 

THOMAS F. WALSH 



EXAMINATION SCHEDULE 



DM. 14-19, 1931 



Monday, Dec. 14, H. 10-10. 10 a. m. 



Home Be 1 
Draw 25 
(kr 2H 

\g M :>> 

An lliis.,0 
Had till 
EliK BB 



111 

Wll 

(. 211 

12 

102 

i:u D 

no 



FlorJ 88 

1 1 tat 50 
Poult 60 

( 'Iii-iii BU 
Land Arc li 75 
Pom 77 



III C 
I'll D 

m 

G 2.S 

in i- 

Wll A 



Monday, 10.20-12.20 m. 

Orient 1 12, IKi. 114 lor 88 ''" h 

111, 110 Hurt Mfn.'.l H.\i I' 11 

G Atfd.iK.38 Ak Ed 80 81* 

Pkytii i 88 Anion 78 101 

( 1 1 "A . BB l) 



Anion 1 
(.«-i I 
Hort I 
KriK 28 
Baa 88 
Flori 80 
Phy* 60 



Monday, 2-1 p. m 
1 13 Pom 68 



102 

II I 1-. 1 1 

<; Aud. 26,88 

no 

Mil 

PL H 



Wll I!, A 

Zool 86 M K- 

An Be 83 114 

Parra Mm 75 811 

Phyi Ed 71 1' Bd 

lloit Mfg81 IIM HO 



Tuesday, Dec. 15, H. 10-10. 10 a. m. 



Bnglhdi l 
MIm Imiuji US, HI 
Mr. Barnard CH A 

Mr. Pattern) 

ill, no 
Mi. Priaoi 

Mr. Kami 
' Mr. Troy 
tMi-ri 25 
Ag K«l 88 



Be 25 
Bot 52 
Knt .50 
Home I . 40 
Land Arch 50 



102 

12 

Ml P, II 

Wll B 

PL 201 

Tuesday, 10.20-12.20 m. 

G Aud, 20, 2S Physiol till 



Chen U 

Knn 80 
<;.-r 80 
Olcri 51 
Bee 80 
An Bd 70 
Hut 7:1 
1 1. inn- Be It 
Wt 75 



An Kng 75 
Ag Kng 78 

11... i 82 



Phys Ed 2 

G Aud. BB, CH A 
Zool 26 EB D, F 

Cliem 61 I • 20 

Knt 52 BB K 

Ag Ec 77 114 



(II 1* 
BB K 
KB D 

Wll B 

Tuesday, 2-4 p. m. 

An II us 75 



G Aud 

110 

G88 

Wll B 

B Ben 

311 

KB K 

IIM 110 

\ I. B 



M BB 
no 

102 
II 27 



Bot 81 
French 75 
Home Bt 81 
l'oiilt 70 
Pfcya Bd 71 



102 

CH B 

FH H 

113 

HI 

P E<1 



Wednesday. I>ec. 16, 8.10-10.10 a. m. 



Cierman 1 G Aud. 2H Ag Bd N5 

Math 28 MB B.G Bot 7s 

Soc27 (lain 75 

SS-ni, IIM 110 Kiik71 

Ac Be 10 no ■■•.80 

A K Bd 51 US Math 70 

Spank*. 80 PH H 

Wednesday. 10.20-12.20 in. 

Mall, I M' M 00 " 

Mr. Boiit.-lle I BCOI M 

US, in. 110, in Gsrwaa 88 

Mr. Marliiurr 

MB B.G 

Wi-iIiu-Mlay, 2-4 p. m. 

Chen 1 li 88.88 AaraaSO 



114 
(II B 

( . 81 

111 

KB K 

MB 1) 



KB D. K 
G 26 

I, Ami 



l-'n-n, li 2-< 

Home i 88 
Hort 25 
Poult 88 

An Ens 51 



111 II 
103 

( II A 
313 

n I 



ll.,t 01 

An Be 79 
Bat 7i> 

Klnti 75 
( il. ti 75 



111 

(11 B 

113 

KB K 
III C 
1 II I) 



WIN OVBH MTCHlUslG 

(Continued from Page 1) 

above resell, and the first period coded 

with no more satisfactory results than 
the satisfaction for the State team that 
they had outplayed the visitors. 

Fitchburg started a rally during the 
second quarter, and with Hammond play- 
ing a leading part, several times had the 
ball in dangerous State territory. The 
"Urigg's iron bound" defense, however, 
held, and as a coinc back, the ball was 
taken up to the State forward line for 
Jackson to score the first point. Stale 
leading at the half by the score of 1-0. 

The third period found both teams at 
their best. Hammond gave a most 
unusual exhibition of clever individual 

soccer playing, but due to toe defense 

work by Hitchcock could not score. This 
quartet saw Bishop score the only point 

for the visitors, due to clever pasework. 
As in the tost part <>f the game, the 

last part saw several opportunities for 
Captain Waskiwic/.'s team to score, but 
all to no avail. Both teams wanted that 

winning point, but with equal inability 

to gain it. Spring, the goalie for the 
Fitchburg team, and the backs for t In- 
state team were the deciding factors in 
that scoreless period. 

Moth teams came on to the field some- 
what the worse for wear, as the first 
overtime period started. However, Koz- 
lowski, still fresh, got into his stride, and 
booted home the winning point of the 
game. After the winning point had been 
pushed home, the well-known State 
defense made itself apparent, and held 
throughout the overtime, to end the 
season with a win. 

The line-up: 

Mass. State 
Jorczak, g 
Cowing, lfh 
Conni'U, llodsdon, rfb 
Shunian, Warren, rhb 
I'ruyne, Tall>ot, chb 
IlittlKoik. lhli 
Taft. ill 
Waakhrki iGaptJ, irf 

lacWsnn. cf 
Mai kiiiunie, olf 
Koatewakt, Potiaat, orf 

Ki-fi-rt-i- Uusworlh. 

This season's record, made by a young 
soccer team, is OM <>f which the whole 

school may be proud. Undefeated teams 

,i rare at best, and the team that made 
this year's mark had as hard a schedule 
,,s any team around these parte. A brief 

summary: 
Soccer scon- for the season of 1931: 



In the following period, the Brown and 
Blue showed its mettle and no sooner 
had the quarter begun when the Jumbos 
began to unloose (rich plays and fancy 
passes which quickly swept the State 
gridsters off their feet. State halted the 
Jumbo's march of the length of the field 
on its 15-yard mark. This was in vain, 
however, for in a few moments, the 
Brown and Blue blocked Welch's kick 
ami Spalding recovered on State's 15. 
(lark and dayman started carrying the 
ball and the Jumbos advanced to the 
goal line, where dayman carried the 
piuskin across and kicked the placement 
I., tie the score. The closing moments 
found the opposing team in full posses- 
sion of the game, but State proved its 
strength once more when it held the 
Brown and Blue on its one-yard line 
after repulsing the attack of the Jumbos 
for four downs. The summary: 

Tufts 

le. Balku?. Child* 

It, Linberg, Bruiiki* 

Ik, SpauldiiiK. Cue hi. in 

C, Knaniiiaii. I'arkliurst 

ig, Nelson, Isbard 



M. S. C. MEN'S MOTTO IS ALWAYS 
LET "DAVE" DO IT 

AMHERST CLEANSERS, DYERS 

and LAUNDERERS 



PHONE 828 



Near the Town Hall 



PHONE 828 



s 



B 
6 



s 



THOMAS S. CHILDS 

Incorporated 

SMART SHOES and HOSIERY for COLLEGE MEN and WOMEN ( 

QUALITY MERCHANDISE PRICES TO SUIT 

275 High Street, Holyoke 



Largest Shoe Store In Western Massachusetts 



«OJ 



Massachusetts State 

Smith. Kyan. re 
BiirriiiKton. Sii-vers, rt 
Si -ha finer, rg 
l.i-ary. Boiirneois, c 
Tnii-, Silicon, lg 
Fosk.-tt (Caiit.).lt 

rt. A. Staffan. Batchelder. Restall 
Mountain, le re. Ellsworth, Cole 

Welch, bojko. qfc Q b - dayman 

Hofaaban. rhb lhb. Kennedy. W. Staffan 

Beak, lhb rhb, McMahon, Hymanson, Bennett 
Friwinl. Hicks, fb fb. Clark 

Tuwfcllnaai TllllsrtiarS Clayman. Point after 
touchdowns— Bush. Clayman (both placement*). 
Referee— J. a. Chalmers. Umpire— J. P. Wlialcn. 
Linesman— J. F. Farrell. Field judge— W. L. 
Stearns. Peiioda— 15 minutes. 



JOSEPH GINSBERG 

19 PLEASANT ST. 

Men's Furnishings - Shoes repaired, called for and delivered 

Freshmen, come in and see our selection of shoes, priced moderately. 

Special sale now on leather coats, just what you need for cold weather. 

CALL 984-M . 



Fitchburg. 

g. Spring 

Ifb, Haggerty 

rfb. Hopkins 

rhb, Steeves 

chb. Pease (('apt.) 

lhb, Riley 

ilf, KCearns 

irf, Hammond 

cf, Southworth 

olf, MiKt-niKlian 

orf. Ponte, Bishop 



INFORMAL CROSS-COUNTRY 
MEET 

Informal squad race between Amherst 
Junior Varsity. Amherst Freshmen, Mass. 
State Junior Varsity, Mass. State Fresh- 
men, and Stockbridge School. Freshman 
coarse, M.S.C., Tuesday, Nov. 17, 1981. 



CARTERS MOULDETTES 

Foundation Garment for Present Styles 
$2.95 and $3.95 

JACKSON & CUTLER 

Amherst, Mass. 



Thursday. Dec. 17. 8.10-10.10 a. m. 



( 'h.-in I G And 

Hiat 98 U3.111 

\ I '•! 



tail 30 

Pul. Spk 



12 



1)11 A 
103 



Bat TO 

Math 7."i 
M il 7.-. 
S<„ T.'i 



ThurMl.iy, 10. 20- 1 2.20 m. 



Sp I i, i: 

Draw '- ' 
Phj I- I 
Bot 50 
Bat 53 
Geo! 50 



i 113, ii i Hon 50 

\v 1 1 Bad 7". 

.1 G And l-'.ni 

I II II Daily 7."> 

BB K l.ui.l An li SI 
BB B 

Thursday, 2-4 p. m. 

Eaa1b*a Mr. Baad 

Mr. Barnard G AwJ Mr. I > < >n 

Ml. Pun..- 108 

Friday. Dec. 18, 8.10-10.10 a. r 

Mil 1 G Ami. 88.88 Mil 88 

Friday. 10.20-12.20 m. 



110 

MB li 

Dll II 
S Sen 



III 1- 

M 28 

BB I) 

FL204 

Wll 



W.l'.l. 

Alllhrl-t 

Weeleyaa 

Cl.uk 
Fit. lilmrn 
( AC. 



(I 
1 




i 
i 



Slate 
State 

Staie 
State 
State 

Slat • 



I 



in 



13 

ii i 



... , 

I H 1). K 



Frin. h 1. 1. -'•'> 

As Be BO 
As Ed 78 

Bot be, TO 
Dak] TO 

Km B6 

C.,1 man TO, 78 
Home Be 77 
Musk 30, 7.'> 



G Aud, '-'i' 



lly arranftement 

Phye <•"'. s "> 
I'hys Bd 7_' 
Plllll Ml 

Poult 80 
So .'<',. 7!l 
S|i,niisli 7.") 
Zool 75, 85 



8TOCKBRIDGE SCHOQL 

ThurMlay, Dec. 17. 8.10-10.10 a. m. 



Bad si 

Flon SI 
l-'niil SI 

Poult si 



(II A 

I- 11 1- 

WII II 



As Eas si 

I lain S3 

Hort Mfs si 



318 
FL 8M 

IIM 110 



TIED BY TUFTS 

(Continued from Pafte 1) 

Balkus nailed him erith a hard tackle. 

Willi tin- passing <>f a few plays, State 
began its march to the goal, with Holm- 
berg meeting oil" 17 yards and Frigard 
te M itiK up the Jumlio lin.- for steady gains, 
until the end came when "Ossie" broln 
through the Tufts defense to run 11 
yards for the State tally. Hush kicked 
the point. 

The second period was spent in punting 
duels and punch lacking advances with 
neither team threatening the other very 

greatly. About in the middle of the 

period. Frigard began hitting the line for 
consistent gains with Hush alternating 
with long end sweeps. State once more 
found itself in scoring distance to the 
goal, but an unlucky fumble by Holraberg 
spoiled all chances for another tally. 
lulls failed to make headway against 
the Pilgrims' defense and the hall en. led 
with the pigskin in the home team's 
possession. 



Thursday, 10.20-12.20 m. 

s~ii- >v Crape Aud, Heel 812 
An Hu» S3 108 PouH 88 

Wll H 
Thursday, 2-4 p. as, 

pi 8M As Bus - I 

I'll l- Bad - 
( il a Bal si 

111) Kt nit SKI 
Friday, DSC 18. 8. 10-10.10 a. m. 

AgOpportSl 103 

a, |.., si ( H A Hon si 



I si 

Dairy si 
Flori S3 

Hon sin 

Poult S6 



(II A 

12 



111 

M 2s 
I li k 

BB I) 

1 II C 
1 11 1- 



Friday, 10.20-12.20 m. 

An Hus SI 111 Fruit B8 

Vea Gard si ("II A Han S7 
I'jim Mat si 108 VfK Gd BB 

ll,,ti B8 I'H C 

Friday. 1.20-^.20 p. m. 

Baa La* SI G And Hon BB 
An BBS S3 118 Poult S7 

For SI I'll F 

By Arranftement 
Home Be si 



Wll B 
FH K 
FH D 



BO 

lio 



Ens Si 



Murray, M ^"> 
II. J. Pearson, S 
Casey, M 3- r i 
Edwards, A JV 
Str'n -kland. II .35 
Blaikburn. M 35 
1 B. P'-arson. P 
I.ittlr. M 88 
Madden. M 35 
\liiur. A 88 

Grata. M BB 
Warren, A 35 

liat< lii-ldi-r, S 
Kainsd.ll. M 88 
l.n-s, like. S 
Alton. M JV 
Grose, A BB 
Bishop, S 
PerUna, S 
Chieppo, A JV 
Burbaak, S 
Alien. M :»•'> 
Dirk. S 

Willar.l. M :i"> 
Sruilli, M 88 
Mistarka. B 

Ctoaa, M '38 

Prrntis-. M 38 
l-.hu-y. M ,1\" 
StW i. A JV 
Hilton, s 
Merrill, M JV 
Kotetiaea, S 
McLeod, A JV 
Cleveland. A JV 

Ililand. M JV 

CoW, M JV 
Schenck, M JV 
Trask. M :i."> 
Rose, A JV 
Simmons, M '35 
Blake, M "88 
Seacord, M "38 

Harlow. \l '38 
Tie Hi-ndri. k\. S 
Bryant. A :i."i 

Grover, A 38 
Warner, M "88 
Waring, S 
Sumner, M '38 

( oli-inan. M "38 
Draper, A "36 

Woodward. A JV 
Roht)in-. A )\ 
S-nior. S 

HecUer, A "SB. 

/ucki-r. M "38 

Hainlil. A JV 

F'oland. A "38 

Mi-v.-i. A "38 

Score by Teams 
M.s.c. P r esha e ta i-:i-.V6-s 
Stockbridse School 2-7-13-15-18 
Amherst Jr. Varsity 4-20-30-34-35 
Amherst Fri-.hnicn 10-12-17-10-17 
M s.C. Ir. Varsity 16-29-32-36-37 



B 

B 
in 
li 
12 
13 
1 1 
15 

it; 

17 
is 
IB 

20 
21 
23 
83 

21 

88 

88 
27 
2s 
211 
:io 
31 
38 
83 
31 

38 

37 
:is 
38 

10 

ll 

42 
43 
44 

15 
If. 
17 
is 
■1!) 

50 

51 

88 

.-,:i 
54 
56 
58 
."'7 
58 
59 
60 



13:51 
13:59 
14:06 

11:32 
11:15 
11:50 

1448 

11:54 
1 I ::,5 
11 :.".»'. 
ll:.V 
1 1 :57 
15:03 
15:01 

15:07 

15:12 

15:18 

15:20 
15:22 

15:23 

15*1 

15:25 
1.V2S 
15:20 

15:38 

15::tf> 

l."i:lO 

15:11 

15:12 

15:11 

15:15 

1. ".:;('. 

15:1(1 

l.V.-.X 

15 :.-,(! 

l('.:0:i 

16:01 

16:05 

16:07 

16:11 

16:16 

16:17 

16:1(1 

16:21 

16-21 

16:35 
16::i0 
16:11 
16:10 
16:52 
16:5 1 
17:01 
17:04 
17:1 I 
17:25 
17:26 
17:3(1 
17:50 
is: 5( l 



23 
88 

123 
132 

150 



Given Away 

A pair of Bostonian $9. Oxfords 
A pair of Friendly Five $5. Oxfords 

FOR PARTICULARS, SEE OUR WINDOW 

BOLLES SHOE STORE 



SHOE SKATES 
from $5.00 to $15.00 



Hockeys 
Pucks and Skate Straps 



A. J. HASTINGS ""SSSST AMHERST, MASS, 

WHY OVER-PAY ON YOUR DRY CLEANING? 

We will dry-clean and press your suit or topcoat for $1.00 

We call and deliver free daily 
Phone 635 SWISS CLEANSERS & DYERS Phone 635 

O-i-r First National Store 



COLODNY CLOTHING COMPANY 

32 MAIN ST. {Neat Depot) NORTHAMPTON 

Full Line of Ski ("oats, Leather Jackets, Riding Boots 
and Breeches for College Men and Women! 

Corduroy Trousers — Sweaters — Golf Hose. 

Also, Suits, Topcoats, and Overcoats. 

Carfare Paid on Purchases of $10.00 or over 



College endowments grow larger every 
year. Harvard lias an endowment amount- 
ing to $108,000,000, ranking first; Yak 
has $88,000,000; Columbia, 177,000,000; 
University of Chicago, 160,000,000; 
M.I.T.. 131,000,000; Stanford, t30,000,- 
000; University of Texas 127,000,000. 



Everything in Hardware 
and Radio Equipment 

ATWATER - KENT 



AND 



MAJESTIC RADIO 

THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 

THE WINCHESTER STORE 




iMaB0arlfU0?tt0 (EolLeatatt 



Vol. XLII 



AMHERST, MASS., WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 9, 1931 



Number 10 



BAUER IS TO PLAY AT 
ASSOCIATION CONCERT 

Concert to Be Given at Amherst 

College Hall is First of Series 

Sponsored by Community 

Concert Association 

Harold Bauer, acclaimed by music 

CCitid U " l, ' u ' () f t'"' greatest pianists of 
a || time," will render his piano eonn-it 
j„ ti, lir>t of the series Of BUCh concerts 

ed by the Amherst Community 

Concert Association in the Amherst 

11. ill, tonight at eight o'clock. 

in- being reserved for all student 

u members ol the Association. 

miM of international repute, Mr. 
Bauer IS pt*Ctically unsurpassed for hi* 

., t of interpretation of piano 
Both Debussy and Ravel, among 

mporary composers, have honored 

him, tin- former choosing him to play 

I fast time his newly-complctc! 

"Children's Corner," while Ravel has 

ited to him his composition "( >n- 

Long the president of the Heet 

Wociat ion in New York City. 

whith he founded, Bauer was decorated 

with the Cross of the Legion of Honor by 

the 1 reach Government, in recognition 

of hi- services in the cause of French 

mostc, during the last year. 

Bauer's career as a concert pianist 

I from the time I'aderewski heard 

him accompany a singer in an emergency. 

Upon the advice of the great Polish 

composer, Bauer turned from his violin 

to the piano, and in three year's time 

uhitved sensational successes in Berlin, 

London, Paris, and Boston. He has 

• I outstanding successes as soloist 

for the Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra, 

(Continued on Pafte 4) 

SOPHS WIN INTERCLASS 
BASKETBALL TOURNEY 

Juniors Make Way to Finals Only to 
be Defeated by Sophomores 21-12 

Last Saturday, playing Before a < a- 

crowd the sophomore class at the 

Massachusetts State College decisively 

trounced the junior class also of the 

College in the finds of the Inter. 

Basketball contest, the si ore for 

the tunc- was 2\-\2. For the sophs, 
Bush was the lion of the hour, for in the 

•i the game he rolled up as many 
pointi - the total score of his opponents. 

White was the loser's Lochinvar, scoring 

team's points. 

I he M-nior-freshnian game was the first 

> be played in the series, the latter 

winning by the dose margin of two 

the score for the game lieini; 

18-11 \a>sif for the frosh was high 

r with eight points, while Tikolski 

retro led their classmates with five 

four respectively. On Tuesday, the 

juniors defeated the Stockbridge upper 

■ with Hanson and Leary scoring 

i six points re spectively for their 

The following Wednesday wit- 

a walkaway for the sophs when 

I mined the Stockbridge lower class 

In this contest, Bush led the high 

ith ten points with Coburn and 

'- following with nine and eight 

credit. young tallied four 

the losers. 

'" ' • semi-finals, the Sophomores 

the freshmen 13-4, thus giving 

right to play the juniors in the 

ihowed the way with six 

Uderraan and Ktedaa shot 

• ach 



IIIBir IN MEMORIAL HALL 
unusual exhibition is now in 
llemortal Building. It co 

■ batiks, tc-xti! s of silk- 
id woven, home dyed and 
• I Many of the pieces are of 
beauty and would be highly 

in modern do oral ive US B. 

I! be in place for another 

fill I" greatly enjoyed l<y 

• time to see it. The 

ined by John \V. Bateman 

Nee York printers, and 
is bees arranged b) 
i ink A. Waugh. 






OUTSTANDING EVENT 
OF THE WEEE 

I or presenting a really interesting 

S ch ola r s h ip Day Address, we te. I thai 

Dr. George E. Vincent should be 

given the "outstanding event of the 
week." 



DR. STOCKING GIVES 
SUNDAY CHAPEL TALK 



St. Louis Minister Stresses the Major 

Satisfactions of Living a 

Worthwhile Life 



St re ss in g the satisfaction gained from 

living a life worthwhile. Rev. Jay T. 

Stocking of the Pilgrim Congregational 

Church, St. Louis, Mo., addressed the 

itudeat body at Chapel last Suadaj 
morning. He spoke tirst of vanity, the 

lower level of satisfaction in which we 
strive to win the approltai ion ol the lest 
of the world. In this, Dr. Stocking saw 
the urge justified l>y the results which 

guide us toward better life. 

lie spoke next of fulfilling the expect. i 
tions of those who lu\e us. He stressed 

especially the feeling which conns to 

those who make sacrifices in order that 

others may go far; in this our parents 

find a great happiness, bein^ able to ice 

(Continued on Pafte 4) 

Lecturer Entertains 

Many at Social Union 

Arthur Guiterman, Well Known Writer 

of Short Articles and Humorous 

Poetry, Read Many of His 

Own Poems 

Arthur Cuiterinan, poet and humorist, 
entertained a large audience Friday, Dec. 
4, in Bowker Auditorium at the second 
Social Union of the season. Mr. Cuiter- 
inan is not only a reader of note, but also 
a writer both of short articles which 
appear in some of the popular nia^a/ines, 

and also of roilei ted verse. Joyce Kilmer 

said of him, 'lie is the most American 
poet of today." 

Mr. Guiterman open ed his program 

with a reading of "The Windham Thaw" 
in which he likened that Vermont 

phenomenon to when "The devil is beat- 
ing his mother in law." 

In an interesting treatment of poetry 
with entertaining illustrations, he said, 

"Poetry does what prose can do and 
something more." lie blamed iritics and 

theorists who have complicated it for 

some people's apparent distaste for 

poetry. Poetry, he continued, was ->ri^i 
nally sung by primitive man. and the 
tinging quality is s-t il I one of greatest 

(Continued on Page 3) 



BAY STATE REVUE 
TO BE THIS FRIDAY 

Interesting and Diversified Program 
Has been Arranged 



For several years Aggie Kcvuc has 

delighted audiences of Massachusetts 
State College students, but this year on 
next Friday evening, December ll, at 
7 o'clock, the first Bay State Revue will 

be presented. 

All around campus students are asking, 

"What's Bay State Revue going to be 
like this year?" Everything points to ■ 

« lcrfullv entertaining evening, the 

finest and best Revue yet. With those 
two veteran actors, Mildred Twias '33 

and Kenneth Hodge '32, president and 
(Continued on Pafte 3) 

REV. BOWIE TO GIVE 
SUN. CHAPEL SPEECH 

Religious Teacher and Author to Give 
Chapel Address Next Suiida\ 

Reverend Walter Russell Bowie, rector 

Of Grace Church, New York, since 1023, 
will speak at chapel next Sunday morn- 
ing. Dr. Bowie has decrees from Harvard 
University, Theological Seminary of Vir- 
ginia, and Richmond College; he is also 

a member of Phi Beta Kappa. 

Some of his many activities included 
membership on the Commission on Social 
Service, the Commission on the World 
Conference on Faith and Order, Board of 
Directors of Union Theological Seminary, 
New York, and the Theological Seminary 
of Virginia. He was also Chaplain of 
Base Hospital 45 during the World War. 
Dr. Bowie is the author ol 7 he Armor of 
Youth, and 5*NM Open Ways to C-od, and 
many other books. 



CAMPUS CALKNDAK 



"Blow. blow, thou winter uih,/ 
Thou are not so unkind 
As man's witraliluile . 

htikrspearr 



: Wednesday, Dec. • 

7.i"> p in Dettetini < iut> Mectiaa, 

Mi-inorial BstUfeBg. 

- 80 i'- in ( omiiiiiiiity Cosu.it, Harold 

I'.ii'i. I'i.mist, CottsSt Mall, Ami/. I I 

GoBeajt. 
Friday, Dec. II 
3.16 p.m. Pte-Mcdioal ExamlaaUoaa. 
7.00 i>. la. State < oUesa Revue, Sum kbridfi 

11.11 
Sunday, Dec. 1.) 
it. io. i. in. < aapat, Rev. water i< 

Howie, ( a.,, •■ < Imn h, N. V. ( it y. 

'( 18 i>. in. Radio « oacait. Ken Yoik l'liil- 
li.iiiiKjni, Coaocrt, M'-moii.cl BuUding. 

C.l.j [i. in. StudeBl lorum, t'nily (liurili, 
( nl. Roniryii (,f Mass. State Coll' 
Monday, Dec. 14 

liii.il Examination \\',<-k Begin*. 



Dr. Vincent Gives Address 

in Scholarship Assembly 



N0RTHFIELD SESSION 
CONSIDERS PROBLEMS 

Student and Faculty Representatives 

a! New I upland Colleges Gather 

at Round-table Conference 

Representatives from 22 New England 
colleges met for a three day conference at 
the Chateau at East Northoeld, Mass, 

last week end to stud\ together the re- 

sponsibiiit v of the academic world to 
contemporary civilization. Both sin 

dents and faculty wen- then- to present 

their respective views on fundamental 

questions relating to the speeches of t he 

conference leaders and round table group 

meetings. 

Trot. Harold I'.. B. Speight opened the 
conference speaking on "The Aim of ■ 

College Education." After an open dis 
cussion on the subject, three primary anus 

were de ci ded upon: an enrichment ol 

life, a linking of tin- student with the 

world community, and the achievement 

of a growing philosophy of life. At the 
tirst round table which followed, the 
problem of vocational courses in the 
college course was seriously considered, 

but because of the d iff e r e n t t>i>es of 

(Continued on Pafte 3) 

Ag. Ec. is Best Liked 
Major Dept. on Campus 

Chemistry is (.lose Second with Ag. 
Ed. Third 



Figures obtained from the registrar's 
office show that the Division of Physical 
and Etiological S cien ces ranks as the most 
popular major or course of study among 
the Students at the College, '.V.i'y students 
being enrolled in this division. The 
Social Science Division ranks second with 

170 students; the Division of Horticul- 
ture is third with ll'.t; the Division ol 
Home Eco n omics fourth with <>(); aiel 
the Division of Agriculture fifth \v i 1 1 1 50 

students enrolled. At the present time 
there are 22 freshmen and sophomores who 

have not i hosen any of the divisions I < >i 

t In ii major studies. In addition there 

an tWO ■pedal students taking work in 
the regular four-year collegiate <oiu 

General horticulture is the favorite 
major in Sto< kbndge School <>i Agricul- 
ture, two-year course at the college. This 

department has an enrollment ol s^ : 
floriculture is second with 64; animal 
husbandry third with 38; dairy maim 
Concinuvd on Pafte 4) 



Tabulated Results of Questionnaire Show 
Majority of Students Favor Disarmament 

Following is a list of questions asked in the questionnaire given out in chapel last Monday together with the results: 

1. If all nations join in similar reductions in military and naval establishments intended for use against each other, how much 
disarmament would vou favor? 

Men: None 38 251 42 60* 108 79 1001 78 

Co-eds: None a -■> ll .Vi 86 40 loo, 17 

Total None 40 26J 63 8011 173 76J ll'.t tOOj 'M 

2. I to you favor our setting an example for the other nations by reducing our expenditures upon armaments? 
Men: Yes 17H No 188 



Co-eds: Yes BB No 

Total: Yes 280 No 

How much reduction.-' 
Men: None lA 

Co-eds: None b 

Total: None 79 



36 
201 



< ■> i 



60j| 81 

60J 42 7:>; 

501 ! (,:; 78 

3. Do you favor the American delegation to the general disarmament conference taking the initiative in calling u|*on all nations 
to join us in reducing armaments.'' 



25 - 
251 



31 
103 



2.; 


ioo'; 


8 


10 


I'KI, 


2 


33 


IOO, 


10 



Men: Ves 270 

Co-eds: Yes no 

Total: Yea 

How much reduction? 

Men: Non 

Co-eds: None 

Total: Non- 



No 
No 
No 

25 



12 

7'.» 

48 
18 

66 



SIX SENIORS RECEIVE 
PHI KAPPA PHI AWARD 

Caird, Cohen, Folger, (.iinness, 

Hitchcock and l.ihhey are Recipients 

of llijih Scholarship Honors 

Assailing with keen and derisive humor 

the pseudo-scholars <»i our time, and 
contending thai the true purpose ( >i advo- 
cation is to train lor the appreciation of 
the pleasures ol the mind. Dr. George E. 
Vincent, ■ past president of the Rocks 
feller Foundation, addressed the second 

ol the annual Scholarship l>av assemblies 

iii Bowkei Auditorium last Wednesday, 

\s explained by Preajdeni Thatcher, the 

purpose ol the Convocation "is to dignify 

t he aims of, and to recognise the rewar d s 

of high scholastic attainment to the end 
thai encouragement to greater endeavor 

III.IN leslllt ." 

Speaking from the conviction that out 

educational systems were misinte r preted 

and had become subjected to the use ol 
those who go to college lor six lal advan- 
tage, Dr. Vincent pointed out the humor 
ol such incongruous student life. The 

speaker outlined such motives as pride, 

vanity, duty, and social approbation as 
urges lor a higher education, and advo- 
cated a ipust of knowledge for the sake 
of knowledge. 

The principal scholastic award of the 
assemblv was the making public the I'hi 
Kappa I'hi eleetions. Wynne K. Caird, 
William Cohen, Richard S. Kolger, 
Robert C. Gwaasea, John I). Hitchctxk, 
and William C. I.ibliey wcie given mem- 
(Contlnued on Pafta 3) 

SCHEDULES FOR 

WINTER TERM 



Jan. 



Feb. 



2, 
Mar. I 

[an. 80 
Feb. »i 



basket hall 

Amherst, at New State Cage 
Trinity, at New State Cage 

Conn. \^\ ii ( wll , Storra, < loam. 

W'orceslei Tei ll at Wok ester 

Wesleyan, at Middletown • 
I lamilton, at New State < age 
Springfield at New State Cage 

12 Middlcburv, at Middlebiiry 

13 Vermont, at Burlington 

17 Williams, at William -town 

New Hampshire, el New State 
Cage 

S i ' n-<\ at Ssr.e use 

Tufts, at Medford 

Provident <-, ,,t \,-« state Cage 

Track 
I'rout Memorial < tames, Boston 

( tardea 
Bo ton Univ., at M.s < . 



'.i 
1 1 
16 
30 
B 
8 
10 



L'O 



Mar 



Jan. 



lib 



bi I'. A A. Relay Meet, Boston 

Anna 

L'o New England Intercollegiates, 

Boston ' ..mien 

."» Worces te r Tech, l hial Meet, at 

M .s.C. 

Hockey 
H St.Stephens.it Annandale 
'.» I 'nion at Schenectady 

13 Williams at Willi. mistown 

16 Colby at M s< 

19 Northeastern at M.S.C. 

22 New Hampshire at Durham 
9 . Bates at Lewieton 

I lamilton at Clinton, N. Y. 

Amherst at \I S.< 

llrown at l'ro\ i<|i ti< • 
Vermont at Burlington 

\4 Middlebiiry at Mi Idl.-bury 



30 
fj 

It 

12 



501 


101 




49 


501 


150 





49 


-- 
i.i. 


21 


< o , 


70 



ioo« 

ioo 



34 

10 

11 



4. Do you favor American adherence to the World Court upon the basis of the Root Proto 
Men: Yes 236 No 67 

Co-eds: Yes ll No 14 

Total: Yes 344 No SI 

5. Do vou favor compulsory military training in coilegi ' 
Men: Yes 156 No 187 

t -,, . Yes No *4 

Total: Yes 183 No 271 

ti. Do you favor dropping military training entirely from the college curriculum? 
Men: Vea M No 303 

Women: Yes 21 No 109 

Total: Yes 71 No 412 



RADIO CONCERT IN \I HI II. DIM; 
Arturo Toscanini, noted conductor of 
the LaScala Symphony m the LaScala 
i House in Milan, ..ill conduct the 
York Symphony Philharmonic <)r 
lor the si- ond time, Sunday, 
I ►© ember 13, a! 3, 15 p. m. The broad 
will be heard on the radio in the 
Memorial I (all at that time 

I lie program is a -. lollo.vv. 

he Shrew 

• 1 IU:. 

Variations on an Original I Dvorak 

In\ itation to th<- Dan ll . 



if 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 9, 1931 




XEbe flfcassacbusetts Collegian 



Official newspaper of 



the Massachusetts State College. 
Wednesday by the students. 



Published every 



Wallace W. Stuart '32 
Managing Editor 



BOARD OF EDITORS 

Frank L. Springer '32 
Editor-in-Chief 

Oscar Margolin '32 Rial S. Potter. Jr. '32 

Associate Editors 



DEPARTMENT EDITORS 

Editorial 

Frank L. Springer '32 

Cempui 
Edmond Nash '33 
Athletics Alprkda L. Ordway '33 

Win jam II. Wear '32 W. Raymond Ward 33 

Eugene Guralnick 33 Harbiettb M. Jackson 34 

Joseph Politella 
Feature 
Oscar Margolin '32 



Alumni and Faculty 

Marjorib I. French '34 



'34 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT 

Eric H. Wbttkrlow Jr. '32 
Husiness Manager 



Kenneth E. Hodge '32 
Advertising Manager 

Ashley B. Gurney '33 



Ilimlnt-NS Assistant* 



William A. Johnson '32 
Circulation Manager 

Philip H. Livsrault '33 



Subscriptions *2.00 per year. Single copies 10 cents. 



Make all orders payable to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In case of change of address, subscriber will please notify the business manager 
as soon as possible. 

Alumni and undergraduate contributions are sincerely encouraged. Any com 
munications or notices must be received by the editor-in-chief on or before Monday 
evening. 



Entered m HCMkpdM matter at the Anker* Poet Ottos. Accepted i'>r nattae. :it speci.il rate of 
portage provided fa in Stetioa HOB, Art of October. r.iir. authorize.! Aamel 10, MM*. 



RETROSPECT AM) PROSPECT 



She prarmnt 

The following tender little elegy in 
honor of Klla, the poor little rabbit 
whom you all read about in last week's 
Collegian, was contributed by a kind- 
hearted young lady of our a c q u a int an ce . 
The Picaroon is very grateful to the 
young lady and to the rabbit. 

THE PASSING OF ELLA 

Ella has Kone; 

She'll never come back. 

The outlook for SCIENCE 

Is gloomy and black. 

In the prima of her youth, 

Her fortune her face, 
i Never a rabbit 

Can Ella replace.) 

Her sweet disposition, 
Her smile ever sunny 
We weep at the thought 
Of the loss of our bunny. 

Her deep love for SCIENCE 
Never did falter; 
Life was the gift 

She laid on the altar. 
And up in the hcavt 

\\ here good rabbits" go, 
Our Ella's an angel 

A^ pure as t be SHOW. 

And maybe she's sorry 
For us down bell I 

We're sorry too. 

|Boo-hoo! Boo hool 

Who wouldn't (eel blue? ] 

ACS. 



COMMUNICATION 



To the Students and Faculty of M.S.C.: 

Much is being thought, written, and 

si>oken in the world today concerning 

peace. May we be permitted to express 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 9, 1931 



ST0CKBR1DGE 



On Sunday evening Dec. 5, the 1 
Klub had for guest speaker, Insti 
Ransom C. Packard. In a very 
eatissg talk he spoke on his trip south and 



a view of the matter which has, perhaps, | his various espei iences while teaching 



not occurred to many of the champions 
of "peace at any price." 

In a recent discussion the writer said 
that the world was not yet ready for 
peace. Another member of the group 
countered with two questions: (i) "How 
do we know that men are not ready for 
world peace?"; and '2 "How are we 
going to got there 'to world peace) if 
we don't start?" 

What is written herein must appear as 
nonsense unless it is realized that man 
is a dual entity, the two aspects of which 
(Continued on Page 4) 



NOTICES 



1 ooking back over the past two months, we view B practically ideal autumn from 
ih«- standpoint of athletics. State College baa experienced an enjoyable number of 
%i. tories; some State College i< arm have been defeated, but those defeat i served to 
make us appreciate the victories to a greater extent and also presented a powerful 
reminder that State College is not invulnerable. We see that Massachusetts State 
did its bit for charity. l'.\ giving half of a much-needed guarantee to relieve the un- 
employed, the Baj State College did its bit much more sanely than had it proceeded 

to hire the largest stadium ill the vicinity and expected to have a charity-minded 

mob swarm it- portals when in reality ool) a few thousand have any genuine interest 
in the contest We need not recount the recorda which State College teams havt 

made this (.ill for you are already quite familiar with them. 

At present interest in centering in intra-mural sports. Interclaaa basketball 
games have been played end the sophomores were lodged the victors. Swimming ia 

claiming much spare time of main a student. When approached on the subjeet ol 

the possibility of a varsit) swimming team to rep re s en t State this winter, Proft 
Hicks \t i\ sanely replied that until the desire of the students to enjoy the new i*«>l 
to the utmost greatly subsided, the time which they would be allowed to uec the 

pool will not be shortened in order to provide time lor a varsity swimnung team to 

practice. This is an excellent example of re cr eat i on for all rather than lor a choaan 
few. 

J. ooking into the future, we see the new Cage tilled with enthusiast i, s|K-ctators 

watching a varsity basketball game being played amid the most modern of surround 
ings. No longer docs the basketeer have to dodge numerous fed when playing the 

side lines, or, when arching a high shot at the basket hnd the path ot the ball inter 

cepted by a low-hanging beam. A difficult s ch e du le baa been arranged for the basket- 
ball quintet ami we are anticipating repetitions of the many dose, exciting games ol 
last year. Hotkey too, should have another "big" season. es|K'(ially as the sext.-t 
is a veteran team. Now that the ice is already forming on the pond, it looks ,i> it 
we would have to bring our skates back with us after the Christmas holidavs. 

Also, don't forget that the handball courts i«re for your own use and that either 
the courts or yourself will improve with nee. 



I'm sure the junior (lass will commit 
plagiary or something by stealing the 
In-t two lines of the third M.m/.i for 
pel BOnall for the Index. 

The Picaroon has an old copy of the 

Nursery Manual which he'll sell very 

cheaply to an) of the young gentlemen 
who are enrolled in the new course called 
Conservation of the Home. This is quite 

a sacrifice, as the book has a great deal 
of sentimental value. I also handle a 

complete line of teething rings, rweiback, 

rattles, tiny garments, and d-p-rs. For 

more intimate details, * ut out the coupon. 



DRAMATICS 



Now the Roister Doisters are co-o|X-rating with the Department of Languages 
and Literature in producing French plays in addition to their regular productions in 
the late fall, at From time, and during the Commencement program. The spoken 
French lieraaaary in the French plays should provide excellent opportunity for those 
Students majoring in French to acquire through the practice at rehearsals a faiily 
adequate and quite Opportune knowledge of this language as it is spoken. 

Realizing that preparation for production involves an immense- amount of time 
and money, nevertheless, we would suggest that the R ois ter Doisters present a greater 
number of plays of the highest type each year. We feel that they are capable of 

such an accomplishment, 



EDITORIAL BRIEFS 

Last year we gained our sole satisfaction from varsity football in toying with 
comparative s ( ( >rv> and thinking about what might have happened. Now. with 
winning teams we claim that comparative scores never had any indicative value, 

anyway. 



We understand that a number of colleges are celebrating "Co-ed Health Week" 
about this time. We wonder if anyone around here has started to worry about the 

lack of sleep, worry, hick of a balanced diet, etc., among State College co-eds vet. 



We are still wondering this time it is with reference as to whom will be the first 
person to fall through the ice in College Fond. 



So the Phi Kappa Phi's are "egregious. 



By the way, egregious means distinguished, prominent, or eminent. It also means 
remarkable for a bad quality, so you can choose whichever definition you prefer. 



Picaroon Lecture No. I. History 

When Napoleon was at \ alley Forge, 
he said t" his brave men who had fol- 
lowed him through 'he perils of coantleaa 

speakeasies and roadhouses, "GarCOns! 
Je connais line autre et line meilleure 
joint a Trenton." 

"Vive l'F.m|iereur!" shouted his DfUVt 
men. 

"Forward!" shouted Kapohson. 
••Alh.ns" 

"Allons!" echoed his brave men. Ah. 
what a gallant march they made! In 
Labrador, it was snowing fiercely. S.me 
ol the men had scarcely a fur co.it to 
their backs. SoOM limped along in 
I.im olns ami Cadillacs, while others were 
reduced to mere Fackards. \h it was 
pitiful! 

Suddenlv a < loud of dust was seen on 
the hori/on. The army halted and 
pitched tents. The < -loud of dust drew 
rapidly nearer and resolved itself into a 
cloud of dust. "Oh jiggers!" s.iid the 
Emperor under his breath for he was 
very careful about lining naughty words 
in the presence of his brave men. Just 
then a handsome young aide galloped up 
on a foaming black Hispano Suiza, j 

"Your Majesty!" he cried, "I've got you 

Creasy Joe's Place!" It was the I icaroon. 
Thoughtfully the thief drew his revolver 
and shot the Picaroon Ix-tween the left 

suspender button. 

"Why, you're wounded!" said the 
Fni|>eror with that jovial humor for 
which he is so justly famous. "You 
should have- got Julep Charley's, .is I 

ordered*" 

"Nay. Sire," the Ph iroon replied. 

I'm only half-shot' - The Kmperor 

examined his revolver. There was not 

a single bullet hit. "Foxed!" he muttered. 

I oxed by the fumbling fingers ol fate!" 

The End 

A sophomore laddie has at last inter- 
preted the true meaning of a certain 
sonnet of Shakespeare's "In this sonnet," 
says our incipient genius, "Shakes|ieare 
s.ivs that he cannot compare his mistress 
to a summer's clay, because a summer's 
day is too hot." And they shot Pool!! 



Textbooks in Aft. Ec. 26 

All students who wish to sell their 
copiea of "American Economic Life" by 
Tugwell, Munroe and Stryker should 
leave their names at the office of the 

Department of Agricultural Economics 

in South College before the end of this 
week so that a list ol those- Students hav- 
ing such second-hand books for sale may 
be compiled and be- made available- to 
the members of Ag. I.e. 28. This will 
also facilitate the ordering of new books 
for those members of the- class who will 
be- unable to procure Second-hand copies. 
First Concert by the A. CCA. 
The first concert by the Amherst Com- 
munity Concert Association will be pre- 
sented tonight at College Hall. Amherst 
College. Harold Bauer, noted pianist, will 

pi. iv. Tickets which have- not been paid 
lor .is yet i .m 1»- secured at the door or .it 
the office of 1 >r. L. \. I hirgin 

Change of Room for Aft. Ec 26 

The- attention of students who plan to 

take Ag. Ec. 20 in the winter term is 

called to the change in the room in which 

the course is to be given. All sections will 

meet in Room '*. Flint Laboratory. 
Hand Ball Court Reservations 
II. unl ball court, Room HA, Physical 

Education Building, is now available to 

the- faculty and students. All persons 
desiring to pl.i\ should make- reservations 
of the room by calling Mrs. Barrett at 

the Physical Education Office. 
Outinft Club Notice 

[anportant meeting of the Outing Club 
at French Hall. Thursday evening at 
7.30. All members should be present. 
Col. Koine vn to Speak 

Colonel Rome yn will address the 
Student Forum at the Unity Church next 
Sunday evening at 6.1 A on the Army, 
what it has done-, what it is doing, and 
what it may do in the future. Colonel 
Romeyn declines to express himself on 

disarmament, believing that that subject 

is imc for Congress only to discuss, and 
that whatever Congress decides on the 
matter, .ill the Army and Navy should do 
is to obey the orders of the President, 
who may Ik- ex|>ce-tcd to carry out the 
expressed wishe-s of Congress. 
Basketball Cfficials 
An examination for prospective basket- 
ball officials who desire to become affili- 
ated with the Western Massachusetts 
District Board of A p pro v ed Basketball 
Officials will Ik- given on the evening of 
Deee-mUr 10 at 7 o'clock. For further 
particulars consult Priggs at the Physical 
Education Muilding. 



North Carolina; also his colli 
spent in the Ontario Agricultural ( 
at ( ruelph, Canada. 

At a meeting of the Stockbridge v 
Athletic Board, the following 
awards were made to members 
football and i [OSS -count ry sepiads: 

Football Team 

Seniors Urban Charles, Harold |.; : 

Joseph Faaacsewski, Stephen K 
Floyd Robinson (Capt.), Duane 
penter, Jr., L. Warren Sketton, Le< 
Burnham, Charles Dawson, Ken 
Keith, Timothy Rabbitt, John Slui 
Manuel Scares, Dwight Williams, 
Joseph Saalfrank, Mgr. 

Freshmen Kurkcn Anu-rian. i 
Frank, Frank Small, John Smith, \ 
Jaeger, and John Martin (Capt. ell 
Cross-Country Team 
ir< Leon E. Pearson, I I 

Batchelor, Emil Jaeschke, and H 

Bishop. 

Frtshntan Harold J. Pearson. 

Class Numeral Awards 

Senior* William Perkins, Ralph 

and Stanley Mistarka. 
Freshmen Paul Koistinen, and < 

Hendrii kx. 

Senior Managers (Class Numerala 

James Sullivan, William Nye 
Bruno Vuornos. 

This is the first year that letter awardi 

have been made to members of the < i >-■ 
country team. 

Managers Fleet 
Football Chilton Hastins S':;:; 
Baseball John S. Crouae S'33 
Crose-Country Milton Swanson S 



CO-ED NOTES 



( iuiterni.ui claimed 
impression that it wis ■ 
each I uesday evening, 



that "man is a singing animal." We always we-re under the 
,ome BOO which masepieraded under the title of "The Chorus" 



Cheer up! Only ten more weeks of the 
Picaroon. 



<)n Saturday afternoon the 
enjoyed their annual W.S.C.A. < bin- * 
Practical 1) every girl attended, 

dancing from '2 to ."> to the in,. 
"Ham" Nelson and five e>f lii- 
Punch and cookies were served dovs- 
stairs during intermission. Miss Skinm r 
Mis, Hamlin, Mrs. Ili.ks, Miss Folr 
and Mrs. Marshall attended both I 
guests and as cka|>eroues. 'The thu 
was in charge of Margaret Ce-rranl 



FACULTY NOTES 



In the November number of American 
fattdsemp* Architect, Professor F. A. 

W'augh has an extended and sumptuously 
illustrated article entitled "A Juniper 
Landscape-." The photographs are from 
the Flat Hills set tion of Amherst. 



Faculty members of the Massachusetts 
State College will have plenty of Oppor- 
tunity to participate in recreational 
activities this winter. Larry Briggs from 
his office at the Phys. Ed. Building has 
just announced that between the hours 
."> and on everv Monday and Friday 
evening there will lie badminton games, 
and at the same hours but on Tuesday 
and Thursday, there will be competitive 
volleyball matches. This will be the third 
year of faculty v olle y b a ll. 



Y.W.C.A sp o nsor ed the annual Christ 
mas party for co-eda in the "V" l< 
at the Abbey Sunday afternoon. ' 
group of girls spent a delightful hour B 
the true Christmas spirit . Wynne I 
president, and Charlotte Miller, chairaw 

of world fellowship committee. SJMBt 
briefly of plans for "Y" work during the 
coming year Dorothea Knopp, <• 
exchange student, talked of Christaktsd 
Germany and sang German carols. Law 

the whole group sang carols t< 
The room was well decorated, a Chi 
tree in one corner dominating the ar- 
rangement. The party was in CB 
Marjorie Cary "A'.i. 

FROSH CO-EDS DEbEAT 
SOPHOMORES 25-19 

Tuesday, Dec. 6, the freshmen 

defeated the sophomore girls L'.'i 19 in J 
basketball game at the Drill Hall playing 

off the challenge the freshmen gi 

the sophomores. At the end o! | 
quarter the freshmen hail a lead due to 

pnaawork and snappy plays for th< 

by Marion Harris, e-aptain of the quick 
freshman team, assisted by Yiole t ! 
and Marian Macl.aughlin. The 
mores were fast, but not quite u 
faster freshmen. Flory Costa w 
standing for the sophomores. I" l 
sei ond rpiarter the sophomore- 
pushed up their score, but in the last 
quarter the freshmen came back ■*■ 
more force and brought the score up ;1 
the final point of 25-1(1 in favw 
freshmen. 

All through the game both teaff' 
showed much skill and exccllei 
play. The iineup: 

Freshmen -M. Harris, cap' 
Koskela, M. Macl.aughlin, I <■ 
A. Merry, and substitutes, P. C.le Hiill. <- 
Tinti, E. Perry, L. Caverly.and M 

Sophomores — E. Healey. L 
M. Clarke, substitutes, F. I 
Peasley, F. Cook, and M. Jen- 



GIVE HIM A CHRISTMAS GIFT FROM YOUR COLLEGE HABERDASHERY 

PRICED FROM $1.00 to $10.00 

L A N D I S 

EST. 1904 



|)K. VINCENT GIVES ADDRESS 
(Continued from Page 1) 

1 iship to the scholastic fraternity. Miss 
Caird and Mr. Libbey were the co-re- 
nts of the one hundred dollar award 

the Society makes to one of the three 

students in the- senior cbuM with the liest 

larship. 

Announcements were also made of the 
candidates for departmental honors in 
1931-1932. The candidates are: Agri- 
cultural E con o mics , John J. Foley and 
Howard A. Cheney; Chemistry, Robert 

( Gunneas, Joseph Jorcaak, Paul H. 

Rosa, and Wallace- \V. Stuart; English, 

Richard S. Folger; Entomology, John 
1). Hitchcock; Floriculture, Curtis G. 
Keyes; Landscape Architecture, John P. 
Cone; Physics, Robert C. Gunneae; and 

g) . William S. Fisher, Jr. 

Public announcement was also made 

< academic prises offered in various 

activities by the college. The pri/e-s 

\w ie awarded as follows: 
Burnham Declamation Prizes: 

First prise ol 116 to Joseph Politella ':;j. 

Second prize of sin to Cost. is Louis 

Caragtanis '33. 

i tratorical Prizes: 

Firs) prize of $30 1<> Norman My rick '31. 

ond prize of ••si") to George White 

Field 11, 

Grinnell Prizes: 

■ prize of 120 to 1 inonel Lewis 
Vincent '31. 

mid prize of s 1 .1 to Robert Emerson 
Stuart '31. 

i of s in to Alfred Alexander 
I Irowu '.'!l. 

rth prize ejf $6.00 to Frank Ford 
Mason, Jr. "31. 
Hills Botanical Prize-: 

Prize of *_'l) to William Sidne-v Fisher, 

Jr. 32. 

Betty Steinbugler Prize in English: 



\ i u have tried the rest? 

Now try the BEST 
And that's the 

AMHERST SHOE REPAIRING CO. 

"< .oodyear Welt System Employed" 



BAY STATE REVUE 

(Continued from Page 1) 

vice-president respectively of the Roister 
Doisters, in charge Of the- Revue, an 

exceptional program may be expected. 

The participants of the Revue will in- 
clude main old favorites as well as new- 
COtners U) campus dramatics. 

Just for an insight into what the Revue 

will include, a few features of the evening 
have- been revealed. A melodrama en- 
titled "The Death of Three Fingered 
Pete-," written by Norman Myrick of the 
class ol '31, will he staged entirely by 

co-eds directed by Mildred Tubs, 
this fianslick, also of the class of '31, 

has written another one ae I plav, "Blind 

Man's Bluff," which he- is directing. 

Kenneth Hodge lias charge of the- musi 
cal selections which will be a part of the 
Revue. Tin re- is considerable musical 

talent available on campus, anil it is 

■ ted thai the music al part of the 
program will be particularly delightful. 
It is hoped that one feature will be a 

saxophone sextette dire, led by Harold 

Shu man '36, 
Several dancing numbers as well .,> 

short skits have also been booked foi 

t la- evening. 

So, just as a re-minder: 
The time 7 o'e lock. 

The place- Bowker Auditorium. 

What May State Rev lie! 



Prise of tfn» to Evelyn Armstrong 
Beaman '31. 
Virginia Dare Extract Prize in Chemistry: 
Prize- (Membership in American Chem- 
ical Society) to Albert HukIi Gower 
';;i. 
Virginia Dan- Extract Prize in Home 

Feonomii i: 

Prize ol .>_'.") to Laura « ■race Coolev '.Yd. 



S. S. HYDE 
Optician and Jeweler 

Ocullau' Prescription* Filled. Broken lenaen 
accurately replaced 

BIG BEN ALARM CLOCKS and other 

reliable makea 

I PLEASANT STREET, (up one Ulftlie i 



FISHER'S 

Here's a New CORDUROY PAJAMA 

One piece, V neck. Ions eleeveM, wide pajama trousera 
In pastel snaden : areen, rose, orchid, rust and purple at only 



$3.98 



NORTH FIKI D SESSION 

(Continued from Pafte 1) 

colleges lepresented, no definite con- 
clusions could be reached. Hovve-ver, the 
students were unanimous in demanding 

that their c olleg es K^c them a "definite 
ness o| aim." 

On Saturday morning, the subjeet 
"College Life and the World Outside" 
uas studied by exchanging ideas on the 

questions: What are- the- eoiil, uts \w 
desire- with the outside world? Should 

controversial issues be excluded from the 

classroom? What does the- vvoi Id ask ol 
the e olleges? Another round table ses-ion 
was held on Saturday evening at which 
the topie was "||e>w e .in the univeisitv 

escape from provim ialism?" These- quea 
tions were studied: How can the "World 
si. nation" be made- vii.dlv interesting to 
students? Wli.it can be done in practical 
ways t<> maintain interval in work) prob 
linis on. e- it is aroused? It was decided 
that the- American student's attitude was 
too much one of detachment , 

Dr. I lent v P. Van Dusen led the 

Sunday meeting, speaking of two dil 
e m aspects of religion, those of vision 

alone- and vision and action. The round 
tables alter this talk we-re extremelv 

practical since the- problem of developing 
student interest in religion was t • - 1 1 to I e- 

a vital one in every college. Chapel. 

compulsory or voluntary, was the main 
topic. The leading questions were: Mow 

cmii a sense ol personal responsibility l» 
developed? To what extent is this ■ 
matte i of religion? How sm cessful it 
modern education in utilising the re 
sources ol religion? Are new values 
emerging? 

The- conference closed with a talk l.v 
Dr. Van I htsen. 

Leaders ol round tables were: Thomas 

L. I Ian is of Harvard, Prof. Milton 
Connover of Yale, Prol. Watren Powell 

of Boston University, Prof. Gordon 
Allport ol Harvard, Miss Margaret B. 

(look ol Smith. Prof. J. W. Millet of 
Williams, Dr. Rayborfl Zerb) of Hates. 
Mis. Frances R. Jordan of Radcliffe, 

Miss Judith Williams of Welle-slev, Ue v . 

Sidney Lovett of aft. Vernon Church of 

boston, and Rev. I ay Campbell of t he- 
Yale- Christian Aesoi iation. 

Massachusetts State College was repre- 

sented at this co nference bv the- following 

df legatee: Dr. Harry N. (.lick, Prol 
Stowell C. Goding, Mr. Robert I. 
Ilawley, and Miss Ruth D. Campbell '.;l 



SWIMMING POOL SCHEDULE 
Nov. M to Dec in 



3.10 

1.1(1 

5.00 

7.IKI 

S.(K) 



JIM I 
3.10 

4.10 
5.00 

7. (HI 
still 



MONDAY 
9M 11.15 a.m. 
2.00 .{.(Hi pin. 

LOO p.m. 

4.50 p.m. 

•">. I."> p.m. 
7 .."><) p.m. 
8.45 p.m. 

rUESDAY 
1.45 11.15 a.m. 

3.00 p.m. 

4.00 p.m. 

1.60 p.m. 

5, 15 p.m. 

7. ."id p.m. 

8.45 p in. 

WEDNESDAY 

B.45 11.17. a.m. 

2.00 :;.(»(! p.m. 
LOO p.m. 

4.50 p.m. 

5. 15 p.m. 
7.50 p.m. 
8, 17) p.m. 

rini<M>\\ 

Same as Tiiesdav 

FRIDAY 

'.'I". 11.17, a.m. 

3.00 p.m. 

LOO p.m. 
4.60 p.m. 
5.45 p.m. 
7.50 p.m. 
8 I7» p.m. 

s\n ki>\\ 
9.00 I LOO a.m. 



Men Instruction 

Men liistrui lion 
High Se hool llovs 
College < .ills Inst'e t ion 
I 'pen Pei iod Men 
Open Pet iod Women 

High School bovs 
Men Instruction 

Men Instruction 
High Se hool ( ,ii Is 
College < .ills Inst'e tion 

< >| >.-ii Period Men 
» >pen Pei iod Women 



::.li» 
l.Ki 
...(in 
7.1KI 
8.00 



College i .ills Inst'e ti., n 
College l ai Is Inst'i tion 

< )pe-n Pel iod Men 
* Ipeii Pel iod Women 



J.IM) 

3.10 
1.10 
5.00 

7.IHI 
SI HI 



Men hist i in tion 
Me-ti hist rid t ion 
Hiuh School I'.ov ■ 
College l .ills Inst '( tion 
( )pen Period Men 
Hied) School < .ills 



< >p'" Period Men 



PATRON 1ZK 



The College Barber Shop 

44 M" BUILDING 

M. S. C. 



CHRISTMAS BOOKS FOR ALL AGES 



( Hk 1ST MAS CARDS -With your own name 

COLOR PRINTS FOR FRAMING 3 5c 

FRAMED PICTURES $1.00 

HILL FOLDS — All Prices 

UNIQUE STATIONERY 



BOXED CHRISTMAS CARDS 25c to $1. 

LEATHER PICTURE FRAMES 

BOOK ENDS 5 0c and up 

MOTTOES 5 0c and up 

LINE- A- DIARIES 



KVERSHARP PEN AND PENCIL SETS 

Discontinued Models $8.50 to $10.00 Now $4.25 
Life Time Guarantee 

JAMES A. LOWELL, - - BOOKSELLER 



Don't Forget Dad and Brother . . . 

They will appreciate a gift bought in cur 
More. We are showing the newest things in 
neckwear that every man likes, as well as a fine 
assortment of toilet cases, bill folds, etc. 

Come in and look them over. 

F. M. THOMPSON & SON 




THE NATIONAL SHOT REPAIRING 

21 MAIN STREET 
Between Town Hall and Masonic Building 
HENS' SHOES SO LED and HEELED $1.75 
PULL SOLES and HI lilil.H HBELS %2.S0 

ladies' shoes Soled and Kubber Heels $1.40 

LADIES SHOES HEELED 40c 

All Work Guaranteed 



College Drugstore 

W. H. McGRATII, Keg. Pharm. 
AMHERST, - MASS. 

VISIT 

BARSELOTTI'S 

All the requirements for the smoker- Pipes, 
Pouches, Smokers Combination 
Ice Cream, Candy, Sandwiches 



SANG LUNG hand laundry 

No. 1 Main St. Amherst, Mass. 

Kl I'AIKINC. AMI All. KINDS OK 
WASHING IKJNK AT KKASONABI.K 

I Iv I ( I S 

Our Laundry First Class 

Our Policy Cuarantecd 
NEXT TO THE TOWN HALL 



TYPEWRITERS 

for Sale and Rent 
k' >.' w' fc n \i 



H. E. DAVID 



The .Y< west 

in 

Jewelry 

ell (I 

Lgrxe Rsmge <>/ /'rices 
Jh.u Arrived 

Miss Cutler's Gift Shop 



DINE AND DANCE 
AT CLUB DEADY 

PATRONIZE 

The Sandwich man 

R. L. BATES, North Amherst 1 1 



SECOND SOCIAL UNION 
(Continued front Pus* I) 

beauty. 

Free verse, be said, is .1 reversion to 
barbaric chants, It is not cmt <<t qui new 
bin one ol the oldest forms d poetry, 

only the older lonn u.is .i K ,,., lt ,1,..,! 

bettei than inosi of our free misc. 
Children frequentl) compose free \>i e 
in the- liist little unconscious songs, like 
"M v dolly is dead" which he re.nl. 

Lyric poetry, Mr. Guiterman said, is 
the most delightful form ol poetry, It 
shows close relation between pcetrj and 

music. lie lead a chant enli 1 1 ained 

"lament ol the Alamo" which revealed 
the s>iiii and movement ol im.: He 
•'!•" read s ballad, "The Oregon Trail," 
a pan oi which has been quoted in I'aik 
man's tale oj < hregoit. In s lyric entitled 

"Mills," Mi: i luitern paid tribute to 

■ mountain man and explained his creed 

Ol hie. 

I he it si ,,i || M . entertainmenl consisted 
oi humorous selections interspersed with 
a fen oi a more serious mood. They in 
eluded: "Blessing Unto Little Boys," 
"The Quest <>l the Ribbon," "The Am, 
■eptic Baby," "At Numbei M," and 
"I'.dm st ion," whit h he denned .is "m.ik 
ing a man." 

t>lle ol his Kri. S, "HoUSe lllessin. 

«oi into London end was somehow <u 
oilier put into old English type, n t to 
music, and eventually sung at s dedl 
ration in England as an old English hymn. 
His chant about the turtle who had to 
"toughen up" and "develops bat k bone," 

were Iceenl) enjoyed. 

linallv he- ret ited "Pershing .it the 
Front," and "Cold," a tabs ol Noah's 

Ark. A, ,i , oni Ins., ,m M r < ,,„,,., mill 
read "Sj ni|,,ilh\ |,,i ll.d.i, s " 



AMHERST 
THEATRE 1 



THURS. 

DEC. 

10 



KAY FRANCIS 
WILLIAM ItOVI) 

in I In 

FALSE MADONNA 
German Talkies 4.1S p.m. 



FRI. 

DEC. 

11 



SAT. 

DEC. 

12 

2 Features 



M0N. 

iimi 

TUES. 
DEC. 

14-15 



RONALD COI.MAN 
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M. A. C. Library. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 9, 1931 



YOU WILL NOT REGRET LATER THE SAVING YOU WILL MAKE ON YOUR NEW HICKEY-FREEMAN SUIT 

For every savin* in cost that's presented in the new Hickey-Freeman Clothes for Fall is economically sound - - made 

possible by the natural conditions of general business and not by any unnatural steps 

to lower the standard of tailoring quality in the garment! 

THOMAS F. WALSH 



(a) 
(b) 
(c) 



COMMUNICATION 
(Continued from Page 2) 

arr represented, broadly speaking, by tbc 
tower nature and the bight* nature. The 
former is the evanescent) tower, material, 
animal aspect. The I. hut the higher 
nature is tli.it which is spoken of by 
Christ as the Kingdom «./ God that is 
within 'those words mean something 
ponder them) and which, srhen per- 
mitted, expresses ItteM through the |kt 
sonality whfch w see before us in our 
everyday 1 if*-. It is the higher, divine 
aaped <>f man's nature. 

Every great teacher mankind lias had, 
every saint, every true, understanding 
follower of Christ, lias differentiated bt> 
tween these two aspects; and then 
writings and teachings are directed pri- 
marily toward a realization of that higher, 

divine nature in which we are to "live, 
move and have our being" by a sublima- 
tion of the powers that have l.een pel 
verted to the evil ends of the material, 
lower nature. 

It may safely be stated that we all 

want peace. but a ure.it deal depends 

upon just what is meant when we use 
the term. Christ said, "I COWS not to 
bring peace, hut a sword"; and yet he is 
represented as a Prime of Peace. What 
can he the significance of this paradox? 
Its explanation will, we helieve, clear up 
many misconceptions. Both statements 
are true. Christ came to bring a sword, 
yes, a sword of Truth against that 
lower animal nature which continually 
usurps the powers of the Divine. The] 
reason for the use of that sword was to 
bring to pass the Peace of the Divine 
nature, the spiritual "i>eace that passeth 
all understanding." 

If this, then, be the peace we want and 
need, what is necessary to bring about 
the Universal Brotherhood of Humanity 
Upon which that peace depends? The 
basis for that Universal Brotherhood of 
Humanity lies, not in the lower, physica 
nature, hut in the Higher, Divine nature 

of man. It is to be a brotherhood of 

spiritual love, of tpmtiuri equality. And 
that is the only basis ujMin which equality 
can lest, for we all know that there is 
no equality, no equal basis for a brother- 
hood of humanity, in the physical nature. 
Evidences are on every hand to support 

that view. We need a reawakening, a re- 
juvenescence of the power ol spiritual 
perception, of spiritual awareness. The 

term rejuvenescence i^ used in a particu- 
lar way in the science of btologj to de- 
scribe a method of eel! formation in 

Which the entire protoplasm of the old 

cell escapes by rupture of the old cell 

wall. .\\u\ then develops a new cell wall. 
That is j'.ist v hat must be done before 
•re cm l.ave a true. Christian world 
peace. We must (rack this shell of the 

lower nature, rid outs. Kes of Selfishness, 
Vanity, and seeking for results, and then 
we shall gain the new uind yet old) 

spiritual body of which Sain! Paw' spoke 
when he said, "There is a physical, 

c.ntliK body, and there is a spiritual 
body." 

How, may I ask. are we going to get a 

world peace the continuance <>f which 
depends upon una Ifiebness and a love 

for humanity (in that higher sens- <>i 

humanity) it selfishness and hate are 

rampant in the world? My friends. 

neither selfishness, nor hate, nor any 

other lust or animal desire, can be de 
feated and overcome by men in an 
environment that caters to its continu- 
ance. Vou are putting t'ne car; befon 
the horse, and that is a fatal mistake in 
matters so fundamental. We obtain 
peace, not by putting the cart before the 
horse and baring peace before man hat 

cleanat d himself of the verj tilings thai 
undermine that Divine Peace lor n 
ire are seeking; but by w orking with men 
in an effi rt to help them realize them 
■elves t<> help them realize their tru 

Higher Nature. Then, when men live in 

that bight r part of Ives, the 

peace attitude comes as one ol tlu 
attribute of 1 fe < n that \ lane. I he pat I 



BAUER TO PLAY AT CONCERT 

(Continued from Page 1) 

and the Boston Symphony Orchestra. 

The concert is under the sponsorship 
of the Amherst Community Concert 
Asso. iation, Which (includes a membership 
of about 400 townspeople, and 290 
students. The State College metnl ership 
is in the \icinity of 17"). Students who 
have not as yet paid in full for their 
season's ticket, will receive the ticket 
Upon payment of the balance at the door 

to College Hall. 
A program of varied movements has 

been arranged, which shows composers 
in their varied moods and genius. The 

program follows: 

I 



(a) Air de Mallet 


Cluck-SaintSaens 


(b) Suite in A Minor 


Bach 


Prelude. 




Saialiaiwle 




Uouip ■■■ 




Gigue 




II 




Beast! in B minor 


Chopin 


Allegro 




BCBCfBB 




Assets 




Presto 




III 




Scene* from childhood 


Schumann 



Foreign Leasts -Funny Slory— Catch me. 
if you ran— Please! -Quite Content— Im- 
pSftsnt Kvent — Dreaming— At the Kirc- 
si<k — The Rocking Horse- Almost too 
serious— Ft ightening— Falling Asleep— The 
Poet Speaks. 

IV 
Reflections in the Water Debussy 

Impromptu in G Flat Schubert 

Rhapsody in E flat Schubert 



COMMITTEE MEETS WITH 

l»RRS. THATCHER TO DISCUSS 
DISARMAMENT CONFERENCE 

On Tuesday, Dec. 1, and Monday, 
Dec. 7, the Disarmament Conference 
Committee of the Y.W.C.A., the Chris- 
tian Association, and the Committee on 

Disarmament combined met with Presi- 
dent Thatcher to discuss plans for the 
Disarmament Conference to be held on 
this campus next January 15, 16, and 17. 
Although there is yet no definite in- 
formation concerning the identity of the 

speakers, the committee expects to ob- 
tain some well known leaders to advocate 

preparedness as the way to peace, and 
other, to advocate disarmament as the 
way to peace. Much of the time will be 
devoted tO student discussions based 
upon the facts and ideas presented by the 
speakers and led by a social psychologist 

expert at leading group diacu sei oa e. 

The publicity committees and the 
social committees of each cabinet are 

working together to phut publicity and 

s.h ial entertainment for the Conference. 
It has been suggested that an informal 
dance be held alter the last me etin g of 
the Conference, but definite arrange 
meats for this have not yet been made. 

Among the problems to be discUSSCrl 
will probably be the qu es ti o n of substi 
tutes for armaments in maintaining 
national security, and the relation of 
military training to world peace. 



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SUNDAY CHAPEL TALK 
(Continued from Page 1) 
their children through. He spoke also of 
the satisfaction of doing those things 
which our parents wished to do ami 
could not do. His examples was of Rabbi 
Wise of New York City who pays tribute 
to his father in a recent publication "What 
I Owe to My Father" containing the 
contributions of twenty prominent men 
and women of today. Rabbi Wise finds 
his greatest satisfaction in trying to 
accomplish in New York what his father 
always wanted to do. 

Finally, Dr. Stocking spoke of the 
satisfaction of a job well done, of being 
abb- to feel that we have made the best 
possible of oar lives. In this he showed 

bow the Christina concept of life is one 

which brings a man to the end with the 
satisfa- tion of having given to his life all 

of the best effort of which he was capable. 

Dr. Stacking was another of the recent 
speakers who have offered the under- 
graduates an address which lias the 
greatest appeal to them, an address 

which gives them a real and WOttbwl i > 

point of view for serious consideration. 



DISARMAMENT WEEK 

During this week a big Disarmament 
Week program is being carried out at 
Amherst College. On Monday Prof. 
Packard of the History Department 
si>oke in chapel, and Dr. H. H. Farmer 
spoke to the Clerical Club. On Tuesday- 
Prof. Thorp (Economics i spoke in chapel, 
and a disarmament poll of the faculty- 
was taken. 

Prof. Phillips Bradley (Political Science) 
■poke at chapel this morning, and Open 
discussions led by faculty members are to 
DC held at the fraternities. On Thursday- 
there is to be another speech in chapel 
and a student meeting led by Prof. 
Harlow of Smith College. The week is 
to end by a disarmament poll of the 
students on Friday. This is to be the 
same poll that was taken of the students 
On this canapes last Monday, and is 
being taken at this time in schools and 

colleges all over the nation. It is spon- 

tored by the Intercollegiate Student 
Council of the Y.M.C.A. and was COO' 
ducted OH this campus by the Christian 
Association. 




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KG. EC BEST 1.1 KED MAJOR 

(Continued from Page 1) 
factoring fourth with 96; fruit growing 
and poultry each have 2.i; and vegetable 
gardening has g students enrolled. 

Figures from the tWO upper classes 
which have S tgWlh e d their departmental 

majors are as follows: In the Division 
of Agriculture: animal husbandry 10, 
general agriculture 2, dairy ft, farm man- 
agement .'!. poultry ft. Division of Horti- 
culture: floriculture 10, pomology ft, 
olericulture ~. landscape architecture "J">. 

horticulture manufactures I. Division of 
Physical and Biological Sciences: bac- 
teriology 15, mathematics 2, botany S, 
entomology 2 1 . chemistry '27. Division 
of Sockd Scie nc es: economics, history, 
and sociology 1 t. language and literature 

\2. agricultural education 22, agricul- 
tural economics 29. Division of Home 
Economics 16. Departmental majors are 
not chosen by freshmen and sophomores. 
There are 12:'. students who have dis- 
tributed their in! re ts between the vari- 
ous departments in the I rivision of Physi- 
cal and Biological S iem es. 
St ' 



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TUFTS PICKS 
ALL OPPONENT TEAM 

At the end of every football season, 
the Tufts Weekly publishes 8 list of its 
all opponent eleven. The selections for 
this honor (?) are not made by any 
player's previous record, but the men are 
chosen as the ones who gave Tufts the 
hardest battle in the game which the 
Jumbos played against their teams. This 
College has three men who were picked 
for the "All Opponent team," and three 
who received honorable mention. As 
follows: 

Knox, le. New Hampshire; Foskett, 

It, Mass. State; Harrington, Ig, Boston 

Univ.; Milliken, c, Bo wd oin; Sibson, 

rg, Mass. State; Mackesey, rt, I.rown; 
Smith, re. Mass. State; Huonanno, qb. 

Brown; Eastis, Ihb, New Hampshire; 
Marsaa, rhb, Brown; and Johnstone, fb, 

Colby. Those who received honorable 
mention were llolmberg. Welch, and 

Bush. 



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to this goal I 

spii itu.il teat hci C1.1 

lusi ius, Plato .by ew 

h,i i \ i i know ii and, 
to be !■ 1 ' «' d 



orth bj 
Buddha 

nut. tht 



T 



>rth 



e eh 



h of 



t i t: 
\\ . a 1 . 



Magnificent 

i hem is the same. 

( ,m m not !■ il <■ that bt yond the 
stifling wall of earthly life there barns a 

fire, a hire of Devotion, that for him who 
• ia the Liahl of ail 1 i e and with- 



out which avail th nothinj 



l.de V 



ALUMNI NOUS 
1 oring II. Jacobs '14, trained here and 
el Harvard as a landscape architect, is 

now secretary of the Massachusetts 

IV ration of Planning Boards and is also 
active as the agent of the Curtis Wright 
I ; ing Servi e, Aerial Survey Division. 
T.ie work of at rial surveys is extensively 

applied to city and regional planning, 
/oiimg. and other lines of work commonly 
classified aa landscape architecture. 

'28 Henry Bailey Ttttll was married 
to Mis- Laura Hollingsworth of Lowell 
on Novembei I, 1931. 



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gfo iWaagarinwtta (Enllpmatt 



Vol. XLII 



AMHERST, MASS., THURSDAY, JANUARY 7, 1932 



Number ll 



FAMOUS PLAYERS 
10 BE ON CAMPUS 

Hen Greet Players to Present 
Twelfth Night" at Social Union 
Tomerrow Night 

Fir Philip Ten Greet and his cast of 
lisfa Ptayatl will present Shakespeare's 

Twelfth Night" at a Social Union held 
in Bowker auditorium this Friday eve 
iiing, January 8th. Drama such as the 
Ben Greet players are famous for pre- 
-t nt ing has long been wanted on the 
Social I'nion programs by many stu- 
dents. The players are on their third 
continental tour and are again being 
welcomed to campus au itoriums and in 
tlic theatres of large cities. Sir Philip 
i ,n 1 1 creates the essential atmosphere of 
lieval reverence. Nothing detracts 
[nun the play's significance. His only 
(Continued on Paje 3) 

FAMED SPEAKERS FOR 
ARMS PARLEY DEBATE 

Colonel Carlston and Mr. J. B. 

Mathews Will Come to Campus 

for Series of Talks 



Colonel W. A. Carlston and Pacifist 
J. B. Mathews will cross swords, strictly 
ll BWOrds, insists Mathews, at the 
Anns Parley which is to be held under 
the auspices of the Y.W.C.A. and the 
Christian Association on Friday and 
Saturday of next week at the Memorial 
building. 

rbsse two men are to debate the Dis- 
armament issue. The Associations are 
especially fortunate in getting Colonel 
CarftOS to uphold the militaristic point 
ol view. He was a soldier on active duty 
for J7 years, served three months in the 
front line trenches in France, and also 
Krved seven months in the Philippine 
blinds fighting the insurgents, where he 
IS* eighteen engagements and was 
twice cited for gallantry in action. Prior 
(Continued on Page 4} 



NEW MEMBERS ELECTED 
TO COLLEGIAN BOARD 

Three Sophomores and Four Fresh- 
men Chosen to Fill Vacancies 
on Fditorial Star? 

Seven membert of the Freshmen and 
Sophomore classes wire elected to the 

editorial stall of the CrtfsfMN at a meet- 
ing of the Collegian Board on Monday. 

This election is held at the liist part ol 
the second term every vear alter a 
period ol competition extending lor seven 
or eight weeks of the first term, during 
which Candidates compete for the vacant 
places on the Hoard. Competition ((in- 
sists of ■ series of journalistic art ides 

designed to reveal the abilities of each 

student. 

Three of the seven students elected to 
the Staff are sophomores, the rest are 
freshmen. Two alternates were appointed, 
one from each of the classes ol '.U and 
';.">. The apparent duty of the alternates 
is to incite the new elect to great efforts 
for if the new member fails or is dropped 
out of school, the alternate fills the 
vacancy, The sophomores elected are: 
Miss Ruth 1). Campbell of Springfield, 
Raymond Royal of Adams, and Stanley 
F. Seperski of East Pepperell. The 
freshmen are: Miss Mary I.. Allen of 
Greenfield, David I.. Arenbsrgof Rochest- 
er, John P. Column of Cambridge, and 
Silas Little of Newbury port. 



OUTSTANDING EVENT 
OF TIIK WEEK 

There is no outstanding event! 



William Seymour Talks 

to Roister Doisters 



M Building is Scene 

of Annual Mardi Gras 



Maroon Key Society to Hold Its 
Annual Dance on January 22 



The Maroon Key Society of the Massa- 
i susetts State College will hold its annual 
Mardi Cras Friday evening, January 22. 
from eight to twelve o'clock. Since there 
have been very few dances this year, 
owing to the paralysis epidemic, the 
M.irdi (iras comes at an earlier date and 
at a time when enthusiasm should be at 
its highest. The Dance Committee has 
plans now under way to make this the 
most enjoyable social event of the entire 
year, and one quite in keeping with the 
gay spirit of Mardi Gras. The Memorial 
batlding has been selected as the most 
suitable setting, because of the antici- 
pated demand for tickets. At an early 
date the orchestra will be announced and 
all the particulars pertaining to what is 
existed to be the finest Mardi Gras 
S*ti held at the College will be published 

Tickets will be available Friday of thi 

and may be purchased from the 

ing Maroon Key members: Charles 

Dunphy, Page Hyland, Fred Clark, 

rl Noble, Edmund Clow, Roger 

Alton, Russell Sturtevant, Carlton Mac- 

Ma kin and Alvin Ryan. 



Students of English Department Also 

Hear Famous Stage Manager's 

Address 

On Wednesday, December 9, a rare 
treat was provided for the students whose 
major study is Languages, those electing 
language courses in the fall term, the 
Roister Doisters, and interested members 
of the faculty, when William Seymour 
gave them some of his experiences in 
seventy years connection with the stage 
as actor and stage manager. Mr. Sey- 
mour is known as one of the greatest 
stage managers that this country has 
produced, to be named with Daly and 
Melasco, and indeed, perhaps the earliest 
American arttst in stage craft. Mr. 
Seymour began his career in New Orleans 
during the war, he saw Farragut's fleet 
come up the Missi sippi, remembers the 
perTous moments of Butler's arrival and 
experienced the regime of General Ranks. 
In July \cMV.i he became stage manager 
for Lawrence Barrett at $25 a week! 
There were 14 in the company and the 
total salary list for Hamlet was $575. 
His greatest experience was during the 
(Continued on Pag* 3) 

Roister Doisters to 

Present French Play 

Cast is Chosen for "Le Gendre DeM. 
Poirier" 



State Colleges Favor 

Compulsory Military 

85J of Land Grant Colleges Favor 

Two Years of Required Military. 

Questionnaire Reveals 

That military training is compulsory 
for a two year t-rm in practically K5',' 
of the land grant olleges in the country; 
that a change of this compulsory feature 
is now iindt r consideration in three of 
these institutions; and that only one, 
the University of Wisconsin, permits 
students to complete a course in physical 
(Continued on Page i) 

MR. BARNARD OPENS 
SERIES OF LECTURES 

Romanticism Subject of First Talk 

of Series Given hy Language 

and Literature Department 



Mr. Ellsworth Barnard) talking to a 

(row (led room of attentive and int rested 

listeners in Stochbridge Hall Tuesday 
night, opened the wint r program of 
lectures by the Language and Literature 
department with a favorable presentation 
of "Romanticism." It seems that be- 
Contlnued on Page 3) 



College Representatives 

at Buffalo Convention 

Seven Delegates from State College 

Attend Convention of Volunteer 

Movement 



LEARY ELECTED CAPTAIN 

Al the annual football banquet on 
er 13, Daniel J. Leary ':« of 

1 - Falls was unanimously elected 

captain for the coming se; so . 
who was handicapped by injuii s 
ir, proved his worth this Ml as 
ring center on Taube's fast, higi 
team. Dan was a steady de- 
passer on the offense, ;nl on 
Me, as roving center, heaccoanttd 
y brilliant tackKs. Leary is a 
wn figure about the camp s, 
■ ryone is confident that he will 
•• highly successful State footb. 1 
I coming fall. 
you, Dan. 



"Le Gendre DeM. Poirier" by Emile 
Augier and Jules Sandeau has been 
selected as the French play which will be 
given by the Roister Doisters this term. 
It is the story of a young nobleman who, 
having married a we' 1 educated girl of 
lever class for her money, considers htr 
a mere boarding school girl, and continues 
to live as he did before his marriage. 
Only after he has become too much 
interested in a woman of his own class 
for whom he is to fight a duel, does he 
re lize the charm and fine character of 
his . i.e. Her father and his partner try 
in very different ways to bring about the 
gi l's happiness but it is Antoinette 
i.ersclf who eventually wins her husband's 
love and bia declaration that in spite of 
being a gentleman, he intends to support 
his wife without her father's aid. 

The following cast has been chosen: 



Last Monday the Mass. State dele- 
gation, headed by Gifford Towle 'A2, 
returned from the Eleventh (Juadriennial 
Convention of the Student \olunteer 
Movement which was held at Buffalo 
from December 90 to January .'{. About 
L':{(H) delegates registered at this conven- 
tion representing the whole nation. 
Among the speakers at the ((invention 
were Dr. John R. Mott, creator of the 
Student Volunteer Movement, of the 
World's Student Christian Federation, 
and the International Missionary Coun- 
cil; Dr. T. Z. Koo, vice-president of the 
World's Student Christian Federation; 
Dr. Robert K. Si>eer of the Presbyterian 
Board of Foreign Missions; and Kirby 
Page, writer, let turer, and editor of 
The World Tomorrow. 

One entire session of the Conference 
was given over to the problem of world 
peace as it is the biggest factor in the 
present world situation. 

It was possible for the Y.W.C.A. and 
the Christian Association to send seven 
delegates from Mass. State with the 
generous help of home and local churches, 
and of members of the college administra 
tion and faculty. 



MANY LETTERS GIVEN 
IN INSIGNIA CHAPEL 

46 Athletic Letters Awarded in Foot- 
ball, Soccer and Cross-Country 

At insignia d apel Friday, Dececnbsf 

11, a total of -Hi athletk letters wen- 
awarded. The Ones receiving them were: 
Football (apt. Clifford R Foskett »S8, 
John C. Bttrringtoa '.'ii', Warren W. 
Fabyaa '.rj, Leslie D. Ooodall \T_\ 

Murray B. Hicks '.'12, Oscar E. Ilolni- 
terg l U l George S. Sylvester *8I, Henry 
11. True If, Frederick J. Welch ';_', 
Daniel J. Leary '.l.l 'captain-elect), 
Ralph II. Rickford '.VA, Renton P. Cum 
mings ';{.l, (^orge A. Bourgeois \U, 
Louis J. Rush '.14, Wilho Frigard '.(4, 
Joseph l.ojko , .S4, David C. Mountain 
'•'(4, Alvan S. Ryan '.U, Raul W. ShatTner 
'•'54, James A. Sibson '.'14, Howard R. 
Sievers '.!1, Donald II. Smith '.M, 
Manager Richard S. Folger -.12. 

Soccer (apt. Bdvard J. IVsildmlri 

"82, John J. Astore '.12, Philip J. Connell 
'•!-. Herbert I.. Forest "SS, John I). 

Hitchcock '.52, Joseph Jonah "i-\ Philip 

W. Warren '.52, Rol.eit Taft '.'I'l (captain 

elect), George !•:. Hodsdon '.U, Granville 

S. Pruvne ','i.i, Harold Shunian W, Roy 
T. Cowing ':H. Robert C. |a<ks..ii \U 
William Kozlowski '.'14, James P. Ma> 
kimmie \'H, Manager Faigene A. Gural- 
nik '.«. 

(Continued on P*S« » 

Real Talent Shown 

at Bay State Revue 

Large Crowd Enjoys Annual Presen- 
tation of Student Talent 

Humor, melody, and tense dramatic 
moments marked the Bay State Revue, 
which the Roister Doisters presented last 
term on December 11 in Bowker Audi- 
torium to an enthusiastic and appreci- 
ative audience. The genial Mildred Twiss, 
president of the Roister Doisters and in 

charge of the Reese, used ■ radio micro- 
phone as a 1 1 1 1 i • j 1 1 ■- means of announcing 

the arts. 

With snap, pap and rhythm, the Five 
Collegians, consisting of Harold Shiimaii 
•88, Robert Noble ',{4, William Koa 

lowski '.'H, Benjamin Weinberger "M, 

and Ralph Henry '.'14 opened the program. 

"Death of Three-Fingered Pete," ■ 

hilarious one-act play by Norman Myrick 
91, kept the audience literally weak 
from laughter. The following cast took 
part : 

Throe-Fingered Pete 

Nancy 

Lord Sidewinder Enthisle 

Lady Sidewinder Knthixle 

Count Ritz Di.iKoiiintf 

Strong Arm (huckcr 

Kagle Eye Snoop De Foop 



STATE QUINTET 
PLAYS AMHERST 

Caj»e Will lie Csed for Initial Contest 
Willi Town Rivals 

This coming Saturda) evening, the 

M.ISS.U hllsetts State College basket..! 

will meet the invaders from the othei end 

ol the town ill the premier ol the s.-ason, 
the game being si heduled to be plaved on 
the new iadOW basketball court in t he 
big glassed in (age adjoining the main 

building oi the Physical Edttcatioi build- 

iiiL;. The ion test will dedicate the ( age 
in that it is th- first public meeting of 
any kind to be run oil in the building. 
Professor Hicks has invited some 70 or 
80 guests to attend the grand opening in 
Anticipation of ■ large evening. 

The State Pilgrims will meet an ex- 
peiiemed Amherst quintet when tin \ 
(Continued on P«g« 3) 

PRINTS BY CURRIER 
SHOWN IN M BUILDING 

Old Engravings Are Much Sought 
After by Modern Collectors 

Fngravings by Currier and Ives hang- 
iiiK at present in the Memorial building 
are shown through the courtesy of Prof. 
Waugh. Most every |>erson who has 
ever read a history lxx>k will recall the 
many illustrations that it contained, and 
in countless cases the author was in- 
debted to the prints of Currier and Ives 
for his illustration. The majority of 
these prints date back to the middle of 
the last century; at that time they were 
considered as much as a part of true art 
as the very carefully prepared photograph 
Continued on Fags S) 



TlH-lniii I)i< kinwui '.'12 

I>ce laSsiiaM '.'12 

Laura Adams '.'14 

Betty Mats' '.!.' 

Thelma DkUaSSS '-'12 

Marian Harris '.'!'> 

Kunii c Keii h '.'i.'i 



(Continued on Pago 3) 

Mr. Troy Speaks Next 

in Series of Lectures 



I Poirier 
(.aston 
Antoinette 
Verdelit 
Vatel 
Chevassus 
Do:ne-ti'iue 
Femme de Chambre 



Ki. h.ifl I);mi. 1- .! 1 

Curtis < l.irk Ma 

Kuth Canpocli 'it 

I lea rn AkM h -i'.i 

Donald ( I 

Vincent Gaguarducd 32 

John Fowler 3'J I 

( lar.i Rl c .12 



CAM PI'S CALENDAR 



"Were half the povrr that fills the world with 
terror. 

Were half the wealth bestowed on camps and 
courts. 
Given to redeem the human mind from error. 
There uere no need of anenah and forts." 
— Ijontfellow 



Thursday, January 7 

6.30 p. m Press < lub Meeting, Draper Hall 
Friday, January 8 

Varsity Hockey, St. Stephens at Annandale 

7.00 p. m. So< ial I. nion, Ben Greet Playrs. 
Twelfth Night. 
Saturday, January 9 

Varsity Hotkey. I'nion College at 

s bean tady. 
7.30 p. m. Varsity Basketball, 
State ( age. 
Sunday, January 10 

9.10 a in. Chapel. Dr. Milo 
I)'. in. St. John Divine 

New York city. 
3.00p.m. Radio Con.eri, New York Phil- 

harinonit ( (p Iie^tra. 
Tuesday, January 12 

7. I.'i p. m. Language and Literature Talk, 

\fr l roj 
8.00 p. m. Chorus, Memorial Building. 



Amherst, 



Ft. Gates, 

Cathedra], 



Humanism to Be Topic of Second 
Language and Literature Talk 

Douglas has gone down in history as 
the man who debated with Lincoln. It 
is yet in the hands of the Fates who will 
play the part of Douglas for even the 
first results forecast a heavy task for him 
who is to gain the decision in the present 
battle of Romanticism vs. Humanism. 
Mr. Frederick Troy will be the speaker 
at the next Tuesday night Language and 
Literature department lecture and an awe 
the argument in favor of Komant i( ism 
of his colleague Mr. Hllsworth Harnard 
Mr. Marnard, who took the first inning 

of this inter-faculty contest, brought hi- 

attack on the "new Humanism" in public 
where heretofore it has lurked in private. 
Mr. Troy expects tO W t as a critii and 
.ilur destroying the argument for Ro 
m.mtiMMii, to attempt to re! uild the 
student's faith in Humani-.m that was 

si disastrous) destroyed last Tuesday 

night. The sight of two sober English 
profs ardently lo< king horns in debate 
should make two spectators grow where 

but one grew before. KeniemlMT: next 
Tuesday, at T.'M) p.m., in Stoi kbridge 

Hill. Come early and bring your eai 
trumpet ! 



Hockey Team to Play 

Initial Game Friday 

State Hucksters to Meet St. Stephens 

at Annandale Friday and Union 

College Saturday 

Hockey has been under way for a we< k 
and the members of the eOCfcsy squad 

have bees practicing on the rink which 

was Hooded (in Tuesday morning so that 
the squad COUld use the ICC surl.K e for 
practice OB Tuesday afternoon. The first 
game which the team will play comes this 
Friday. The St. Stephens team will 
entertain the Stale puck chasers at 
Annandale, \. Y. The following day 
the State team will journey to S henec- 
tady where they will ciKoimtcr I'nion on 
the ice. 

Little CM be prophesied about the 
game as none of the teams have as yet 
played any opponent. While practice 
develops teamwork, the only true test of 
a team's strength is a game. The State 
passing has l>een hampered by the rough 
ice, but two forward lines have l>een 
stressing the passing attack and as a 
result the goalies have been very busy 
following the movement of the puck. 

Coach Ball has not announced the 
definite lineup of the team at the opening 
whistle, but presumably the two forward 
lines will be made up of the following 
men : 

If. \V. Potest (CapC) Henry 

('•. Cain Snow 

J. W. Tikofski Sylvester 

The defense positions will be taken by 
dimness and Hammond, while Mitchell 
will keep the puck from denting the twine. 

ROISTKR DDLS IKK TRYOUTS 
Roister Doisters have chosen for their 
next pro duc t k m "I he Swan" liy l-erenc 
Molnar, an entirely dilfeient t vpc of 
play from any recently presented and 
one arnica will be entirt, lining for the 

playe. s es well as tbeii audiences. "The 

Swan" ia an Aiistii.ni romance BrbOSS 

characters are counts and princesses 

TryOUta will be held Monday, January 
II at*S p. in. in the "M" building. This 

play calls for ■ casl of twent) one, 

13 men and 8 women. Kver>one is 
invited to try out and. since 21 is .i 
large numher of people to cast, to be 

prompt. 



2 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY, JANUARY 7, 1932 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY, JANUARY 7, 1932 



Zbe flfcaesacbusetts Collegian 



Official newspaper of 



the Massachusetts State College. 
Wednesday by the students. 

BOARD OF EDITORS 



Published every 



Wali.ai I \V. Si i \m 
MitnaititiK Editor 



Frank I. Springbb "-M 

Editor-in-Ckitf _ _ 

H Oscar Maw.oi.in 89 Rial S. 1'ovilk. 

A tsotiat* Edik i 



Ik. 32 



DEPARTMENT EDITORS 

;s2 



Editorial 
Fbamk L. Spbinci k 



CampuM 
I- DMOND NASH '33 

Altbbda L. Obdway '33 

Ruth i> ( ampi si l "M 

Habbocttb m Jac bson '34 

jo i. I'll l'ni ii i.i.i. a :i! 
Raymond k ^ -l :. i Maby L. Allsn 



Athleties 
Wiu.iAM li Wbab :i-' 

hi i.i.sk di BALNH K '38 

SI \SI.\ !•. Sll I.RSKI ':n 
I OHM P. ( (II. MAN "■'>■> 

su.as Little, Jk.. US 



Feat u re 
Oscak Maki.olin '33 DAM!! L. AWMBVBG ■!•. 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT 

I k II- Wi.i ihKi.mv Jk "SI 

Busintu UunmiT 

Kinnkiii I'.. Hodcb , : i ;i Wu.i.iam a. Johnson "33 

Adtertisint Uanagtr CawaiaJfes Itrnnnm 

Ituslncss Assistants 

Asiii.ky li. GUBM*« "SS l'im.ii' II. LSVSSAUL1 W 



Subscriptions *2.00 per year. Single copies 10 cents. 



Make all orders payable to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In case of change of address, subscriber will please notify the business manager 
as soon as possible. 

Alumni and undergraduate contributions are sincerely encouraged. Any com 
munications or notices must be received by the editor-in-chief on or before Monday 
evening. 



Entered as second-class matter at the Amherst Post Office. Accepted for mailing at special rate of 
pottage provided foi in Section 1103, Act of October. 1917. authorized August 20. 191K. 



RKMKMBKR, WE'RE HOSTS 
ii the 1982 varett) basketball season opens Saturday evening in the near 



cage, the student body <>t Massachusetts State College arill be the boat t<> large and 
varied Kf""ps «.f gueeta. Thelarfesl group of ourgueata will be compoaad of Amherst 
College men who, undoubtedly, will be quite as excited ai State students after the 
start <>f the name. Remember the Amherat team and the officials of the game are 
our guests -i 1 -" ;,ml nut naerely iacumbenta upon the Maroon Key. There will also 
be a number of Friends of the college who aided quite materially in the coaatruction 
of the new State gym, folks who have had little or no previous direct contact with 
this college and, of ionise, will be viewing the encounter with a critical eye, eapaciall) 

from the standpoint of student attitude. 

We do not want you to lie hypocritical, just keep sane and DC real sports. Ke- 

nember that our guests •"'' capable of clever performance! and commend them 
accordingly. Remember thai the refereea pronounce the final judgment in spite of 

the high esteem in which most of us harbor our own ability as a judge d basketball 
procedure. 

Have enthusiasm plenty of it but remember! 



®lje fJirarmm 

THE RUBAIYAT OF OMAR MAKKS 

With apologies to Mr. Kipling 
Now the New Year reviving old resolves, 

The penitential Froah in tears dissolves, 

I )e< ides on three hours study every niulit 

Forgetting all the will power that involves. 

( liarlie and Jim are K"iie, and so are Kose 
And Claire and Dorothy and Hill, where 

no one knows; 
But still a few are left, and each one fe.irs 

Leaf he himself should be the next that 

^oes. 
I5ut still one hands one's self the same old 

line: 
Next week I -.wear I'll start this work of 

mine, 
Or two weeks hence, for I must dance and 

dine, 
And work can wait, not so a jun of wine. 
Each morn a new and firm resolve shall 

bring, 

(Students will promise 'almost any thing). 

Hut term-end comes apace, the Bird of 
Time 

Shall fly; in fact, he's on the wing. 

Each year tWO hundred l'reshmen brings 

you say; 
Yes, but where leaves the Frosfa of y s 

terday? 
This liist Report that brings the marks 

shall take 
YpUT friends, or even you yourself away. 

Well, let it take us; wh.it have we to do 
With marks, exams, and theses, quizzes 

too? 
Let Deans and I'rcxics threaten as they 

will, 

P ro f es s o r s call to study, heed not you. 

For blithe romance sin^s quite another 

tune, 
Who wants to study when there is a moon? 
II lovelorn lads and ladies need advice 

Just drop a letter to the Picaroon. 

A book of Math we lead ami read in vain. 
English and French again and yet again, 
Physics and l.ntomologv are like a log, 
And Chemistry and "Ec" give us a pain. 
Well, it's no use to wony, fret or fear, 
Even if Final Week seems very near. 
Cheer up! Cheer up! Don't look so sad 

my dear 
Perhaps we'll meet again, let's say, next 

year. 



BAY STATE REVUE 
(Continued tram Pais t) 

The next act found "Hob" Noble '.'{4 
seated at the piano on a stage lighted by 
a single green spot-light. His excellent 
contribution to the evening's entertain- 
ment was "Some Call it Madness." 
Following this, Herbert I.. Hishop '-',2 
sang that old favorite of which people 
never grow tired, "The Road to Manda- 
lay" to which the audience listened with 
keen enjoyment. ( leorge Hart well ':;."> 
exhibited a most pleasing bit of freshman 
talent when, accompanied by Roger 
bates '.'{4, he played two solos on the 
xylophone. 

Ashley Gurney '33 gave a stirring and 

realistic reading of "The Raven." that 

famous poem written by Edgar Alien I'oe. 

With their nu lody and the variety of 

their numbers, the Lord Jell Scienaders 

delighted the audience again and again. 

Some outstanding selections were "Dinah" 

"On the Alamo," and "Wild bird Joys." 

"Tully" George Sylvester '32 kept the 

uidience roaring while he rambled and 



re rambled. His famous subway skit and |o*Naxareth. 



some artificial flowers caught fire from a 
gas jet. Wallack was at the opposite 
side of the stage. He strolled across, 
picked up the blazing flowers, lighted 
ciuar with them, dropped them quit 
on the stage and Stepped on them. I 
another occasion, an actor did not eat) r 
when his cue was spoken. The mom. | 

aai tense. Wallack proceeded without i 
moment's hesitation. He walked tow 

the window, saw the man, WOttdei 
whether he could tome in, yea, he 
getting out of his carriage, the matter 
was in some doubt more conversation 

Hi to poasihilttifs "Yea, hehaaappan 

ly made up his mind to come in after all." 
And in he came! 

In San Francisco. James O'Neill pro- 
dm ril The Passion Play. There was ii: 

discussion of the propriety of produi 
this play but the excellence of O'V 

performance silenced the critics. B 
Cicault said he thought it wholly fin 
that James O'Neill should play the star 
put because the initials of star and hero 
were the same, James O'Neill and Jesus 



J nelson 

Doris Kinuman 

sir*. Kinnman 

Mi. Kisemaa 

Marvin Oruithwaitc 



A Man Bringing Home a Chicken 

pleased the audience especially. 

"Blind Man's buff," another of Otis 
llanslick's successful one-act plays, was 
presented with real skill by the following 
cast : 

Nathan Hill "M 

Kleanor Sin 11 83 

Amies McMahna "'•'( 

(His Hansliik 31 

C'ostas (ar.iKi.mis "S3 

"Accordian Jim," James Klar '34. 
furnished some of the finest musical 
entertainment of the evening. If time 
had permitted he would have been kept 
playing for the rest of the evening. 

Selections by the College Orchestra 

brought the Kevue to a (lose. The 
orchestra played "Intermezzo" from I.' 
Ailc-ienne Suite No. li by Bizet, and 
"Rakocsy March," Hungarian Melody, 

directed by Edgar Sorton "M. A student 

directed college orchestra of the excel- 
lence demonstrated by our college or 
chestra deserves much praise 



Mr. Seymour married May Davenport 
of the Museum Company, sister of t In- 
famous Fanny Davenport and daughtei 
of the great tragedian Kdgar Davenport, 

lie resides at his beautiful home lacing 
tin ma at South Duxbury near the estati- 

of Fanny Davenport. His house is filled 

with mementos of the great figures of the 

American stage. 



NOTICES 



BOTH SIDES OF THE QUESTION 

A week from Friday night will usher in the second annual all-college seminar 
This year the question under fire will be very timely subject of "Disarmament." 
Colleges all over the country have found a vital interest in the comparative assets 
and liabilities of peace and war and the attitude which many of the leading minds. 
of the nation and the world are taking on this question. During this conference 
which will consume the whole week-end, we find both militarism and pacifism ably 
represented. Men who are to present the various phases of disarmament are will 
qualified to state and expound logical and fundamental arguments in defending 
their positions. 

Opportunity is given State students to become at least partially posted on this 
world-wide question. Prospects point to a chance for you to gain an unbiased opinion 
for yourselves inasmuch as both sides of the problem are to be stressed. In other 
words, get up to date and beep up with the times. 



B & M, HOW MUCH LONGER 

We see that the Hoston and Maine Railroad has petitioned to discontinue pas 
singer service from Northampton to Hoston, via Amherst, having freight traffic 
moved over this line as in the past but discontinuing passenger service between 
Oakdalc and Northampton. Inconvenient as has been the accommodations on the 
train between Boston and Amherst, a removal of this means of transportation (when 
none other is available presents an even greater inconvenience. 

If the petition of the railroad company is consid red and permission granted for 
the Hoston & Maine to discontinue passenger service from Amherst, it will be just 
the passing of another tradition. 

EDITORIAL POINTS 

We have often heard that the B. & M. operated a fast train to Amherst so we 
tried to get out and see what it was mat to. 



When I penned the third from the last 
stanza, I little expected to be taken up 
quite BO soon, and by a member of the 
(acuity, too! However, I am a man of 
my word, so here is the coveted advi e 
which I promis d. 

Dear Sir: 

I was very much interested in your 
letter. In compliance with your urgent 
request, I have had the delicacy to re- 
frain from publishing it in this column. 
Yours is indeed a sad story. So you were 
crossed in love? Well! Well! Cheer up! 
When we are young we are inclined to 
make mountains out of molehills. The 
Abbey is full of eligible young women, 
believe me, Sir, they are not all the 
same. If this doesn't work, try two 
tablespoons of bicarbonate of soda in a 
tumbler of water. Calomel is also very 
good they say. 

Hoping your condition will improve. 
Sine rely. 

The Picaroon 



What do you think of the new Bacteriology Boulevard now under construction? 



Looks as if traffic congestion and parking problems became paramount during 
the vacation either that or Professor Armstrong has a new h >bby, that of collect- 
ing auto registration numbers. 



How many of vour Christmas neckties has your room-mate borrowed so soon 
in the season? 



Our New Year's Resolution was to make no more New Year's Resolutions. 



So they are giving the band the "air"! 



Finally, don't forget to rememberl 



To the students interested in the 
curious and unusual, the Picaroon recom- 
mends Arthur Machen's book, "The 
Anatomy of Tobacco." Here followeth 
an extract : 

"Hut if the intention of restoring be 
altogether absent, * * * then it is no 
longer borrowing, but sponging, a hateful 
and detestable practice, of which certain 
students at the University of Oxford did 
show their abhorrence in coining the 
future tense of a verb * * * to express a 
fellow who was notable for such para 
sitical champetry. Such a sponge will 
walk into another's rooms with a cheer- 
ful smile, and before he has tarried long 
out comes his pipe, and with some lame 
excuse of having forgotten his pouch or 
the like, will dive deep into the tobacco 
jar, and calling for ale, will play the host 
most gallantly at another's expense. Off 
with such bloodsuckers from the face of 
the earth! say I 'a twenty devil way,' 
as old Chaucer hath it. So much for 
Sorrowing." 

Hush! Hush! Bet ween this Sunday 
and next the freshman girls are to be 
deprived of their chief source of gossip, 
namely the alloping tongues of their 
older sisters. Just wait till afterward. 
though! 



WILLIAM SEYMOUR TALKS 

(Continued from Page 1) 

years of his stage managership at the 
Famous old Hoston Museum Stock Com- 
pany. William Warren. Mrs. J. R. 
Vincent, Annie Clark, Charles Barron, 
George Wilson and a dozen no leas 
talented actors were there; his actors and 
all the great plays were now and then in 
their repertoire. Great actors like Hoik i- 
cault, Booth, Bamtt, came for season-, 
at this theatre supported by the great 
Museum Company and directed by 
William Seymour. His later years, until 
two or three years ago. were spent with 
the Frohman and other great New York 
productions. 

Mr. Seymour pointed out that in the 
early days of the great stock companies 
everything was made in the theatre; it 
was an all-inclusive factory producing 
costumes, scenery, and all kinds of 
"properties." Today the actor bsOWS 
nothing of the technique or the history 
of his "profession." Even a dramatist 
was en aged by the theatre. When Dr. 
Jekyll and Mr. Hyde was written by 
Stevenson, the regular dramatist of the 
old Hoston Museum Company, T. Ku~ 
Sul liv an, produced the dramatic v.rsion. 
By the way, it was Mr. Seymoui who 
made Mansfield a star. Mr. Seymour 
remarked in passing that it was just SO 
years ago that Hazel Kirke was produced 
at the Museum. 

It is impossible to convey the charm of 
this address. It abounded in interesting 
and humorous incidents. Mr. Seymour 
■aid that Lester Wallack was the mos! 
s. II -possessed actor that he had known 
in all his experience. On one occasion 



because of the growing difficulty .mil 
danger from indiscriminate driving <>i 
automobiles on the College campus, tin 

following regulations with reference to 
use of cars by students have been adopt 

to be effective at the beginning of the 
winter term, January 4, \\V-\2. 

Any student who uses an automobile 
for the purpose of coining to campiM 

must tile with the Treasurer <>f the Col 

the registration number of the car to be 
so used. He will then receive a permit 
entitling him to park his car in any MM 

of the following parking spaces: 

1. Rear of Stockbridge Hall 

2. Rear of South College 

;i. South of Physical Education Bldg. 

4. ( >pcn space north of Alumni Fiel 1 
a. North of Abigail Adams House 
All other parking spaces are for the 
use of College employees and visitor- t" 
the campus. 

The use of cars by students for travel 
about the campus between classes viH 
not be permitted except in apodal easel 
recommended by the Dean and apprnw! 
by the Treasurer. 

R. W. Thatcher, 
President 



M.S.C. Student Activities tickets will 
be accepted for admission to basket lull 
games at the North Side entrance to the 
Cage only. A cement walk leads Iron) 
the street past the Women's Pool en- 
trance to this Cage entrance. 

Please do not present your student 
ticket for admission at other entrances. 

Curry S. lb 



RADIO CONCERT 

Ossip ( .abrilowitsch, noted conductor, 
will be guest conductor of the New 

Philharmonic Symphony orchesti 

Sunday, January 111, in a concert winch 

will be heard over the radio in the 

Memorial Hall at '■> p.m. The pr 

follows: 

Overture to "Rosamunde" 

Symphony No. 5 Be* 

Scheherazade Rhnsky-K" 



THE POEM OF THE MONTH 

WEARY CONNECTICUT RIVER 

Weary river, weary river, flowing out to sea, 

Weary streamlet, sleepy streamlet, lazy as can be, 

O'er the rock-strewn land you stray., surely as the hours of day 
Weary river, weary river, flowing out to sea. 

Weary river, muddy river, slushing past our way. 

Weary streamlet, sleepy streamlet, yet too quick to stay, 
With the tides you rise and fall, like the lives of one and all, 
Weary river, muddy river, on your ocean way. 

Author: John Polar ".Y.l 
Judge: Mr. Troy 

Manuscripts for the January competition must be left at Mr. 
Rand's Office by the loth ol the month. 



GET YOUR CORDUROY TROUSERS KNICKERS BREECHES 

N O W 



L A N D I S 






MR. BARNARD LECTURES 

(Continued from Page 1) 

Mr. Barnard and Mr Frederick 

, there exists a great difference of 

i on the merits of Romanticism 

inc | Humanism. The former spoke in 

r aVOI ,,i Romanticism, and next Tueada) 

n opposite side ol the question 

presented when Mr. Troy speaks 

ie of Humanism. 

\h. Barnard first of all explained his 

in treating the subject of Ro- 

-.m. lie was not arguing or living 

intellectual assent, he said, but 

.;, I lining and trying to justify his 

,. h, he leils, is one aspe. t of the 

tru th. He did not attempt to give a 

d definition of Romanticism in a 

entence because he believes it is 

ible to do so. 

oke only to those who believe in 

turahsm, in something more than 

in be seen in a microscope. "It 

)l not a doctrine for fools to play with," 

i., acknowledged, but he felt that he 

1U , -peaking to those who hail some 

mtciousness and si lf-respL'd. 

Historically, Romanticism is a revolt 

against the artificialities and intellectual- 

i-in that prevailed in Europe in the 

lixteenth century. At that time there 
131 a revolt in the fields of religion, 
politics, and art, as well as in literat ure. 
The tirst distinguishing point in Ro- 
manticism is the new attitude the Ro- 
man i. ists assumed toward nature, byn n, 
[« example, glorified the mountains and 
I Ie wrote: 
"Roll on, thou deep and dark blue 
(Mian, roll!" 
Likewise, burns wrote poetry to a mouse, 
to i daisy, and to other aspects ol nature, 
-aid, 
And in our life alone docs nature live." 

["he Humanist t. Ices strong exception to 



You have tried the rest? 

Now try the BEST 



And that's the 



AMHERST SHOE REPAIRING CO. 

"Good> ear Welt System Employed" 



this, insisting that man's nature is dual. 
Mr. Barnard stated that there is not one 
law for man and one law for nature. 
Instead, it is truly a universe, with one 

Mt oi laws, In- said. The manifestations 

may change, but the law remain> the 
same. 

The second aspect i> the new attitude 
towards man. from a principle ot onenesi 

to one of diversity. The interest <>f the 

Romanticist is in the unique, not the 
normal. The Humanist insists that man 
is naturally bad, but the speaker main- 
tains thai il one follows his svinpatbie- 

he isn't necessarily going downward. 
Knowing what to do i- tl'.e fust aspect 

of conduct, and not only knowing, but 
doing i> important. The second aspect is 

knowing how to act effectively. Unless 

a man aspins to become divine, he will 
never truly become human. And the 

third and perhaps meal important aspect 

is the will to righteousness. It involves 
the problem of giving man an incentive 
to do what is right. 

Idealism of Romanticism is the third 
aspect which Mr. Harnard discussed. It 
involves a belief in something more than 
what we see around us. Truly, the 
Universe is a Universe. The many 
existing parts are symbols of the OOCSMSS 
behind it. From this springs the Ro- 
manticist's love of nature, his love of 
humanity, and his love of an ideal a 
single ideal of goodness, truth, and 
beauty. 



INSIGNIA CHAPEL 

(Continued from Page I) 

Cross country Captain Donald M. 

Mason Ml'. Stuart D. Kdmond '.:_', 
Gordon A. Hruraa "33, David W. Caird 

';*4 (captain elect , John li. Karrar '34, 

Russell L. Snow ':;», Manager Frederick 

<;. (lark "34. 



S. S. HYDE 
Optician and Jeweler 

Oculltti' Prescriptions Filled. Broken lenae 
accurately replaced 

BIG BEN ALARM CLOCKS and other 
reliable make* 

S PLEASANT STREET, (up one flight) 



FISHER'S 

Here's a New CORDUROY PAJAMA 

One piece, V neck, long sleeves, wide pajama trousers 
In pantel shades: green, rose, orchid, rust and purple at only 



$3.98 



CALENDARS AND DIARIES 



One Year Diaries 

Five Year Diaries 

Address Hooks 

box Files 50c 

I Fibre Fxpanding Envelopes 
5c and up 

JAMES A. LOWELL, 



Desk Calendars of all kinds 
Student Budget Hooks 25c 

Index Box Files 

with KM) cards and Index 

in black doth 50c wood 75c 



BOOKSELLER 



STATE QUINTET PLAYS AMHERST 

(Continued from Page 1) 

•tack up against the Royal Purple a! the 

cage, tor most ol the men in the expected 

line-up have played varsity regularly or 
have proved themselves very versatile on 

the hoop court. In Captain "Joe" 

DePasqua, who, a> m>t a fea ol you 
will remember, was so irritating to the 

Slate gridsleis at I'latt Field last fall. 
the Purple has an excellent guard and 

an extremely clever all around basket 
ball player. The other veterans are 
George Reynotda, Huff, a fast forward, 
Milla, Gregg, Wheeler, and Warner. The 

opponents, under Coach \\ he. hi , have 
had much more practice than the State 

boopaters, the former having reported 
for practise about November 20. 

For the State Co lege, the probable 
lineup will have Captain Foley and 
lloiiian at guard, lojko and bush al the 

forward positions and Fletcher jumping 

.it center. The substitutes include 

Reynolds, Ahlatrom, Fawcett, Stuart, 

Hansen, Ziclinski and Hicks. lor the 
past few work outs Coach Fllcrt has been 
tightening up the defense and polishing 
up the play in all departments. Without 
being unduly optimistic, the student body 

feels that soother victor) at the ripcinet 

of the traditional rival is forthcoming. 



PRINTS BY (.1 KKII'K 
(Continued from Page I) 

is today. In most cases the print WM a 
reproduction of scenes, persons, Of ol 
some other objects which were easily 
rendered into this t v pe of r eprese n tation. 

One ot the companies in this In Id o| 

printing was the Currier and Ives Com 

pan) ol New York, and lodav this com 
pany is considered to have produced the 

best prints. Printing of this son died 

out at the end of the century and its 
popularity < lei leased with the coming of 

the modern photograph. At present there 

is a "rage" throughout the country lot 

these prints and their value has increased 
im men sely; so much so that even this 

old business has iniiir under the influence 

of the gangster. There are many lalse 
reproductions of these prints now being 
sold as originals. 

Constituting a remarkable collection 
of prints, this group is not for sate, how- 
ever, and they will be on exhibition during 
this week. They should be regarded as 
interesting to everyone for it is thought 
b)f some that the revival of these prints 
is permanent and not just a passing fad. 



THE NATIONAL SHOE REPAIRING 

21 MAIN STREET 

Between Town Hall and Masonic Building 
MENS' SHOES SOLED and HEELED $1.75 

PULL SOLES and HI Mil K HEEIS 
I adits' Shots Soltd and Kubbtr llttls 
LADIES SHOES HEELED 



t2.5S 

$1.40 
40c 



All Work Guaranteed 



Now Is The Time - - - 



BACK TO THT-: PRICKS OF SIXTEEN YEARS AGO 

Schaffner & Marx, Michaels Stern and other makers of 
lint clothes have contributed to the merchandise we are DOW 
offering at great reductions. 

Suits and Overcoats from our regular stock are now offered at 
- ranging from $19.50 to $40.00. 

F. M. THOMPSON & SON ■ 



College Drugstore 

W. II. McGRATH. Reg. Pharm. 
AMHERST, • MASS. 

VISIT 

BARSELOTTI'S 

All the requirements fur the smoker- I'ipes, 
Pouches, Smokers Combination 
Ice Cream, Candy, Sandwiches 



EAT 

AT 

BUCK'S 



PATRONIZE 

The Sandwich Man 

R. L. BATES, North Amherst 



FAVOR COMPULSORY MILITARY 

(Continued front Page 1) 

education as .1 substitute for required 
R.O.T.C., is revealed by the replies to .1 
questionnaire senl to the is land grant 
colleges in the country. The inquirj has 
been made by t he Trustees ol 1 In-- college 
in connection with their consideration ol 
the student petition to make military 
training here elet live. 

lour questions were .isked to each ol 
the colleges: <i 1> the bask course of 
R.O.T.C, .it your institution required or 
1 hi tbe. J >l.' !i required, are 1 wa years' 
training required? 3 II leas than two 
m.iis, hou much? I Is any change 
expo t'-'l in the near future? All oi tin 
48 I. mil ^r.mt colleges in tin- country 
are represented in the results of the 
questionnaire, The replies, tabulated by 
the President's otni e, follow ; 

11 report th.it two years <>i military 

tr.iininn .ire required of .ill mi. Me collegiate 

students .mil th.it no change in this u- 
ipiiiement IS e x pect e d. Three ins! it ut ions 

re.iort thai excu a es from the requiremenl 
.ire granted in special cases. 

3 (Cornell University, Pennsylvania 
State College and M.iss. st.it «• College] 
report that .1 change h required to 

elective status is liein^ considered by the 

faculty and trustees 

I (University of Georgia) reports one 
yeai required without credit, but th.it .1 

s< id yeai m.iv be elected In which 

• .ise ."{ year hour credits are granted for 

t he two years' work, 

I (Texas A. iV \l. College) reports that 
"If the War Department docs not raise 
the quota for students taking the a<l 
vanced course this institution will prob 



PATRONIZE 



The College Barber Shop 

"M" BUILDING 

M. S. C. 



SANG LUNG hand laundry 

No. 1 Main St. Amherst, Mass. 



Kl I'AIKIM. AND Al.l. KINDS OK 
WASHING IM)NE AT HKASONAHI.K 
PRICES. 

Our Laundry First Class 

Our Policy Guaranteed 

NEXT TO THE TOWN HAI.l. 



TYPEWRITERS 

for Sale and Rent 

»:»£»: a a a 
H. E. DAVID 



GRENFKLL CALENDAR 

now reduced to 
$1.25 

i'mer painted from photograph 
by I'rof. Sears 



ablj not requin any student to take 
Military Science, but make it purely 
voluntary " 

l (North Carolina Mate Collage of 
Agriculture A Engineering reports two 
ve.11- of Military Training required, but 
individual students in. iv petition to take 
alternative courses in History or Civics, 
such substitution to be granted by the 
President oi tee College upon joint 
recommendation ol the Directors of 

Instruction and Profesi 1 Military 

s, ience and T.u 1 ii », 

I (I'liiwr-itv of Wisconsin reports 
tint "all physically fit male students are 
ni|uiicci to rompletc two yeai <>\ our <>| 

the following three course! as a prere 

• |ni i e to gradual ion: < I ) Militai v 
Science, (2) Physical Education, 
Hand limited to l in men). Transfei 
from our course to snother is not per 

milted " 

This inquiry is the seimni in the in- 
vestigations of the board oi Trustees t<» 

measure current opinion upon the sub 
jeet of cunpulsorv R.O.T.C. The lust 

movement in this direction came daring 
October, when a questionnaire senl to 
the resident faculty of the college re 
railed that 68 out of the 11 u members 
oi tin- faculty who replied t . ■ \ •>!<<! the 
retention of the basic course in military 
training on a compulsory basis, while 34 
were unqualified!) in opposition. 01 the 
68 in favor, 17 preferred the present two 
yeai requirement, and 21 a modification 
1 is favored s our year < ourse with 
option between military and physical 
education the second year; three favored 
a required course ol one yeai onlj I. 

The matter will be definite!) voted 
upon in the meeting <>| the board ol 

Ti 11 tees during the ensuing week. 
FAMOUS PLAYERS ON CAMPUS 

(Continued from Page I) 

modification oi the true Elizabethan 

m. it i^ in the use ol mini and mi^rc 

elaborate hangings than were employed 

liv the l.li/aliet hails. The simpliiifv oi 
hi^ productions is based on the/lhcmv 

that the stage should stimuUtte and 
inspire, rather than relieve the imagin* 

at ion 

Everywhere the Greet plaveis have 
pr es e n t ed tbeii plavs, the company has 
won the highest praise Man) favorable 
press 1 ri: ii isms have been published about 

Sir Hen Greet and his company. 

The cast ol < harai ten is as follows: 

"TWKI.FTII NIGHT (WHAT VOU Wll.l./' 

By William Shakespeare 

Oraiao (Daac <>f Dlyria) Piwfcikt s.irnnit 

Carlo (.1 iiiicin, n ■tttiadlsi (Lamreani Johns 

Y.ilinlinr lh<- Data (Basil l),-.,r 

•SS ' apUfal M.,rk Dnnui.im 

Viola (,w. 11 I.I, wrllyn 

sh 1 any Mi ii ' !<■ lo Olivia) Rasaeii l kotndikc 

KaM < ].nk 

IO -x Will, 1 ■ 

\iii"i Barren 

Him i,i. 1 

Vera li> at I, 

Kdlth Mayor 

Pe* r Deertag 



Miss Culler's Gift Shop 



Maria 

S11 Andrew Ague beek 

Peste (.1 1 lownj 

Malvolio (steward to t >in ta] 

• llivia 

Attendant 

lalilall 

tian (Brother to Viola) Christopher Ca oa 
Antonio (a tea captain, Iriend <a Seba tian) 

w I- rtonoway 

Sft m \ 'Us in IIImi.i .mil the sea ••..i>i m.,i « . 

1 1»- v.n li . .,11 ii„- < .,.,«! the 

l)nk<- • I'.ila . ( Hum . House ami Gar- 
den A itraei and a 1 orridkM 

l««i «hort mit-rvaU the Mash is at Um 
period 



START THJS TERM RIGHT 
BY HATING REGULARLY 



at 



Sarris Bros. Candy Kitchen Restaurant Inc. 



MT. ROCK FLEECE OVERCOATS, 
are selling at their lowest price in years. You can now buy this wonderful overcoat for $45.00 

A large assortment awaits your selection at 

E. M. SWITZER, JR., Inc. 



M. A. C. Library. 



TISE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY, JANUARY 7, 1932 



HAPPY NEW YEAR 

It will not be a Happy New Year unless you have a suit customized by II ickey- Freemen 

THOMAS F. WALSH 



Everything in Hardware 
and Radio Equipment 

ATWATER-KENT 



AND 



MAJESTIC RADIO 

THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 

THE WINCHESTER STORE 



FOR OUTDOOR ENTHUSIASTS AND HIKERS 

Ski Lovers will find our Line of Ski Coats, Ski Suits, Most Reasonable 

•e-COLODNY CLOTHING COMPANY 

32 MAIN ST. (Near Depot) NORTHAMPTON 

Also, Riding Outfits for Men and Women! 

Sweaters, Wool Hose, Leather Coats, Ski Pants! 

Carfare Paid to all Students on Purchases of $10.00 or over 



JOSEPH GINSBERG 

19 PLEASANT ST. 

Men's Furnishings - Shoes repaired, called for and delivered 

Freshmen, come in and see our selection of shoes, priced moderately. 

Special sale now on leather coats, just what you need for cold weather 

CALL 984-M 



ARMS PARLEY DEBATE 

(Continued from Page 1) 

to his retirement in I'.il'.s be was on 'lutv 

as a member <»f the Court Martial at 
Governor'! Island, N. V. which tried 
numerous well known "•lacker*." Col. 
CarletOfl is a lecturer much in demand 
and is one ol the principle shakers of 
the National Defense League. His 
lecture topics which have caused most 
discussion are "The Fallacies of Paci- 
fism" and "Revolutionary Radicalism." 

J. B. Mathews is executive director of 
the Fellowship of Reconciliation, the 
foremost pacifist organisation in the 
world, with branches is most of the 
European countries. Mr. Ma hews was 
a pacifist during the World War and has 
been blacklisted by organizations such 
las the D.A.K. for his well-known peace 
sentiments. The associations are es- 
pecially fortunate in having secured the 
services of Mr. Mathews, for he is a 
speaker in much demand. 

In addition to those two men tin- 
Parley has secured the s rvices of Prof. 
Ralph Harlow d Smith College. Prof. 
Harlow recently spoke at the Student 

Volunteer Convention and eras perhaps 

the most enthusiastically received of the 
spe.ikers at the Convention. He WSS 
reported the next day by the Assoi iated 
Press as having suggested that the Con- 
vention urge President Hoover to ap- 
point a student as a member of the 
American Delegation to the Arms Con 
ference in Geneva. 

Mr. Thornton Merriam of the National 
Council on Religion in Higher E d u ca ti on 
will act as Conference chairman and will 
COndutt the discussion from the floor. It 
is expected that there will be much stu- 
dent discussion during the sessions of the 
Conference. 

Prof. A. A. Mackimtnie of the State 
College is to act as technical expert. 
Prof. L. B. Packard has also been asked 
to act in the same capacity. 

The program will appear in the next 
issue. 



M. S. C. MENS MOTTO IS ALWAYS 
LET "DAVE" DO IT 

AMHERST CLEANSERS, DYERS 

and LAUNDERERS 



PHONE 828 



Near the Town Hall 



PHONE 82S 




o: 



ns I 



Thomas s. guilds 

Incorporated 
SMART SHOES and HOSIERY for COLLEGE MENandWOM. 

QUALITY MERCHANDISE PRICES TO SUIT 

275 High Street, . Holyoke 

Largest Shoe Store in! Western Massachusetts ' 



SHOE SKATES 

from $5.00 to $15.00 



TTT 



HOCKEYS 
PUCKS - SKATE STRAPS 



A. J. HASTINGS 



m TSSSSJT AMHERST, MASS, 



GORDON FULL FASHIONED SILK HOSIERY 

New Colors 7 9 C pair Chiffon or Servit, 

JACKSON & CUTLER 



RTC 
JANUARY SALE 

Men's Bostonian Oxfords - Bass Moccasins 

Women's Oxfords - Dress Pumps 

Hosiery 

BOLLES SHOE STORE 



WHY OVER-PAY ON YOUR DRY CLEANING? 
We will dry-clean and press your suit or topcoat for $ 1 .01 

We call and deliver free daily 
Phone 635 SWISS CLEANSERS & DYERS Phone 63j| 



Over First National Store 



BOLTER'S 
SEMI-ANNUAL CASH SALE ) 

On Monday, January 4th, our Semi-Annual Sale starts, bringing to you an opportunity to buy our quality merchandise at prices you never thought 
possible. This is your chance to stock up your wardrobe. All authentic stylings. Nothing bought in for this sale. 

' ' $19.75 

A few odd suits of our regular line in broken sizes. Super values—all in correct 

styles—worsteds— cheviots— in this season's smart colors— Greys Browns — 

Blues. 

A RANGE AT $23.75 A RANGE AT $38.75 A RANGE AT $28.75 

Formerly priced at $35.00 Formerly priced at $50.00 Formerly priced at HMO 



OVERCOATS 
Warm Luxurious Fleeces, Smart Camel Hair Coats and Polo Coats in all models— Single and Double Breasted with or without Belts. All tailored to 
our high standard THE FLEECE COATS $23.75 and $38.75— formerly up to fe 
CAMEL HAIR COATS $38.75— formerly $50.00 HARRIS TWEED SPORT COATS Most popular coat for Sports wear 
POLO COATS $28.75— formerly $40.00 Formerly $20 W*\ 



PIGSKIN GLOVES 
A timely item at this time of year. Full range of sizes 



HOSE— Imported hose, plain and fancy patterns, referred to you at Sen 
$1.95 sational Reductions. Ribbed End Hose 55c, two for $1. Fancy Hose, 4 for $1 

Imported Hose, <j 5c. Golf Hose, 95c. „ 

PAJAMAS- Finest quality broadcloths. Plain anu printed in large tull cut SiiORTS- Comfortab y cut shirts and snorts in plain and fancy pattern* 
designs now $1.55, two for $3.00 ^^ now 3 for *\ 1 



NECKWEAR We have nothing but the finest hand made Ties in designs and colors. Stripes. Pin dots. Fancy figures 

and at 95c all our $1.50 1 ics 



NOW 55c TWO FOR*' 



SHOES 
Regular $10 Shoes now $7.95 Scotch Grain Shoes at $5.95 Black and Brown 
Brogues and Wingtips in your choice of colors. Take advantage of this buy 



SWEATERS Special values in zephyr wool sweaters 
Sleeveless $2.45 Slip-on $2.95 At this price you can have one of each 



GREY FLANNEL TROUSERS Toe Spoil's Ou standing Style Item at $5.95 



SILK ROBES Wonderfully tailored— in the popular shades— all one-half price 

WOOL ROBES In plain colors $6.45 An ..iways use u urcaase In Pastel shades 



SHIRTS If you usually spend $2.50 or $3.00 for your shirts you will want some 
of these. Collar attached white oxford. 



FANCY SfRIPE TABS 
$1.6> 



BrlOAOoLOTH SHIRTS 
$1.15 two for $2 $1.35 three for*" 



TRENCH COATS The coat of many uses. Drastically reduced at 



$ / . :> 



SLICKERS Now at a price you cannot overlook 






CARL H. BOLTER 



BOLTER'S New Haven 



BOLTER'S— Cambridge 



—INCORPORATE D— 



BOLTER'S— Amherst 



— BOLTER'S Ise 



I 



gifrg iHaB0arl|tt0gtt0 (Efllunjtatt 



Vol. XLII 



AMHERST, MASS., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 13. 1932 



Number 12 




Arms Parley to be Held 

on Campus This Weekend 



COLLEGE BAND IS TO 
GIVE RADIO CONCERT 



Band Will Broadcast from Cook's 

Ballroom in Springfield on 

January 21 

Broadcasting from Cook's Butterfly 
Ballroom In Springfield on January 21 

will be an experience for Captain Sumner 

and his Massachusetts State College Band. 
A regular march program still l>e played 

(01 ,i half hour from 6:15 to 6:48 on 
Thursday ni^ht relayed through station 
WBZ. 

(Continued on Page 2) 



FRATERNITY PLEDGES 
Fraternity pledging was commenced 

again after the vacation and closed on 

Monday morning. The new members 
gained on Fraternity Row are: 

r.V. Howard Pease '35, T. Savaria. 

Phi Sigmt Kuppa — Ronvr Warner '36, 
Francis C Murke ':>.">, John K. Evans '36, 

Philip Stone '•;."». 

Kippa Siv.mn Donald Stuart '.'i.">, 
Hi! Robbins "36. 
Tin-In Chi Harold Baron '35, George 

Pease ':;.">. Richard Hubbard '36, John 

Eldridge '35, William Foahall '35, Henry 

Harlow '36. 

Sigma PhiEpsilon Burns Robbins '34. 

'ilia Gamma Rh<> Charles Moody 

l harles Tha) * '■•■>. Ronal I Matlock 

Kuppa Eplilon Willard Boynton '36, 
Robert Abbott '•'!"), John Consolatti ';J5. 



STATE MEETS TRINITY 
BASKETEERS TOMORROW 



Trinity (.hi inlet, Made Up of Five 

I ettermi ii Should Furnish Strong 

Competition in Phys. Kd. 

liuilding Tomorrow Night 

Trinity, a team that the Stair basket* 
ball team easily defeated l.i>t season, 
will lie the second opponents ol the 

Maroon and White Thursday on the 

basketball floor in the cage. Trinity 

baa been moved on the State schedule 

from next to last, as last Mar. to second 
this winter. Although defeated last week 

by Williams, an unusually strong five, 
Trinity promises to K |Vt- the Massachn 

setts quintet I hard battle. The Hartford 
court team is made up of five letlermen 
and in Captain Goiiuo, Meier, Amicus. 

Bat I lick and Dusfca, Trinity has a speedy 
quintet. 

However, another State victory is ex 
pected after the excellent showing m.n'e 
by Coach Kllert's chargej against a sur- 
prisingly strong Amherst team. Tie 

sophomore forward line performed Ide 
seasoned veterans and it is expected that 
II' teller. I lush and I.ojko will keep tip 
their good work against Trinity. The 
Trinity center will have his hands full in 
Irving to keep the lanky Fletchei from 
■coring and Trinity's guards will havi to 
be wide awake to keep the State midget 

(Continued on Page i) 



"Twelfth Night" Presented 

by Famous Greet Players 



Record Crowd Applauds Presentation 

of Shakespearean Comedy 

Enthusiastic applause was accorded 
Ben Greet English Players production 
Shakespearean drama, "Twelfth 
h •.. is riven Friday e\ ening 
auditorium. All the members 
rve men' ion for their 
• -it ion of tin ir parts. But , the 
ppiied the comedy 
rticul .rly well received. I hi 
oi Sir Toby broke the bored and 
air with whirh the play began 
• : ence on thi < rowded I* 
th i he players. Sir 1 oby 
• ; Russel Thorndyke, whili Sir 
' iii rs in fun, tht v;,iw ky Sir 
mi 1 shrewish Maris i by 

Iters and Enid Clark respectively, 
dso part:' ularly effective. I - 
worthy o comment from a 
iewpoint was cene 

\ i' da and sir Andn » . I be 
- "! the two assailant a as wei 
ww of the perpetuators ol the 
dl the audience in constant 
(Continued on Page 3) 



English Singers Next 

on Concert Program 

Musical Concert to lie Given this 

Friday Evening as Part of C m- 
munitj Concert Association Program 

( >it< ring madrigals, motel , foil 
and canzonets, characteristii 

oi i he Renaissam e i ! ure in Engl 
the English Singers ol London will pre- 

md oi thi mush al 

eonei rts under the 

erst l omnium! y ( !onci ri As i* 
;ion. l-ri'!,i\ evening, January !■>. 

lock in the Collegt Hall ol Amherst 



The 


English 






repn sentativea ol 






Sisti 


ol th< I rat 




t : • , 


our Ki 








Royal 


■ 




to the 1 : 


Minstn 


Edwa 


rd 


VI in 


these > 


in ge rs d< 






keeping 


alive the i 






quest ' 


f mediaeval 


En 


i he 




Continue 


on 


Page 4 



OUTSTANDING EVENT 
OF THE WEEK 

The Superlative entertainment 

offered last Fridaj evening by the 

Hen <.reet Players in "Twelfth 

Night." 



DR. GATES DELIVERS 
ADDRESS IN CHAPEL 

Well- Known Clergyman Calls Min- 
istry Grantast of Arts in Talk 
last Sunday 

"Recently the clergy have invented ■ 

new kind of afternoon sport 'knot kin^ 
the church/ " stated l>r. Mito II. Gates, 

Dean of the Cathedral of St. John the 

Divine in New Vork City, at chapel on 

January 10. 

(Continued on Page .4) 

Mardi Gras to 

be January 22 

Rreglio's Conquerors Secure! to 
Furnish Music at Annual hall 

Music, resembling the romantic love 
chant of a barbaric nation, sounds in 
the grand Hall ol the Mardi (.ras while 
figures in strange, que r. and >et beauti 
ftd costumes shuffle across the Boor on 
ihis momentous Friday night. Exotii 
oners droop from high beams; bal 
loons struggle to free themselves from 
grasping hands. The music continues; 
non slow, nos fast, no* enticing, now 
re.ielling, but always stimulating. Tie 
Mardi Gras i on an ancient festivit) 

(Continued on Page .4) 



( uti'isi mi NDAR 

".1 »;./ .'/;. ../ 

I 

Wednesday, January 13 

I . 
town, 

1 > W < . '. 

R 
Hall 
Thursday, January it 

7.00 i 



Friday, J.,n.i.ir> 
Ka i urda) . Januu 






Id 



Sunda) . J.iiir..: 17 

p. m. Sj 
Til— day, January l'» 



PUCKMEN TO MEET TWO 
OPPONENTS THIS WEEK 

Sextet Will Flay Strong Williams 

Team Wednesday and Colby 

Saturday 

Wednesday, the Massachusetts hockey 
squad will travel to Willianistow n to try 

for their first victory on foreign Ice ol 

the season. Williams will have the ,nl 
Vantage over the State sextet in that 

they have held practice during all the 
holidays and will be playing on their own 
ice. Last Saturday, Williams lost a 

closely fought contest to Army and will 
do everything in their power to down 
the Maroon and While pink team. The 
lirunt of the State attack will lie tarried 
l)\ the veteran forward line ((imposed of 

Forest, Cain, and likofsld who saw 
action in last year's gaflM against Wil 
Hams. Iii fad ii was Tikofski'i long shot 
thai won the game in the closing minutes 
of play. As yet, the power oi the State 

second forward line is not known so 

well, hut Sylvester, Snow, and I lenry 

showed up well against Conn. Aggies 

(Continued on Patfe 3) 

WALTER DYER SPEAKS 
AT STUDENT ASSEMBLY 

Cives Interesting Sketch of the Fife 

of "That Notorious Rascal, 

Slephan Burroughs" 

At the last Wednesday assembly, 
Walter Dyer spoke on "That Notorious 

Rascal, Stephan Burroughs." He traced 
his life from early years as a had hoy at 
school, through terms ol teaching and 
preaching, to a period ol enforced rest in 

local jails, and finally to his uneventful 

old age as a respei ted family man. 

Stephan lived during the Revolution, 

the son ol a ( |crn>lliail ill Hanover, Nil. 

Alter becoming accomplished at stealing 
water met Ions and adept at throwing .ill 
blame on others, he attempted to run 
awa\ to the army, lie was thwarted iii 
this design and sent to Dartmouth, where 

his father was ,i liustee. I 'nlorl iinali l\ , 
his College < aid r was stopped at t he end 

ol sophomore \eai at the urgent request 

ol I he I.K lllty. 

After his departure from Dart mouth, 
he set out to find some Job which would 
allow him to travel. The only available 

one was that of ship's doctor. Aftei 

one week's training, he was read) to 

hegin work. Evidently there were no 

(Continued on Page 4) 



Conference Aims to Civc an Im- 
parl ial Presentation ol Facts for 
and Against Disarmament 

May the hest man win! That is t he 
liiK idea behind the Amis Parley whieh 

begins here next Friday al 7.30 p m. la 
the Memorial Buildiag under the dlrei 

tion of the Y.W.C.A., the Christian 

Ass ociat ion, and the student Committee 

on Disarmament. 

Ever since pacifism began, militarists 
have been calling pacifists names and 
vice versa. Right on this campus those 

who are p.n itistii ally inclined have heen 

accused ol disseminating unfair propa* 
ganda, and presenting a one sided picture 

of the situation, while the militarists 
have also heen subjected to the same 

charge. Tan Anns Parley should re m ove 

this (hlh. ulty, for its purpose is not to 

convert any one to pacifism. <>r , iU \ one 

to militarism, hut to lay out the prolih in 

as nearly as possible to the full view of 

all, and to analyse it into some ol Its 

most important factors so that every 

person may think the problem through 
and come to his own GOBI lusioii. In the 
mind ol each person there, it is Iio|kmI, 

the hest side, the li^hl side, of th 

Irovery will win out. May the best man 
win! 

I here will he an unusual op|»ortunity 

loi discussion throughout the conference. 
( iroup discussion d ep e n ds for its success 
as a stimulant to clear thinking more 

upon the dis< ussion leader than upon any 
ol Ik i single factor. An expert in this 

field will be the chairman ol this con- 
ference, lie is Thornton Merriam, 
formerly ■ profasaOf al Western Reserve 

University, when- he taught a course in 
discussion leading. He was with Dr. 
Harry Emerson Fosdick in New Vorh as 

Continued on Page 4) 



SYMPHONIB FRANCAISF THIS 
SUNDAY 

Consisting entire!) of musiciaas, each 

ol whom has won a first prize in the 

Conservatoire de Paris, the Symphonic 
I rancaise will appear in a ■yrnphonic 

program Sunday, Januaiy 17, at .'<:.'iO in 

How ker Auditorium. The program is 
being sponsored l>\ t he Soi ial I 'nion, 

The group, consisting of about a 
dozen members, is a detai hment from 
the Boston Symphony Orchestra. Al- 
though the program has not as yet heen 

made public, it will UtidolllitedK itxlnde 

many classical compositions. Unques 
lionahly the unit is representative ol the 
finest in musical art and instrumentation, 
state College Students will be admitted 
on their Academic A< ti\ni( s ticket! 



State Quintet Trounces 

Amherst 1 7- 1 2 in Opener 



Students Give Debate 

in Chapel Last Monday 

Politella and Salter Discuss l)is- 

armament Before Assembled 
Student Body 



Monday Chapel tl eefc was given 

o the Debating Society lor the 

purpose ol mikiir.', clear the aubject oi 

i he V :■ Pari I debate to be held 

l : ; i f thi week. A 

"both tides oi the 

1 • ) me ml 
I i onard A. Salter. 
I ipholding iIm - mament 

; ill colli i 1 la S|K)KI II' i — 

that I he pr m m c< onomii distn is dm 

placed <ni 
nt ol r ma men I a bj i he \ ariou? 
■ii s and i heir at tempt b to keep .1 
iiat ions in 1 1 1 

Leonard Salter re ied for the other 
1 hat 1 he nal ions of tin- 
world were not ready lor disarmament, 
and that the United States in particular! 
ild not be a sked to di 1 . 

(Continued on Page 4) 



First Game In Nam Building Brings 

Maroon and While Town 
Championship 

Performing before one of the quiet< I 
' rowds ' rnbied at an l ball 

contest in the past few years, the Massa" 

< h'is. it-, St. ite College basketball team 
christened the new Boor and dedicated 
the rage whin it managed to turn saide 
the mild attack of a mediocre quintet 
from 1 In other end ol the town, the score 

ng 17-IJ whin the whi 1 h 

nounced the end of the game. Str.ii 
cunning in handling the ball gave to 
Fletcher, State's center, the unquestioned 
status of being thi outstanding man in 

. one, while i bounding em 

propelled him hithi r and von t hus making 
ol. 11 . for the oppo 
sit ion, 1 ■ ■ ind < ieorgc Reyrn 

■I to In- the mainsprings in the 
rsl ittack wl the di fense ol 1 he 
entire team showed itsell to be quite 
potty. 

In the first half, the State ba sk e te e rs, 
irged forward h> the ball hearted \eiis 

(Continued on Page 4) 



i 



\ 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 13, 1932 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 13, 1932 



TTbcflDassacbusette Collegian 



Official newspaper of 



the Massachusetts State College. 
Wednesday by the students. 

BOARD OF EDITORS 

'32 



Published every 



Wallace W. Stuakt 
Managing Editor 



l'KANK I.. SPRINGS! 

Editur tn-Chtef 
;>,2 OiCAK Margolin '.',? Rial S. Potter, 

A ssociate Editors 



h . 



1>I PARTMENT KU1TORS 



Editorial 

l'KANK L. Sl'KINGER .32 



Campus 

EpMOMD Nash '33 

Alfkeda L. OkllWAY 'XI 

ki in D. Campbbi l ;i 
Hawkiimte M. Jackson '84 
JosKI'll Poliiklla M 
Raymond K>\al :;i Mary L. Allen 



Oscar Margolin '32 



Feature 



Athletics 

William H. Wear '._' 

EUGEKB GUKALNICK "33 

Stanly F. Siierski "M 
John p. COLMAM "-i'> 
Silas Little. Jr., "■'-', 



David L. Areni>uk<; ".'•'> 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT 

Eric H. Wetterlow Jr. '32 
business Manager 



Kenneth E. Hodge '32 
Advertising Manager 

Ashley B. Gurnev '33 



Business Assistants 



William A. Johnson '32 
Circulation Manager 

Philip H. Leverault '33 



Subscriptions $2.00 per year. Single copies 10 cents. 



Make all orders payable to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In case of change of address, subscriber will please notify the business manager 
as soon as possible. 

Alumni and undergraduate contributions are sincerely encouraged. Any com 
munications or notices must be received by the editor-in-chief on or before Monday 
evening. 



Entered as second-class matter at the Amherst Post Office. Accepted for mailing at special rate of 
pottage provided fot in Section 1103. Act of October. 1917, authorized August 20. 101K. 



SIR PHILIP AND HIS TROUPE 

Presenting Shakespeare in true EngUafl fashion, Sir Philip I'en Greet and his 

company of English player* 1 gave to the largest audience which we can re m em b er 
being Mated in Bowker Auditorium an insight into English drama that was inspir 
inn, revitalizing, and trem e nd ously interesting. 'Twelfth Night," with its hilarious 
comedy interspersing the bits of dramatic tenseness, pr es en ted S h ak e speare in a new 
li^ht to the State College a u di enc e. 

Relying entirely upon their acting ability, the players gave new life to stage sn 

tertaimncnt and had the audience with them from the start, in spite of almost the 
plainest of stage properties. The Hen Greet Players are more than a credit to their 
art, they are a tonic lor Simulating genuine interest in the tine art of the legitimate 
sta^e. 

We Congratulate the sponsors of the Social UnhM upon the presentation before 
the students and friends ol State College of probably the best example of the itinerant 
theatre. 



PACIFISM OR MILITARISM? 

Student attention has been Centered in the Arms Parley to he conducted on 
campus this week-end. Under the auspices of "Y.W." and the Christian Association, 
the committee has spared no pains in securing for State students, s(K-akers who are 
outstanding authorities in their res p ective fields. More to the credit of the com- 
mittee is the fact that they have procured speakers to present intelligently both 
sides of the disarmament question namely, pacifism and militarism. It would have 
been a very simple matter for the Christian Association and "Y.W." to conduct a 
pacifist seminar, but instead they realised that much can be said on both sides of 
the question and so they are giving you the opportunity of creating your own opinion 
after you have heard the various attitudes on this q u estion presented. 

Colonel Carlston knows war, he has seen active service for 27 years and has had 
an opportunity to view military service from the inside both in peace-time as well 
as in war-time. Do not class him as being in favor of war; however, do give him 
credit for knowing on first hand just why the United States should not disarm to 
the extent that many persons are demanding at the present. 

Our pacifist exponent is to be J. B. Mathews, one of the outstanding men in the 
country who have given the grounds for pacifism much concentrated thought, who 
have formulated principles, and who have the backbone to stand by the principles 
in which they believe. Mathews has viewed war from the outside, he has examined 
peace-time antics of standing armies, he has criticised naval practices and govern- 
mental policies during the time of peace as well as in war. 

What fairer, more exhilerating type of a parley on disarmament could be pre- 
sented before State College students than to be given the opportunity to appreciate 

the arguments of dia m etric ally o ppo s e d speakers, each ex c eeding ly well-versed in 

the position which he is to defend. The parley is for you, so make the most of it 



QMf* fliranum 

Dear Picaroon: 

I heard a student remark this very 

morning as we walked across campus 

between < l.i sis: "Life on this (ampu- 
ls )UB( a walk between a sleep and a 

sleep." Ain't it tl.e truth I 

Wondering 

Dear Wondering: 

Life is also a dream and a waking, 
though for many it is just a dream. 
Thank you for the contrib. 

The Picaroon 

My spirits are a bit dampened this 

week. It seems as if somebody doesn't 
care very much for this colyum, or for 
the colyumist either. Vet I'm really such 
a nice chap, when you get to know me! 
Yes! Maybe there's an aching heart 
behind the painted smile! We Paggliacci's 
and Punchinello's certainly lead a dog's 
life! 

LETTERS OP A FRESHMAN 
October — , '31 
Dear Hill: 

I been intending to write earlier but 
I've been busier than a cross-eyed cow 
with crutches, what with studies and 
what not (fhe what not being the co-eds). 
1 K<>t a swell little redhead opposite me 
in (hem., and German's another class 
I'll never cut. Also a side trip to llolyoke 
or "llamp" is profitable. 

The way we've had to skid around for 
football practice makes it seem as if 
I've got mudguard sewed up but there's 
going to be a K'-o) for the other positions. 

There's too much competition for the 
uniforms we've been issued for military, 
for them to be appreciated and the only 
use I've found for mine is to hitch-hike 
home in. They don't issue bullets with 
the rilles, so much as I'd like to, 1 can't 
shoot our corporal. 

Two nights ago a tobacco shed caught 

fire and I went to see how "They're 

Toasted." Hoy, oh, boy, somebody must 
have had twins on the way down becau-r 
14 (count 'em le'lers piled out of Put- 

maa's puddle jumper. The only case 

that beats it is where a lo-piecc band 
climbed in a Model T, but someone 
(limbed into the bass horn, so that 
doesn't count. 

The profs sure are fond of slinging 
the blue pencd. I passed in a theme on 
"How I Shave." It had this glorious 
phrase: ". . . somewhere in the neigh- 
borhood of my Adam's apple my mind 
begins to wander." It came back: "Is 
that where your mind is?" 

Your pal, Joe Phrosch 

P.S. Write me if Ethel goes out with 
Sam. 

From his seat on the stage last Friday 
evening, the Picaroon could hear and 
observe much better than anyone else, 
so naturally his opinion is worth ever so 
much. It is, as everyone knows, very 
Elizabethan to sit on the stage, but it is 
also very embarrassing, especially to a 
man of my delicate and retiring nature. 
Several times the actors actually stood 
between me and the audience, just as I 

was receiving the frenzied applause of 

the admiring multitude. They seemed 
unable to realize their mistake. Tsk! Tsk! 



CO-ED NOTES 



SORORITY PLEDGES 
Sigma Btta Chi Gertrude Church ':;_', 
Eliaabeth Howe '32, Ruth Campbell '34, 
Eleanor Cande "84, Frances Co<>k ':;t, 
Laura Cooley '34, Harriette Jackson '::i, 
Marjorie Jensen '34, Shirley McCarthy 
'34, Mary Tomlinson 34, Joan Will ox 

Lambda Datia Mm Zoo Hlckney '32, 
Lucille Adams '33, Edith Smith ".'A, 
Eliaabeth Wheeler '.;4. 

Alpha tambaa Uu Lulu Warner ';>,■>, 
Laura Adams '.A, I'lory Costa "M, 
Florence Duckering '34, Josephine Fisher 

':;», Ruth Gardner '84, Elsie Healy '34, 

Sarah I'easlcy ".A. 



From <>:45 to 7:45 tonight in the Y 
room, the Y.W.C.A. will hold its monthly 
meeting. The theme will be world 
fellowship and will include reports from 
the two delegates to HulTalo, and short 
talks on disarmament and missions. The 
year's calendar for meetings and house- 
parties as well as the new budget will be 
submitted to the members. 



Wednesday, January 20, at four o'clock, 
a food demonstration will be held at 
Fernald Hal), sponsored by the Home 
Economics Club. The speaker will be 
Millicent Atkins. This meeting will take 
the place of the one scheduled for Jan. 
13, 1932. 



A junior-freshman tea, sponsored by 
the W.S.C..A. Council will be given at 
the Abbey center Wedn e sday, January 
13, from 3.30-4.30 p.m. The tea is under 
the direction of Sylvia Wilson "33 and 

Margaret Gerard '83. 



COMMUNICATIONS 



TRACK NOTES 

Candidates have been called, and are 
practicing for this year's relay team. 
Thus far the ones who have reported 
include: Pruyne and Kenneth Hale of 
last season's team, and also MacMackin, 
Welch, Crawford, Warren and Wood. 
The first race of the season will be run 
at the Prout Memorial Games in Boston, 
on January 30. As yet the opponents of 
the State team have not been named. 



On Tues., Wed., and Thurs., January 
19, 20, and 21, a Pentathlon will be run 
of! in the cage. It will be the first all- 
school event of the year, and is open to 
all four-year and Stockbridge students. 
Each man entering competes in any five 
of the events offered. Points will be 
awarded on the basis of time in die 
track events, and height or distance in 
the field events. The perfect score in 
each event is 100. 



THE BAND ON THE AIR 

You will want to rush through your sapper a bit faster than usual a week from 
tomorrow Right as the State College Hand is scheduled to play over Station WBZ 
from tiilo to »i:4,">. Fifteen minutes during which a bit of the Hay State College's 
nuskal spirit will be broadcast. Drop a line to your folks and remind them of a 
chance to hear some of the "Songs of Old Massachusetts" via radio. Captain Sumner 
has given much of his time to develop a re.il band at this college and now his dreams 
of a real, honest -to-goodness feature broadcast are coming true. Acoustics in the 
new cage certainly do not enhance the playing of any band but arranged correctly 
Upon the orchestral stage in Cook's ballroom in Springfield, the band should sound 
quite different from last Saturday evening. Remember to tell the folks to listen in 
at 6:15 a week from tomorrow evening over Station WBZ. 



EDITORIAL POINTS 

To pat you on the back we appreciated your conduct last Saturday night, 
Don't be hypocritical. There are more games coming so keep up the good spons 
manship. 



M.S.C. freshmen will meet Stockbridge 
in a dual meet at M.S.C. on February 25. 



lust to bring you down to earth, Dean's Hoard will be February 13. 



Ferenc Molnar's "The Swan' 
Standing merit. 



Is fair to present another Prom Play of out- 



What diil you think of the "Humanism vs. 

Saturday will find the Hen Greet I'l.i\ers 

and an evening performance. 

and "may the besl man win.'' 



Romanticism" conflict? 

in Northampton for both a matinee 



Special mention should be given to 
W. E. llolloway for his splendid voice 
and unaffected acting of the role of 
Antonio, one of the sea captains. Russell 

Thorndike .is the genial Sir Toby, was 

easily outstanding, and Hen Greet was 
excellent in the role of Malvolio, he of 
the meaning smile and the yellow stock- 
ings. Entd Clark (lid well as Maria, but 
Miss French was much too elocution. ir\ 
in the part ot the lady Olivia. Glen 
Llewellyn, it seemed to me, gave a rather 
overacted and melodramatic version of 
the part of Viola. The part requires a 
good deal of subtlety and finesse. The 
well known lines in which Viola speaks 
of herself in veiled terms: "Like patience 
on a monument, smiling at grief," were 
so miserably rendered that if the wraith 
of Shakespeare were not a very tolerant 
and forgiving ghost, used to rough hand- 
ling he must inevitably have appeared, 
rattling his poor bones and waving his 
cerements, to frighten the audience and 
confound the players. Mr. Frederick 
Sargent was quite inadequate as Orsino. 
He was much too amateurish, and, I'm 
afraid, much too ladylike. The per- 
formance, on the whole was very enjoy- 
able, and the attendance certainly indi- 
cated that, among the students at least. 
interest in the legitimate stage is far 
from being on the decline. 



OUTING CLUB NOTICE 

The Art of Photography is the subject 
of a talk to be presented by Professor 
Frank A. Waugh, at the regular monthly 
meeting of the Outing Club at French 
Hall, Thursday evening, 7:(K) p.m. Prof. 
Waugh is an accomplished photographer 
and knows how to make his subject 
intensely interesting and alive. Several 
important questions will be discussed. 
All members are urged to be present. 



BAND TO GIVE CONCERT 

(Continued from Pafte 1) 
Direct from Campus to Ballroom, the 
Hand will go; there in an atmosphere of 
modern music a real collegiate collection 
of musicians will play for an audience of 
inconceivable numbers. Busses will trans- 
port the band from the campus to Spring- 
field. Facilitations will be arranged at 
the Ballroom in order that the micro- 
phones and other broadcasting para- 
phenalia can be erected. There will be 
outstanding numbers and individualistic 
pieces by members of the band. The most 
unusual feature of the evening will be 
the rendition of a new march "Statonia" 
written and arranged by W. Grant 
Dunham of the class of '34. Many of the 
other pieces have been arranged by 
Dunham in collaboration with Captain 
Sumner. 

Individualistic pieces to be played in- 
clude an accordian solo by James Klar 
who as "Accordian Jim" was extra- 
ordinary at the Bay State Revue. He 
will be accompanied on the piano by 
Robert Noble "<i-i who was also out- 
Continued on Pafte 4) 



The Collegian accepts no responsibility 
opinion! expressed in the communication col 
'tin' column aims to serve as a means ot :-■ 
esprejrioa to student opinion. Any letter will \^ 
printed which does not reflect upon the edi 
Board, or which does not indulge in person < 
Communication! must lie submitted eigne 
though the name need not appear. No conn 
cation of over oOO words will be accepted. 



To the Editor of the Cotltgutni 

The writer knows from experience 
difficulties of conducting the CoUt 

and he knows also the unreasoaabli 

of the protests often offered by hyst. | 
alumni. Nevertheless, there conn s % 
time when forbearance (eases to 1 
virtue; and in the opinion of at least one 
alumnus, that time is here. The Pican 
has been soliciting contributions to 
column. It is hoped that the folio 
contribution, although not to his column, 
will satisfy his solicitations for some time 
to come. 

Our college paper, in the days gone by, 
Offered no insult to the reader's eye. 
Although at times it was a little dull, 
It did at least remain respectable. 
But now we see, in this degenerate age, 
Full many a blot on the Collegian's p 
First came Ye Scribe, beyond all measure 

"dumb," 
But now a duller than Ye Scribe has come. 
The woes of past years why should we 

rehearse? 
Ye Scribe was bad; the Picaroon is woi r> 

The Picaroon, by intellect ungraced, 
Supplies in odor what he lacks in taste; 
And taking pains to make himself uncivil, 
Unceasingly spues forth his sens' 

drivel; 
So that one's led, his nerve so brassy i-. 
To exclaim in wrath, "O Whatana Sei>: 
Unfettered by a sense of what is fit, 
I le sweeps up campus dirt and calls it wit! 
Unchecked by shame, or even modesty, 
I le wears a duncecap for the world to 
Like Bottom, of whom he perhaps has 

read, 
His too great vanity has turned his bead; 
And what he thinks Apollo's laurel crown 
Is but an ass's head set on a clown. 
He does not know the laughter that he 

hears 
Is caused not by his words but by his ears! 

Men are allowed, in our democracy, 
To flaunt their folly for the world to - ■ 
We boast that here — note some of those 

who rule — 
A man is free— to show himself a fool. 
And had the Picaroon the self-respect 
To keep his folly quiet, none would 

object: 
God made him, and it is not ours to scan 
His will, or justify His ways to man; 
But 'tis a pity that He did not stint 
One fool's desire to be a fool in print! 
And when this stains the College's good 

name, 
Weaslr. divided between wrath and shame, 
That the Collegian's second page may not 
Be more disfigured by so dark a blot ; 
Which, offered to its readers to applaud, 
Insults them here, disgraces them abn 
For why should a man's mind be so mis- 
used, 
But that he thinks his rant will be perused! 
Net who of self-respect is void enough 
To admit that he enjoys such rotten stuff? 
And if the outside world should chance 

to heed 
This scum where intellectual maggots 

breed, 
Why should it not think students who 

permit 
Such stuff, as bad as he by whom its 

writ? 



"lis true, no doubt, he does receive some 

praise, 
For donkeys listen when a jackass br.iys- 
And monkeys think themselves of human 

shape 
When a man chatters to them like an ape. 
Also, our colleges breed many such, 
Who in their ignorance think that they 

know much: 
Ready to follow any jesting fool, 
Scoffers by rote, and radicals by rule: 
Abortive Menckenists, who sit and jeer, 
Lacking their master's wit, they ape his 

sneer; 
And hold up decency to vile derision 
Because they see it with distorted * 

Therefore we offer to these perso: 
A chance to see themselves as they app**» 
To others. And here may the Pic 
See himself as he is, a cheap butt 

E. Bar 

Sett— This is not an entry in th 
of the Month contest. 



CLOTHES DRY CLEANSED, PRESSED and REPAIRED 

FOR INSTANT IIRVICI PHONE K 1 1 - \\ 



2 7th YEAR 



L A N DIS 2 7tl, VI AR 



"TWELFTH NIGHT" 

(Continued from I'afte 1) 

The midnight revelry of Sir 
sir Andrew, the (Town, and Maria, 

tinging of the half drunken 

,kers, also, kept the crowd in an 
The latter scene, as weie all the 
II acted with naturalness and 
tv, and the parts were acted 
w ith spirit. The action was extremely 
, lively and seemed to sweep the 
au( jj, n e along with its momentum. The 
tvo n minine roles, Viola and Olivia, 
ere played by Gwen Llewellyn 
aD d Vera French, respe c tively, also re- 
ouch applause. 
It alter curtain applause is any proof 
u \ popularity then Ben Great as the 
I and vain Malvolio was well 
I His supreme vanity finally 
mating in his wearing of orange 
colored stockings and a bright colored 
i laughter and applause. 
An outstanding feature of the Greet 
playera presentation of the play was the 
me simplicity of the stage setting. 
This KtUng was an excellent example ol 
ii„ Greet theory that the stage should 
stimulate and inspire rather than relieve 
the imagination. 

STATE MEETS TRINITY 
(Continued from Page 1) 

I forward! from getting under their basket. 
In tarn the Connecticut forwards will 
bave a difficult task to break up Captain 

| Foley's and Houran's defense. 

As only a few games will be played at 

I borne this season, another capacity crowd 

lil expected. The probable line-up: 

STATE TRINITY 

rl Zujko, If 

I leti In r, c Ouska, c 

iLojko, If (iolino, rf 

Foley, lg Meier, rg 

:, rg Baillick, lg 



You have tried the rest? 

Now try the BEST 
And that's the 

i AMHERST SHOE REPAIRING CO. 

"Goodyear Welt System Employed" 



CHAPEL ADDRESS 

(Continued from Page 1) 

One has only to get a Monday morning 
paper and read the resume of the sermons 

of the previous da) to verify the truth of 
Dr. dates' Statement. To be sure, the 
church has made mistakes, has erred, hut 
the speaker confessed that he was an 
optimist and proceeded to speak en- 

couragiagly of the church. 

If there is one institution the world 
has seen and can be proud of, it is the 
church. It has lasted a long time and 
has dOM a great deal of good. .Ministry 
CM truly be called the greatest of the 
arts. Followers of every art have certain 
materials with which to work, and it is 
the material the clergy works with that 
greatly contributes to its Importance 
namely, humanity. 

Dr. dates nave as his motto, "1) God 
who dids't inspire the hearts of people." 

Instead of asking the amusing questions 
which api>ear on most questionnaires, 

the real question to be asked by a pros- 
pective employer is "Is that girl or that 
boy inspirahle?" 

"Heresy," said Dean Gates, "is the 
most conce ited word in the dictionary, 
and I therefore hesitate to use it." 
People seem to feel that by saying they 
are heretics they are advertising an 
abundance of intelligence. But it doesn't 
take much intelligence to destroy, and 
it takes a lot to construct. 

"The great American heresy in religion 
is casuaintSS," asserted the speaker. It 
is impossible merely to catch at anything 
like calculus, astronomy, or religion. 
Educationally and religiously it is true 
that one cannot get and keep inspirahle 
by casual attendance at church. There 
must be a system to it. 

By iteration we make a path. And 
just so do we make a path in our mind 
over which it becomes increasingly easy 



S. S. HYDE 

Optician and Jeweler 

Ocullat*' Prescriptions Filled. Broken lenie 
accurately replaced 

BIG BEN ALARM CLOCKS and other 

reliable makes 

3 PLEASANT STREET, (up one fllftht) 



FISHER'S 

ANNUAL JANUARY DRESS CLEARANCE SALE 

Extraordinary Quality at Low Prices 
$3.95 to $19.95 



CALENDARS 


AND DIARIES 


One Year Diaries 


Desk Calendars of all kinds 


Five Year Diaries 
Address Books 


Student Budget Books 25c 


Box Files 50c 


Index Box F"iles 


fibre Expanding Envelopes 


with 100 cards and Index 


5c and up 


in black cloth 50c wood 75c 


JAMES A. LOWELL, 


BOOKSELLER 



Now Is The Time - - - 

BACK TO THE PRICES OF SIXTEEN YEARS AGO 

"art, Schaffner & Marx, Michaels Stern and other makers of 
«ne clothes have contributed to the merchandise we are now 
offering at great reductions. 

Suits and Overcoats from our regular stock are now offered at 
- ranging from $19.50 to $40.00. 

F. M. THOMPSON & SON 



\i audi <;ras JANUARY n 

(Continued from Pufte I) 

caught by the modem world and re 
duced to a manifestation "t the existence 
i>i ,i Maroon Key. The day is Friday, 
number twenty-two; the month i> 

January; the hour is between eight and 

midnight; the place is the assembling 
hall of a ^reat memorial building. 

Voices break out as the music stops, 
ami groups gather, there is an interchange 
of partners. The dame continues. Fig- 
ures p.iNS by. There is a tension of joy 
in the air, there is a sound of lose, there 
is the personality of youth, At the end 
of this room of celebration, men in 
black and white make odd motions to 
arouse ami create sounds which effect 
those who move about the floor. The 
Mardi Gnu continues. The chieftains 
who have laboured long to create this 
exotic and unusual scene have gone to a 
city fluiiK far in barbarous places and 
brought back a band. Standing before 
this band, waving a thin stick, is their 
chief who is called Breglio, and so great 
is his fame in the other land that even 
bis tribe is known as Breglio's. Conquer* 
ors of a thousand fantastic pieces, they 
sound like the divine made human. 

All is not joy however, for the tribute 
demanded by these men of the Maroon 
Key is two hundred and fifty red pieces 
of OO ppe r. There is regret and cursing 
because of this tribute lor there in 
those who say it is too nun h. 

More fantastic than the brilliant 
hnugini streamers of the ancient Mardi 
' iras ttyls are the costumes. They are 

created from cloth as ant lent as the 

festival, and their individual colors 
mingle with the drab and each Other t<> 
produce the bizarre, the erratic, and the 

outlandish. Occasionally siranue figures 

leave to pass through an alley into 
another hall where they take unto them 
■elves that which is called "refrcsli- 
iikiiIs." 'There are Others present who 
wear no costume but are dressed in the 

formal clothes of the period. Midnight 
ap pro ac hes and the hour is at hand for 
the culmination of the feast. Strange it 
is for even how many are none and the 
Mardi (iras has ended. 



for the filthy and evil or the pure and 
ideal to go. As we do in education so 
must we in religion keep ourselves 
inspirahle. 



THE NATIONAL SHOE REPAIRING 

21 MAIN STREET 

Between Town Hall and Masonic Building 

MESS' SHOES SOLED and HEELED $1.75 

PULL SOLES and Rl BBEK HEEIS I2.SS 

1 adut Shots SoUd and Hubbtr Heels 11.40 

LADIES SHOES HEELED 40c 

All Work Guaranteed 



College Drugstore 

W. H. McGRATH, Reg. Pharm. 
AMHERST, - MASS. 

VISIT 

BARSELOTTI'S 

All the requirements for the smoker - Pipes, 
Pouches, Smokers Combination 
Ice Cream, Candy, Sandwiches 



EAT 

AT 

BUCK'S 



PATRONIZE 

THE SANDWICH MAN 

R. L. BATES, North Amherst 



WALTER DYER SPEAKS 

Continued from I'.im- 1) 

serious cases, as he arrived in France 
without discovery. Here, m usual, he 
got into difficulties and finally though! ii 

well to return home. 

Again in Hanover, he derided to be' 

come a teacher and so went bach to 
school. He taught school with surprising 
success until he fell in love with a married 

woman in the town where he was living. 

He eras forced to leave then, and once 
more returned to Hanover. 

Never at a loss to find some use for 
his talents, Siepli.m armed himself with 
BWVeral of his lather's old sermons and 

set oil down the valley to become s 
minister, lb- preached once at Ludloa 

and was given a good recommendation 
to Palmer. From there, he went to 
Pelham where he became a well liked ...:d 
trusted pastor until a college friend 
happened along m\<\, (ailing him by the 

name of Bu r ro u g h s, aroused the bus 

pieion of the church. 

leaving Pelham, he was followed by 

Pelhamites and almost captured. How 

ever, he went to Providence, then to 
Attleboro. Going bach to visit some 
friends in I'elhain was his undoinii, for 
he fottttd them in need of someone to 

pass counterfeit money in Springfield 

and volunteered his services. He wis 

caught and lodged in jail there until he 
was r emov ed to s stronger one in North 

aiupton. His attempt to bum down tin- 
place resulted in his shipment to t'astle 
Island. After his n lease from there, 

there are several accounts of his lit*-. 

The most popular is that after teaching 

ill a boy's school in the south, he w.illdeled 



PATRONIZE 



The College Barber Shop 

"M" BUILDING 

M. S. C. 



SANG LUNG hand laundry 

No. 1 Main St. Amherst, Masa. 

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WASHING DONE AT REASONAIII.E 
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Our Laundry First Class 

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TYPEWRITERS 

for Sale and Rent 

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and FLYING PUZZLES 

and also 

mechanical mici: 



Miss Cutler's Gift Shop 



HOGKE1 OPPONENTS 

(Continued from Page I) 

and appear to he ,i t ,s( ,,i„| , |, V) .| |j,„. 

that will be a menat e to opposing foalii s, 
An Brown left a defense position open 
that will probablj be filled by Bob 
Gunneis, who showed up well sgainst 
Conn. Aggies last Monday, As .1 hurt 
defense, Williams «/i|| have 1 hard time 
to push the rubber past Mitchell, The 
probable starting line tips at both teams: 

STATE UN 1 1 wis 

Forest, In rw, Horton 

( Wn, C c, Johnson 

Tikofsld, i« iw, Doughty 

Hammond, rd id, Lisle 

Gunness, Id rd, Rogers 

Mitchell.g K, Thayei 

State spins Sylvester, Snow, Henry, 
Taylor, N.nti, Powell, Dam. I- 

Williams spares Bacon, Chapman, 

llanrahan, Reeves, Yansant, Samniis. 

Stan wood. 

Qolh* Saturday 
Saturday, Cotb) will attempt ton-peat 

its victory of last season against the State 

sextet, on the College pond. As yet 

little is known of the merits ol the Colby 
hockey team. Colby is, however, well- 
known for the Strength of its ice teams 
in the past and all indications point to a 
strong squad this \,.n. t mi It up around 

several tettermeii who played against 
Stat.- 1. ist year. Coach "Red" Mall is 

Confident that the Maroon and White 

will chalk up a will against the Blue and 

White of the Maine team. 



lo land,!, 111. mi,, I, .mil beCOOM a i, 
loi in, ,| m. hi. 



NO THRILLER EVER 
MADE CAN TOUCH IT 




RANKEN5TEIN 

-TOMAN WHO MADIA MONSTER 



Friday, Jan. 15 

Walter Huston - Loretta Young 

in "THK RULING VOICK" 



Sa t urday, Jan. 16 2 Fe a t u r es 

Marilyn Miller 
in "HEX MAJESTY LOVE*' 
— co-feature 

Frames Dee in "Nice Women" 
Laurel and Hardy Comedy 



MON. 
TUBS, 

January 

18-19 



WALLAd IIKKRY 
CLARK GAgCI 

In 

"HELL DIVERS" 

wHli DOROTHY JORDAN 



START THIS TERM RIGHT 
BY HATING REGULARLY 



at 



Sarris Bros. Candy Kitchen Restaurant Inc. 



SALE 
20% Mark-Down on all Suits, Overcoats, Topcoats and Shoes. Sale now on. 

E. M. SWITZER, JR., Inc. 






AiBriVS OaD 



U. A. C. Library. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 13, 1932 



HICKEY-FREEMAN SUITS 

To the man who wants a suit that will wear exceptionally long, even under the hardest abuse, 

we recommend Travelwear, customized by II ickey- Freeman. 

THOMAS F. WALSH 



ARMS PARLEY THIS WEEK-END 

Continued from I'afte I) 

assistant minister for two years, and tlM 
had wide experience in leading dis- 
cussion groups both here and abroad. 

Ill- is now working on the National 

Council on Religion in Higher Education. 
There will be opportunity for every one 

to tr>t liis opinions and tliose ot his 
fallow students in the melt inn-pot of 
group discussion. May the best man win! 
After the session on Saturday evening 
there will he an informal "vie" party in 
the Memorial Building, Carl Clancy has 

charge of the arrangement!; so it ought 
to he good. Come, bring your friends, 
and don't forget May the hest man win! 

The program: 
Chairman, Mr. Thornton Meriam 
Friday, Jan. 15, 7.:t() p.m. 

Previous Kfforts to Disarm I'rof. Mackimmie 
Why I Favor Disarmament Mr. J. Ii. Mathews 
Why I Opixise Disarmament Colonel Carleton 
Question* ami Discussion 
Saturday. Jan. Hi 
StOO p.m. 

1. Discussions: Do the KelloMj Pact, World 

Court, and the LeaKUe of Nation* offer 
effective substitutes for armaments? 
Factual statement: I'rof. Mackimmie 

2. Debate: Resolved: That Compulsory 

R.O.T.C. Ik: abolished at Land (Irani 
Colleges. 

Affirmative, Joseph Politella 
Negative. D-onard Salter 
Kibuttals from the tloor 
7:30 p.m. 

Why I am a Militarist Colonel Carleton 

Why I am a 1'acirist 1'iolessor Harlow 

Social DaiuiiiK in the Memorial Hall. 
Sunday, Jan. 17. l»:0u a.m., Bowker Auditoiium 
Closing Address, Reinhold Niebuhr 



power to a 112 lead at the close of the 
fust period. Each team had the attitude 

ol not taking the other very seriously, 

although the Massachusetts score does 

not corroborate this statement. At any 
rate Fletcher thrilled the spectators with 
two smooth follow ins made possihle by 
long, flexible arms, while Hush, llouran 
and l.ojko contributed two points each. 
Captain 1 >c I'asqua of the Purple, snared 
his team's only score in this period when 
he stood just short of the middle of the 
floor and swished the net with a fine, 
arching shot. 

The ten minutes following the hegin- 
ning of the second half saw the complete 
domination of the Amherst hasketeers 
over the State Pilgrims who vainly 
attempted to stem the tide which threat- 
ened to engulf the State quintet. In 
these few minutes, Gregg, Reynolds, 
Van Nostrand and Merchant ran up ten 
points hctween them to give their club 
a one-point lead. Then Fletcher entered 
the contest replacing Fawcett at center 
and proceeded to swing the count to the 
opposite side for he dropped two baskets 
from the floor through the rim to add 
to Bush's tally and to complete the score. 



The summary: 



Amherst 



STATE TROUNCES AMHERST 

(Continued from Page 1) 
of the student body accompanied hy the 
Lilliputian shrills of the fair co-eds, 
advanced with overwhelming scoring 



Mass. State 

ii. F. P. B 9. V. 

Lojko, If 10 2 Mills, rg 

Stewart. If Warner, rg 

Bush, rf 12 4 DePasqua, lg 1 2 

Ahlstrom, rf Gregg, c 12 4 

Fletcher, c 4 19 Neilson. c 

Kawcett.c Huff, rf 

Foley, lg Merchant, rf 1 1 

llouran. rg 1 2 G. Rcyn'ds.lf 1 1 :i 

J.Reynolds, rg V'N'trand, If 2 2 



7 3 17 



3 C IS 



Referee- -Feldman. Umpire — Roberts. Time 
20-iiunute periods. 




Thomas S. ghilds 

Incorporated 
SMART SHOES and HOSIERY for COLLEGE MEN and WOMEN 

QUALITY MERCHANDISE PRICES TO SUIT 

275 High Street, Holyoke 

Largest Shoe Store in! Western Massachusetts ' 



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19 PLEASANT ST. 

Men's Furnishings - Shoes repaired, called for and delivered 

Freshmen, come in and see our selection of shoes, priced moderately. 

Special sale now on leather coats, just what you need for cold weather 

CALL 984-M 



ENGLISH SINGERS ON PROGRAM 

(Continued from Page 1) 

setting will present the Singers as an 

Elizabethan after dinner group, seated 

at a table with madrigal books before 

them. 

In the days of which the English 
Singers sing, the standard requirement of 
the lady and gentleman was the ability 
to sing. In the "Compleat ( ieiitleiiian," 
a contemporary book on etiquette, is 
contained this enlightening statement, 
"I desire no more in you than you sing 
your part sure at first sight; withal, to 
play the same upon your Viol, or the 
exercise of the Lute, privately to your- 
self." Thomas Morley's "Plaine and 
Easie Introduction to Practical Musicke," 
is also significant upon this point: "Supper 
being ended, and Musicke books being 
brought to the tables, the mistress of the 
house presented me with a part, earnestly 
retptesting me to sing. Hut when, after 
many excuses, I protested unfeigned/ 
that I could not, everyone began to 
wonder. Yea, some whispered to others, 
demanding how I was brought up." 

The troupe consists of Flora Mann, 
Nellie Carson, Lillian Berger, Norman 
Stone, Norman Notley, and Cuthl>ert 
Kelly. Mr. Kelly will make explanatory 
remarks concerning each of the pieces 
sung. The program follows: 

Motets 

Praise our Lord 

Ave verum William Byrd (1543 16 88) 

Ilosanna to the Son of David 

Thomas Weelkes (1575-162.5) 
Ballet and MssMssll 
Sing we and chant it 

Thomas Morley (1558-1603) 

softly singing lute 

Fran.is Pilkington (c. 1562-1638) 

Though Amaryllis dance 

Wiliam Byrd (1543-1623) 
Folk-Songs 

The Dark-Kyed Sailor 

The Turtle-Dove 

Wassail Song 
Italian Strcct-Ciics 

Chimney Sweeps Jacques du Pont (circa 1600) 

Rag and Bone Adriano Banchieri (c. 1066-1634) 

Hot Chestnuts Jacques du Pont (circa Hi'MD 
Duets and Trio 

1 spy (Vila Henry I'urcell (1658-16'.)..) 
John, come kiss me now (16th century) 

Arr. hy K. W. Navlnr 
The Three Fairies Henry Purcell (1658-1695) 
Ballet. Madrigals, and Canzonet 
Wiliome, sweet pleasure 

Thomas Weelkes (1576-1689) 
The Silver Swan Orlando GttbSWJ ( 1.583-1 6:2. '.i 
I go before, my darling 

Thomas Morley ( 1 .">. .S- 1 603 ) 
My l'liyllis bids me 

Thomas Weelkes (1575-1633) 



M. S. C. MEN'S MOTTO IS ALWAYS 
LET "DAVE" DO IT 

AMHERST CLEANSERS, DYERS 
and LAUNDERERS 



PHONE 828 



Near the Town Hall 



PHONE 82S 



WHY OVER-PAY ON YOUR DRY CLEANING? 
We will dry-clean and press your suit or topcoat for $1.00 

We call and deliver jree daily 
Phone 635 SWISS CLEANSERS & DYERS Phone 635 1 



Over First National Store 



DESK CALENDARS 

25c to $1.00 



FINE WRITING PAPER 

72 Sheets 6 9 C 50 Envelopes 



FOR OUTDOOR ENTHUSIASTS AND HIKERS 

Ski I. overs will find our Lin* of Ski Coats, Ski Suits, Most Reasonable 

** COLODNY CLOTHING COMPANY 

32 MAIN ST. (AVnr Depot) NORTHAMPTON 

Also, Riding Outfits for Men and Women! 

Sweaters, \\ o>l 1 1< so, Leather Coats, Ski Pants! 

Carfare Paid to all Students on Purchases of S10.00 or over 



Everything in Hardware 
and Radio Equipment 

ATWATER-KENT 



AND 



MAJESTIC RADIO 



THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 

THE WINCHESTER SI ORE 



A. J. HASTINGS "TESSST' AMHERST, MASS.| 

SPECIAL FOR THIS WEEK — GOTHAM GOLD STRIPE HOSIERY 
Chiffon 8 8c pair Service 

JACKSON & CUTLER ! 

AMHERST, MASS. 

BIG 

JANUARY SALE 

Men's Bostonian Oxfords - Bass Moccasins 

Women's Oxfords - Dress Pumps 

Hosiery 

BOLLES SHOE STORE 



Arranged by 
R. Vaughan Williams 



STUDENTS DEBATE IN CHAPEL 

(Continued from Pafte 1) 

This is intended to be a brief peroral ion 
of the series of debates that comprise 

the Arms Parley Conference, coming 
this Friday evening, Saturday afternoon 
and evening. Much the same material, 
in the form of a debate, will l>e given by 

the same men at one debate of the 

Conference Saturday afternoon <>n the 

exposition. Resolved: That conipulsorv 
military training should be abolished in 
all the land gram coHeges of the United 

Slates. 

BAND TO GIVE CONCERT 

Continued from Pafte 2) 

standing at the Revue. Noble will also 
accompany George Hartwell '">."> who 
piays a xylophone solo, a characteristic 

piece entitled "Klappcrctte." 

Captain Sumner has labored assidous 
ly and diligently to develop this Hand to 
a st .t • equal to any of the other college 
Hands, in it* entity the program to \>-- 

played constitutes .1 well balanced li.-t 

of marches, so!os, and songs of the State 
College. Tin re are also included numbers 
by a saxophone sextet whose numbers 

have been arranged by Dunham. 

The program follows: 

Victory Man h of Mm— i liu-rtts State College 

Batei 

Hulit On to \ i. inry ( ,: 

Jolly Student | ( hapman 

Fight, Massachusetts' Sumner 

Mail Purdue D Heated to Coach Melvta Taube 
When Twilight Shadow! Deepen Griggs 

A Night in I Serenade 

Stan and Stripei Forever s>u-,i 

Ma-- 11 in i -< n- State March Sumner 

Piano Solo Robert Noble :U 

Xylophone Solo George Hartwell :t."> 

AiTOtcli.ui Solo James Klar 83 

SOMofOM Maanchuaetti Knight 



Semi Annual Cash Sale 

at 

BOLTER'S 

When you want something different than you rind 
at the ordinary run of clothing stores — merchandise 
not sold on every corner — then drop in at Holter's- 
the shop where quality and exclusiveness is our yard- 
stick-^yet the same popular prices. 



$23.75 

wre $30.00 

POLO COATS 

S28.75 



SUITS 

$28.75 
were $36.00 



$38.75 

W*rs $50.00 



wert SJ0.0G 



HOSE 

4 pairs for $1.00 
2 pairs for $1.00 
Imported Hose 95c 



CAMEL HAIR COATS 

$38.75 
wen $55.00 



ALL FUR FELT HATS 

$3.45 wert v i 

SHIRTS 

Broadcloth $1.55 two for S3.00 
Oxford or Broadcloth 

$1.35 - 3 for $4.00 
Tab collar shirts $1.65 



WOVEN MADRAS PAJAMAS 

$1.55 each two for $3.00 

OVERCOATS 

$23.75 $33.75 $38.75 

wen $90.00 wen I \0J00 wen -$50.00 

CHESTERFIELDS 

$33.75 $38.75 

wen $40j00 wen $50.00 

All $10.00 SHOES Now $7.95 
A few discontinued styles now $5.95 

TIES TIES 

55c 2 for SI. 00 95c 

CARL. H. BOLTER 

INCORPORATED 



®fj? iHaaaarljirfifitfi fflnllrmatt 



Vol. XLII 



AMHERST, MASS., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 20, 1932 



Number 13 



Students, Professors and 

Visitors Attend Parley 



Well Planned Program Arouses In- 
tense Interest in Arms Parley 
Held Last Week-end 



\ttcr an outlining l>y Professor Mac- 
kimmie of previous attempt! toward dis- 
armament, J. B. Matthews, Executive 
Director of the Fellowship of Recon- 
ciliation, spoke in favor of disarmament 

it the Anns Parity here last Fridav 
evening. Mr- Matthews pointed out 
that some of the forces usually found to 

favor armaments are habit, vested in- 
terests, and the press. He objected to 

armaments mainly on the grounds that 
armaments jeopardize orderly social 
change, the peace mechanisms built Up 

in the post-war world, and the security 

. air standards of living. Colonel 

( arleton, speaking in favor of armaments 

(Continued on Page 4) 



MASS. STATE OVERTOPS 
CONN. AGGIE SATURDAY 



I irst (iame Away Won by Kllertmen 
13 to 19, in Neighboring State 



Defeating Connecticut Aggies at Storrs 
last Saturday, the Massachusetts State 
College basketball team won their third 

straight game of the se ason . Led l>y 

Lojko and Hush, the Maroon and White 

rolled up 33 points while holding the 
i onnecticut team to seven tloor goals and 

ii.i successful free throws. Contrary to 
the procedure Of last season the State 

quintet l>'d by a comfortable margin at 

tin end ol the first half and their lead 
was never in danger throughout the game. 
A marked improvement was shown in 
the number Of long shots that were <aged 
|i\ the wearers of Maroon and White 
ami in the fact lh.it very few thfOWS 
(Continued on I- age 2) 

Symphonie Francaise 

Enjoyed by Audience 

Group from Boston Symphony Or- 
chestra Oives (Concert Last Sunday 



I )( lighting those who understand the 
musical interpretation of life, I. a Sym- 
phonic Francaise played before i rather 
large audience at a Social Union Concert 
Sunday afternoon in Bowker Auditorium. 

I. a Symphonie Francaise is connected 
with the Boston Symphony Orchestra, 
attd is composed of a group of musicians 
who are all of the French nationality. 
I here are thirty-five member s of the 
"H Symphony who are French and 
the majority of them have received first 
prize in the Conservatoire de Paris. 
\ musician in La Symphonie Fran- 
has received such a reward of merit 
from this school which is thought to be 
the best and the most famous in the 
•odd. M. Abdon Laus was the con 
dm tor of the group. 

Balanced, appropriate, and pleasing, 

numbers of the program were all of 

the , lassieal or semi-classical conception. 

Many of the pieces were descriptive, 

sti' h as the Marriage of Figaro by Mozart, 

•nd the Valse Triste by Chopin. These 

pieces contain within themselves musical 

"lis of the forces of life which were 

Bid by the composers and trans- 

' <1 into song. The philosophies of 

authors are to be found in their 

•wks. Impression Exotic, a fantastic 

by Mouton included two numbers 

h were reir.inescent of the Orient. 

A feature of the afternoon was a violin 

Mr. Lauga. 



FOOTBALL AND SOCCER MEN 

RECEIVE GOLD TROPHIES 



All lett.rmen, and the coaches of both 

cer and football teams received 

1 trophies recently as the result of 

' ' played seasons. In presenting the 

r balls to the "hooters," 

or Curry S. Hicks made it dear, 
' •' r. that no precedent for future 
»ae being established. 



SUNDAY CHAPEL TALK 
BY REINHOLD NIEBUHR 

Well Known Professor from I'nion 

Theological Seminary Discusses 

Armaments 



In view of the Arms Parley held on 

campus over the week end, "Peace and 
Disarmament" was the subject of Rev, 

Reinhold Niebuhr of I'nion Theological 
Seminary, in his Sunday morning chapel 
address of January 17. 

He first read from the bible one ot 
the oldest prophecies of world peace, and 
spoke of the time when the lion and the 
lamb shall lie down together. But before 
these tWO can lie down together, nature 

must be changed, he said. 

Man is quite like the lion that devoun 
the lamb, only man keeps on devouring 
alter every legitimate demand is satis 
tied, whereas the lion knows when to 
stop. Hut while man is gorging, be dreamt 
of the day when pc.ee shall come, and 
this dream of peace exalts him. 

before these dreams shall be fulfilled, 
three problems must be answered. First, 
we face a psychological problem. The 

world is still a chaotic community pro- 
ducing more and more war. Everyone 
is carrying a gun, but BO one is satisfied 
with that one gun. Just as soon as one 

man suspects another is carrying two 

guns, he must have tWO or even three 
(Continued on Page 4) 

CONN. AGGIE PUCKMEN 
ROUTED BY 17-0 SCORE 



Cain Leads Scoring Rampage with 
Five Coals 



Rolling up the good score of seventeen 

points, the Massachusetts State v ar sity 
hockey team started the season right b) 

shutting out the Connecticut Aggie 

sextet on the former's rink. The home 
team started the scoring when (.unins 
unassisted, shot the puck across the 
Connecticut goal after only three minutes 

of play. Captain F ores t and Cam also 

scored during the first period. 

During the second period, the state 

sextet pushed the rubber SCrOSS six more 
times with "Sugar" Cain leading the 
scoring with two goals to his credit. 
During the last part of the game, Coach 

Hall sent in sev era l of the reserves who 

weie able to continue to push the scon- 
upward. The second forward line, con- 
sisting of Snow. Sylvester, and Henry 
was used and they worked together well. 
The State sextet displayed some good 
teamwork, fourteen of the seventeen 
goals being the results of assists. 

Mitchell, the State goalie, was called 
ujion to make only about five stops in 
comparison to about twenty stops for 
the Conn. Aggie's goalie. Cain, with five 
goals to his credit, Capt. Herb Forest, 
and Snow stood out on the offense; 
while Dick Hammond was outstanding 
(Continued on Page 2) 

PROF. HARLOW CITES LACK 
OF STUDENT INTEREST 

IN WORLD AFFAIRS 



Speaking to the students on the 
matter of disarmament, Professor Ralph 
Harlow of the department of religion of 
Smith College explained and illustrated 
his attitude toward the entire matter. 
Drawing upon a story of the woman who 
interrupter! his speech wherein he advo- 
cated that Germany was not entirely 
guilty of the War, he explained that her 
(Kjsition was akin to that of many others. 
She stood up in one of his lectures and 
proclaimed that she considered Germany 
entirely guilty of the War. She had read 
nothing of the literature on the War. 
This attitude of ignorance is character- 
istic of many opinions held concerning 

disarmament. 

Professor Harlow's speech was very 
well received for it was dotted with 
amusing anecdotes. 



HAND TO BROADCAST 

PIUS WEF.K 

Statonia, the new state march, 
written and arranged by (.rant 
Dunham "34, will be heard for the 
ftrsl time over the ail when the State 

College Hand broadcasts ar earl) 
evening concert of march music over 

the WBZ network at Springfield this 
Thursday at 6.18 to 6.4fi p.m. Out 

standing members of the recent Baj 

State Revue will also be heard. The 
accordian-piano twins of James Klar 
' :.! and Robert Noble ',14 and a few 

selections on the sytophonc by ( ieorge 

Hart wall '.».") will feature this part of 

the broadcast. Under the direction of 

Captain Sumnci the present State 

College Band has developed into one 

of the best in the history of the school. 
Captain Sumner wrote "Fight MaSM 

chusetts" which has become a part of 

the repertoire ot the United Stales 
Anns Hand; this selection is also 
included on the program. The broad 
< ast is to be from Cook's HllttellK 
Ballroom where broadcasting appa- 
ratus will be installed. OttCC again, 
the date is this Thursday, the time is 

6.15 to 6.45 p. m.; tune in during 
the supper hour. I lere is the program: 

\ i v \t.it. h c.i Maani buettti State College 

Bate*. 
I- Ight i >n n> \ i. lory i rrisssl 

i Jolly Student* Chapmaaj 

Plant, m waw iin siniiiirt 

Hail Purdue 

Dedicated to < oacn MiKin Taube 
When Twilight S ha d o w Deasm <.nuus| 

A Nlulll ill JttaC Sen II. nli- 

ui'i Sti ii"- • Porevee Souse 

MaeeachiMetti State Match Busmm 

Piano Solo Robert Noble 84 
Xylophone Solo Gaorae HartweU 3o| 

\. i in. ii. in s«iii. Janee klar H 

SoneofOU afasswhseetta Knighl 

IStat .i Dunham 



Norn ilt'a iSjisturtj 

I AST VI \K 

Winter carnival weekend. 

FIVE YEARS AGO 

Alumni offer price of one hundred 

dollars for the best college marching 

song submitted by undergraduate. 
IN 1010 
Hoard raised from $.'5.7") to f4.00 
pet week in college dining hall CSU0CI 
investigation by students. 



MARDl GRAS TO 
BE HELD FRIDAY 



Maroon Key's Formal Party Promises 
to Be a Cala Affair 



Friday evening the Mardi Cras is to 
lie held in the Memorial Huilding from 
eight o'clock until twelve o'clock. This 
is the fifth annual Mardi Cras, and is to 
be costume or formal, as has been the 
custom in years past. 

Vincent Breglio'l i>opular night club 
orchestra from Springfield will furnish 
(Continued on Page 4) 



CAMPUS CALKMMR 



"Armaments never cause war." 

— Colonel Carlelun 
"War is the greatest lie there is." 

— Professor Harlow 



Wednesday, January 30 

8.00 p. m. Ottawa* Rehearsal, I tf l WSM 
Auditorium 
Thursday, January 21 

6.15 p. m. Band broadcast from WBZ 

Springfield 
7. lap. m. Press Club, Walter T. Bonney 
31, Springfield I'nion, Draper Hall 
Friday, January 22 

Varsity ll<>< hey, '.'.of N. H., Durham. N'.H. 
7. '(op. m. Liberal Clan, Dr. Caaea, ' 

State Co Heae , Memorial KuildinK 
8-12 p .m. Mardi GfaS, Memorial Buildinu 
Saturday. January 2.) 

Vanity Hoi hey, Batee at Lewi-aon 
Sunday, January 24 

B.lOe in. Sunday Chanel. J. Paulding 
Moody. President Middiebury CoHtei 
3.00 J. in. K.idio rants It, X. V. Symphony 
Orchestra, Memorial Building 
Tuesday, January 26 

Language and Literature Talk, Bowker 

Auditorium 
Chorus, Memorial Building 



Trustees Vote Important 

Questions at Last Meeting 



BASKETEERS DEFEAT 

TRINITY BY 22-15 



IWisb Leads Team in Scoring and 
IMay for Second Win 

In what we mav call the next to the 
dullest game thus far in the unfolding 
of the basketball season, the Mass. 
State Pilgrims successfully nudged out of 
the winning column a i.ither middle i lass 
Irinitv College quintet by pinning a 
22-10 defeat to the visitors Irom the 
Nutmeg state. Ahout the only occasions 
when the student body exerted itsel! 
enough to muster up a half -hearted cheer 
were when the opposing players were 
called Irom the tloor to make place for 

the various substitutes. Mush led the 

State scorers, not only in the numliei 
ot pobltS tailied, which were nine, hut 
also in sheer brilliance of plav. I letcher, 
the home clul.'s uilv center, shared with 
lojko, the Massachusetts lelt loiward. 
second honors with live points each. 
Goltno, who played extremely well lor 
the Trinity quintet) snared si\ points for 
his team liv sinking three tosses from 
the floor to count. 

In the hist minute ol the opening half, 
Kenncy sroied the initial point for 
Trinity when hi' tossed in a loul shot. 

llouran immediately matched the shot 

by a foul throw, and then Stale went 

into the lead when "I. on" Hush dribbled 

(Continued on Page 4) 

SWIMMING CONTEST IS 
NOW BEING CONDUCTED 

Coadi Rogers Has Arranged Kx ten- 
sive Program of Diving 
and Swimming 



"Joe" Rogers, the College swimming 
instructor, has started a thousand point 
swimming contest for the college men 
Anxious to have a large nuinher turn out 
in order that the contes t may he inter- 
esting, he has arranged a varied program 
that will test the skill of the aquatic 
performers. This contest is made up of 
ten events, one coming each week. The 
first event, the dives, took place; last 
week; but if anyone wishes to enter Un- 
contest now, he may make up for lost 
time. The events are to he traded in 
much the same way as those in swimming 

contests held in other places. "A frac- 
tion of a point counts as a full point in 

any event. Dives are to he marked on 
a basil of ten each and then multiplied 
by the diver's difficulty," which in case 
he makes a P erfe ct dive, is four. The 
(lashes are to he graded according to the 
time of the swimmer. 

The schedule of the events in the 
thousand points swimming contest for 
men is as follows: 
Jan. 10*16 Dives ffront, back, 

front-jack, back-jack) 
Jan. 17-2.'* 25 yard dash (free style) 

Jan. 21 .in 25 yard dash (bat ki 

Jan. 81-Feb. 6 25 yard (breast) 
Feb. 7-13 60 yard dash (free style) 

Feb. 14-20 60 yard dash (back) 

Feb. 21-27 .7) yard dash breast; 

Feb. 28-Mar. 5 75 yard dash (free style; 
Mar. 6-12 75 yard dash (medley) 

Mar. 13-19 100 yd. dash (free style; 



Summer School to lie Omitted; 
New Dormitories Wanted; and 
Compulsory Military I' a sored 

With a twenty pel cent increase in 

student enrollment, and the prospect of 
a decrease in the state sppropriations, 
the Trustees ot the Massachusetts' state 

College voted to omit the summit school 
session this year, at theii annual meeting 
held in tin- Stale House on Januais 13, 
To meet the deplorable housing condi- 
tions at the College the Hoard voted to 

request legislative appropriations lor the 

Construction Of a women's and a men's 

dormitory in ordei to provide accommo- 
dations lor freshmen students. Final 
action in reference to a petition ol 276 

students that all courses in military 

silence and tactics should be made 

(Continued on Page i) 

DEBATERS PLAN FOR 
EXTENSIVE SCHEDULE 

Many Appearances Away lake 
Students Over Several Slates 

An extensive schedule, involving en- 
gagements with teams in Mas „i< luisel I s, 

New York, Pennsylvania, sod Delaware 

has been ananged for the State College 
debating team, according to the plans 

announced bj captain-manage! Leonard 

A. Salter, Jr. A southern trip, calling 
lor meetings with New York I nivci sit y, 
eithei the College of the ( "its ol New 

York or Lehigh University, Franklin and 
Marshall College, ami the University ot 

Delaware, will be taken dining the 
Mali Ii V ai at ion. 

\ilivities tin the season will begin on 

Tuesday) February 9, when the Masaa* 

i hilsetts lean -els the Spriiigheld 

College debaters before an assembly <>t 

(Continued on Page gj 

Hockey Team to Play 
Two Games This Week 



CHAPEL SPEAKER 

CRITICIZES COMPULSORY 

CHAPEL ATTENDANCE 



Seldom has a sjieaker woven such 
interest and appeal into a morning chapel 
address as did Mr. James Charland, 
Scottish redigious director at Amherst 
College. His topic was religion and 
athletics at the American College, and 
he compared the local institutions with 
those which he had attended in the 
British Isles, lirst he spoke rpjite at 
length on the lark of the amateur spirit 
both in the players and in the spectators 
which pervades the local campuses and 
probably those of the nation. He brought 
(Continued on Page 2) 



Strenuous Schedule Includes Tilts 
witb U. of V II. and bates 

The Massacluiset I s State ( 'ollege lux key 
team will meet two Op p o nents this week 

away from home. On Friday, the Maroon 
and White will encounter the "Wildcats" 

ot University ot New Hampshire at 
Durham and on the following day will 
oppose the Mates "Bobcats" at l.ewiston. 
Lack ol lie has prevented the Stat,- i, e 
team from meeting nnv strong opponents 
as yet, so that the merits of the hockey 
■quad are still unknown. Coach "Ked" 
ball is in hopes that the weather will 
turn colder so that he can put his charges 
into condition to play two hard games 
on sin i ceding days. 

Hates defeated last year's strong State 
sextet in one ol the first games of the 
1931 season and will try to repeal this 
time. Many will recall the exciting game 

last year between tin- State College and 
the University of New Hampshire ice 
teams and there is no doubt that the 

Massachusetts packmen will have a 

difficult task in repeating its l'*.'U vic- 
tory. N everthe less it is eapei ted that 

the Maroon and White will bring the 
pelts of a "bobcat" and a "Wildcat" as 
tokens of two vi< tories. 



LACK OF ICE 

NECESSITATES POSH'ONINC 

OF TWO HOCKEY GAMES] 

Warm weather has forced the cancel- 
lation of the varsity lux key game with 

Williams. Coach ball has announced 

that no definite date has lieen <|e< ided 

upon lor the game ami it is questionable 

Whether or not the game tali be played 
ill the future. The Colbv game which 
was to have been played at State has 
been postponed I nless i old weather 
sets in the lux key team will have several 
games to work in with the regular ■ hed- 

ule if the game, i .,n |„- arranged al all. 









THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 20, 1932 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 20, 1932 



Zbe fliassacbusette Collegian 



Official newspaper of 



the Massachusetts State College. 
Wednesday by the students. 

BOARD OF EDITORS 



Published every 



Wallace W. Stuart 
Managing Editor 



Campus 



Frank L. Springer '32 
Editor-in-Chief 
32 Oscar Margolin 32 Rial S. Potter. .1r. 3^ 

Associate Editors 



DEPARTMENT EDITORS 



Editorial 
Frank L. Springer .32 



impm 

Edmond Nash "33 W. Raymond Ward '.'« 

Alfrbda L. Ordway '33 

Ruth D. Camphbi l "il 

Harrietts M. Jackson '34 

Joseph Politella '34 

Raymond Royal '34 Mary L. Allen '3.5 



Athletic 

William H. Wear 

Eugene Guralnick 

Stanly F. Seierski "M 

John P. Colman 16 

Silas Little, Jr.. '30 



'32 
•33 



Feature' 

Oscar Margolin '32 David L. Arbndbrg '35 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT 

Eric H. Wbtterlow Jr. '32 
Business Manager 



Kenneth E. Hodge ,'32 
Advertising Manager 

Ashley B. Gurnby '33 



Business Assistants 



William A. Johnson '32 
Circulation Manager 

Philip H. Leverault '33 



Subscriptions <2.00 per year. Single copies 10 cents. 



Make all orders payable to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In case of change of address, subscriber will please notify the business manager 
as soon as possible. 

Alumni and undergraduate contributions are sincerely encouraged. Any com 
munications or notices must be received by the editor-in-chief on or before Monday 
evening. 



Entered as second-class matter at the Amherst Post Office. Accepted for mailing at special rate of 
postage provided for In Section 1103. Act of October. 1917. authorised August 20, 1918. 



Stye IJttarflfln 

Professor: 

Would you young gentlemen mind 
waking up? The bell »/Ul ring in a 
moment, and you're liable to be late for 
your next class. Thank you. Now, tan 
anyone in this audience tell me what is 
the meaning of u posteriori judgment? 
All right,— the little chap with the ear 
muffs. 

Picaroon (shyly): Pleathe, thir, I 
think it mutht be a thwift kick in the 
pantth. 

Another book which the Picaroon 
recommends to those in search of good 
entertainment, and those afflicted with 
dropsical or scrofulous swelling of the 
self-esteem, is Tristram Shandy. Allow 
me to fill a little space with a quotation: 

". . . Pray reach me my fool's cap — I 
fear you sit upon it, Madam — 'tis under 
the cushion, — I'll put it on — 

Bless me! you have had it upon your 
head this half hour- There then let it 
stay, with a 

Fa-ra diddle di 

and a fa-ri didle d 

and a high-dum — dye-dum 

fiddle-dumb-c. 

And now, Madam, we may venture, 
I hope, a little to go on." 

Tristram Shandy 




INDEX PHOTOGRAPHS 

All group photographs for the 1933 
Index will be taken this coming Saturday 
afternoon and Sunday, January 23 and 
24. Any groups not in last year's Index 
must notify Robert llornbaker immedi- 
ately if they wish to be photographed. 

Individual sittings will be taken Satur- 
day afternoon directly after lunch. 

Schedules will be posted on Stockbridge 
and South College bulletin boards. 



LIBERAL CLUB 

Liberal Club meeting Friday evening 
January 22. Transportation will be 
furnished from the Memorial Building. 
Members will meet at the Memorial 
Building at 7.30 p. m. Professor Cance, 
of the economics department, will speak 
on Russia. 



Slowly, one by one, in the infinite 
meadows of this campus, the parking 
areas are being removed. Ain't nature 
grand? 



OUR RELIGIOUS SCRUPLES 

We have been reminded by the Trustees that it has been the privilege of the men I 
students of the two lower classes for the past few years to be excused from compulsory | Oear Ma: 
military training on the ground that their religious beliefs condemn military training 
in the college. To our knowledge this privilege has not been explained in a satis, 
factory manner to the freshmen. When the ruling was made, we were under the 
impression that it was suited only to certain individual cases, that is, to Quakers, 
who are noted for their outstanding pacifistic ideals. 

The great majority of freshmen cannot class themselves as Quakers, yet we feel 
sure that many condemn the practice of making military training compulsory at 
the State College. Once in a generation of students comes one who has back-bone 
enough, sufficient determination, anil extraortlinary presence of mind to know the 
ethical standards to which he adheres and to make a decided stand for what he 
believes to be right. Such a case occurred three years ago. This student, after 
standing by his beliefs with much tenacity, secured the support of the administra- 
tion of the college ami also the board of trustees. Hence he was not required to 
participate in the military training as offered at the college. 

Now with the average freshman who has not acquired such firm convictions, but 
yet feels that compulsory military training is not in accord with what he believes to 
be right, we have another picture. Like most freshmen he has an inferiority complex 
antl is backward in airing his opinions, especially to the administration. He has 
military training thrust upon him, is given to untlerstantl that he is expected to 
enroll as a cadet, and that he has no say in the matter whatsoever. Such an errone- 
ous state of affairs should be corrected immediately and the men of the class of 1986 
should have the advantages antl disadvantages of military training explained to 
them during Freshman Week. It should be stressed to them that if they sincerely 
believe that military training is not in keeping with their ideas of what is right, 
ethical, antl moral, they are at liberty to elect certain work in physical education in 
place of military training. 

It seems to us, however, that as long as the trustees went so far as to rule that 
students may be exempt from military training if their religious convictions so dic- 
tate, it would have been just as well to have made military training elective and 
hence have avoided much red tape. 

It will also be interesting to note the increase in Quakerism on this campus if such 
beliefs become the only medium of relief. 



LETTERS OF A FRESHMAN 

October — , '31 



I got your last letter and package. I 
wish you could send more to eat. I know 
we get plenty at the hash-house but, 
tlarn it, the supply of calories kinda runs 
out on us between meals. I hope Pop 
can send a check next time. I got books 
to buy and a position to keep up here. 
You tlon't know how many things I 
have to pass up. I couldn't join the 
Outing Club and I'll bet you'll ask me 
why I don't improve myself up here. 
Don't worry about my playing football. 
I couldn't get hurt because the coach 
keeps me on the bench. 

Your loving son, 
Joseph Theodore Phrosch, Jr. 

P.S. Tell Dad to have the car tuned 
up and filled with gas because I'll be 
home Thanksgiving and I'll need it to 
visit all the people that helped send me 
here. 

AFTER THE ARMS PARLEY 



FERNALD CLUB 

The Fernald Entomological Club will 
hold its January meeting in Fernald 
Hall, Room K, on Thursday, January 21, 
at 7.30 p. m. The subject of the talk 
will be "Entomological Experiences" by 
A. F. Burgess of the Gypsy Moth Labo- 
ratory in Greenfield, Mass. 



STOCKBRIDGE 



The following students have pledged 
Kolony Klub: John Mat Donald, 1 
Simmons, Manuel Yeiga, Henry Merrill, 
Charles Bonnemort, John Hamel, All 
Hill, Richard Waring, Lowell Eastnia;;, 
Harold Hokanson, Leo Murphy, Clu 
Oehme. 



The Stockbridge Agronomy Club will 
hold its opening meeting of the year on 
Wednesday evening, January 20, in 
Room 203, Stockbridge Hall, at 7 p. m. 

The guest speaker, Director F. J. 
Sievers of the College Experiment Station, 
will address the club on agriculture in 
Washington State. Mr. Sievers' addn h 
will be supplemented by lantern slides 
depicting his subject. 



CHAPEL SPEAKER CRITICIZES 
(Continued from Page 1) 
out the facts that the idea of winning is 
uppermost, that success or failure is 
reckoned only by the records of the major 
sports, that the minor sports and the 
intramural games which are in truth the 
most important in considering the ath- 
letic result are lightly considered, that 
the audience frequently shows poor 
sportsmanship in not only refusing to 
acknowledge well executed plays of their 
opponents but also frown upon other 
members of their student body cheering 
its opponents, and that the players of 
the losing team all too often pass the 
buck on to the coach. In speaking upon 
the religion factor of the local colleges, 
Mr. Clearland said that compulsory 
attendance made chapel exercises lose 
the spirit which should pervade them, 
and that the checking off of those present 
and the penalizing of the absentees was 
contrary to the freedom which is essential 
to religious success. 



This year the Greenkeepers' School is 
divided into two sections. Members of 
the first, come from not only the New 
England states, but the Middle West ami 
as far north as St. Augustine, Canada. 
Nine men are enrolled in the advanced 
section all of whom graduated from our 
Winter School in previous years. 

An attractive feature of interest to all 
members is the Annual Golf Show and 
Convention of the National Association 
of Greenkeepers which will be held in 
New York City, January 19-22. Every 
greenkeeper should attend if possible. 



EMERGENCY MEASURES 

Dormitory facilities have been decidedly inadequate during our stay on campus. 
Men students have not had suitable living quarters for many years and during the 
past two years, the Abbey has not been capable of accommodating the women stu- 
dents. Now we find Presitlent Thatcher strongly recommending to the trustees that 
they present an emergency measure to the State legislature for immediate dormitory- 
construction for both men and women students. 

Now we have hopes of another dream to be realized, but will it mean that a 
request for the construction of a new library antl the numerous other buildings which 
are needetl on campus will again be indefinitely postponed? We hope not. 



FOLLOW IT UP 

Much discussion has been created about campus due to the very successful and 
stimulating Arms Parley which was conducted on campus last week-end. This dis- 
cussion bids fair to stimulate much interest in the International Relations Club 
which has plans for carrying on extended discussions of world problems with their 
relation to armaments. Professor Harlow, that very popular thought-provoker from 
Smith College, will lend a hand in the discussion in February. 

The campus is in a receptive mood for intelligent and interesting discussion of 
world situations, so it is up to the International Relations Club to provide a con- 
tinuation of the very popular discussion which pervaded this campus last week-end. 



Pacifist: Hello! 

Militarist: Hello! 

Pac: Been to the Arms Conference? 

Mil.: Yeah! Lousy, wasn't it? 

Pac: The dancing was pretty good 
But that — militarist! 

Mil.: You mean that— pacifist! 

Pac: Say! Are youse a militarist? 

Mil.: Of course! Ain't youse? 

Pac: Sa-a-a-y, do youse realize that 
everybody will be wiped out if there's 
another war? 

Mil.: Say listen! Suppose you was out 
walking with your dog, and some guy 
come along and give your dog a kick. 
What woultl youse do under them cir- 
cumstances? Answer me that! 

Pac: I'd give his dog a kick! 

Mil.: There you are! 

Pac: Where? 

Mil.: Right there! Anybody with 
brains is a militarist! 

Pac: Are youse insinuating that I 
ain't a pacifist? 

Mil.: Of course you ain't. 

Pac: Take that! 

Mil.: Ya would, wjuldja? 

They clinch as, 
The Curtain Falls. 



STATE BLANKS CONN. AGGIE 

(Continued from Page 1) 
on the defensive. Horn and Williams 
threatened the Mass. State goal occa- 
sionally, but usually the puck was held 
in Connecticut's territory. 
The line-up: 
Mass. State Conn. Aggie 

Forest (Henry. Clancy), lw 

rw, Williams (Photaltis) 
Tikofski (Sylvester. Natti), rw 

lw, Horn (Godfrey) 
Cain (Snow), c c, Guthrie (Carlson) 

Gunness (Cain. Snow). Id rd. Buller 

Hammond (Daniels), rd Id. Walker (Dubrow) 

Mitchell (McGuckian) g g. Robinson 



The following students returned Jan. 4 
to complete their work in the Stockbridge 
School: Eleanor Wilder, William T. 
Greene, Clyde H. Putnam, and Sherman 
M. Niles. 



The 1932 Shorthorn staff is as follow i; 

Lditor-in-Chief Leon Pearson 

Asst. Editor-in-Chief Charles Leland 

Business Manager Horace Clark 

Asst. Business Manager Melvin Lafrance 
Asst. Business Manager John Macdonald 



EDITORIAL POINTS 

Yes, we certainly did enjoy "The Student Prince." 



Looks as if the Arms Parley caused the military department to re-assert itself, 
so they are making the freshmen antl sophomores blossom out in their monkey- 
suits again. 



If a certain chapel speaker bad his way, we know of four students who would 
be out of a job — antl in this season of depression, also. 



Now that the trustees have voted to discontinue the summei school, we imagine 
that MMBC i'miors will have to take more than 20 credits per term during the coming 

yea P. 



Now that all the entertainments and 
features of the past two weeks are over 
with, we can all settle back to the — by 
the way, what is the serious business of 
our college? 

At last relief is in sight. All students 
who can prove religious scruples will no 
longer be required to board at Draper. 
Gloria in excelsisl 



AMBITION 
There was a young man with a soul 
Wht) climbed up a telegraph pole. 
When he got to the top, 
He decided to stop, 
For at last he'd arrived at his goal. 



STATE DEFEATS CONN. 33-19 
(Continued from Page 1) 

from the ten foot line missed their mark. 
Houran, by sinking four out of five free 
throws, led both teams in this depart- 
ment. The Nutmegger's five man de- 
fense could not cope with the fast passing 
and dribbling of the State sophomore 
forward line. Bush and Lojko, who had 
their sharpshooting eyes gaged correctly, 
scored half of their team's points and 
Fletcher's long left arm accounted for 
three floor goals on passes from his 
teammates. In the closing minutes of 
the game the Connecticut rooters were 
treated to a pretty exhibition of passing 
executed by the Bay State substitutes. 
The Nutmeggers could not get possession 
of the ball with which to siage a last 
"forlorn" attack in the hope of over- 
coming the great lead of the Massachu- 
setts team. 

The team enjoyed a novel experience 
in that the game was broadcasted over 
the Connecticut school's radio station, 
WCAC. The line-up: 

State C.A.C. 



Associate Editor 
Associate Editor 
Associate Etlitor 
Associate Kditor 
Art Editor 
Asst. Art Etlitor 
Asst. Art Editor 
Asst. Art Editor 
Athletk Editor 
Asst. Athletic Etlitor 
Asst. Athletic Editor 
General Secretary 
Asst. Secretary 



Francis Keoh.in 

Stephen Kov.ir 

Thomas Abbott 

Howard Jennings 

Ivan Bruce 

Howard White 

Sherwood Stedman 

Robert Wilson 

Urban Charles 

Floyd Robinson 

Floyd Calvert 

Katherine Da\i> 

James Bowen 



The herd of Harmen Boelsma, with an 
average of 502 pounds of fat antl 18,960 
pounds of milk to its credit, was awarded 
a silver placque for having the highest 
record of any herd in the State. 

Mr. Boelsma is a graduate of the 
Stockbridge School of Agriculture, in the 
class of 1927. 



CO-ED NOTES 





B. 


F. 


P. 




B. 


F. 


P. 


Lojko.lf 


3 


2 


8 


Lampson.rg 


1 





2 


Stuart, If 











Mason.rg 











Bush.rf 


3 


3 


9 


Maddon.lg 


1 


t 


3 


Ahlstrom.rf 











Wilson ,c 





i 


1 


Flctcher.c 


3 





6 


Levilow.c 


1 





2 


Fawcett.c 











Skublishas.rf 


1 


1 


1 


Zielinski.c 











Calamari.rf 





1 


1 


llour.in.lv; 


1 


4 


6 


Eddy .If 


3 


1 


7 


Reynolds.lg 



















Foley ,rg 


2 





4 










Hanson, rg 





















12 


9 


33 




7 


8 


19 



This week the women's rifle team will 
start shooting match targets. Each 
member of the squad is to report to the 
rifle gallery twice each week, once for 
practice, and once to shoot her match 
target. The following women make up 
the squad this year: Zoe Hickney 
captain, Edwina Laurence '32 man.i. 
Wynne Caird '32, Susan Lake '32, Orris 
Merritt '32, Elizabeth Howe '32, Pauline 
Webb '32, Irene Armstrong '33, H 
Rudman '33, Celia Einbinder *34, Betty 
Barr '35, Dorothy Bartlett '35, Helen 
Beebe '35, Loraine Caverly '35, Florence 
Fay '35, Irene Govoni '35, Eloise Kellogg 
'35. 



Sigma Beta Chi entertained its pl< 
in a supper at the Davenport Inn, Suua ■■}' 
evening, January 17. 



Thursday evening at 7 p. m. the 
ing of the W.S.G.A. for this term will be 
held in the M building. There will 
guest speaker. 



January 24 trom 3 to 7, the Y. 
giving a party at Miss Hamlin's ' 
and songs wdl open the meeting '' 
cussion groups will then take plac 
which refreshments are to be 
This meeting is under the direction of 
Anna Parsons '32. 



SWALLOWTAILS and TUXS TO RENT for the MARDI (iRAS 

CLEANSERS DYERS LAI NDERERS 

L A N D I S 

P.s. WE ARE AFFILIATED WITH Voir AMHERST LAUNDRY 



TRUSTEES MEETING 
(Continued from Page I) 

was also taken at the meeting, 
laml voted down as a matter of expedi- 

|cni>- 

Summer School to Be Omitted 

The trustees felt that the financial 
,i) at the College warrants a cur- 
tailment of the program, and eliminated 
. uner session for 1932 on this 
: . uuling. The omission of the 
Summer School was the major economy 
measure adopted at the meeting. 

Summer School has long been an 
published institution at the State 
, , having been started in 1907. In 

be early years it was primarily a tech- 
nical school of agriculture and nature 
study. I" 1923 it was reorganized as a 
trictly college course offering under 
Baduate and graduate credit toward 
It became more and more 
pular as a training school for teachers 
nl dining recent years these have com- 
filed a majority of the students en- 
olled. One hundred seventy-seven stu- 
leati were enrolled in the 1931 session. 
In ai ting to omit the Summer School 
2, the Trustees of the College ex- 
ressed the hope that this would be the 
nlv year in which this omission would 
, necessary and that the school be re- 
tablished in 1933. 

Trustees to Push for Dormitories 
In his annual report, President Thatcher 
iated out that it had been necessary 
refuse admittance to some forty women 
tudents this year because of lack of 
oosiag facilities. He stated that it may 
t necessary to limit next year's freshman 
omen to fifty as compared with eighty- 
our in this year's class. Referring to the 
I uf men students he said: "We 
tve adopted what has proved to be a 
try wise policy of housing freshman men 
tudentt in campus dormitories so far as 



fou have tried the rest? 

Now try the BEST 
And that's the 

VMHERST SHOE REPAIRING CO. 

"Goodyear Welt System Employed" 



accommodations are available. Our pre- 
sent facilities, however, take care of iess 
than half of the class. Men students, 
especially those in the Stockbridge School, 
have to live long distances from the 
college campus antl frequently under 
conditions of poor sanitary and social 
environment because of lack of adequate 
housing facilities." 

To meet this serious situation the 
President recommended that the Trustees 
make every effort to secure appropriations 
for the erection of dormitories as an 
emergency state building enterprise. Act- 
ing upon this recommendation the Trus- 
tees voted to request legislative appro- 
priation for the construction of a women's 
dormitory in order that all women stu- 
dents may be housed on the campus and 
to request an appropriation for the con- 
struction of a men's dormitory in order 
to provide dormitory accommodations 
for all freshman men students. The 
Board authorized its Committee on 
Buildings and Grounds to prepare esti- 
mates of costs of such buildings and to 
submit an official request to the Legis- 
lature. In accordance with this action a 
bill will be presented to the present 
session of the State Legislature requesting 
the appropriation of funds for the pur- 
pose of constructing two dormitories on 
this campus to accommodate 15() stu- 
dents each, one for women and one for 
men. 

The Trustees reaffirmed their policy of 
limiting the enrollment of women stu- 
dents to the number which can be housed 
in college-controlled houses antl in pri- 
vately-owned houses which are untler 
college regulations. 

Trustees Vote for 
Compulsory Military Training 

In connection with the student peti- 
tion for making military training at the 
college elective, the Trustees undertook 



S. S. HYDE 

Optician and Jeweler 

OculUta' Prescriptions Filled. Broken lens* 
accurately replaced 

BIG BEN ALARM CLOCKS and other 
reliable make* 

3 PLEASANT STREET, (up one flight) 



FISHER'S 

ANNUAL JANUARY DRESS CLEARANCE SALE 

Extraordinary Quality at Low Prices 
$3.95 to $19.95 



JUST OUT 
WORLD ALMANAC 

1932 

A Mine of 

U p-To- Date 

Information 

for 

50c 

JAMES A. LOWELL, 



DRAWING MATERIALS 

Charcoal and Charcoal Paper 

Fixatif, Pencils and Erasers 

Oil and Water Color Paints 

Drawing Inks, Paint Boxes 

Show Card Colors 

- BOOKSELLER 



a very comprehensive study <>t the exist 

ing siiu.it ions. A survey of faculty 

opinion on that subject revealed thai 

the instructors favored the p r e sen t status 
of military training at this institution. 
Practically 90j Of the faculty answered 
the questionnaire, with 1UL' out o! I lu- 
ll. r > copies of the questions returned. 
Thirty-four teachers favored an entirely 
elective Count in military, while til the 
68 voting for compulsory military train- 
ing, 47 favond the present two \e.u 
requirement (18 favored a one ye.ir 
course with option between military ami 
phytical education the second yen ; 
three favored a requiretl course of one 
year only). A survey of the situation in 
the land-grant colleges showed that 4f> 
out of 48 required two years of military 
training of all able-bodied male students, 
and that of these 41 were not considering 
any change in this requirement. In only 
one land-grant college is this training 
optional at present. 

Untler the terms of the agreement 
with the War Department, R.O.T.C. 
training is offered at this College almost 
entirely at federal expense. The govern- 
ment spends annually, for this instruc- 
tion, about $;{.'!, (KK) for salaries of officers 
and men and $15, (XX) for supplies and 
equipment. It will not finance the tost 
of military instruction in an institution 
unless at least one huntlred students art- 
enrolled in the course. 

It was with these facts in mind and 
with a feeling that this decision should 
be made upon the basis of general college 
policy rather than as a curriculum matter 
that the following resolution was adopted. 

"Whereas, this Board has received a 
petition signetl by 27(5 stutlents of the 
College asking that all courses in military 
s< fence ami tactics at the College be 
made elective; and 

Whereas, all Land-Grant Colleges are 

required by Federal statutes to offer 

instruction in military science and tac- 
tics as a part of their college curricula; 
antl 

Whereas, ;it each Land-Gtuttt College 
this i nstru c ti on is now provided by the 
establishment there of a unit of the 
R.O.T.C. with officers and enlisted nun 
of the U. S. Army assigned as instructors, 

ami with U. S. Army equipment supplied 

by the War Department as uniforms for 
men antl for instruction of classes; and 

Whereas, thisco-o|>erative arrangement 
with the War Department is the only 



method which has been found sat isl.u tm \ 

l>\ experience for providing the required 
offerings of instruction in military science 
and tactics at Land-Grant Colleges; ,uul 
Whereas, the contract with the War 
Department for the establishment of ■ 
R.O.T.C. unit at any college requires ■ 
guarantee of a definite minimum number 

of students taking this training, which 

guarantee can be met with certainty at 

this College only by requiring certain 
groups of students to take certain of the 
courses in this department, therefore be 
it 

R e s olv e d , that we the Board Of Trus- 
tees of Massachusetts State College, bad 
it impossible to grant the request that 
all courses in military science and tactics 
at this College be made elective." 
Excuses to Conscientious Objectors 

Excuses from military training will be 
gnntad to conscientious objectors, in 
accordance with a ruling from the Prcsi 
dent's office. 

At their September meeting in 1990, 
the Trustees voted to authorize the 
President of the College to excuse stu 
dents from military drill, rooming in 
dormitories, eating in the dining hall, or 
other non-curricula requirements of the 
College upon presentation to him of 
satisfactory documentary evidence that 
compli a n ce with these rules or regulations 
is in COafHct with the teat lungs or rules 
of the religious organisation to which the 
Student belongs. 



DEBATERS PLAN SCHEDULE 
(Continued from Page 1) 

the student body at Springfield College. 
On the evening of the same day, the 
team is engaged to exchange arguments 



SPECIAL FOR 

Wednesday, Thursday, Friday 

Finger Wave and Shampoo Sl.Jo 

I'er nutrients $6 .00 

COLLEGE BEAUTY SHOP 

"M" BUILDING TEL. H24-M 



SANG LUNG hand laundry 



TUXEDOS 

LOWER IN PRICE — NEWER IN STYLE 
NOW $25 AND $35 

It is still the right time to buy that suit. 
Now priced from $19.50 with two trousers. 

F. M. THOMPSON & SON 



THE NATIONAL SHOE REPAIRING | 

21 MAIN STREET 
Between Town Hall and Masonic Building 
MENS" SHOES SOLED and HEELED 11.75 

FULL SOLE.S and RUBBER HEE13 «..■>• 

ladies Shots Soled and Rubber II eels S1.4S 

LADIES' SHOES HEELED 4Sc 

All Work Guaranteed 

College Drugstore 

W. H. McGRATH, Reft. Pharm. 
AMHERST, - - MASS. 

VISIT 

BARSELOTTI'S 

All the requirements for the smoker- Pipes, 
Pouches, Smokers Combination 
Ice Cream, Candy, Sandwiches 

EAT 

AT 

BUCK'S 



No. 1 Main St. Amherst, Mans. 

REPAIRING AND ALL KINDS OP 
WASHING DONE AT REASONABLE 
PRICES. 

Our Laundry First Claaa 

Our Policy Guaranteed 

NEXT TO THE TOWN HALL 



TYPEWRITERS 

for Sale and Rent 

I? It* a? * * * 
H. E. DAVID 



ZIPPER PURSES 



in 



Greater Variety than before 

$1.00 to $1.75 



Miss Culler's Gift Shop 



with speakers (mm the American Inter. 
national College, In I >• >t li cases, the 
St. iic College representative* will oppose 
the cancellation of the allied s/ai debts 
by the United States. 

The only home engagement .is yet 
arranged is to be with New Ymk I'ni- 
versitj on March -, on this rumpus. 
when the te.uns will debate the Socialism 
venue Capitalism questions. The New 
York team is considered a powerful rival 
in the debate activity, end arrangements 

an being made to present lioth teams at 
a time when students will he able to 
avail themselves Oi an opportunity to 
attend. Tin- Massachusetts team met 

tins University in a no-derision radio 
debate last year. 
()n March 91, the State College team 

will meet New York in New York, on the 
Subject "Resolved, that socialism has 

mote to offer the people than capitalism." 

On the following ttigfat, the Uav State 

orators will argue with representatives oi 
the Franklin ami Marshall College at 
Lancaster, Pennsylvanin, on the alleged 

failure ol capitalism on the basis of its 

f un da men tal principles. The Question 

for debute with the University of Dela- 
ware at Newark will concern the possible 

government ownership <>i the primary 

sources of |>ower. An engagement with 

either the College of the City of New 
York or LeMgh University on any of 
the subjects mentioned above will com- 
plete the season. 

Debates are bdng held snch week 
before I'rof. Walter K. Prince of the 
Eng lish Department. Speakers selected 
to represent the College in both the 
debates in Springfield, will probably be 
announced next week. 



AMHERST 
THEATRE 1 



WED. 

JAN. 
20 



THURS. 

JAN. 

21 



J KAN HARLOW 
- In - 

"PLATINUM 
BLONDE" 



FRI. 

JAN. 

22 



SKI 1 1 I'AKKIK 

ami his Jonesport 

Neighbors 

- in • 

WAY BACK HOME 



SAT. 

JAN. 

23 



M0N. 
JAN. 

25 



AOOLPHI MENJOU 
— In- 

4 'Friends and Lovers" 

with 
KrlcVonSiroliHm-l.lly Ihimlta 



Lowell Sherman 

In "HIGH STAKKS" 

. Co-Feature - 

Laurel and Hardy 

In "BKAH HUNKS" 



TUES. 

JAN. 

26 






Chan. Roftern - Peftly Shannon 

Charlie Kugitlea 

- In - 

"The KKCKLKSS 

a<;k" 

Douglas Fairbanks Jr. 
—In 

"I LIKE YOUR 
NERVE" 



PATRONIZE 

The sandwich man 

R. L. BATES, North Amherst 



START THIS TERM RIGHT 
BY EATING REGULARLY 



at 



Sarris Bros. Candy Kitchen Restaurant Inc. 



SALE 
20% Mark-Down on all Suits, Overcoats, Topcoats and Shoes. Sale now on. 

E. M. SWITZER, JR., Inc. 



U. A. C. Library. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 20, 1932 



IIICKEY-FREEMAN CLOTHES 

You gel value when wear Clothes customized by Hickey-Freeman. 

Good Clothes are Good Psychology. 

THOMAS F. WALSH 



CHAPEL ADDRESS 

(Continued from Page 1) 

himself. II h<- wei a neighbor walking, 
perhaps innocently, with someone else, 
he immediately awunwi that the neigh- 
bor fiH Si! .illy, and so they band tn 

gether, iwn here and i«" there, in com- 
radeship baaed on common hatred. 

In the lecond place, the speaker con- 
tinued, there ii 1 1 1 *- political problem of 
creating an international community 

which lias power over ils national units. 
To do this we must reduee tears and 
multiply trusts, and this is difficult when 
we live in ■ community where nations 
are often not trustworthy. 

The masses of men move by interests. 
We are a people who have known what 

we wanted and have taken it. Of course, 
we arc a kind people, but we are not un- 
selfish. By carefully setting up a moral 
pretention of unselfishness we are able to 

justify our growing selfishness. 

Our voluntary social action is not very 

brisk. If we see a neighbor actually 
starving, we may help him, hut it he is 

barely altle to Struggle along we let him 

do so. lor our seven million unemployed 
we voluntarily contribute only a third 

ol what the English contribute l>y tax- 
ation for their two million. It is, stated 
Rev. Niebuhr, a case where we ought to 
be made to give more. 

We net d today political interdepen- 
dence to keep up with our economic 
interdependence. For example, a tarifl 
war is inevitable when nations continue 
to engage in unmutual conduit. And 
tarilT war often leads to military war. 

In the third place, continued the 

speaker, there is the moral problem of 

creating a degree of social justice. <>ur 
governments .ire more interested in 



MARD1 OKAS FRIDAY 

(Continued from Page 1) 
the melody for the damers. Noisemakers, 

balloons and streamers will add to the 

hilarity ol the revellers, while novelty 

James w ill gi ve the re eds aa op p o r tun i ty little saees than 
to take advantage of leap year. Ed Clow 

promises refreshments that will tempt 
even the most exacting dancers and 
appease their hunger. 

Chaparones for the party are Dean 
and Mrs. Machmer and Captain and 

Mrs. Hughes. 

This is your chance to dress your own 
part and come to the dance. The price 
of admission is two dollars and fifty 

cents, for, according to the committee, 
the most delightful dance of the yen. 
the Mardi C.ras. 



peace pe.u e at any cost than in jus- 
tice. Justice is imperative, for injustice 
leads to resent mint which leads to hatred 
which brings on war. 

One of the great difficulties with 
American peace conferences is that they 
deal primarily with disarmament. And 
if we cannot produce a higher degree of 
justice between nations we cannot pre- 
vent war. 

Will repudiation of debts by F.uropc 

produce hatred and war, questioned Rev. 

Niebuhr, "or are there enough intelligent 
peopk to realise that repudiation is 

inevitable?" 

When we realize these three major 
problems to be answered, it can be seen 
that we are not even near disarmament. 

Its absolute necessity is the only thing 
that makes it even possible. 




Thomas S. Childs 

Incorporated 
SMART SHOES and HOSIERY for COLLEGE MEN and WOMEN 

QUALITY MERCHANDISE PRICES TO SUIT 

275 High Street, Holyoke 

I.arfteat Shoe Store inj Western Massachusetts 




A 






ATTEND PARLEY 

(Continued from Page 1) 

as the way to world peace claimed that 

the United States is practically dis- 
armed now and that our armv is very 
po li ce lone. He 
sketched conditions in Europe, claiming 
that force and fear of arms is the only 
way to suppress the constant struggle 
there and throughout the world. 

In the discussion on Saturday after- 
noon on compulsory military training, it 
was brought out that students at this 
college can obtain exemption from mili- 
tary training on religious grounds. 

"Hie United States has never sought a 
war," said Colonel Carleton in his ■p ea ch 
on Saturday evening. In describing the 
wars of this country he characterized 
every one of them as a righteous war of 
self-defense fought at great cost because 
of unprcparcdness. "Armaments never 
cause war," he said. 

Professor Harlow, who served in the 
World War, was formerly a teacher of 
history, and is now Professor of Religion 
at Smith College, claimed that the War 
of 1812, the Mexican War, .mil the 
Spanish War were wars of aggression, 
and supported his claims with references 
to, and quotations from, many accepted 
authorities. lie said that he was a 
pacifist because fiis ex perien ce during 
and after the World War proved to him 
that war is the greatest lie there is; the 
World War did not "protect women and 
Children," it was not a "war to end all 
war." and it did not "make the world 

safe for democracy.'' 

A poll taken at the List session re- 
sulted as follows: 

Do you favor reduction of arms.'' 

Yea, 121; no, 22. 

Do you favor the I'nited States taking 
the initiative in proposing reduction at 

the coming Geneva Conference? Yea, 
108; no, 28. 

Do you favor compulsory military 
training? Yes, 36; no, 06. 

Do you favor America's joining the 
League of Nations? Yes, 108; no, 111. 

Will you support the I'nited States in 
the next war? Yes, 55; no. 45. 



M. S. C. MEN'S MOTTO IS ALWAYS 
LET "DAVE" DO IT 

AMHERST CLEANSERS, DYERS 
and LAUNDERERS 

PHONE 828 A T ear the Town Hall PHONE 82* 

WHY OVER-PAY ON YOUR DRY CLEANING? 
We will dry-clean and press your suit or topcoat for $1.00 
We call and deliver free daily 
Phone 635 SWISS CLEANSERS & DYERS Phone 635 

Over First National Store 

SPECIAL PRICE ON PARKER DESK SETS 

$11.00 OUTFIT $7.98 810.(10 OUTFIT $7.4 9 $7.50 OUTFIT $6.5t 



A. J. HASTINGS 



NEWSDEALER and 
STATIONER 



AMHERST, MASS. 



SPECIAL VALUES — LEATHER HAND BAGS 
at $1.79 and $2.95 

JACKSON & CUTLER 

AMHERST, MASS. 

BIG 

JANUARY SALE 

Men's Bostonian Oxfords - Bass Moccasins 

Women's Oxfords - Dress Pumps 

Hosiery 

BOLLES SHOE STORE 



JOSEPH GINSBERG 

19 PLEASANT ST. 

Men's Furnishings - Shoes repaired, called for and delivered 

Freshmen, come in and see our selection of shoes, priced moderately. 

Special sale now on leather coats, just what you need for cold weather 

CALL 984-M 



SKI OUTFITS 

LOWEST PRICES! 



SKATING OUTFITS 
HIGHEST QUALITY! 

COLODNY CLOTHING COMPANY 

32 MAIN ST. {Near Depot) NOR! HAMPTON 

Ski Suits for Men and Women! 

Ski Hoots $6.50 Skating Breeches $2.95 

Ski Coats $5.95— Riding Boots and Breeches 



Everyth 



ing in Hardware 
and Radio Equipment 

ATWATER-KENT 



AND 



DEFEAT TRINITY 22-15 

(Continued from Page 1) 

down the floor alone, speeded in under 
the basket, and flung the sphere through 
the hoop for two points. I.ojko drew 
blood next as Fletcher intercepted a 
Trinity maneuver, flipped the hall to 
the blond forward who proceeded to 
swish the curtains for two. For the 
following few minutes, the Pilgrims con- 
tinued to ir.iss the hoop with no one 
under the basket to take the follow-ups. 
while Bath continued to rush madly 
around the floor, the only one alive to 
the game. Before the period, closed, 
however, the Trinity squad took a vain 
hope which finally culminated in Meier's 
long basket from the center of the rec- 
tangle, making the score 10-2 at the half. 
The Massachusetts attack continued 
to abate in its fury with the passing of 
the second period. I.ojko dropped a foul 
shot just before the fireworks began. 
Daut gave warning of the assault by 
calmly shooting a basket from the side 
lines, while Colino followed with two 
more tallies before Bush slipped through 
the defense to add to his mounting total. 
Then Fritzcn tallied, followed closely by 
Captain Foley, thus making the score 
17-10. Bush and Fletcher acquired two 
and one points respectively before Golino 
got in another one of his uncanny long, 
k! ing baskets. Duksa made the final 
Trinity contribution to the score board, 
white bush and Fletcher contented them- 
! 1ms with a basket apiece. The sum- 
mary: 

Mass. State Trinity 



Semi Annual Cash Sale 

at 

BOLTER'S 

When you want something different than you rind 
at the ordinary run of clothing stores — merchandise 
not sold on every corner — then drop in at Bolter's— 
the shop where quality and exclusiveness is our yard- 
stick — yet the same popular prices. 



MAJESTIC RADIO 



THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 

THE WINCHESTER STORr 



$23.75 

were $30.00 

POLO COATS 

$28.75 

were $40.00 



$38.75 

were $50.00 





B. 


K. 


P. 




B. 


F. 


1'. 


I.ojko .If 


2 


1 


5 


Kenney.rg 





1 


1 


Mi-vvard.lf 


n 








Mcicr.ru 


1 





2 


*»..->. 1 1 


4 


1 


9 


Bi.ilick.lK 











Ahl^trom.rf 


li 








I'rit/cn.li; 


1 





•j 


ll.in-.nti.rf 


1) 








Daut.c 


1 





2 


Hetclirr.r 


a 


1 


"> 


Andrus.c 





1 


1 


l'',IHirl(.i: 








(l 


Golino .rf 


3 


(1 


8 


Houmn.lg 


II 


1 


1 


Houlihan. rf 








ii 


Ahlstrotn.lf 


II 








/ujko.lf 








ii 


Foley j| 


1 





a 


Duk.a.lf 





1 


1 


A:.l~t otn.ri: 


1) 
















HeyaohtMi 








o 












<l 


-1 


a 




6 


8 


16 


Referee -Wl 


ale 


n. 


Umpire — Winters. 


T 


inn 




20-minttte halve*. 















SUITS 

$28.75 

were $35.00 

CAMEL HAIR COATS 

$38.75 

were $55.00 

ALL FUR FELT HATS 

$3.45 were $5 

HOSE SHIRTS 

4 pairs for $1.00 Broadcloth $1.55 two for $3.00 

2 pairs for $1.00 Oxford or Broadcloth 

Imported Hose 95c $1.35 - 3 for $4.00 

Tab collar shirts $1.65 

WOVEN MADRAS PAJAMAS 

$1.55 each two for $3.00 

OVERCOATS 

$23.75 $33.75 $38.75 

were $30.00 were $40.00 were $50.00 

CHESTERFIELDS 

$33.75 $38.75 

were $40.00 were $50.00 

All $10.00 SHOES Now $7.95 
A few discontinued styles now $5.95 

TIES TIES 

2 for $1.00 95c nw 



55c 



CARL. H. BOLTER 

INCORPORATED 



(gltg fMaHMrfrttggftg (Enllerjtatt 



Vol. XLII 



AMHERST, MASS., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 27, 1932 



Number 14 



CHAPEL ADDRESS IS 
GIVEN BY DR. MOODY 



rmldWIf of Middlebury College Sees 

Relief for World Through 

Turning to Jesus 



Realizing that he was of a generation 

,,1 ol Massachusetts State- students. 

President Paul !>• Moody of Middlebury 

College spoke at Sunday chapel on 

January 84 of things of more importance 

,,, hit listeners than to his own generation. 
Recent trouble in Honolulu was the 
caute of his choice of subject. 'This 
affair, he said, illustrated a breakdown 
in civilization. For the people of the 
Hawaiian Islands are not recently civi- 
lized. As early as 1849 Californians who 
I afford to were tending their children 

tol lonolulu to be educated in the miss ion- 

■i bootl which were far superior to 
those "I California. 

(Continued on Page 4) 



Walter Bonney Tells 

of Reporting as Cub 

Gtvee Some of the Romance of News- 
paper Work in Talk to Press Club 



Youngsters seven months out of 
College aren't expected to be world 
beaten and if they try to be they may- 
Kit stepped on," stated Walter Bonney 
nt the class of 'III, who spoke before the 
Press Club last Thursday night. Walter 
Bonney, since his graduation last June, 
hat been a member of the Springfield 
!•'., -publican staff; he related several inci- 
dents which might occur in any cub 
reporter's life. At the recent hotel blaze 
in Springfield he related his impressions 
of the crowd surrounding the blaze, an 
arm hanging outside of an upper story 
window and the im|H>ssible rescue, of 
the smoke roding down and the steamy 
mist rising from the hose water, of the 
(Continued on Page 3) 



PHI KAPPA PHI ASSEMBLY 
POSTPONED 

Edward D. Sherman of the American 
Express Company will deliver an illus- 
trated '"Round the World Travelogue" 
• luring the assembly period on Wednes- 
<l.i\ afternoon, February 10. This fea- 
ture will replace the Phi Kappa Phi 
assembly, scheduled for that date, which 
hai been postponed until the spring term. 



ALUMNUS RECEIVES APPOINT- 
MENT AS DEAN OF ARTS AND 
SCIENCES AT CONNECTICUT 
AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Of interest to Massachusetts State 
itudents, faculty, and alumni, is the 
promotion of Dr. Howard 1). Newton to 
the position of Dean of the Division of 
n.| Sciences at Connecticut Agri- 
cultural College on January 20. 

Dr, Newton is a graduate of this 
and while a student here was a 

er of the College Shakespeare Club, 

which has since become Alpha Sigma Phi. 

i graduate student at Vale from 

■ Vans and received his I'h. I). there. 

From I90fi to 1(M)S he was an a-.si-i.mt 

ilistry at Vale. Since then he has 

releasor of chemistry at Connecti- 
r« ultural College. 
Newton was appointed to the head 

nis and sciences department to 

' 1 the late Professor George II. 



RADIO CONCERT IN 
MEMORIAL BUILDING 

■ Walter, nationally known con- 
will had the New Vork Symphony 
■ Orchestra in its concert in 

Mall on Sunday, January 31. 
nn, broadcast over the air, 
heard on the radio in Memorial 
3.16 o'clock. 

i Piatigorsky, 'cellist, will be 
is soloist in the program. The 

I')! lows: 

1 berture, No. 3 Beethoven 

' oncerto in L> major Haydn 

hony No. 2 Brahms 



REHEARSING FOR PROM 
PLAY ALREADY BEGUN 



Parts Assigned for "The Swan," A 
Molnar Romantic Comedy 

"'The Swan " a romantic comedy in 
three acts by Franz Molnar, play to be 
presented by the Roister Doisters for 
Prom I'lay this year. Rehearsals for the 
first act are now in full swing under the 
direction of Professor Frank P. Rand, 
and everything points toward a must 
enjoyable and delightful presentation. 

The scene is laid in a European king- 
dom in the early part of the twentieth 
century, 'The plot deals with a family 

trying to regain royalty and sover e ign 

power, the loss of which they attribute 

to Napoleon's invasions. 

Princess Beatrice is trying to marry 

her daughter, Alexandra, to Prince 
Albert, the heir apparent to a neighbor- 
ing throne. At the end of a three day 
visit Albert has made no seiiuus advances 
toward Alexandra, so Dr. Agi, the tutor, 
is < hoses as a character foil to incite 
Albert's love for Alexandra. The tutor 
is ignorant of the n-.il conditions and 

believes he has won the love of the 

princess. Needless to say, difficulties, 
pathetic scenes, and amusing situations 
arise as a result of this deception. 
(Continued on Page 3) 



SWIMMING POOL SCHEDULE 
January 4 to March 18 





MONDAY 


9:45 A.M. 


-11:15 A.M. 


Men 


2:00 P.M. 


—3:00 P.M. 


Men 


3:10 P.M.— 4:00 P.M. 


High School Boys 


4:10 P.M.-^:50 P.M. 


Women 


5:00 P.M.— 6:00 P.M. 


Men 


7:30 P.M. 


—8:10 P.M. 


Women 




TUESDAY 


9:45 A.M. 


-11:15 A.M. 


Men 


2:00 P.M. 


—3:00 P.M. 


Men 


3:10 P.M. 


-3:50 P.M. 


H. S. Girls 


4:10 P.M.— 4:50 P.M. 


Women 


5:00 P.M. 


—6:00 P.M. 


Men 


7:30 P.M. 


—8:10 P.M. 


Men 




WEDNESDAY 


3:10 P.M. 


—4:00 P.M. 


Women 


4:10 P.M. 


— 6:00 P.M. 


Men 


7:30 P.M. 


—8:10 P.M. 


Women 




THURSDAY 


9:45 A.M. 


-11:15 A.M. 


Men 


2:00 P.M. 


—3:00 P.M. 


Men 


3:10 P.M. 


—3:50 P.M. 


H. S. Girls 


4:10 P.M. 


-4:50 P.M. 


Women 


-,:(K) P.M. 


8:00 P.M. 


Men 


7:30 P.M. 


-8:10 P.M. 


Women 




FRIDAY 


9:45 A.M. 


11:15 A.M. 


Men 


2:00 P.M. 


.i:00 P.M. 


Men 


3:10 P.M. 


-4:00 P.M. 


11. S. Hoys 


4:10 P.M. 


4 M P.M. 


Women 


5:00 P.M. 


0:00 P.M. 


Men 


7:30 P.M. 


8:10 P.M. 


Men 




SATURDAY 


9:30 A.M. 


-11:30 A.M. 


Men 



Football Team Awarded 

Trophies at Banquet 

Alumni Award Gifts in Appreciation 
of Teams Efforts 

The Collegian of January 20 made the 
statement that all lcttermcn and coaches 
of both SOCCer and football teams re- 
ceived gold trophies as a result of mk i 
ful seasons just past 

At the football banquet, held at the 
Lord Jeff on December 12, Hill Doran, 
s ecreta ry ol the Associate Alumni, in 

behalf of that organization, presented 
gold footballs to all thirty-four members 
of the football squad, to the manager, to 
Coaches T.iube and Grayson and to 
Curry Hi Its. 
The footballs were engraved on the 

front with the year. 1991, and the score, 
State 13, Amherst 1-'. Ob the laic of 
the ball was a raised maroon and white 
enameled "M". The recipient's name 
was engraved on the back, 

Mr. Doran. in making the presentat ion, 
Mated that the Associate Alumni, though 
setting no prece den t, wished to show, in 
some tangible fashion, its appreciation 
of what the football team had done for 
the College during the past season. 



Nmu 3Jt'fi Sjifituru 

I.ast Year 
Basketball and hockey teams win 

six games during week. 

Five Years Ago 
('■iris' (dee Club broadcasts a pro- 
gram of the college songs from VYBZ. 
In I'MH 
Hash House Thermometer on front 

page indicates result ot student in- 

« j nil \ thai board can be reduced to 
83.25 or lower by charging extra lor 
second servings Ol meat and desserts. 



Mardi Gras is 

Well Attended 

Fifth Annual Dance of Maroon Key 
Is Knjoyed by Many 



Success was the cli.n.u tei ist ic of the 

Maroon Key's tilth annual festivity, the 

Mardi ( iras, last Fl idav night in Menioi i.il 

Hall. Much <>f this sin i ess was contribu- 
ted by Vincent BregllO and his orchestra 
from Springfield; approximately sixty 
couples danced to the slow rythm ol his 
music. 

Comment ing at the hour of eight and 
continuing until twelve, the Mardi Gras 
gave its attendants one of the most 
(Continued on Pag* 3) 



NEW MEMBERS ELECTED TO 
BUSINESS BOARD OF COLLEGIAN 

The following men were elected to the 
business board of the Collegian: Benton 
I\ Cummings *88, Frank Batstone 14, 
I lerbert Jenkins '.'14, W. Lawrence Schenck 
'.'14, and Edward J. Talbot '34. 



CLASS AVERAGES FOR 

FIRST TERM 1931-32 



IMS . • • 

Women . 

Men . . 

1 <•:{.'{ . . . 

Women . 

Men . . 
All Women 

All Men 

General . 



80.58 
81.27 
80 :\7 

7'.» :{"> 

80 8.J 

78.88 



1984 . . 
Women 
Men . 

1885 . . 

Women 
Men . 



7.1 07 
73.81 

73 SI 

70.88 

80 31 

71 4<» 

74 0.') 
74 013 
74.68 



FRATERNITY AVERAGES FOR 

FIRST TERM 1981-83 

Alpha Lambda Mil (Sorority) 81 7:5 

Kappa Kpsilon . .81.17 

Sigma Beta Chi ( S or ority ) . . hi 01 
Lambda Delta Mu (Sorority) 7 ( .» :;."> 

Phi Sigma Kappa .... 7'.» 18 
Alpha Gamma Kho . 7'.t <»'.» 

Delta Phi Alpha .77 05 

Lambda Chi Alpha . . 77 71 

Kappa Sigma . .77 'AT 

O. T. V 77 34 

Thets Chi .... 78 00 

Alpha Sigma I'hi .... 76 08 
Sigma I'hi Kpsilon 75 56 

Non fratt rnity .... ~'.'> 14 

\on sorority ..... 73.06 

All Women 74.05 

All Men 74.98 

( ieneral College . . .71 68 



CAMHIS CAI.KNDAK 



" t man wke has friends should show 
himself friendly " 



Wednesday. January 27 
4.00 p.m. Interclas* Track Meet, Case 
vim p. in. Debating Club, Mem. Building 
R 00 ii in. < u be it i. so., kl .ri<i ii<- Hall 
Bowling: Kappa Sigma n. Kappa Ep«ilon 
and Sigma Phi Kpsilon pa. Theta < ni 
Thursday. Jan. 28 

l 00 p, in. interrl I rat k Meet 
6.00 p.m. ' Douglai I'.ooth on Intfr- 

national Affairs, Memorial II. ill 
.". :;n [i. in. K. o. < tub Meeting 
7.00 p.m. Uniini? flub Meeting, French 

Hull 
7,'ki p in. Animal rfuabandry < lub 
K.OO p. m. Index Meeting, Index Office 
Bowling: Delta Phi Alpha n. Phi Sigma 
pa and Alpha Sinina Phi vs. Alpha 
Klio 

Friday. January 29 

Bowiing: si«in,i i'hi BpsUea v-<. Kappa 

lull 
Saturday. January A0 

Vanity Hoi k<-> •: Hamilton at Clinton 
Y;ir-ity Baaketball: Worceatet Tech at 
won eater 
Sunday, January SI 
'.(.in a. in Chapel: Shailer Math 

Chicago Divinity s hwl 
3.00 p ni. Radio Concert, New Vork 
Philharmonic O r c he a t ra 
Tuesday, February 2 

6.H p. m Language and Literature Talk, 

Stockbridfe Hall 
Sim |i in ( bona, Memorial KuiMing 



STATE COLLEGE BAND 
GIVES RADIO CONCERT 

Kami Renders Collection of March 

Music, College Tunes anil Special 

Numbers Over WBZ 



Martial airs, college tinirs, and popular 

melodies were featured in the radio con 
cert gi\cn by the State College Hand 
over Station WBZ last Thursday during 
the supper hour. Assisting the band were 
the outstanding members of the recent 
Bay State Revue. At six fifteen, sitei 

varied and sundry annouin iinents, 

"Victory March of Massachusetts" was 
•rafted over the ait with the players 
seemingly struck ■ !>it with "mike fever," 
but, on the whole, rendered with spirit. 
After this march James Klar and < teorge 

Hart well gave an accordion and *yk> 
phone duet with the playing of "When 
It's Sleepy Time Sown Smth." The 

band, thoroughly recovered <>f "mike 
fright," broke forth with "Fight Massa- 
chusetts," which was played with all the 
dash and vigor which has characterised 

the hand's rendition of P ieces this tall 

and winter. Followed several special 
numbers, "Jazz Me Mines" by the I ittU- 

|.i// hand and "River Stay Away from 

My Door" given as a piano anil voeal 

duet by Robert Noble and llarmond 

(Continued on Pafta 3) 

I'RIIYNK WINS PENTATHLON 
FOR TRACK CANDIDATES 
WITH IHCill SCORK OF 4975 

In the pentathlon that took plaot in 
the cage last Tuesday, Wednesday, and 
Thursday, l'ruyne, Stcdman, and I'earson 
carried off the high honors, placing first, 
second, and third respectively in the 
final score. The events were run off on 
three different days, about four events 
coming each day. The first man in each 
event received a thousand points to his 
credit, while the others in that event 
were graded similarly according to their 
l>erformances. 

This pentathlon was open to the 
candidates for the varsity, Stockbridge, 
and freshman teams and offered them the 
chance of trying events, which they had 
never tried before, but in whieh they 
might do better than in those they were 
out for. This week the interelass meet, 
which is being run olT on Tuesday, 
Wednesday, and Thursday, offers to all 

the nun a similar opportunity to test 

their skill in the various events. This 

(Continued on Pug* 1) 

Fraternity Basketball 

Season Well Started 

Single League Makes Keener Com- 
petition Among All Fraternities 

As the result of placing all fraternities 
in one league, more interest and keenei 
competition has been shown in inter 
fraternity basketball than in previous 
years. Instead ol one or two fraternities 
outclassing the others in either of the 
two leagues as in the past, there is, this 
winter, a si ramble among four or live 
teams to eonie out on top and win the 

fifteen coveted points for their fraternity 
It is too early in the season to prophesy 

t he nut eon ie but the standing of the teams 
at present .n 







u 




/. 






/'< 


P. S K. 




i 











KKXI 


K. S. 




a 











inoo 


5. P. K. 




2 











inon 


V S. P. 




3 




1 








1. ( A 








2 






500 


A. «.. K. 




I 




1 






.VKt 


q, r. v. 




1 




£ 






:;:;:; 


1 ' 




1 




2 






333 


K. E. 




1 




2 








1). P. A 









4 






non 


.'. 1 









4 






000 


S hedule lor this 


week: 










Wednesday: 


P.S 


vs. 


AS. 








Thai 


k 1 


. v^ 


. I..( \ 




i 


• HI 








V9, S.P.E. 


i 


US 






1 ' 


. vs 


N.F. 




6 


10 




I riday: 


K S 


. vs 


1 < 




8 


30 






A.G 


K. 


\ L.< 


A. 


1.16 




All gam to l><- ii! 




1 in the < axe, 








The leadin 


1 scorers: 










White, MA. 
















Whftcomb, 1 .C 
















Zielinaki, AS. 
























, 






V.t 


( henowith, P S 














. 16 


Berntti in, D.P. 


\. . 












. 16 


ISro«n. P - 






, 








. 11 


Goddard, P 5. 














! 1 


I'ruyne. K. v . 














. 11 


< oburn, K.S. . 














. Hi 


Sheff, S.P.E. . 














. 10 


Howe, T.C. . 








. 




, 


. in 



STATE QUINTET MEETS 
ENGINEERS SATURDAY 

llaskctecrs to Resume Activities After 
Week and a Half Rest W Inn it 
Meets Strong Worcester leant 

Alter a lav nil ol a lull week and a 
half, the M.iss.i« husetts St.ite College 
basketball quintet goes into artion this 
coming Saturday evening when it mati lies 

baskets with the powerful W.P.I, noop- 

sieis, who, up until the gone with 
Springfield College Tuesdav before last, 
u.is undefeated, having conquered Boston 
University, U. S, Coast Guard, Browa, 

Tufts, and Weslev.iu, all by substantial 
simes. The game, which is to be plaved 
on the Won ester COUrt, will no doubt 
piove very interesting in the light o| the 
Outcome Of contests played between the 

two rival colleges in the past . 

Won ester is exceedingly strong this 
mu bv viitue of its large number of 
(Continued on Paga i) 

Fred C. Ellert Gives 

an Analysis of Goethe 



Sees RcHection of Poet's Own Life in 

Development of His (Greatest 

Character, Kaust 



Prefacing his ad drtSS with the remark 
that he was neither a Humanist nor a 
Romanticist, Mr. Fred Kilcrt of the 
(icrman department Continued the series 
of language and literature talks with his 
interpretation of ( ioethe's philosophy as 
shown in his greatest poem. 

Although many of (Ioethe's weaknesses 
and much of his philosophy is revealed in 
the character of Faust, still the author 
far surpasses his creation in strength 
and triumphant philosophy of life. To 
Ik* sure, Faust's rise from despair at his 
own selfish interests to the final surrender 
to more public interests is a revelation 
(Continued on Pag* 2) 



Famous Lecturer is to 

Speak in "M" Building 

(i. Douglas llooth Considered Au- 
thority on the Prohlenis of 
the Italkans 

< . Douglas booth, traveler, publicist, 

lecturer, authority on M.dkan affairs, 

and who has s|« ut a number o| ve.irs in 

the Meat East and the BaJkans collecting 
political and economic material foi a 

new book, will speak at the Memorial 

building, Thursday afternoon bom 6 to 

<i o'clock. All those who are interested 
in world alfairs should not miss the 

opportunity to bear such ■ prominent 

authority. 

Mr. Hooth is a member of the Royal 
Institute of International Affairs in 
England, and has studied at the Ai .id 
emy of liiternalioii.il Law at the Hague. 
For seven Mais he has studied problems 
of the Mediterranean and the Balkans, 
and has resided and traveled in MOTOCCO, 

Egypt, Rhodes, Pat mos, Athens, and 
Belgrade. 

His hi tilling e x per i e nc e is varied and 

iii< hides considerable political work for 
the National liberal Party of England, 

work ill the I niled Miles for Liberty 
Loan and Red Cross drives while in His 

Majesty's Forces during the War, ami 
later eaperiem e lo i uring in bot h England 

and the United Slates on international 
relations. 

DR. CANCE ADDRESSES 
LIBERAL CLUB 

Last Friday night the Liberal Club 
met at the home of Mr. Williams for an 
informal discussion led bj Dr. < ence on 
the subject of Russia. Dr. Canes gave 
a rerj inter est ing descri p tio n ot con 

ditkms there a- he tound (hem when he 

vi tted the country last summer. That 

the prolit motive is not the only motive 
that will drive a people (.. SUIT IBS is 

shown by the great enthusiasm of l he 

young Russian people, who do not <\,n 

know, he said, what the profit motive is. 

The next meeting is t<> be held Feb, 
2<i. The speaker will be Professot < hriseidn 

Kuhlman of Broo fcwo od Labor College. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 27, 1932 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 27, 1932 



Zbe flfcassacbusetts Collegian 



Official newspaper of 



the Massachusetts State College. 
Wednesday by the students. 

BOARD OF EDITORS 



Published every 



Wallacb W. Stuart 32 
Managing Editor 



Frank L. Springer '32 
Editor -in-Chief 



Oscar Margolin 32 Rial S. Potter, Jr. '32 

Associate Editors 



DEPARTMENT EDITORS 



Ktlitorlal 
Frank L. Springbr .32 



Campus 



input 

Edmond Nash '33 W. Raymond Ward "S.i 

Alfrbda L. Ordwav '33 

Ruth D. Camfubil "W 

Harribttb M. Jackson '34 

JOSBPH POL1TBLLA '34 

Raymond Royal "SI Mary L. Allen ,io 



Athletl.s 

William H. Wear '32 

Eugene Guralnick '33 

Stanly P. Sefbrski "m 

John P. Colman 38 

Silas Little. Jr.. '88 



Feature 

Oscar Margolin '32 David L. Arenuerg Ja 

BUSINESS DEPARTMENT 

Eric H. Wbttkrlow Jr. '32 

Business Manager 



Kenneth E. Hodge '32 
Advertising Manager 

Benton P. Cummincs 33 

ASHLEV B. GURNEY 33 

Philip H. Levkrault 33 



Business Assistants 



Edward J. Talhot "M 



William A. Johnson *32 
Circulation Manager 

Frank Batstone "il 
Hekhert Jenkins "il 
W. Lawrence. Si henck 34 



Subscriptions $2.00 per year. Single copies 10 cents. 



Make all orders payable to The Massachusetts Collegian. 



In case of change of address, subscriber will please notify the business manager 
as soon as possible. 

Alumni and undergraduate contributions are sincerely encouraged. Any com 
munitions or notices must be received by the editor-in-chief on or before Monday 
evening. 



2% fliranroti 

I.KTTKRS Off A FRKSIIMAN 

October — , '.il 
I Dear Ethel: 

y«l don't know how lonesome it is up 
berc without you. The other day 1 looked 
at your pktun and almost cried. Don't 
worry about the other girls up here. 
You've pot them all looking like ■ bow- 

legged eat with the measles. 1 haven't 
even spoken to one except when they'd 
ask me some darned fool question about 
what's the subject of a preposition, stuff 
you'd think they'd know. 'Sfunny but 
they always pick me out. I guess it's 
my personality. Someone told me I 
look like John Gilbert but I think they 
were stringing me. Anyhow 1 can't help 
what nature did, so it wouldn't do you 
any good to get jealous. 

1 guess I'll have to quit now. It's 
after 12 and I'm in training. Pack a 
■pare powder puff and come next Thurs- 
day and watch yours truly perform with 
the permmbubUing pigskin. With you 
watching, I could beat Colgates. 

Don't forget your lonesome cowboy. 

Joe 

I'.S. I )on't go out with any other guys. 
There's no sense in lowering yourself to 
their standards. 



NOTICES 



Candidates for Business Hoard 

Freshmen candidates for the blttUMM 
board of the Collegian meet in the Cul- 

Ugia» office at 4 p.m. Wednesday. 



Index Snapshots 

The Index asks the loan of any snap- 
shots portraying Juniors and Junior life. 
See Clancey, Guerney, or Howes of the, 

(lass of ''A'A. 



STOCKBRIDGE 



Entered as second-class matter at the Amherst Post OfT.ce. Accepted for mailing at special rate of 
postage provided fot In Section 1103. Act of October. 1817, authorised August 20. 19 IK. 



ONE WAY TO GIT UP TO DATE 
We have heard numerous re|K.rts from various members of the student body who 

have had the opportunity recently to meet other students from colleges all over 
the United States and without exception, the Massachusetts State representatives 
lament the fact that they are sadly lacking in comprehensive and mteli.gent knowl- 
edge of national and international affairs. 

It is even more deplorable that such a condition should exist m a state college, 
where of all the institutions of higher learning, the students are being exposed 

«* it.. alK to modern educational methods for the purpose of creating better atstens. 

It i« obviously impossible for anyone to be classed as an intelligent c.t./ei. who has 

nnt aT1 adequate knowledge of the affairs of state, of world econotnk conditions, of 

BOCial condition, which are continually in a state of turmoil and as these M.uat.ons 
exist in the world of today. 

Many people say thai a g I cross-section of the status of world activities today 

can be gained bj the regular and intelligent reading of ■ good daily newspaper. 

Quite SO, but how many Students a. .his college take time OUt each day for MC* 

diversion? Certainly, not s verj iieticeable percentage. 

\\h .t we would suggest, end we feel that the majority of student body voices the 

M1BC suggestion, is that a series of lectures, given thrice weekly by some able mem 
!„., ol the faculty, be opened to the entire student body and attendance at a Certain 
percentage of the lectures would entitle the student to academic or should we say. 

Kholastic credit. The lectures should be devoted to current kappenings of import- 

an „. throughout the world and Should be presented in a complete, though brief. 

fair-minded manner with ample opportunity given for discus-ion. 

Some say that the teaching burden is already becoming too great for many ol 
the members of oui present faculty. We realize that with an increase ... the number 

of students enrolling and also a reduction in the amount of funds av a.lal.le to, rCSI 

dent instruction, the addition of a ...an to the teaching stall is .. problem. Howevei . 
i, would not be necessary to employ a full-time instructor, for we led ■urethat there 

.,„. , mml | )t . r of very competent men on the faculties of our three neighboring col- 
leges who would Ik- willing to conduct such a course on this campus for a very nominal 

This is only one remedy for our preset km state of world-rmndednese. There 

are other- but we U el that this is the most feasible, ami as long as it is granted that 
'something must 1„ done, we hope that immediate action will be taken ... tins matter 
of the true education of Mate college students. 



Even the Phys. Ed. department has 
taken up the theory of evolution. Con- 
sider the evolution of the following signs 
posted in the gym: 

1. Attention track men: Please re- 
move your shoes, or at least wipe them 
before going to the balcony, as they are 
liable to track «lirt. Thank you. 

•J. Please wipe your feet. 

.'{. WIPE Y<>l'R FEET! 

Have you noticed the prevailing fashion 
in men's headgear? The l.oy's are taking 
a belated but terrible rexenge for the 
poor departed Kugenic hat. 



Seniors Interested in Modern 
Languages 

All seniors desiring to teach Modern 
Languages next year, please report to 
Mr. (ioding as soon as possible. 



K. O. Club 

K. O. Club meeting, Thursday evening 
January 28, in Room 114, Stockbridge 
at 5.:$() p.m. Professor C.eorge L. Farley, 
head of club work, will be the speaker. 
An interesting program has been arranged, 
including reading by Mildred Twiss '.'ili. 
K. (). Club is a division of the 4-H Club. 
The president is Costas L. Caragianis '33. 



COED NOTES 



Stockbridge senior extend a cordial 
invitation to the freshmen and Winter 
School students to attend an informal 
dance which will be held in the Drill 
Hall Friday evening, January L".'. 
S p.m. Music will be furnished by 
"Ham" Nelson's orchestra. For those 
not dancing there will be card playing 
at the Memorial Building. 



Dwight Williams, S'.'52, who was in- 
jured last fall in football reports that the 
cast has been removed and all the neck 
vertebrae are back in the right place, 
Few people have ever recovered from ., 
broken neck so that the doctors tell 
Dwight he is a lucky boy. All Stoik- 
bridge students rejoice in his recovery. 



The Stockbridge basketball team lost 
the third game of the season to a fast 
Agawam High team. The final score was 
Agawam 2S, Stockbridge 4. 



Fast Thursday, Jan. 21, the first of 
three games between Omega Chi and 
Tri Sigma was played. Tri Sigma won 
the game with a score of 25 to 21. 



THE BAM) GETS A HAND 
We understand that the first telegram which Captain Sumner and his Massa- 
chusetts State College Band received bearing congratulations for their concert which 
was broadcast last Thursday evening was from C.eorge Cadigaa ol Amherst ( oUege. 

His greeting is what WC COUsidei the greeting of a true sportsman and a gentleman. 
Tike heed that v.... State College ...en are worthy of such praise and do not bunt 
such conduct only 1.. bandsmen on review. There are thousands ot other occasions 

when Midi an attitude will mean more enjoyment for both donor and receiver. 



ON IMPORTED LECTURERS 

I at Monde] afternoon, we had the pleasure ot attending a very interesting 

lecture on abnormal psychologl b 5 Dr. Taylor of Smith College, who presented the 

lecture and demonstration at the request of the department ol psychology at this 
college. A few weeks ago. the depart Hunt of languages and literatures invited Sir 
Philip Ben Creel to lecture on the appreciation of Shakespeare. 

These lecturers from without our little sphere prove to be very interesting ami 

we hope the practice may be expanded in the near futu.e. 



EDITORIAL POINTS 

Ralph E. t.mm TO and the "gang at Cambridge" sent their congratulations to 

the band, as dill , . 

Ray Griffin '27 Charlie Cox '30 he lamented the fact that the band has been 
forced to exist Without B food piccolo player ,ince June. 1830) and Charles W . Han, S, 

Jr. '30. 

Looks as if this column should be a supplement to the Alumni ButieH*, 



Disguised as a long, flowing, white 
beard, the Picaroon attended Professor 
Taylor's interesting psychological demon 
Stratum last Monday afternoon. Since 
then, hypnotism has seated itselt on the 
pineal gland of everyone in college to 
the exclu-aon of everything else. When 

I \isit the fraternities ma s quera din g as 

an a. w.o.l. reserve-book, or a book sail's- 
man s.lli.ig sets of All You Want to 
Know for 18.08, .dl of the bull-sessions 
seem to be discussions of hypnotism. 
When I went to the annual Mardi Cras 
or costume ball, dressed as a stuffed 
tuxedo suit, 1 found that I was far from 
original in my choice of a costume. 
Fortunately all the guests hypnotised 
ea. h Other into thinking that it was a 
real costume ball. When no one was 
looking, I hooked the box of chocolates 
so the judges were spared the trouble ot 
awarding the prize for the bCSt costume, 
let's see! What was I talking about? 
Oh, yes! Hypnotism. Only the co-eds 
arc quite indifferent to the topic They 

know all about hypnotism. Well 
gents. 1 was inspired to write a story 
on the subject, as you see: 

HIPS OF HYPNOTISM 
.1 fascinating story! So real that 
7. iff u< tii'tliy put y< u to store. 

Tin- Massachusetts Collegian 

Hi p - hip hypnotism! 

It's the latest cataclysm: 

Hypnotism's on the Stage, 

In every book on every page, 
I lip-hip hypnotism. 

Seems to be the rage! 

"1 have voii hi my power-house!" 
The speaker, a tall handsome sat limine 
indivi.hi.il. in fact none other than the 
Picaroon himself, was speaking to none 
other than himself. Those famous mag- 
netic eve- of his Stared at each other. 
There ensued a long silence, the longer 
the better as the reader will be kept 

longer in suspense. "What an- you 

going to do to me.-'" gloomed the Picaroon 

shuddering. 

"YOU are a loaf of bread." said the 
hypnotist. 

"I am a loaf of bread," replied the 
Picaroon. 

"You are very hungry." suggested the 
hypnotist. "YOU must eat the food that 
is nearest to you!" 

The Picaroon turned pale. 'What!" 
he pleaded, "without any butter even?" 

"At once!" ordered the hypnotist 
harshly. 

And SO, ladies and gentlemen, the 
Picaroon ate himself up ami died of 
indigestion. Let his sad fate be a lesson 
to vou. 

The End 



BASKETBALL SCHEDULE 
Jan. 28 Sorority vs. Non-sorority 
Feb. 4 Off -campus vs. Abbey 
Sophomores vs. Seniors 
Freshmen vs. Juniors 
Tri Sigma vs. Omega Chi 
Stockbridge vs. M.S.C. 
Finals 

Interclass 

Tri Sigma vs. Omega Chi 



11 

IS 
25 
Mar. 8 



The following students have pled. ! 
A.T.C. : Cordon H. Fenno, Alfred 15. 
Jaeger, John R. Martin, Henry II. 
Neely, and Joseph II. Young. 

Sunday evening, January 17, Mi. 
William Shaughnessy, a member of the 
Federation of Magicians entertained mem- 
bers of the A.T.C. Club and guests with 
numerous stunts. 



Mr. Bartlett boydeii of Deertield 
Academy showed moving pictures ot the 
Deerfield-Stoclibridgc football game whirl, 
was played at Deerlield this pact season. 
at the A.T.C.. Club House. 



At the W.S.C.A. meeting Wednesday, 

a committee was elected to nominate 
candidates for offices next year. The 

membe r s of the nominating committee 

are Wynne Caird "32, Celeste Fiore 'ML'. 
Anita Pike *33, Helen Rudmaii '33, 
Harriette Jackson ':i4, and Lois Babb, 
representing the Stockbridge girts. 

Mary Louise Allen was elected fresh- 
man r epr e se n t ative on the W.S.t.A. 

council. 



Mr. A. G. C, lover, editor of llo.u.i' 

Dairyman was the speaker at the open- 
ing meeting of the Animal Husbandry 
Club on Thursday evening. January 21. 

Mr. Clover talked on tin- outlook of the 
dairy industry in general. The meeting 
was well attended. 



Athletic awards will be made at in vt 
Thursday's Assembly. Coach "Mel" 

Taube will be guest sp eaker . Lettert 
and certificates will be given to members 

of the football team and for the tit -t 
time, to thi' crosscountry team. 



Six senior girls, who are majoring in 
Home Economics, have left the Abigail 
Adams House to live in the Homestead 
this term. During the term they will 
receive practical training in Home Eco- 
nomics under the leadership of Miss 
K a Ow ltO O. The girls who will be living 
in the Homestead this term are (.ertrude 
Barnes, Elizabeth Howe. Orris Merritt, 
Anna Parsons. Betty Reed, and Mildred 
Twiss. 



Allen M. Belden, S'2".». has organized 
his own < one, 111 with William W. Mr> 
Intire, S'J'.i. known as The New Hamp- 
shire Landscape Service with head 

quart*" in Manchester, N. II. Belden 
is living at l2Sti Harrison Street, tame 

city. Mclntire may In- addressed at the 
local Y.M.C.A. 

Mr. Belden i.-. spea k i n g on "Gardens" 

before the New Hampshire Federation "! 
Women's Clubs in March, and n; 
many calls for this type of service. 

Arthur Pinion, S'. - ',0, is in chargi : 
farm records at the Moiison State Hospt- 
tal. 



THE MARRIAGE OF TAWNO ciiik.no 

"There is the wind upo.i the heath; 
Life is sweet." sang the Romany dial; 
And he made for his true love a scented wreath 
Of the lowers in spring, of the leaves in fall. 

Now the Romany dial forever leaves 
The old hill-paths and the lone wolf's lair; 
On winter nights the birch flame weaves 
Lights and shadows in his true love's hair. 

With his own true love and the geni.il worth 
Of a COSy iot and a sparkling lire. 
And the homely music of cottage mirth. 
What more CM the Romany chal desire? 

Bleak is the wind upon the heath; 

Cold is the dark and dismal night; 

Ami the lean wolf grins and bares his teeth 

At the glow of Chikno's cottage light. 

For once they hunted the hills together, 
Followed the grouse and the whistling (mail, 
Ami. couched at night in the wind-threshed heather, 
Were lulled to Bleep by the western gale. 

Sweet was the kiss of the laurel's bell, 
Cold and sweet were the mountain streams; 
And Tawno Chikno, who loved them well. 
Shall remember them always in hi- dreams. 

Author Oscar Margolin "A2 

Judge P ro fes sor Waugh 

Manuscript- lor the February competition must be left in Mr. Rand's office 
by the lath of the month. 




State College Representative for 
"MARK CROSS" GLOVES 



Fst. i.Nii LANDIS Ls,. 



I •.MM 



N./acTW.fVd*' 

e *GLAM° 



FRED C. ELLtRT 

(Continued from Pafte 1) 

M the poets own life. Then too, both 
l Kl ,l in 1 oinuion an intense love of beaut \ . 
because t.oethe was aware of his own 
nii'ierlei lions, he said, "I see no fault in 
that I might not have committed 
myself." He then proceeded to work 
these weaknesses by working 
tiuiii out in his writing. Goethe was not 
,,nl> a poet, but also a scientist and man 
( ,i nature. Mr. Kllert considered him a 
Romantic poet whose philosophy is 
gated at the beginning and end of the 
poem: "He who strives after an ideal 
must meds go astray, but the good man 
never misses the right road." 
Supplementing the story of Faust, 
tor Godding of the French de- 
partment described the changes which 
,1,, finds in the opera version, and 
played three records: "The Flower Song," 
\tlut D' Amour," and "The Jewel Song." 

HAM) GIVES RADIO CONCERT 

(Continued from Page 1) 

Kelson. Later in the program llarmond 

aas again heard with the Little 

] A u Hand; another much looked-for 

rytophone and aCCOrdian duet was given 

the broadcast ended. The hand 

[played a scries of stirring marches, 

and Stripes Forever," "Hail 

Purdue," which was played in honor of 

Coach Taube, "Statonia," which is the 

State march written by Grant 

Ml. Proa its first reception it 

Is I lit to equal the popular "Fight 

luisetts" march written by (apt. 

I Sumner, the State College band leader. 

Statonia" i^ solely .1 march; no words 

I accompany the piece, but it has dash and 

I sweeping power. "Sins of Old M.is-a- 

l" by the band completed the 



Y< u have tried the rest? 

Now try the BEST 

And that's the 

[AMHERST SHOE REPAIRING (0. 

"Goodyear Welt System Employed" 



WALTER BONN FY SPEAKS 
(Continued from Page 1) 

outcasts banded together in a nearby 
lunchcart, of one of the men minus his 
artificial limb and with a broken arm 
leaning against the wall. The scene 
shifted to the rei ent celebration in honor 
of Springfield's new police chief, Mr. 
Maloney, and the relating of the happy 
crowd, the flushed face of John Maloney, 
of the meeting of life and "good souls." 

"Even though the name of the college 
has changed and I only took 14 agricul- 
tural credits and nine of those in Horti- 
cultural Manufactures I am considered 
the agricultural editor of the pa|M-r," 
Walter Bonnev stated with a smile. The 
speaker then related bow pleasant it was 
to receive a letter from the milk pro- 
ducers thanking the staff for its aid in 
their campaign for fair prices; and how 
enjoyable it was to reiKirt the county- 
fairs and to mingle with a people out on 
their major holiday. 

"Do not be flowery in writing news for 
all types of people must be able to under- 
stand it, and try and see a picture when 
you go out on an assignment," were tin- 
speaker's concluding remarks. 

PROM PLAY REHEARSALS 
(Continued from Page 1) 

Lva La C.allicnnc, in the title role of 
the Swan, had a successful run in this 
play for some time. 

Hie cast includes the following: 
Prill, ix ItBBtllOS MlMleil Twtas |32 

Symptoms*, tier sister M.iwry Jensen at 

Hyacinth, her l>roih< r William Davis SJ. 

Alexandra, her dausBtef Shirley Met aiiliy •( i 
George and Arsea, tor sow , , . 

Ki. bard Hubbard and Geone Iv.ih- 3fi 
Dr. 11. ins A«i William Wear :;_' 

Prince Albert Warren Southwortta :tt 

Princess Maria Uc.nmn«.i 
Count Luetaen 
i olonel Wunderlich 

< xxinteas SitoMBtayn 

< ae-.il 

Alfred 

l li.iinlM-riii.ii'l 
II 11— ,11s 



Doii.,1.1 Dun. II '. 1 

Nathaniel Hill u 

Kuili Vofd '33 

Thutl Brown '33 

not , .i-i 

Harriette J.i< k-<>" :: i 

i hm ai Maraolin and 

Vincent Gasliarducd "XI 



S. S. HYDE 
Optician and Jeweler 

Oculists' Prescriptions Filled. Broken lense* 
accurately replaced 

BIG BEN ALARM CLOCKS and other 

reliable makes 

3 PLEASANT STREET, (up one flISht) 



FISHER'S 

ANNUAL JANUARY DRESS CLEARANCE SALE 

Extraordinary Quality at Low Prices 
$3.95 to $19.95 



FREE ART COURSE 

I N 

PLAQUE PAINTING 

ENDS SATURDAY 

No Instruction Fees — Prizes Awarded 
Evening Classes Arranged 



UMES A. LOWELL, 



BOOKSELLER 



TUXEDOS 



LOWER IN PRICE 



NEWER IN STYLE 



now $25 AM > $35 

It is still the right time to buy that suit. 
Now priced from $19.50 with two trotter 

F. M. THOMPSON & SON 



HtUYNI wins 

(Continued from Page 1) 

meet will serve as a preliminary to the 
meet with Hoston I niv ersit v , which 
takes plaee litre February 6, Sinee 

Mass. State will not lie represented at 
die I'ront Memorial Games in Boston 
Garden on January 30, the meet with 
Boston University wilt open the season 

for the track nier. 

However, the pentathlon revealed 
seve ra l promising men whom Coach 
Derby is relying upon in the coming 

meet. The foltowipg list of the high 

siorers in the different events includes 
several of the l»est candidates. 

Tuesday's Events 





llllill Jt'MI' 






JiriKht 


Points 


Pruyne p 33 


.-,•1" 


KM) 


Ryan ';w 


.VI" 


HNHI 


l one '3fi 


.VI" 
■220 VAKI) DAM I 


S.'KI 




Time 


Pofnfi 


Warns 'S3 


21 1 


Him 


Pearson 6 


37 :. 


950 


Miilin.in S 


17.8 
If HJ( RUN 


BOO 




/ J Mil 


Potafi 


rasissa s 


4 .71 


IIHNI 


( rawford '33 


:. 00 


050 


Kiliniiinl "A2 


S 23 


s7.". 


12 






/•i Inn. t 


/'.,f,»/s 


Brown, ('. :« 


JUNI 


Hot/ '33 


.iT'ii" 


<C". 


Tuft. R. '.it 


:t7'i" 
Wednesday's Kvrnts 


•Hill 


.-).-, 


VAKI) 1111,11 lit Kill. IS 






7 tme 


1','int'. 


Piiiviu' ':n 


:. 1 


IIKHI 


Stephaa '33 




000 


gf 


YARD LOW IM kill. 1 :s 






/ inn 


/•../»(/■ 


l'in\ ne ':t:i 


1 I 


IINMI 


Stedmaa S 


1 § 


0511 


Stephaa "M 


1 | 
If VAKI) DASH 


MA 




» I ime 


/'..|«/v 


ttrl, I. ':;_• 




IIHNI 


VI. i. VI. it km 


M i I 


075 


Stedmaa S 


i . 




I'm!, ne ';s:i 


i ■ 
UtOAO JUMP 






Pl'llS 


l\.lil! 


Play at '33 


W2" 


IIHKI 


Steamaa S 




IKHI 


Kdanoad '^i- 







Ilo VAKI) KI \ 






Tinu 


Points 


|v. it -<.i> S 




IIHKI 


Warren '■'■ 




'', . 


Stedmaa S 


1 lllllxl.lN > llrlllN 

POt 1 V VI 1 1 


'• a 




//. 


/'. IMl 


K\.ui :u 


lltV 

U POUND WEIGHT 


MM) 




/'i lea, , 


Poem 


II..I/ :tL' 


• 
v. VKI) RUN 


l<am 




1 imi 


Points 


M S 




|'«<l 


< rawford ■'• ■ 


2 Xi 


••■ • 


Warren (-' 


2 2:> 





I iii il Score by Poinln In IVm.ii I1I..11 
Pruyne 33 ... 

Stednmn S 

Pearson s . . . I.'» 

Warren "-i2 . 

< rawford a-'t . MM 



THE NATIONAL SHOE REPAIRING 

21 MAIN SIRI.KI 

Between Town Hall and Muwtnlc llulldlnft 

W/..W SHOES V/ / /' and III i I I l> 11.7* 

Ft II. SOLES and Ht Hill K IIFJ l.s M.'n 

ladies koet oUd and Kubber Heels SI.4S 

LADIES MK'ES HEI.I.l.t' SSv 

All Work (.uaranteed 



College Drugstore 

W. II. McGRA'l II. Keg. Pharm. 
AMHERST, - MASS. 



VISIT 

BARSELOTTI'S 

Ail the nqutriments for lite srrioLrr ■ l'ij»cs, 
Pouches, Smokers Combination 
Ice Cream, Caie Iwiihes 



THE BEST COFFEE IN 

TOWN IS ON TAP 
at BUCK'S ROADIIOl'SE 



PATRONIZE 

The Sandwich Man 

R. L. BATES, North Amherst 



MEET ENGINEERS SATURDAY 

iContlnueil from Pu&e t) 

veterans on the team, the Engineers 
having lost but one varsity member in 
graduation last June. For the Irst time 
in four successive \cars, Massachusetts 

Stair humbled tin' Redmen on the old 

Drill Hall loot last vc.11 liv a sour <i| 

17-15, with Foley rating as the beat 
guard on the court. This Saturday 
Captain Foley is expecting to duplicate 
iiis fine performance ol ■ year ago, and 
there is no question but that he will 
have the energetic force of the entire 
tram behind him. 

It is expected that the W.P.I, line up 
trill consist of the following men: ^Gartrell, 
'Purrington, Smith, *.\sp, *Cultto. Hoese 
nun played on the W.P.I, team last yeai 
against State, 

For tlu' State Pilgrims, Lojbo, hush, 
Fletcher, Houraa, ami Captain "Jack" 
Foley will strive to carry the tram 

through to the fourth straight virtoiv 
this season. 

Tlif substitutes lor the respective men 
in order will probably be the following: 
Steward) AJustrota or Hanson, Fewcett, 
Ahlstiom ami Reynolds, 

SOPIIOMOKK CLASS KI.KCTIONS 

In a recent chapel, ballots were passed 
around to tlu- members of tin- sophomore 
• lass, The candidates for election to 
offices were selected l>v a nominating 
committee, ami voted by the « lass. The 
results oi tins election w/ere as follows: 
president, Edmund Clow; vice-president, 
Carleton Macmachin; treasurer, Akin 
Ryan; secretary, Harriette Jackson; 
captain, Joseph Cobura; ami sergeant* 
at 11 in-, Russell Tali. 



KKH St.KI VI 'TO HAVE YOl RIIAIR 
SIIAMI'OOKI) AFTKR A HAIRCUT! 

The College Barber Shop 

"M" BUILDING 



SANG LUNG hand laundry 

No. 1 Main St. Amherst, Mass. 

ki i'.mkim, ami all k.nds or- 
wasiiim; im)\k at kka.sonahlf. 

PRK.KS. 
Our I uundry First <:luss 

Our •••►ll« > Guaranteed 

VI XT TO THE TOWN HALL 



MARDI CRAS Will. ATTENDED 
(Continued from rage |) 

enjoyable dances ol the school vrar. 
Balloons and streamers decorated the 
hall ami colored lights enhanced the 
effect. The dancers coveted the haltoona 
for tlu-v resembled the characters ol ■ 
Hugo novel, with groteeque faces and 
strange figures. One person only had 
tin- courage t<> an.iv berseU in costume, 
hut even that courageous soul changed 
into an evening gown when sin- <iis- 
covered her non-conformity. The entire 
affair was ably handled. There are even 

now the usual rumors about the pniuh, 

which is a criterion of so<ial sum as. 
The cookies were present as usual At 
on,- t-ml of the hall was placed s picture 
of tin- Maroon Key, a symbolical tribute 
to the niin who greet tin- strangers to 
our campus. 

During the last dance, tin- ■tres^neea 
Mire pulled down, ami then- canse the 
balloon rush. Soma unacbiowladged 
discoverer found a batch of nnian mnhr rs. 
and distributed them about. Silence was 
no lunger a virtue, Tin- novelty dances 
promised were not forthcoming, much to 
tlu- disappoint on nt i,i certain partiea, 

Tin- cbaperones win- Dean ami Mis. 

M.uhimr, ami Mrs. Dwight Hughes, 

Expert opinion coming from varied 
qu a rter s tin- nun ning after was unanimous 

111 stating that it was "great." 



TYPEWRITERS 

for Sale and Rent 

w w' ».' * u x 
H. E. DAVID 



VALENTINES 

for 

SUKKTIIKAKTS 

MOTHERS and FRIENDS 



AMHERST 
THEATRE 1 



WPD. 

JAN. 
27 



THURS. 

JAN. 

28 



FRI. 

JAN. 

29 



SAT. 
JAN. 

30 



EDNA MAY OMVKK 
—In 

"LADIES 
of the JURY" 

With Rom ot- Atl'S 



Wlu'i'lor .imi Woolsi-y 
- In • 

"PEACH <)' RENO 

Willi 

Dorothy Lee 
Zelma O'Neil 



Paul l.ukas- Frances Dec 
Chan. Rogers 

Judith Wood 
- In - 

•WORKINC; GIRLS' 



Miss Cutler's Gift Shop 



rvioN. 

FEB. 
1 



TUES. 
FEB. 



WALTER HUSTON 

In 

A HOUSE DIVIDED 

. (Jo-r-'e lit lire - 
Jiii kit- <:<M»|>fr-KolnTi looiioi 

in "SOOKY" 



JbUMOI Sully 

DUNN and KII.I.RS 

- In - 

"DANCE TEAM" 



POLA NEGRI 

I n 

The WOMAN 
COMMANDS" 
with II. B. U urinr 



Three Reasons Why You Should Ivat 
at the Candy Kitchen 

/. Our food is delightfully prepared 
2. We give excellent service 
J. Our prices are moderate 

Sarris Bros. Candy Kitchen Restaurant Inc. 



FORMAL 

The importance of evening wear is obvious whether it be a tailcoat or tuxedo, hand tailored by Langrock in a manner 
which overlooks no detail. And most important of all, assures ease and comfort. Price starts at $45.00 

E. M. SWITZER, JR., Inc. 



II. A. C. Library. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 27, 1932 



i 



HICKEY-FREEMAN CLOTHES 

You get value when wear Clothes customized by Hickey-Freeman. 

Good Clothes are Good Psychology. 

THOMAS F. WALSH 



SUNDAY CHAPEL ADDRESS 

(Continued from Page I) 

We are confronted with ■ colonial 

problem, and we don't know how to deal 
with it. "You are Amerii ans. You are 
going (0 DC the responsible people in a 
short time," challenged the speaker. 
If a Mtu.it ion we can not ignore, anil 
continued, how long '«" |0V*f ntnent of 
the people, by the peo|>le, and for the 
people endure? 

Political questions in China, Japan, 
and India, as well as the economic situ- 
ation all over the world, Rive rise to the 
question: "To whom shall we turn for 
light?" We have touched bottom so 
many times that now we have had to 

form a new conception <>f "bottom." 

Bankruptcy exists in the moral world 
,is well as in the economic world today. 
And who is the authority in these matters? 
To whom shall we turn? It is true that 
nearly every forward step has been made 
by people who have said, "We're not 
dead sure our fathers are right." And 
there is a place for the man who sa\>, 
"I'm going to challenge their decisions. 
I'm going to find out." Hut because a 
thing is old is no reason for its being 
obsolete. 

One time when Jesus' band of followers 
had become shrunken in size, Jesus said 
to the remaining few, "Will ye also go?" 
One of the loyal ones replied, "Lord, to 
whom shall we go? Thou hast the words 
of eternal light." 

Today people say that conditions have 
altered so completely that we can no 
longer rely on Jesus. And it is because 
we do not follow Jesus that we are 
wandering in the wilderness, stated 
President Moody. When we misunder- 
stand Him, we misunderstand God, the 



World, and Life, for he lived not to show 
us how to die, but how to live. 

If JeMis WCfC placed in Honolulu the 

unfortunate tragedy would not have 

occurred, DM would the subsequent 
events have taken place, but even if he 
lot here, his spirit is. If his principles 
Ed been in the hearts of our financial 
leaden and of our people, the present 
panic WOUld not have resulted. 

We believe it is impossible to "turn 
the other cheek." Oh no, it is far better 
to "pack a good wallop." And just look 
at us, the speaker continued. If we don't 
follow his principles, we'll be in the midst 
of another war so soon that some of you 
men Ian will die by inches, torn along 
on barbed wire in a battlefield, he pre- 
dicted. 

At a recent Peace Conference, the 
powers that be decided that there was 
no time for prayer, and so the Prince of 
Peace was not invited to sit down at the 
Peace Table. Is it any wonder the Con- 
ference only led to further confusion? 
There was room for hatred, mistrust, and 
greed, but no room for Peace. 

Beethoven, so the story goes, once 
entered a cathedral and asked permission 
to play the organ. The organist refused 
on the grounds that it was too valuable 
an organ for the fingers of a stranger. 
But he finally consented, and the music 
that poured forth brought tears down the 
face of the organist, who asked at length, 
"Who are you?" At the man's reply, he 
moaned, "I've kept Beethoven from 
playing the organ!" 

Just so we have kept Christ from play- 
ing on the world that is his. And the 
answer to "To whom shall we go" is — 
Jesus. 



COMMUNICATIONS 



The Collegian accepts no responsibility for 
opinions expressed in the communication column. 
The column aims to serve as a means of giving 
expression to student opinion. Any letter will be 
printed which does not reflect upon the editorial 
board, or which does not indulge in personalities. 
Communications must be submitted signed, al- 
though the name need not appear. No communi- 
cation of over 500 words will be accepted. 

To the Editor of the Collegian: 

About this here now compulsory mili- 
tary training 

What course, I ask, is honored by as 
little thought as military? How many 
men, when sweating on the drill field, 
think of the fact that they are training 
for war} They are rather counting the 
minutes to the time when they can remove 
that monkey suit. How many men, 
when learning that the United States 
Army Rifle, Model 1006, Caliber MO, is 
29.44 inches in length, think of using this 
rifle to murder a fellow-man in conflict? 
Surprising as it may seem to rabid 
pacifists, war almost never enters the 
mind of normal, thinking college men 
who are exposed to military training. 

Military training, I hold, is a necessary 
evil. But so, to many freshmen, is 
chemistry. Perhaps the study of chem- 
istry is wrong, too, for it deals with 
poisons and explosives. Pernicious 
knowledge for immature minds. 

I have said that military training does 
not promote thoughts of war. And yet, 
agitators in favor of voluntary R.O.T.C. 
will say that I have said nothing in its 
favor and have even admitted it as an 
evil. To which I reply, in the words of 
the philosopher: 

"It's a good thing for a dog to have 
fleas; it keeps him from broodin' over 
the fact that he's a dog." 

"Dexed" '31 



IM KRFRATKRM I Y BOWLING 

So far this season, bowling between the 
fraternities has run along at a swift pace. 
Competition is keen and the teams are 
all well matched. Kach team is to play 
a ten match series, and while the results 
look more or less one-sided now, surprises 
may be just around the corner. Relative 
standings as we go to press are: 





Won 


Lost 


Average 


Kappa Sis 


3 





1000 


Sig Kp 


1 





1000 


Alpha clam 


1 





1000 


Alpha Sig 


2 


1 


666 


Lambda Chi 


2 


1 


666 


Theta Chi 


1 


2 


333 


Q.T.V. 


1 


2 


333 


Kappa Ep 





1 


ooo 


l'hi big 





2 


000 


Delta Phi 





2 


000 



ALUMNI NOTE 

The members of the varsity cross- 
country team of the past season were' 
entertained by Coach and Mrs. Llewellyn 
L. Derby at a supper party at their 
home on Sunday evening, January 17. 



ALUMNI NOTES 

Harry E. Eraser '2i\ is doing b 
as a landscape architect with a«l 
N o rw oo d, Mass. 

Harry R. Francis '10 has a sal.l. t t „ a ; 
leave from his work at Syracuse ' 
sit y and is doing graduate work i the 
University of New Hampshire. 

Melvin B. Borgeson '20, is Ian 
architect with the Westchester 1,^ 
Commission in New York. Hi 
charge of planting and planting pi 
25 miles of parkway. 

'19 Charles H. Jewell is a chemist in 
the research and development depart, 
ment of the sundries factory of the I. S. 
Rubber Co., Providence, R. I. 

'28 Leslie Smith is a soil sur\. 
San Vincente, Porto Rico and is helping 
with the ground control of Porto k,„. 
aerial photographic maps. He writ< > thtf 
Pep Young 29 is the ranking golfer at 
Central Aguirre. 



8 



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QUALITY MERCHANDISE PRICES TO SUIT 

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LARGEST SHOE STORE IN WESTERN MASSACHUSETTS 



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Phone 635 SWISS CLEANSERS & DYERS Phone 635 



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THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 

THE WINCHESTER STORE 



M. S. C. MEN'S MOTTO IS ALWAYS 
LET "DAVE" DO IT 

AMHERST CLEANSERS, DYERS 
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PHONE 828 Near the Town Hall PHONE 828 

JOSEPH GINSBERG 

19 PLEASANT ST. 

Men's Furnishings - Shoes repaired, called for and delivered 
Freshmen, come in and see our selection of shoes, priced moderately. 
Special sale now on leather coats, just what you need for cold weather 

CALL 984-M 



SPECIAL PRICE ON PARKER DESK SETS 

$11.03 OUTFIT $7.98 $10.00 OUTFIT $7.49 $7.50 OUTFIT $6.51 



To the Editor of the Collegian: 

During the past few weeks and in fact 
during the past three years, I have seen 
evidence to show that a great many- 
people about this college do not appreci- 
ate the military forces of our country. 
I feel that our R.O.T.C. unit, which we 
should be proud of, is held up to ridicule 
by unthinking people. 

The facts are available at present to 
show that this country is not armed to 
any great extent as compared to other 
large nations. Yet there are students, 
supposedly mature thinkers, on our 
campus who demand the halt of what 
they call "a military domination." This 
is asked for at a time when the world is 
in a state of chaos and the safety of our 
country may evea be threatened. 

In part exchange for our education, 
those of us who are male Students give 
a small amount of our time for two years 
to the Federal (iovcrnment. This is 
very trivial compared to the personal 
sacrifices exacted by many foreign govern- 
ments. This training which we undergo, 
i> eatfied on under the direction of a 
staff of competent, conscientious officers. 
1 believe that we may well be proud of 
the R.O.T.C. unit at Massachusetts and 
only too gl ill to do this little bit for our 
nation and for ourselves. However, 

many people repeatedly hurl discourtesies 

at our Military Department. 

Whatever those people may do or >av, 
there are some who do not forsake their 
government in the hour of trial and who 
urge the sup] ort of the R.O.T.C. 

Ashlev B. < lurncv 



A. J. HASTINGS 



NEWSDEALER rod 
STATIONER 



AMHERST, MASS. 



SPECIAL VALUES — LEATHER HAND BAGS 
at $1.79 and $2.95 

JACKSON & CUTLER 

AMHERST, MASS. 

BIG 

JANUARY SALE 

Men's Bostonian Oxfords - Bass Moccasins 

Women's Oxfords - Dress Pumps 

Hosiery 

BOLLES SHOE STORE 



TRACK NOTES 

It has been found that it is to the 
mutual advantage of both the Amherst 
College and the State track teams to 
have a series of dual track meets daring 
the season. To this end the following 
meeta have been arranged: 
Feb. 127 M.S.C varsity vs. Amherst 

varsity at M.S.C. 
Feb. 9 — Amherst Freshmen vs. M.S.C. 

Freshmen at Amherst Cage 
Feb. 11 — Amherst Sophomores vs. Stock- 
bridge at Amherst 
r-eb. 10— Amherst Juniors vs. M.S.C. 

Freshmen at M.S.C. 
Feb. 18 — Amherst Freshmen vs. Stock- 
bridge at M.S.C. 



^Announcing the Opening of 

BOLTER'S MUSIC ROOM 

with all the 

LATEST victor RECORDS 

Drop in anytime and enjoy your 
leisure hours listening to your 
favorite dance rhvthms. 

,-< X ;* 

You will find a most complete 
and up to date stock of records 
from which to choose. 

CARL. H. BOLTER 

INCORPORATED 

Yale Harvard Exeter Hyannis 



ty\\t iMaBBarfriifigttg ffloUemati 



Vol. XLII 



AMHERST, MASS., WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 1932 



Number 15 



DR. HARLAN TARBELL 
TO ENTERTAIN FRIDAY 



World Famous Magician to Give 

Mystifying Exhibition Entitled 

"The Magic of the Ages" at 

Social Union Friday 



Friday evening, Harlan Tarbell, world 
famous magician and maker of magicians 
trill entertain the Social Union audience 
in Bowker Auditorium with "Magic of 
the Ages," a fascinating story of amazing 
teries of India, China, Japan, Egypt, 
Europe, and America. 

For years, Dr. Tarbell has been a 
master mind of magic, a creator of magi- 
cal effects, and president and founder of 
the Tarbell School of Magic. 

In "The Magic of the Ages," Dr. 
Tarbell presents mysteries of ancient 
and modern days together with their 
interesting and amusing stories which 
include original magic that he has him- 
self designed for famous conjurors. 

Dr. Tarbell's original specialty, seeing 
with the fingertips, is a baffling per- 
formance in which he is able to dis- 
tinguish objects held within a few inches 
of his fingertips although his eyes are 
securely blindfolded. 

This performance has been described 
as just as interesting to a group of in- 
tellectuals who can argue for hours about 
how it is all done as to a company of 
people who frankly expect to be enter- 
tained without too much cerebral com- 
motion. Another feature number in the 
program is the rope mystery created by 
Dr. Tarbed for the Hindu magicians and 
"has caused more gibbering insanity 
among audiences than any other dis- 
covery of recent times." 

One reviewer writes: "I have seen the 
witch doctors of most of the primitive 
tribes across the world do their stuff. 
I have seen Chinese magicians, Japanese 
magicians and Hindoo fakirs, I have 
st in most of the American magic makers 
including Houdini and Thurston; but 
I have never been more mystified by 
any man than I was by Tarbell." 



AMHERST PUCKMEN TO 
INVADE CAMPUS SAT. 



both Sextets Handicapped by In- 
experience Due to Lack of Ice 



Captain Fred Knutson will bring his 
Amherst varsity hockey sextet to the 
Mass. State campus to engage the State 
aggregation on Saturday, February *>. 
The game will be the second for the 
bone team, all the other games ha\ing 
bees postponed. This contest will be 
watched eagerly by the members of both 
the student bodies. There has been 
some speculation about the relative- 
merits of the opposing teams but there 
is very little evidence that either team 
is going to find the contest an easy 
victory. 

Warm weather has seriously handi- 
capped both the teams. Amherst played 
Princeton and met defeat at the hands 
strong Tiger team. This contest 
(Continued on Pag* 4) 




MASS. STATE vs. AMHERST 
The first basketball game in the New Physical Education Building 



Dean Shailer Mathews 

Gives Chapel Address 

Religious Leader Hits Out at Those 

Who Expect a Miracle to End the 

Depression and Those Who Would 

Return to the Conditions 

of Our Fathers 



COLLEGIAN AND INDEX 
LEAD ACADEMIC COSTS 



Report Shows Where Academic 
Activities Tax Goes 



•; 



the Collegian and the Index 
• nd most of the income from the 
'<> mic Activities tax, is shown by a 
t last year's expenditures recent- 
I by Prof. Frank Prentice Rand, 
manager of the Academic Ac- 
Hoard. The Roister Doisters and 
ricultural Judging Club are next 
'. the figures reveal. 
the Academic Activities tax of 
■liars assessed on each student, 
*SS for a subscription to the 
and &i.(K) for the subscription 
Index. Fifty cents of the re- 
*ai collected by the Academic 
l Board as custodian of the 
"taral Judging Fund, and $1.50 
(Continued on Page 3) 



"You don't look to God until you feel 
the need," were the words of Dean 
Shailer Mathews of the University of 
Chicago Divinity School at chapel in 

Bowker Auditorium Sunday. Taking for 

his subject the attitude of the modern 
world that men should turn to religion 
now because there seems to be no mortal 
thing that can be done to help the world 
from the depths of despondency in which 
it now lies, and holding the audience to 
strict attention by the power of his 
(Continued on Page i) 

Donglas Booth Speaks 

to Group of Students 

English Authority on World Affairs 
Discusses International Problems 

Last Thursday afternoon, C. Douglas 
Booth, English authority on world affairs. 
met with a group of students at the 
Memorial Building. The meeting took 
the form of an informal discussion of 
the questions and problems brought up 
by the students. Mr. Booth came to 
this campus through the International 
Relations Club and the Carnegie En- 
dowment for International Peace. 
(Continued on Pag* 3) 






Now ill's Sftatflrg 



Last Year 
The Roister Doisters present "The 
Americans Come" in Weston, East 
Walpole, and Acton. 

Five Years Ago 

Proftssor Patterson's interpretation 
| of "Rip Van Winkle" delights Social 

I nioii audience, 

In 1910 
"Buy New England Farms!" is 
subject of speaker's address to M.A.C, 

Alumni, as he urges tliem to make 
two blades of grain grow where but 
one grew before. 



HONORS GROUPS FOR FALL TERM 
Group l 

1932 Miss Anderson, Miss (aird, 
(one, Delisle, HitchcOl k. Tippo. 

Schwartz- 



1933 


Bearse. Chenoueth, 


\\( Ider, 




1934 


1 1 off man, Winokur. 


1 «.»:*-> 


Abbott, Brune. 




(Continued on Page 4) 



HOCKEY GAME POSTPONED 

Cold weather arrived too late to 
benefit the hockey team which was 
forced to call off another game. Then- 
was no ice last Saturday and the game 
which was to have been played with 
Hamilton, did not materialize. The 
number of scheduled games which have 
not been pl ay e d has now reached eight. 



DEBATERS TO ENGAGE 
SPRINGFIELD COLLEGE AND A.I.C. 



Massachusetts will debate with Spring- 
field College before an assembly of the 
entire student body in Springfield on 
Tuesday, February !». at 10 o'clock in 
the morning. The Bay State team will 
uphold the negative side of the question, 

••Resolved, that the L'nited State- should 
cancel all Allied debts contracted during 
the war." 

Captain-manager Leonard A. Salter 
and Joseph Politella Will comprise I In- 
State College team. Main speeches are 

to be of ten minute duration with five 
minute rebuttals. A board of judges will 

give the decision. Both Salter and 

Politella are members of last year's team 
which defe.ited Springfield on the free 
trade question. 

(Continued on Pane 4 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 



Wednesday, February 3 

.'J.20 p. m. Assembly, "Around the World" 

Travelogue, Edward D. Sherman 
H.(X) p. in . Rehearsal for Swan", Me m o ria l 

Building 
x.no j). m. Orchestra Rehearsal, Stockbridge 

Hall. 
Thursday, February 4 

2-ti p. m. Walter B. Wiley, Discu lion on 
Turkey ami the Near East, Senate 
Room, Memorial Building 

F'riday, February 5 
Vanity Basketball, Wesley anal Middd 
S.i ial Union, Harlan Tarhetl, Magician 
Saturday, February 6 

3.00 p.m. Vanity Tru, k. 111. al Ma--. 

State 
3.00 p. in. Vanity Hot key, Amhei 

Mats, State 
7.00p.m. Varsity Basketball, Hamilton al 

Ma — . Mat'- 
Sunday. February 7 
!».i o a. in. ' ha pel, President 

I'ark, Wheaton ( otlese 
3.15 p, in. Radio Concert, M. Building 
Tuesday, February 9 

10.00a.m. Vanitj Debate, M.S.C, 
Springfield al Springfield. 
( am • nation oi War Debt 
10.00 p. in. Varsity Debate, M 
Amerii an International < oUi 
War Debt Cam < ii. 
c> |5 p, m. La n gu a ge! and Literatures 
HJQ0 |i. ra. ( horua. Memorial Hall 



J. 



Kdxaf 



Unusual Art Exhibit 

Shown in "M" Building 

Collection of Famous Medici Prints 
of Paintings of Dutch and Flemish 
Masters Attracts Unusual Attention 

Another notable exhibition is now in 

place at the Memorial Building. This 
time Professor Wangh has brought tO 
the college community an unusual Oppor- 
tunity do .hi study. Thirty-one full 
color reproductions of the paintings oi 

Dutch and Flemish masters are loaned 

by the American publishers ol "Medici 

Prints." The group of artists represented 
is one of great importance and fame; 

among them are counted Rembrandt) 
I Mo/ Hals, Rubens, Vermier, <h- llmxh, 
and Vandyke, 

As Pr o fessor Waugh states, these 
reproductions give better opportunity for 

(Continued on Page 4) 

'33 Easily Wins the 

Interclass Track Meet 

'31 Musses Total of 57.5 Points. 

S'i2 Follows with 31.5 and 

'32 with 27 



The class of '33 placed first in the 
interctaaS meet held in the < age last 
Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday, 
making a total of fifty seven and one half 

points and leading their ne a res t com- 
petitors By twenty-six points. The meet 
was made up of twelve events, about 
four events coming each day. The 
events were graded on the plan of five 
(Continued on Page 4) 

DR. PAPENDIECK TO DISCUSS 
GERMAN POLITICAL AM) 

ECONOMIC SITUATION 

Next Tuesday evening at 6.45, Dr. 
Hans Papendieck, German exchangi 
dent from the University of Koenigsberg, 

will speak on the present German situ- 
ation, both political and economical, as 
a pres e n tation ol the department of 

languages and literal ores in their regular 

Tuesday evening series ol lectures, 

Dr. Papendieck came to the United 
Stairs in September 
Munich and Koenigsberg and is engager! 
in performing research in agronomy at 
tiiisi oilege. 

lie, l 

posted 



BASKETEERS DEFEATED 
BY WORCESTER 39-31 

State College Quintet Leads at I ml 
of Half but is Unable to Main- 
tain Fast Puce 



Worn and tned, the Massachusetts 
State College liasketliall team was dis- 
placed from the lead in the last few 
minutes of the game with Won ester 
Tech at Won ester last Saturday when 
the Engineers forged ahead with re- 
newed spirit to completely bewilder the 
dogged State quintet which in the end 
was toned to accept the .'i'.l-.'fl defeat, 
the first defeat at the hands ol the Tech 
men in eight \ears I he tontest was not 
a question oi tOO little State, but rather 

too much Worcester, for in the last half 
the Techmen demonstrated s kind of 

stamina which the men front the stale 
college could not match. The outstand- 
ing player on each team was the respec- 
tive center, Fletcher lot sfssss*. huwtti 

and Smith for the Kodmen. 

Throughout the first frame the 
Massachusetts basststeers continued the 

same spirit which characterised their 
onslaught upon the Engineers at the 

initial blast of tin- starter's whistle. 
Whirling, dashing, always on the alert 
to take advantage of the breaks, the 
Staters amassed IM points to lead the 
Tc« listers by 1 points at the half. During 
this half, F letcher , Bush, and Lojko 
matched baskets with their opponents, 
while the ace of the Worcester team, 
Smith, could not seem to play the brand 
of liasketliall which he played in the final 
half, although ( ulh-n, Asp and Purring- 
ton fought doubly hard to keep the pace 
set by the visitors. 

The second half saw a very differ ent 
Worcester aggregate lined up against 
the leaders. Although the home club 
did not immediately assert itself in a 
marked way, nevertheless, the State 
opponents played a fast and tiring game 
si. that in the (losing minutes thev had 
everything their own way. The effect 
of the aggressive attitude of the Slide- 
( Continued on Pag* 3) 



QUINTET TRAVELS TO 
MIDDLET0WN FRIDAY 

Basketball Team Meets Strong 

Wesleyan live on Lalters 

Own GstMl 

Friday the liasketliall team journeys to 
Middletown to play a strong sVestsvafl 

team. Official opinion is that the Stats 

bssketeers will heal them, although they 
are considered a little better than Am- 
herst. They play the same type of 
liasketliall as the latter, having a fast- 
lireaking nllense in contrast to our 
varied, sometimes fast and sometimes 
slow breaking offense. Both Wesleyan 
and State play a man toman defense. 

The best player and high scorer for 
them is Schlums, last fall's football star; 
they likewise have a (lever (enter to 

match Fletcher, who has bees starring 

for Stati- of late. 

Continued on Page 3) 



is a i li,in< e t'i bet ome par! tally 

n one ol the modern world prob- 
lem- and heal ii presented bj a 
man vho has had an opportunity to 

\ ii .-. the situation from both sides. 



FRENCH ROMANTICISM 
SUBJECT OF LECTURE 

Mr. Stofflet of French Department 

Is Speaker at Weekly Language 

and Literature Talk 

'That Absurd I rent l> Romantit ism' 
mentioned in s previous lecture is no 

more absurd than the English," wis the 
Claim "I Mr Donald Slolflet ,,| | | l( . 

French department al the Language and 

I. Herat ure meeting of |,inii.u y 28. 

Mr. siohlet first traced the historical 
and literary background for the move- 
ment. Romanticism is a revolt 

th<- idea of using ., ne's head, against 
rationalism, brought about by the terrors 

of the French Revolution. He mentioned 
various English Romanticists, as Son, 

Shelley, Word -.worth, and Byron, all of 

whom died young with the exception of 
Siott, who prospered and lived to an old 

(Continued on Pag* 4) 



1 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 1932 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 1932 



Zbe Massachusetts Collegian 



Official newspaper of 



the Massachusetts State College. 
Wednesday by the students. 

BOARD OF EDITORS 



Published every 



Wallace W. Stuart ,32 
Managing Editor 



Frank L. Springer '32 
Editor -in-Chief 



Oscar Margolin 32 Rial S. Potior. Ik- •>- 
Associate Editors 



DEPARTMENT EDITORS 



Editorial 

Frank L. Springer ;32 



Campus 



mi pus 

Edmond Nash '33 W. Raymond Ward 33 

Alprkda L. Ordway '33 

Ruth D. Camim<bi l "34 

Harkiktte M. Jackson "34 

JOSKPH POLITKLLA '34 

Raymond Royal .(I Mary L. Allen IB 



Athletics 

William H. Wear 32 

Eugene Guralnick '33 

Stanly K Sei-brski :n 

John P. Colman "■'■'< 

Silas Little. Jr., 38 



Feature 
Oscar Margolin '32 David L. Arenuekg 30 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT 
Eric H. Wetterlow Jr. '32 

llusiness Manager 



Kenneth E. Hodge '32 

Advertising! anager 

Benton P. Cumminls "Si 
Ashley B. Gurnby '33 
Philip H. Leverault '33 



Business Assistants 



Edward J. Taliiot '34 



William A. Johnson '32 

Circulation Manager 

Frank Batstone '.il 
Hex bert Jenkins '31 
W. Lawrewe'Sihenck '31 



Subscriptions 12.00 per year. Single copies 10 cents. 



Make all orders payable to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In case of change of address, subscriber will please notify the business manager 
as soon as possible. 

Alumni and undergraduate contributions are sincerely encouraged. Any com 
munications or notices must be received by the editor-in-chief on or before Monday 
evening. 



Entered as second-class matter at the Amherst Post Office. Accepted for mailing at special rate of 
postage provided for in Section 1103. Act of October. 1917. authorized August 20. 1918. 



Gllf? prarnun 

My Dear I *i. : 

'llu- si<l effect! of your mt;il last wick 
li.ive- an. used my heartfelt sympathies. 

Cheer up! E\ery cloud he* its silver 

lining, even a * loud of brain dust. The 
Pftpef Stay well do without one whose 
humor is as Bowing a* an empty fountain 
pen, whose wit is as bright as a cadet's 
hut tons, and whose brains are as high 
powered as a fraternity llivver. 

Yours in sympathy, 

J. E. Lussy 

I'.S. I forgot to say that I think you 
might improve. 

Vermesl Fsdiculu* capitis! Kt tu, 

cute! Another admiring member of the 
Picaroon fan club. The Picaroon has 
one effective threat that transforms all, 
friends and foes, into a gelatinous ooze. 
The slimy sweat of fear seeps from their 
brows when but a whisper of its terrible 
nature is allowed to pass the hallowed 

lips of Ye Pic. For certain parties have 

almost prevailed upon the board to sup- 
plant this spavined column with a Book 
Review. Think of sitting down to your 

mid-day dish of pd and reading the 

ghastly resume of the R.O.T.C. manual, 
bask coarse. Repent, o sinmr, while 
there is yet time. 

Superiority 

Close he bent o'er the maiden's mortar, 
Slow she lost her queenly hauteur 
Vet she stood as calm and distant, 
For he was only a lab assistant 
And she the chem prof's daughter. 



NOTICES 



SENIORS 
All seniors desiring to teach English, 
Trench, German, or Spanish, will please 
report to I'rof. Coding in French Hall 
before Saturday, February (5. 



LOST ARTICLES 
Various articles found on the campus, 
including pencils, fountain pen*, gloves, 
scarfs and a pocketbook containing a 
small sum of money, may be claimed at 
the Treasurer's Office by proving own- 
ership. 



STOCKBRWGE 



Stockbridge scored its first victory of 
the season by defeating Smith Agricul- 
tural School of Northampton 'AT to 17 
on Wednesday, January 27. The final 
score lor the second teams was St. 
bridge 18, Smith Agricultural School 4. 



CO-ED NOTES 



The freshman class extends a cordi.il 
invitation to members of the senior e 
and Winter School to attend an infoi 
dance on Saturday, February t'», at 
p.m. in the Memorial Building. Ml 
will be furnished by Cerruti's orchestra. 



DORMITORIES -AN EMERGENCY BILL 

House Hill No. 427 due to be considered in the near future by the Legislative 
Committee on Education is an emergency measure presented by Harry D. Brown 
'14 and Louis A. Webster '14, Representatives in the Legislature, recommending 
that the Commonwealth issue notes to the amount of £35f>,(XX> so that two dormi- 
tories may be built on the Massachusetts State College campus, thereby filling a 
very pressing need. The need for increased dormitory accommod.it ions on this 
campus has become extremely acute and, with the prospect of a steadily Increasing 
enrollment, has risen as a major obstacle in permitting more citizens of the Com- 
monwealth to take advantage of the opportunity of studying at State College. At 
present, the only alternative is to restrict the enrollment, a policy that has not met 
with favor in state-supported colleges. 

Each of the hoped-for dormitories will accommodate 150 students, one for men 
and one for women. The women's dormitory will also have a dining hail with a 
capacity for 880 patrons which should accommodate the co-eds living in the dormj- 
tories. It is estimated that the men's dormitory will cost JltiO.IMH) and the Abbey's 
sister will cost S195.000. The income from rentals will be sufficient to pay for the 
maintenance costs, interest on the investment and provide a reasonable interest on 
the investment and an amortization of the capital so that the project may be con 
sidered as a sound financial investment by the Commonwealth. 

State College needs these dormitories and needs them immediately. You can do 
your bit by letting your representative know of the very inadequate dormitory 
accommodations at the present time and that it will be a sound investment for the 
state to appropriate money for the immediate erection of two more dormitories on 
this campus. 



The flannel ear muffs go this week to 
the sophomore co-ed who couldn't find a 
, hi of distilled water in the entire chem 
lab. 



Lured by some instinctive, inherent, 
insiduous longing, the Picaroon stole into 
Sunday chapel well hidden under the 
vest of a freshman disguised as a second 
main of griddlei akes. "Lo," spake the 
speaker, "hard times are upon us." 

"Yea," came the meek response from 
several pursethin pupils. 

"They grow anil multiply since ye 
wish to bring back the past to future 
years. Ye are dead to opportunity." 

And then the Picaroon saw the light, 
liven the venerable Collegian can no 
longer find outstanding events of the 
week and must resurrect the gray bones 
of history. 



The following is the schedule for the 
women's rifle team for the 1932 season: 

Week ending Jan. 16 Univ. of Wash- 
ington, Pennsylvania State College. 

Week ending Jan. :«) Drexel Institute. 

Week ending Feb. -Univ. of Mary- 
land, Univ. of South Dakota. 

Week ending Feb. 90 Michigan State 
College. 

Week ending Feb. 28— Univ. of Maine. 

Week ending March 12— Carnegie In- 
stitute, Univ. of Wyoming, Univ. of 
Kansas, Cornell Univ., R. I. State. 

Thursday evening, Jan. 28, the Sorority 
girls won a basketball game against the 
Non-Sorority girls with the close score 
of 23 to 22. 

For the first time in history the Massa- 
chusetts State College has sent co-ed 
delegates to the annual Outing Club 
Conference held at Smith College. Under 
the auspices of the W.A.A. three dele- 
gates, Helen Rudman, Anna Parsons, 
and Frances Cook, were sent. The con- 
ference began Friday, January 15, with 
a banquet at the Northampton Hotel 
and was concluded Sunday with a dinner 
at the Gardiner House. Mr. Fredrick 
Harris of the Dartmouth Outing Club 
was guest speaker at the banquet and 
leader of the discussions. 



About seventy-five couples atten. 
the 1932 senior class dance on Friday 
night in the Drill Hall. Cards were 
enjoyed by some six tables in the Mi 
Building. Winter School students and 
Stockbridge freshmen were guests of the 
class. Prof, and Mrs. Cuy Y. (datfelur 
and Supervisor of Placement and Mrs. 
Emory E. Grayson acted as chaperon. . 



On Wednesday evening, Februarv 
the Stockbridge Agronomy Club will be 
addressed by Mr. John K. Westberg oi 
the Eastern States Farmers' Exclu 
Mr. Westberg will present motion pit 
tures of the Exchange relative to its, 
origin, purpose, and activities. Winter 
School students are particularly invited 
to attend this meeting which will take 
place in Room 114, Stockbridge Hall, it 
7.00 p.m. 



HOWS THIS FOR INSURANCE? 

We noticed in an issue of "The Tech," student publication at the Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology, that insurance salesmen are still taking cruel advantage of 
gullible students when one high-pressure distributor of insurance walked into Walker 
Memorial, the recreation hall at Tech, and announced that he would sell "Ten Thou- 
sand dollars insurance for only two cents." On further investigation, it was found 
that any student who "fell for his line" was told that he had only to buv a copy of 
a certain boston newspaper to get the insurance policy and then continue buying 
the papet every day lor a ve-,ir in order to keep the paper. 

If the student re ma i ne d interested alter this elucidation, the prospective buyer 
would (hscovei that the insurance paid ten thousand dollars only in case of loss ,,t 
life in a railroad or street railway, ami then only if he had paid his fare. The term 
of the policy i> for one vear. 

If nun can ^11 policies like that, then the prospects of having some sort of em- 
ployment next ve-.ir certainly looks pretty certain to many of the seniors. That 
just makes us think how much worse the unemployment situation would be if there 
were no sinker- for such salesmen to prey upon. 



HIS MASTERS VOICE 

We understand that students at Columbia University are to have phonograph 
records of their voices made when they enter as freshmen and when they are gradu- 
ated as seniors. The records of the voices will be used in the English department to 
show students what their speech manners are, and to aid them in correcting any 
defects which may be presented. 

We feel that something should be done about the voice culture of students at 
State College. As a rule, we are left to develop our own provincial drawl without 
any consid. ration of the correct pronounciation from a phonetic standpoint. Correct 
speed, coupled with a pleasant tone quality, results in creating much of a favor- 
able impression during an interview. And we all know what a favorable impression 
may mean these days. 



EDITORIAL POINTS 

It might have beefl the warmest January on record in Amherst, but it feels as if 

February will be right down to normal again. 



Maybe the total score for the hockey team will not be 17 goals for and none 
against, now that freezing weather is here again. 



The ruie prohibiting roller skating on 
the sidewalks has been abolished that 
Austins may be prevented from falling 
into the pits of the roadway. 

Jutht in a thilly thort of a way one 
wonders why the ice that covered the 
dust everywhere Saturday was so good 
to skate upon that many took advantage 
of it involuntarily, whereas now with the 
dust on the ice, well think something 
yourself to sav about it. 

Diary dates: Jan. 28, day of the big 
flunk. 

"Friend*," said the cow skull, "I have 
always minded my own business and 
told no tales but 1 must tell my story. I 
had no fear of harm, yet one dark night 
my peaceful nictitations were broken in 
upon. 1 heard voices, shouts, saw lights 
and torches approaching. Then I was 
seized by rude hands and borne off in 
triumph. All night was I carried for 
many weary miles. It was morning when 
I was set down. 1 saw strange imple- 
ments paddles. 1 think. A fine thing, 
thought I, to take a decent body up and 
bring him in such company for the sake 
• il some celebration known as Mel I week. 
That's my story. Now why can't I go 
hack to my job of enriching the soil?" 

There is to be no more summer school. 
Consequently, many students will lose 
credit. Consequently there will be a 
larger number of students remaining in 
college. Consequently the college will be 
ov e r crowd ed. What is to be done? 

Why, it's perfectly simple! Observe, 
Messieurs et Mesdames, there is nothing 
up my sleeves. Now, watch me closely. 
Two spacious new dormitories (count 
em) are to be added to the campus. 
Consequently, all students who are 
afraid of having to leave school, — take 
heart: There will always be a place for 
you at your dear old Alma Mater! 



MR. WILEY, RECENTLY 

RETURNED FROM TURKEY, 
TO DISCUSS SITUATION 

IN NEAR EAST 

On Thursday afternoon Mr. Walter B. 
Wiley, recently returned from Turkey, 
will be in the Senate room at the Mem. 
Building to hold discussions with any 
students who may be interested to come. 
Mr. Wiley has been doing social work in 
Turkey since 1924, and his presence here 
is an unusual opportunity for students 
to discuss conditions in Turkey, and the 
relation of that country to the problems 
of the Near East. He will be at the 
Memorial Building all the afternoon. 

Mr. Wiley graduated from Dartmouth 
in 1918 and went to Turkey as a tutor, 
but the disturbances following the war 
compelled him to return after about a 
vear and a half. After taking graduate 
work at Andover Seminary and Yale 
Divinity School he went back to Turkey 
in 1 ( .)24 where he has been doing social 
work ever since. He is well qualified to 

interpret the complex: and rapid changes 

in the Near East to students in America. 



Alfred J. Shats, S'30, died on January 
29, 1932 of tumor on the brain, after a 
protracted illness of about a month, and 
several serious operations. "Al" was 
treasurer of his class, a member of the 
hockey team, and belonged to Kolony 
Klub while in Stockbridge. He kftd 
started his own business even before 
graduation and was carrying on success- 
fully a truck farming operation of about 
25 acres at West Hanover. He was only 
23 years old and a young man of unusual 
promise. He was an outstanding 4 11 
Club worker in high school for four 
years and was garden club champion of 
Plymouth County in 1928. 



Eight members of the faculty were 
guests at the A.T.G. House Sunday 
evening. 



James Brandley has been elected by 
the class of '33 to serve on the Student 
Council. 



IN 1ERFRATERNT TY BASKETBALL 

No drastic change in the interfra- 
ternity basketball league standing re- 
sulted from the games played last week. 
Phi Sig by dropping one game, left 
Kappa Sig and Sig Ep tied for first place. 
It looks like Kappa Sig, Sig Ep, Phi Sig, 
and Alpha Sig will have to battle among 
themselves for first honors, although 
Lambda Chi with a strong team cannot 
be left out in the final reckoning. 

League standing 



W. L. 


F.C. 


K.S. 4 


1.000 


S.I'.K. 4 


1.000 


PS. 4 1 


.800 


AS. 4 1 


.800 


i.e. A. :i 2 


.600 


A.G.R. 2 2 


.500 


Q.T.V. 2 a 


.400 


T.C. 2 2 


.400 


K.E. 1 3 


.250 


D.P.A. 4 


.000 


N.F. 5 


.000 


Results of games played last 


week: 


Q.T.V. 7 T.C. 


5 


A.S. 14 l'.S. 


ll 


A.(,.R. 90 D.P.A. 


13 


fA. 20 K.K. 


15 


s.. E. 9 y.T.v. 





T.C. 13 N.F. 


5 


Schedule for this week: 




Wednesday: L.C.A. vs. A.S.P. 


8.30 


T.C. vs. S.P.E. 


9.15 


Thursday: K.E. vs. A.G.R. 


tJJ 


Friday (after Social I'nion): 




K..S vs. A.G.R. (Cag 


D.P.A. vs. L.C.A. 


IDrill Hall) 



The engagement of Ernest Goldthwaite 
S'2t>, to Miss Alberta Benjamin of Fra- 
mingham, Mass., was announced on 
November 1, 1931. 

Fourteen Stockbridge and three Winter 
School students, accompanied by Mr. J. 
H. Yondell, poultry plant superintendent, 
left Amherst last Wednesday noon for a 
visit to the various markets and market- 
ing agencies of poultry and vegetahle 
products in New York. 

Under the guidance of Mr. Dal la 
the American Railway Express Co. the 
students went through the Erie Rail- 
road's fruit and vegetable terminal, to 
the produce auctions, Mercantile I v 
change Pacific Coast Egg Produ 
Co-operative Association office* and auc- 
tion, the New York Central Railroad 
freight yards where carload poultry ship- 
ments are received, cold storage plants 
and to many commission merchant- 01 
the city. 

In addition to the above the Stud 
had ample time and opportunity to 
the points of interest in the city. 

FRIDAY CHAPEL 

On Friday, Feb. 29, a very enj 
and stimulating Chapel exercise *M 
presented before the student body m 
the form of a musical presented by M r 
Ralph Tarlow, director of music in the 
Amherst Schools. Mr. Tarlov 
several familiar selections which i 
forth the enthusiasm of the entin 
dent assembly. 



MONDAY CHAPEL 

Dr. Charles S. Gibbs, of the d 

ment of veterinary science, on M 

Feb. 1, during Chapel, expre^ 

point of view on the Chinese sit 

« t he 
Dr. Gibbs spent several years 

University of Nanking. While thei 

observed many unusual incident - 

was professor of bacteriology and 

there. 



HOW ARE YOU FIXED for LAUNDRY DRY CLEANING REPAIRING and PRESSING SERVICE ? 

WE ARE NOW AFFILIATED WITH YOl'R AMHERST LAUNDRY 

L A N D I S 
CLEANSERS — DYERS - LAUNDERERS 
Phones 81 1- W or J-W 



c;0 ll ICIAN AND INDEX 

LEAD ACADEMIC COSTS 

(Continued from Pafte 1) 

lected for the General Fund, to 

nded in sponsoring debating, the 

the employment of coaches, the 

., ur , ise of medals, award of prizes, etc. 
following totals are taken from 
v,| r . lii.kinson's summary for the 1930- 
n, ending last June. The sum- 
in, i; oee not indicate the assets and 
hi its of the various organizations as 
of July L 1931, but presents an estimate 
-unis handled by the managers 
f the M adeinic activities. 







Disburse- 


Hon 


Receipts 


ments 


ian 


$2,94 1 .24 


7p** , OtSo.OU 




75X0 


7!I.(H) 


Orchestra 


157.23 


170.78 


Roister Doietcn 


1,436.94 


914.12 


Judging Club 


441.10 


276.24 


ing 


202.00 


180.90 


Index 


2,095.44 


2, 284.58 


General Fund 


1,584.10 


1,077.7(1 


Totals 


$8,933.74 


$7,521.88 



1)1 HATERS TO ENGAGE 

Sl'KIM. FIELD COLLEGE AND A.I.C. 
(Continued from Paga 1) 

The American International College 
will be the opponent on the evening of 
a day, when the State College 
debater! again maintain the negative 
tide "f the debt cancellation subject. 
Leonard A. Salter '32, Miss Gladys 
WhittOfl "A~>, and either Costas L. Cara- 
|ianu '33 or Nathaniel B. Hill '34 will 
defend the case for Massachusetts. 

The i uly home debate of the season, 
to be held on this campus with New 
York University on Wednesday, March 
2, il already being provided for. Speak- 
er- l<>r the New York team will be an- 
[ nounced in the very near future. 



You have tried the rest? 

Now try the BEST 

And that's the 

AMHERST SHOE REPAIRING (0. 

"Goodyear Welt System Employed" 



DEAN SHAILER MATHEWS 

GIVES CHAPEL ADDRESS 

(Continued from Page 1) 

personality, the speaker talked inti- 
mately with rather than preached to his 
listeners. 

In the Bible there are a seiio of 
articles which might be called modem 
editorials. These were written by the 
srtSC men of biblical times, and view life 
and the living of men through the cms 
of God. They treat with divine COO* 
Mile-ration the things whieh are treated 
by narrow minded theorists and ecOttO 
mists of today. They deal with de- 
pression in the human spirit. Men 
should look to them to find a method of 
recovering the equilibrium of the world. 
Superstitition is still found among Un- 
sophisticated peoples, and holds a fore 
most rank among beliefs. Evidence* of 
that are found in the expression, "Wrap 
on wood," and the ever present distrust 
of anything connected with the number 
thirteen. 

The world of today reflects the philoso- 
phy of a man with whom Dean Mathews 
once spoke. "We have tried this and 
that, and we can't get rid of the de- 
pr< ssion so I guess we'll have to turn to 
religion." Thus human nature looks only 
to God when they can find no remedy 
for their troubles. Certain men decry 
the conditions of the present and they 
advocate a return to the days of our 
forefathers. Dean Mathews answered 
them in such a manner: "I don't want 
the democracy of my forefathers to come 
back, I want the democracy of my 
children to come in." Such a sentence 
is characteristic of a man advanced in 
the world of today. Men pray to Cod 
for miracles to save their finances in 
this gigantic depression. "Jesus was the 
son of God," but he had sense enough 
to know that if he jumped off the roof 



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of the house he would fab to the ground. 

People think that because they have 

pushed prosperity off the top of the 
world that God will influence the resuhs 
so that no one will suiter. 

There are unnuineraMe laws which 
hold ever true in the physical and chem 
leal worlds. If men open theit eves 
they will see that there are also laws 
holding just as true in the rife which 
men lead. The proposition is not lo wail 
until God Creates His miracle to help 
nun, hut to commence the labor in 
order that ( .<k1 will be ahle to help those 
who help themselves. It is the duty of 
man to abolish depression rather than 
to wait for God to aid him. 

DOUGLAS SOOTH SPEAKS 

TO GROUP OF STUDENTS 

(Continued from Pafte 1) 

Mr. Booth said that England favors 
Self-gOVerarnent for India, but feels that 
the Indian nation is not yet ready to 
bear that responsibility. Ghandi an. I 
his followers are a difficult problem. 
"I hey sit down on the street car tracks 
in t hous a nd s; if we drive them oil with 
staves, we are condemned lor 'using 
violence against a non-resisting civilian 
pop u l ati on'; if we let the cars run over 
them, we are 'committing atrocities'; if 
we do nothing at all, the transporlat i. n 
is completely paralyzed." This shows 
the power of the method of passu. 

resistance. 

After discussing conditions in the 
island of Cypress and the influence of 
Italy in the Mediterranean, he spoke of 
the British foreign policy. England wants 
the eventual revision of peace treaties 

by agreement, not by conflict. England 

stands neither for the status quo, nor 
for immediate changes while "every 
nation in Kurope is consumed with an 
exaggerated nationalism." The rigid 
policy of Franc* in insisting upon her 
"|K)und of flesh" from Germany is re- 
garded as damaging to all of Europe, 
I ncludi ng even France hers. It 

Speaking of the possibilities of war in 
Europe, Mr. Booth expressed the opinion 
that the English people could not be 
induced, in case of war between Germany 
and France, to cross the English Channel 
to uphold the Locarno Peace Treaty in 
which England has agreed to defend 
either Cermany or France if one should 
be attacked by the other. "War in 



Europe is not Imminent; there an- too 

main social and economic change* goin^ 
on at present. The downfall of the 

capitalistic system is very, very usai In 
Europe." 

He also said that he .lid not think 
England would ever accept communism. 
Although industry there is becoming 

nationalised, the land is not. Large 
inheritance taxes on land are slowly 

splitting it up into small holdings and 
doing away with a non-owning Iggrarian 
proletariat. 



HASKETEKRS DEFEATED 

BY WORCESTER W-.U 
(Continued from Page 1) 

ml rs upon the Pilgrims was one which 
dictated a policy of conservative bang- 
ing on in order to ward oil the not fav.u 
able results committed to the Stat, is 
by the Op p onen t *. Inevitable, theieloic, 
the hithertofore gentlemanly contest 
turned into a rough and tumble- brawl 
so intricate in its very essense that the 
referee was calling fouls when I hey did 
not occur. At the start of the sham 
battle, Fletcher and Bush lengthened 
the State had to 25-17. Thereupon, 
Smith p roc eede d to measure the basket 
for one jioint, followed closely by Asp 
who flipped a one hauder through the 
net, while ( "1111111 moved the IV Ti score 
two points ahead lo add to Smith's free 
toss. Foley shortly afterwards added a 
point to the Stale College's score, but 
the lanky center on the opposing team 
charmed the crowd with two shots from 
the floor which put his team in the had 

with a one point advantage. 

With the removal of Fletcher, who at 
this time became incensed al the- rather 



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questionable decisions of the referee, 
Smith again became attracted by the 
magnetism oi the Stat* hoop ami acti- 
vated the game still furthei b> dropping 

three baskets from the' floor, with Mush 
valiantly Irving to stem the tide liy sink- 
ing a loul shot .111. 1 a goal lioin the court 

iii rapid s u c c ess i on. Captain Purrington 
sunk a iree shot, tad Fletcher returning 

lo the contest, KUUTCd tWO points from 

under the- basket, uhile c.aitrcll garnered 

two tallies and Hammer one point to 

complete the scoring. Summery: 

Tech 



1'iin ium.m.lf 

II. mini. 1 ,l| 

Gartrdlif 

Smith,.- 
llo.lukinson.c 
''ulleii.lg 
Asp.rit 



B. F. P. 

■2 I I 

1 (I 2 

I 



Muss. State 

It. V. V. 



lx>jko,lf 

Itu-li.il 
Fletc I1.1.1 



•I 7 IS FawceUx 

o n 11 Houran.lg 

2 2 ti I'olcy.rg 

:t (i « 



Referee 



11 11 SB 
I. ui Parkei 



'2 4 

;i 2 h 

:» ti in 

11 o 
2 (i 4 

1 :i a 



l.t 6 31 



QUINTET TRAVELS TO 

M1DDLETOWN FRIDAY 
(Continued from Page 1) 

So far in the season Wish van has been 

b ea t en by Springfield, Williams, W.I'.L, 

and Coast Guard and his won over 
Connecticut Aggies, KIM., ami Ifrown. 
lor Wcslcyan the probable starting 
lineup is s* follow*: Johnstone, If; 
Wells, rf; Stiiebringer, r; Colman, Ig; 
and Schlunis, rg. For Stale the lineup 
that will stall is probably the- following: 

I.ojko, If; Hush.rf; Fletcher, c; Houraa, 

Ig; and Foley, rg. Steward, Ahlstrom 
and Hanson, law.clt and Ivcynolds will 
substitute- lor the first string. 

The State team has lost only one- game-, 
i.e., to W.I'.L Thus the-re is no reason 
why Friday evening should not see the 
team on the- right side of the score in 
the game with Wcslcyan. 



AMHERST 
THEATRE 1 



Wed., Ken. t 



John Boles unci I I ml a Wutklna In 
"GOOD SPORT" 



Thurs, Feb. 4 



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Don't Forget 
Mothers, Sisters 
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After Inventory Sale and believe us 
things are cheaper. Whether it's under- 
wear or overcoats, you can save plenty now. 

See our windows for some of the 
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F. M. THOMPSON & SON 



College Drugstore 

W. H. McGRATII, Reg. Pharm. 
AMHERST, - MASS. 

VISIT 

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Alt the requirements for the smoker- Pipes, 
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Ice Cream, Candy, Sandwiches 



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Cordial Friendly Greetings 
Dripping with Sentiment 

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U. A. C. Library. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 1932 



SPALDING ATHLETIC GOODS 

We are agents for A. G. Spaulding Athletic Goods — 
Basketball Shoes, Jerseys, Sweat Shirts and Pants, Sweaters, Sport Shoes etc. 

THOMAS F. WALSH 




The Collegian accepts no responsibility for 
opinions expressed in the communication column. 
The column aims to serve as a means of giving 
expression to student opinion. Any letter will be 
printed which does not reflect upon the editorial 
board, or which does not indulge in personalities. 
Communications must be submitted signed, al- 
though the name need not appear. No communi- 
cation of over 500 words will be accepted. 



To the Editor of the Collegian: 

At the recent Arms Parley a lively 
interest was shown in international 
affairs, and many students expressed a 
desire to study the world situation. 
These students, of whom a large portion 
is freshmen and sophomores, should be 
members of an International Relations 
Club on this campus. 

Hut the International Relations Club 
is dead! bast term the officers called 
two meetings. No one showed sufficient 
interest to attend; so the officers nave it 
up as hopeless. The International Re- 
lations Club is dead! 

On many campuses the International 
Relations Club is one of the strongest 
groups; in some places it is even neces- 
sary to require members to meet scho- 
lastic standards to keep the club from 
growing too large. There are some of us 
who feel that there is a place for such a 
club on this campus. You who expressed, 
after the Arms Parley, a desire to study 
world affairs have given us new hope 
and new courage. We hope that you 
meant it, and you can show us whether 
you did or not. 

There will be a meeting probably 
next Wednesday evening, February 10, 
at the Memorial Building. Watch for 
the announcement in next week's Col- 
legian. We hope that out of this meeting 
a new and stronger International Re- 
lations Club may arise. You who are 
interested, COME! It will be YOUR 
club. 

The International Relations Club is 
dead. Long live the new International 
Relations Club! 

Kay Ward 



AMHERST PUCKMEN TO 

INVADE CAMPUS SATURDAY 
(Continued from Pago 1) 

was held indoors on artificial ice. The 
difference between the conditions under 
which indoor and outdoor hockey games 
are played and the strangeness of the 
ice surface itself may have been the 
reasons why the Lord Jeffs were on the 
short end of the score. On the other 
hand the Maroon and White team played 
on very poor ice to defeat the Conn. 
Aggie-s by a large score. The game was 
a rout, but if the ice had been better 
the State team might have had a better 
chance to get accustomed to their pass- 
inn attack. 

Lineups for the teams will presumably 

be as follows: 

AMHERST: Capt Knutson, Turner, 
and Cumming alternating with Owen, 
Murphy and Pomeroy for the forward 

j walls, and Fort, Bryant, and Hallantine 
playing the defense positions, (ireene 
at goal will alternate with Washburn. 

MASS. STATE: Capt. Forest. Cain, 
and Tikofski as the first forward line 
will alternate with Henry, Snow, and 
Sylvester. Cunness and Hammond will 
play defense and help Mitchell keep the 
puck away from the State net. 



FRENCH ROMANTICISM 

SUBJECT OF LECTURE 
(Continued from Page 1) 
age. "If you are going to be a Roman- 
ticist," admonished the speaker, "follow 
these rules -don't prosper, and don't 
grow old." French Romanticism, proper, 
began as a movement of revolt and dis- 
illusion. 

Prominent members of the movement, 
as Madame de Stael, Rousseau, and 
Chateaubriand, were discussed at some 
length. Madame de Stael, in "D'Alle- 
magne," said that all literature either 
imitates antiquity, or owes its being to 
middle ages. Romanticism then, added 
melancholy to its qualifying factors. 
The speaker brought out the effect of 
heredity and environment on Rousseau. 
Chateaubriand wrote "The C.enius" 
which brought him in favor with Na- 
poleon. His early life was all reflected 



in his writings. Of particular interest is 
the fact that he visited America and 
wrote some works with American settings. 
He was famous as a describer of nature. 
This interest in nature added a new 
element to Romanticism. 

About 1S()0 a new mte crept in— 
idealism. People diverged from the 
philosophy of people like Rousseau and 
became interested in chivalry and mysti- 
cism. 

Mr. Stofflet next spoke of the life of 
Victor Hugo, with mention of Hugo as a 
dramatist, novelist, and poet. Hugo said 
"I want to be Chateaubriand or nothing," 
when he was fourteen years old. Accord- 
ing to Hugo, Romanticism is liberalism 
in literature. He demanded not only 
imagination, but also accuracy. 

As a dramatist, Hugo combined accu- 
racy with historical truth, and mixed 
the good and the bad, just as in real life. 
His "Hernani" is a triumph of Romanti- 
cism." "Notre Dame de Paris" and "Les 
Miserables" represent Hugo's great skill 
as a novelist. He showed amazing prow- 
ess of vision and expression in his poetry, 
and is known as a "lyric genius." 

As a man, Hugo was ambitious, as a 
dramatist he was a romanticist, as a 
novelist he was a humanitarian, as a 
poet he was imaginative, and as a phil: 
osopher, humanistic. 

As a concluding statement, Mr. Stoff- 
let said that pure Romanticism is dan- 
gerous, and when pursued can result 
only in self-destruction. 



UNUSUAL ART EXHIBIT 

SHOWN IN M BUILDINC 
(Continued from Page 1) 

the study of this important art period 
than can be found by the ordinary 
traveller spending an entire summer in 
Europe devoting himself exclusively to 
this field. From the standpoint of art 
study one could well afford to spend a 
day or two at the Memorial Building 
rather than to take a trip to Europe. 

Of especial note among the prints is 
the well known "Laughing Cavalier" by 
Franz Hals. It is an excellent example 
of the remarkable detail and the wonder- 
ful reproduction of expression so notice- 
able in Hals' paintings. There is also 
that excellent character study "Hille 
Bobbe" by the same artist. Another 
familiar reproduction is Hobbema's 
"Avenue of Trees." Others outstanding 
are Rembrandt's "Holy Family," "The 
Sweeping Cirl" and "The Stone Bridge"; 
Ruben's "The Painter's Sons," and 
Susterman's "A Prince of Denmark." 

The entire exhibition is one of beauty 
and significance, well worth a careful 
study. It has something of the majesty 
of the old masters which impresses us 
with its infinite detail and beauty of 
coloring. We have an opportunity here 
which no lover of beauty can afford to 
miss. 



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33 EASILY WINS THE 

INTERCLASS TRACK MEET 
(Continued from Pags 1) 

points for first place, four for second, 
three for third, two for fourth, and one 
for fifth, the class of the contestant 
bring credited wuh his points. 

This class meet was open to all college 
men; but the winners in the pentathlon 
for the track candidates, held the week 
before, were, in most cases, the high 
scorers in this meet. Some of the track 
men made better time than they did in 
the pentathlon, while others did not do 
as good. (Greatest improvement was in 
the distance for the twelve-pound shot. 
Rod Cumming hurled it 44 feet and 6 
inches. His distance was 5 feet and 2 
inches better than Brown's record in the 
pentathlon and S feet and 2 inches 
bitter than llolz's throw in the class 
meet. 

From the leaden in the interclass meet 
and pentathlon, Coach Derby will have 
to pick his team which meets the Boston 
University track team February 6 in the 
first dual meet ever held in the cage. 
The following list of leaders in the differ- 
ent event! includes many of the men 

whom Mass. State will enter. 
Tuesday's Fvents 
330-yard. D;isli 1st, Stedmu S'33. 26.8; tie for 
2nd, Pruyne "33, 26.9, and Warren :J2. 

Mile Run— 1st, Pearson S'33, 4.">6; 2nd. 
Murray '35; 3rd, Crawford 33, 

High Jump— 1st. Ryan '34. 5'3"; 2nd, Pruyne 
ii.i. .VA' r , 3rd, tone "3.-). 5'2". „ „ , 

12-lb. Shot— 1st. Cummins* "35, 44'6"; 2nd. 
Holz 32. 3ti'4"; 3rd. Taft '33, 3o'3". 
Wednesday's Events 
Broad Jump— 1st. Stedman S'32. 19'4"; 
Pruyne '33, IS'*"; 3rd. Ryan '34. 1S'3". 

440-yd. Run— 1st. Crawford '33, 57.4; 
Pearson S'33, .-.7.9; 3rd. Warr.-i. '32. 590. 

35-yd. Dash -1st, Stedman S'32, 4.5; 
Stephan '33; 3rd, Pruyne "33. 

3.">-yd. Low Hurdle)* — 1st. Pruyne 33. 5.0; 
2nd. Su-phan '33: 3rd, Stedman S'32. 

36-yd. High Hurdles— 1st. Pruyne 33. 5.2; 
2nd, Stedman S'32; 3rd, Stephan '33. 
Thursday's Events 
KSO-yd. Run— 1st. Pearson S'33. 2.1; 2nd. 
Murray '35; 3rd. Crawford '33. 

Pole Vault— 1st, Ryan 34. iO^"; 2nd. Taft 
'33.!)'1"; 3rd, Caird '34. S's" 

35-lb. Weight— 1st. Holz '32, 33'1". 
Summary of Points 
Class 

1st '33 

2nd S'32 

3rd '32 

4th '35 

Sth '31 

tith S'33 



March 18, 19, 20 are the dates for the 
spring conference of the Connecticut 
Valley Union of the Student Volunteer 
Movement for Foreign Missions. This 
conference is to be held at Wesleyan 
University, and is unique in that it 
directly follows the Quadrennial Con- 
vention in Buffalo, to which six delegates 
from this college were sent. 

Leaders of this spring conference will 
be Paul W. Harrison, M.D., Fellow of 
the American College of Surgeons, and 
for twenty years missionary to Arabia; 
and S. Ralph Harlow, professor of religion 
at Smith College, former missionary to 
Turkey. 

It is expected that a delegation of five 
students from this college, headed by 
C.ifford Towte '83, president of the 
Connecticut Valley Union of the Stu- 
dent Volunteer Movement, will attend 
this conference. 



HONORS GROUPS FOR FALL i I R\i 
(Continued from Page 1) 
Group 2 

1932 — Miss Black, Burns, ( 
Edmond, Foley, Folger, Forest, (. 
Miss Johnson, W. A. Johnson, Jonzalc, 
Keyes, O'Donnell, Pineo, Prince, 1< ()S , 
Salter, C. G. Smith, Stuart, Tetro, M, bS 
Warner, Miss Webb. 

1083 -Miss Adams, Asquith, Birr, 
Dechter, Gleason, Gurney, Hanson. 
Hovey, Isgur, Miss Miller, Parker, 
Sisson, R. L. Smith, Southwick. \| ,, 
Voftl. 

1934 —Becker, Caird, Miss Campbell, 
R. K. Cole, Cooke, Denmark, 1 
Politella, Miss M. Taylor. 

1885 - Miss Allen, I). Arenburg, Blake, 
Boynton, Currier, Dubin, Miss < 
Hermanson, Hubbard, Miss Lindquist, 
Newton, Norris, Robinson, Sleeper, 
Veerling. 

Group 3 

H«2— Baker, Bishop, Miss Bohad, 
Bunten, Burrington, Carter, DeGeHefct, 
Donaghy, Doyle, Miss Fiore, Fontaine. 
Foskett, Gagliarducci, Goodwin, Mai 
Gordon, Hale, Holz, Miss Howe . M ... 
Hunter, Killeen, Miss Lawrence, Libbrj 
MacLean, Miss Markus, Mason. \1„. 
Ohlwiler, Miss Parsons, Powers, Mi,. 
Rice, Miss A. Taylor, Thompson, True. 
Wear, Welch, Wendell, Wheeler, Wits*, 

1933— Miss Armstrong, Beeler, Mist 
Beamen, Miss Benjamin, Miss Bnl 
Clancey, Clark, Crowell, Cummin,;, 
Fowler, Miss Gerrard, Goodell, Mm 
Griffin, Hodson, Miss Johnson, Miss 
Kane, Miss Klauche, Marchelewicz, Miss 
Munson, Pelissier, Poole, Pruyne, Riihi- 
maki, Shepard, W. T. Smith, Miss Snell. 
Steffanides, Taylor, Miss Taylor, Thomp- 
son, Tyler, Miss Wilson. 

1934— Alton, Bernstein, Miss Candei 
Clark, Miss Clark, Miss E. A. Cfltt 
Miss F. L. Cook, Coombs, Dame, M in 
Ellis, French, Miss Ginsburgh, Coodstein. 
Miss Hager, Miss Jackson, Koskmh, 
Lojko, Miss Mac Donald, Man M 
Carthy, Pyenson, Ryan, Steffek. 

1935— C. M. Clark, Cross, Mini Do 

Feinberg, Fisher, Miss Flack, Golub. 
|,,nlan, Miss Kellogg, Libbey, 1 
Mi-s Loring, Lubin, Miss Mad 
J. Miller, Moulton, Pollin, Scott 
Miss Smith, Stewart, Toder, Winnku. 



M. S. C. MEN'S MOTTO IS ALWAYS 
LET "DAVE" DO IT 

AMHERST CLEANSERS, DYERS 
and LAUNDERERS 



PHONE 828 



Near the Town Hall 



PHONE 828 



2nd. 
2nd. 
2nd. 



JOSEPH GINSBERG 

19 PLEASANT ST. 

Men's Furnishings - Shoes repaired, called for and delivered 
Freshmen, come in and see our selection of shoes, priced moderately. 
Special sale now on leather coats, just what you need for cold weatner 

CALL 984-M 



Point* 

57.5 

M :> 

27 

20 

16 

14 



IN TERFRATERNI1 Y BOWLIM ; 
Inter fraternity bowling rolled on last 

week without any startling results. Con- 
tinued enthusiasm marke I this week's 
tournaments, and the standings hot off 
the score board are as follows: 

ir. /.. PC. 

4 1 IKK) 

2 1.<M> 

9 l 7.-.0 

2 2 .693 

i i ,6oo 

2 3 .400 

1 I . 333 

1 2 . 333 

1 | 2:>o 

3 .000 

High Singles 
Smith . . . .113 
BonzaRnie 111 

K S. vs. S.P.E. A <;.R. vs I. (A. 

O.T.V. v- I). PA. K..K. vs. A.<; K. 
.VS. n, s.l'.E. l'.S.K. vs. T.C. 

Alter Nh i.il I'nion D.l'.A. vs. AS. 



STATE COLLEGE 
STATIONERY, BANNERS, PENNANTS, and STICKERS 

LAUNDRY CASES $1.50 REFILLS 2 5c 

A. J. HASTINGS m VSS8m" AMHERST, MASS.I 



STATIONER 
NEW SPRING COLORS 

GOTHAM GOLD STRIPE HOSIERY 

SERVICE — CHIFFON 



$1.00 / 



<air 



JACKSON & CUTLER 

AMHERST, MASS. 



K.S. 

A.G.R. 
L.CA. 

TV. 
K.E. 

AS. 

Q.T.V. 

S.P.E. 

p s 
d'.P.V 



Feb. 2 

a 

i 
s 



BIG 
JANUARY SALE 

Men's Bostonian Oxfords - Bass Moccasins 

Women's Oxfords - Dress Pumps 

Hosiery 

BOLLES SHOE STORE 



SIfo Ulaaaarfrttfiptta fflnUematt 



Vol. xlii 



AMHERST, MASS., WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 1932 



Number 16 



"Beggars Opera" to be 

Presented Next Tuesday 



1 uuous Opera to be Civen in Bowker 
Auditorium by Traveling Company 

On Tuesday evening, February lt>, at 
Bowker auditorium at 8.16 "The Beggar's 

ra" will be presented by a company 
vhich lias toured the continent six times. 
The College authorities in allowing the 
play to come onto the campus in the 
middle of the week are simply taking 
advantage of what seems to them an 
exceptional opportunity for the students. 

Ju>t about one hundred and fifty years 
before Gilbert and Sullivan opera was 
first seen in America, John Gay, a cele- 
brated Knglish satiriest, presented the 
father of all musical plays, "The Beggar's 
Opera," in London. History records that 
it made an instantaneous success and 
•ai given sixty-two consecutive per- 
il u mantes, which was remarkable in 
1728. 

It was the first musical play to be 
in New York in 1750. Its nu»t 
important revival occurred in London in 
1920 when it ran for four years at the 
Lyric Theatre. Since then, the old 
standby has toured America with ever 
iiu rcasing success. 

As .1 picture of English life two hundred 
year's ago, "The Baggara Opera," written 
bj John Gay, features old English and 
Scotch songs and has its musical effect 
increased by the use of a ladies orchestra 
modeled after that which accompanied 
IBS >ingcrs in the days of the play. The 
harpsichord and other old time instru- 
ments are included in the ensemble. One 
of the outstanding features is the men's 
chorus with the drinking song "Fill 
Every Gl ss." 

This is the pioneer theatrical offering 
of its kind; London was first shocked, 
then delighted by the daring inovation 
in which dramatic tradition of the time 
was Itrushed aside and criminals and 
(Continued on Pag* 4) 



WINTER CARNIVAL IS 
TO BE THIS SATURDAY 

Tobogganing, Skiing, Skating and a 

Dance on the Ice Outstanding 

in Program 



Fraternities to Hold 

Annual Banquets Soon 

Many Fraternity Banquets Sched- 
duled for This Week 



The annual M.S.C. winter carnival 
will be held Saturday on the college 
Campus if the snow lasts. In the morning 
there will be tobogganing and ski-joring, 
and in the afternoon the skating and 
skiing events will take place. One of the 
most enjoyable items on the program 
will be the "vie" dance on the college 
pond which proved to be so popular last 
year. Those who wish to enter the figure 
skating, s|>eed skating, ski-racing, and 
ski-jumping event*, sign up with Robert 
Laberge, or any of the members of the 

c o llege Outing Club, before »'. p.m. Friday, 
or entries may be left in the Collegian 
boa in the basement of the Memorial 
Building. 

The afternoon schedule is tentative, 
the times of the various events depending 
on whether or not there is to be a Stock- 
bridge hockey game. At four o'rlock 
the snow models will be judged. All 
models must be built on the east side of 
the pond, and must be completed l>\ 
three o'clock, on Saturday. Models may 
be built by groups or by individuals. 

The program: 
9.00 a.m. to 12 m. — Tobogganing, skating 

skiing, and ski-joring. 
2.00 p.m.— Figure skating 
2.15 p.m. — Speed skating 
2.45 p.m.— Ski-racing 
•'5.00 p.m. — Ski-jumping 
4.00 p.m.- Snow model judging 
4.10 p.m. Dance on the ice 



Annually at this season of the year the 

fraternities on the "Row" leave their 

tt.il homes and with the pledges 

Which they have won during the year 

•eric new eating places and for one 

Ding dine and pass the evening with 

oi.l story It is thus that custom 

Orden that the new members shall be 

welcomed after the brotherly treatment 

during "Hell Week." This year as usual 

mon of the fraternities will follow custom, 

and have set the date for this Saturdav 

evening, February 13. 

Q.T.V. has decided that there is no 
a i quite so good as that near to home 
" Its members will stroll across the way 
and make merry at the Davenport. 

Phi Sigma Kappa has decided to be a 

"ttk different and has postponed their 

banquet until the spring term. Verily 

« l*hi Sigs believe that he who eats 

eats, with the greater gusto. 

Continued on Pafte 4) 



BASKETBALL TEAM TO 
FACE STIFF SCHEDULE 

Three (James with Strong Opponents 
to Be Played This Week 

This week, the State College basket eers 
have a very strenuous program in store 
for them in view of the fart that three of 
the most difficult games on the schedule 
this season are to be played on Wednes 
day, Friday, and Saturday. < >n Wcelnes- 

day, the Srate Pilgrims stack up against 
the Gymnaeta from Springfield College 

who so far have had a most succe-slul 
year, winning five games and losing four. 
Among those teams beaten by the 
Springfield aggregate are \Vc-|e\,ui. 
W.I'. I. and Vale, all by large margins. 
According to comparative stores, the 
Springfield Gymnasts should prove a 
difficult obstacle to hurdle in view of 
the fact that they overwhelmed W.P.I. 
(Continued on Page 3) 



COLLEGE TO HOLD WASHINCTON 
ORATORICAL CONTFST 

Two orizes, one of $30 and the other 
will be awarded for the first and 
second ,est orations on George Wash- 
ington, as one of the features of the 
St ate College participation in the bi- 
j-enurmial celebration of Washington's 
Wth. T*- e prizes are being given by 
'inistration. 
' : ' a definite date has not as yet 
ided upon, it is expected that 
test will take place during some 
>ly in the early part of the spring 
Ihe contestants will be judged 

J, "i the content and delivery of their 

oran 

students have signified their in- 

of entering the event at the 

' j 't time. Professor Patterson is in 

"' all details and arrangements 

'jntest. 



Relay Team Entered in 

Meet in Boston Arena 

To Run Against Teams from Colby 
and Worcester Tech 



h 



Next Saturday a relay team, represent- 
ing Massachusetts State College, will 
run against teams from Colby and 
Worcester Tech at the 43rd annual 
indoor games of the Boston Athletic 
Association. These games are going to 
be held in the Boston Arena; and track 
stars, both college and club athletes, 
are entered in the games. 

Mass. State has available two of the 
men who ran last year. These veterans 
are Pruyne and K. Hale. The other two 
members of the team will probably be 
Warren and Crawford. The alternate 
that will be taken will be chosen prob- 
ably from among the following men: 
Mac.Mackin, Foskett, Welch, and Ed- 
mond. 

Stiff competition is expected from 
Worcester Tech. In the Prout Memorial 
games, Worcester outclassed Boston U. 
in every event, and should have plenty 
of material available to make up a 
strong relay team. 






B. U. TRACK TEAM 
DEFEATED 49-23 



State College Team Wins First Meet 
Held In New Cage 



Carrying off first place in every event 
except the dash, the Mass. State varsity 
track team easily won the dual meet 
with Boston University, collet ting I'.t 
points to their opponents' 23. This 
meet, last Saturday aftet noon, v\as the 
fust intercollegiate track meet ever held 
in the cage. 

Pruyne and Stnphan, by placing first 
and third in the high hurdles, shoved 
Mass. State into first place; but Pollak 
and Bloom, by coming in first and third 
in the dash, evened the wore. Altn 
that, the State team carried off ev<iv 
first honor and added to their lead. 

Caird and Crawford alternated in the 
mile and 1000-yard runs, Caird placing 
first in the mile and second in the KNHI, 
(Continued on Pmgs J) 



OUTSTANDING KVKM 
OF THE WEEK 



Our vote this week goes to I'm 
feasor Walter K. Prince for his talk 
at the Language and Literature 
meeting. 



Norn If a 8j iatarg 

Last Year 

By defeating the Tufts basketball 
feam 2ti-l, r ), Massachusetts wins the 
first game in any sport against them 
in four years. 

Freshmen crash the Amherst 
Theatre. 

Five Years Ago 

Massachusetts defeats Worcester 
24-17 and Williams 21-10 in basket- 
ball. 

Co-ed Valentine prom is chief 

week end event. 

Theta Chi represents college in 

broadcast over VYBZ. 

Phi Sigma Kappa wins Interfra- 

ternity Sing. 

In 1910 
Students are much in favor of 

keeping on with vesper services on 

Sunday evenings. 

\LA.C. Literary Monthly" make, 
its debut with original poems and 
I tories by students. 

Farmers' Week is observed 



CAMPIS CAI.KNDAR 

"F.al drink and be merry fur lamiirrmv you die." 



Wednesday, February 10 
.i.2u p. in. Assembly 

6.00 p. a. Hockey, Amherst, state Rink 
.">-*i p. in. International ReUUuUS Club 
Meeting, Memorial BuiMinR 
7.oo p. in Varsity Basketball, Sprmaftald 
< oll<Ki-. State < an 
K.OO p. in. On ti>-tia Rehearsal, StockbridKe 

Hall 
K.00 p. m. Debating Club Meeting, 
Memorial Building 
Thursday, February 11 

7.00 p. m. Outing Club Meeting. French 
Hall 

7.00 p.m. Christian Association Cabinet 
Meeting. Memorial Building 

7.30 p. m. l-.rnald Club. Prof. Claude R. 
Kellogg, l-ernald Halt 
Friday, February 12 

Hockey, Vermont, Burlington 

Varsity Basketball, Middlibuiy at Middle- 
bury 

Saturday, February 13 
Track, Tri-meet. Colby. Worcester Tscfc, 

State, Boston Arena 
Fraternity Banquets: 

Sigma Phi lipsilon. Weldon Hotel, Green- 

fieU 
Lambda Chi Alpha, Lord Jeffery Inn, 

Amherst 
Alpha Gamma Rho, Lord Jeffery Inn, 

Amherst 
Alpha Sigma Phi, Weldon Hotel, Green- 
field 
Q.T.V., Davenport Inn, Amherst 
Theta Chi, Lord Jeffery Inn, Amherst 
Kappa Epsilon, Highland Hotel, Spring- 

ti.-ld 
Delta Phi Alpha, Draper Hotel, North- 
ampton 
Sunday, February 14 
0.10a.m. Chapd, President Edgar Parks, 

Whi-aton College 
3.00 p. m. Radio Concert. N. Y. Symphony 

Concert, Memorial Building 
6.30 p. m. Liberal-International Clubs. 

Prof. Harlow, Smith College, Unitarian 
Church 
Tuesday, February 16 
8.15 p. m. Beggar's Opera 
7.1jp. m. Language and Literature Talk, 
Hitchomaro. Japanese Poet, by Prof. 
Rand 



Wesleyan and Hamilton are 
Victims of State Quintet 

WESLEYAN DEFEATED HAMILTON RECIPIENT 
IN FAST GAME 32-28 OF 42-22 TROUNCING 



Accurate Shooting by Lojko and 

Superb Passing by Ihish 

Feature GnOM 



With Hush playing a supeib passing 
|ame and Lojko shooting like a wild 
man, the Massachusetts State College 
put down in the last few minutes to play 
a stubborn Weslevan quintet which, 
pomping on its home court, endeavoured 
to thrust aside ihe State attack onlv to 
face the ."llM'H defeat as the game closed 
upon the furious melee. C.reat credit is 
due to the keen eye of that blond for- 
u.ikI, Lojko, who popped the ball through 
(he hoop from impossible angles, while 
Mush fortified his attack with rental kablc 
passing from all corners of the court. 
The Weslevan center, St t iebinget , led t he 

scorers for the Middletowners, followed 
closely by Johnstone, the shifty but de- 
pendable left forward. 

The first period was plavcd for the 
moat part without the aid of Captain 
Foley and Fletcher who retired from the 
game after the first four minutes of play. 
Throughout this half, Hush, Lojko, and 
I Ionian whirled around the floor trying 
to match the best put forth by the 
I Cardinals, the latter playing the best 
defensive game this season. As a result 
of the Pilgrims' excellence in all depart- 
ments, the home team was headed at the 
half by one point, the scoreboard read- 
ing 14-1.1. In the final half, the contest 
l>ii aine more informal and the contest- 
ants became less inclined towards polite 
"ess, as a result of the inability of tin 
(Continued on Pag* i) 

PRES. BARST0W GIVES 
ADDRESS IN CHAPEL 

Religious Leader Questions Value of 
Looking Backward Too Much 

"The world is too much go vern ed by 
its grandfathers," stated President Rob- 
bins \V. Baraton who spoke at Sunday 
Chapel, February 7. The speaker said 

that there is no sin li thing as "going 
bach to normally," that the world lavs 

t<«) in u< !■ emphasis upon the past, lie 

brought out the (ad that the individual 
ism which was ne e ded during the pioneer 

era his developed from its former neces 
sity into tin' exploitation of fellow beings, 

unwise competition, and the pinfit mo 
five. 

The speaker said that politics is look- 
ing backward too much. He pointed to 

blind party allegiance, Kraft, and tin- 
spoils svstem to prove his point. That 
diplomacy of the old type still uses 
armies and battleships to bolster itself 
Up, and that in the far east the same old 
(Continued on Pafta 3) 



New York Team Furnishes Little 

Opposition us Hush und 

Fletcher Star 

Last Saturday lor the second time in 
as main nights the State College l'i|- 
urims again crashed into the winning; 
■ oluma by swamping an inferior 1 laiiiilt on 
basketball ipiintet on (he new court at 
the I'hvs. Ed. building, the score for the 
game being IJ 23, The satellite for the 
State aggregate was the meteoiic "Lou" 
Hush who flashed over the court to 
chalk up ten points at the cx|>cnsc of 
the over rated New York cpiintet. llet- 
cher once more thrilled the fair-sized 
crowd with the one handed shots for 
which he is so famous and incidentally 
added nine points to his already rapidly 
expanding se.i-,on total. 

Fletcher started the scoring by tossing 
through the stiings a neat back hander 
from under the basket. Then the tidal 
wave broke, and the Hamilton basket. n-, 
found themselves caught in the singing, 
evci increasing waves ol attack, hirst 
Hush would measure the rim for a basket 
from the scrimmage, then Fletcher would 

reciprocate with several flips from the 

space under the hoop, while Lojko 
tempered the affair with snappy side 
loops from the edges. As a restdt of the 
early State assault, the I'ilgiims led the 
Hamilton!. ins by the substantial score of 
25>10a| the close of the half. 

The second |>eriod was somewhat more 
exciting for the participants, but of 
COttree the college cheering section main- 
tai.ud its usual frigid dignity which is 
so much in evidence this seaaon, Kvcry- 
body tallied it seemed; llourail, llctchcr, 
and Hush scored four points apie. e 
(Continued on Pafta 3) 



Prof. Prince Speaks 

to Group of Students 

Compares Humanism and Romanti- 
cism in Weekly Lanft. and Lit. Talk 



Northfield Conference 
to Come This Week-end 



Several State College Students Plan 
to Attend 



From Friday through Sunday the 
Northfield Y.WC.A. and Y.M.C.A. 
Annual Spring Conference is to be held. 
Kirby Page, editor of the World Tomorrow 
will be one of the outstanding leaders. 

Mary Black '.{2 and CifTord Towle '.'12 
have been active on the committee which 
planned this conference. Robert Reeves 
of Williams, was chairman of this com- 
mittee, Miss Henrietta Thompson n pre 
sented the New England Y.W.C.A., and 
"Hill" Kitchen, several times a visitor 
on this campus and well known to those 
who attended Freshman Camp last fall, 
represented the New Kngland Y.M.C.A. 

Elinor Cande, Edith Smith, and Mary 
Tomlinson, all of the c lass of "34, will go 
from the Y.W.C.A. to represent this 
college at the Conference, and it is ex- 
pected that the Christian Association 
will send four delegates. 



To examine the fundamental al'iludes 
of the two school- of Rom. ml i< ism and 

new Humanism with the idea ol effecting 

a synthesis of their common prim iples, 
to present a criticism of both s< bools, ami 
to express his own opinion of tin; move- 
tncnta, was the aim of Professor Walter 
I.. Prince of the English department at 

the February 2 lecture present e d by the 
Language' ami Literature department. 

This lecture was the last of that division 
Which has dealt with Roman! fa ism and 
Humanism. 

"Neither are inertly literary move- 
ments," the; speaker said, "the-y are 
'ways of life.' " They ileal with the 
whole prob le m of Ihe relation of man to 
man and man tej the- universe. 

Professor Prince outlined six points of 
agnenient in the- two s< hools. First, 
Romanticism is not bound to defend the 

extreme' and sometimes absurd mania 

(Continued on Pag* 3) 



GOV. ELY APPOINTS 

NEW MEMBER TO 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

Mr. David Maliom, superintendent of 
schools at Charlemont, was appointed a 
trustee of the College by G overn o r Ely, 
and his appointment confirmed by the 
Coun ci l last Wednesday. Mr. Charles 
H. Preston of Danvers was rcap|>ointed 
for another term. 

Resides being superintenelent of the 
Charlemont schools, Mr. Maleom is a 
special correspondent ami columnist for 
the Sunelay edition of the Sprtn^juld 
Union. He succeeds Mr. Carlton D. 
Richardson of West Springfield, whose 
term expired this year. Mr. Preston is 

an alumnus of this College, and s erv e d 

as chairman of the Trustee- Cejmrnittee 
on the Experiment Station during the 
past year. Both will be- ini-mbers ol the 
Hoard of Trustees until P.WJ. 



.::T > 



' Id 



2 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 1932 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 1932 



Zbc flfcassacbusetts Collegian 



Official newspaper of the Massachusetts State College. Published every 

Wednesday by the students. 

HOARD OF EDITORS 

Frank L. Springer '32 

Editor-in-Chief ,., 

Wallace W. Stuart 32 Oscar Margolin 32 Rial S. Potter. .1r. d* 
Managing Editor Assoctats Editors 

DEPARTMENT EDITORS 



Editorial 
Frank L. Springer ,32 



Campus 

Epmond Nash '33 W. Raymond Ward ':s:s| 

Alfreda L. Ordway '33 

Ruth D. Camiheil "34 

Harriette M Jackson '34 

Joseph Politella '34 

Raymond Royal "M Mary L. Allen H 



Athletl.* 
William H. Wear '32 

Eugene Guralnick '33 

Stanly V. Seierski "84 

John P. Colman :( r > 

Silas Little. Jr.. '35 



Feature 
Oscar Margolin '32 David L. Arenherg 3o 

BUSINESS DEPARTMENT 

Eric H. Wetterlow Jr. "32 

Business Manager 



Kenneth E. Hodge '32 

A dwertisinggM onager 

Benton P. Cummin(.s "53 

Ashlbv B. GUENEV '33 
I'hilip H. Lkvbrault '33 



Business Assistants 



William A. Johnson '32 

Circulation Manager 



Edward J. Talbot '34 



Frank Batstone '34 
Hbkbert Jenkins '34 

W. LAWRBNCB'Se.HENCK 34 



®lje pranmn 

YEARNING YOUTH 

A sad, mad, (slightly bad) story of a 
wistful lad.— The Ma.ssathuselts Collegian 

The chapel dock tolled the hour of 
ten. "1 must hasten within," murmured 
■he. 

So soon?" muttered he. 

"Indeed yes," stuttered she. 

He looked wistfully, yearningly, into 
her beautiful, beautiful, beautiful eyes. 
I le had studied mythology, and her eyes 
reminded him of the eyes of lo. He 
yearned and yearned. 

"Darling," queried she, "why do you 
yearn so? I can see what you had for 
breakfast." 

"Y-a-a-a-w-w-w!" he yearned. "I 
study too darned much! Don't get no 
sleep." He yearned again. It was con- 
tagious. She yearned back at him. They 
said good night and went yearning to bed. 

The End 



NOTICES 



Baseball .Manager 

There is a vacancy in the position of 
Manager of Varsity baseball. This 
vacancy will be filled by appointment 
from the e lass of 19M. 

Members of the class of 1933 who 
wish to be candidates for this position 
must apply in person to Curry S. Hicks, 
General Manager of Athletics, before 
noon, Friday, February 12. 

The final selection of a manager will 
be made from the list of candidates by 
the Executive Committee of the Athletic 
Board. 

Curry S. Hicks 
Gen. Mgr. of Athletics 



STATE STATIC 



"Some fev i» that, hut numbers ere in tl. 
'Jen censure WMf for one s*fte Wrt 

amiss," 



Competition for the honor of \» 
king or queen of Dean's board li.is 1 * 
keen this term, especially among the 
sophomores. The suspense will be re- 
lieved Saturday when the honors will bt 
potted. 



Subscriptions *2.00 per year. Single copies 10 cents. 



Make all orders payable to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In case of change of address, subscriber will please notify the business manager 
as soon as possible. 

Alumni and undergraduate contributions are sincerely encouraged. Any com 
mnnications or notices must be received by the editor-in-chief on or before Monday 
evening. 



It's a long road that has no yearning, 
My, how the Picaroon's ears are burning! 



International Relations Club 

There will be a meeting today, Wed- 
nesday, from 5 to G o'clock in the Senate 
Room at the Memorial Building for all 
those who are interested in being mem- 
bers of an active International Relations 
Club. 



As a result of the snow-storm, 
things happened. First, it gave woi: 
a large number of the unemployed, 
secondly, it gave the co-eds a chance to 
blossom forth with their red, green, and 
purple panties. As yet, no co-ed has bees. 
seen wearing one of the abbreviated 
collegiate hats that the men affect. 



Walter Winchell has nothing on the 
Picaroon. The Abbey is expecting a 
little stranger, — a bran-new sorority! 



Entered >s second-class matter at the Amherst Post Office. Accepted for mailing at special rate of 
provided fot in Section 1103. Act of October. 1917. authored August 20. 1018. 



What made the brothers Alpha Sig so 
late for classes one day last week? Some- 
body must have been stringing them. 



Outing Club Notice 

All members of the Outing Club are 
requested to be present at a very im- 
portant meeting, Thursday at 7 p.m. in 
French Hall. 



COED NOTES 



To the Weatherman. Feb. 3, '32 

Dear Augustus: 

How about a little snow for the boys? 
The Picaroon 



MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE, LTD. 

Legislative petitions have interested us greatly, especially during the past few- 
years. It is very amusing to peruse some of the results of |>ersonal grudges, petty 
prejudice, and illogical consideration which constitute many of the bills with which 
the legislature has to contend each time it convenes. 

Now there appears House Bill No. 788, introduced by Mr. Wheelright of Danvers 
at the petition Of Charles F. Shirlev that the- number of pupils (not students) attend- 
ing the Massachusetts State College be limited. This bill will be acted upon first 
by the Committee on Education. It reads as follows: 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives in the General 
Court SMI milled, and bv the authority of the same, as follows: The student 
bodv ol the- Massachusetts State College shall be limited to one thousand 

students, excepting, however, the students taking the Stockbridge e-ourse 

or the two-year practical curse in agriculture. Students not residents of 
tl,,' commonwealth shall he limited to one hundred in number. Tuition 
charged for non-resident students shall be not less than two hundred dollars 
per annum. 

It is indeed fortunate that the Common wealth of Massachusetts has among its 
dtizeM one who has ■ fatherly interest in the drastic way in which the Common- 
wealth hM been exploited in its itt.n.pt to provide higher education for Us citizens. 
WC understand that Mr. Slii.l.x has been finding fault with this college ever sine e 
the "Dark Ancs." Surely, no institution under such close supervision of the State 
M i-^ this College, could he consistently in need of the numerous and varied bits of 
legislative <>ntr<>l as has been propounded by Mr. Shirley .luring his unofficial period 
as paternal o\erseer loi Hie State of this College. 

1 et us examine his latent finding. It looks as if he were desiring to keep the bless- 
ing ,.l learning to a mere handful, inasmuch as the desire of many more than a thou- 
sand c it. /.ens of this Commonwealth appears now to be to share in the opportunities 
presented at State- College. It appears to be an unwise policy for a state- supported 
college to limit its enrollment when there are so many properly qualified citizens 
desiring admission. Then, too, he takes exception to the Stockbridge School. We 
wonder if their numbers are to be inclu.led in the thousand? If so, we had might 
just as well pack up and leave- the whole place to the- Stoekl.ridge School. Also, just 
remember thai M a land-grant institution, ideally, this should be a college, not merely 
another trade- school. It appears that Mr. Shirley desires to relegate this institution 
from collegiate .inks and foster the establishment of just another trade school, of 

which there are plenty in Massachusetts at the present time. It will be conceded, 

however that there are not sufficient facilities lor state -supported collegiate edu- 
cation at the preseni time in Massachusetts. We think that the matter of tuition 
should be left to the State Department of Education, as they arc- the- specialists in 

the administration of educational institutions. 

In fact, the whole matter of adininistrational policy should be entirely in the 
hands of the department of education and should not be meddled with by outsiders, 
especially, if the outsiders might be biased. 



Feb. 3, '32 



To the Picaroon. 
Dear Percival: 

I'm mighty sorry, old man. I've got 
to have warm weather for my lumbago. 
The Weatherman 



Feb. 4, '32 
Dear Augie: 

I am sending you under separate cover 
my own recipe for lumbago cure. I'm 
sure you'll love it. How is that darling 
baby of yours? 

Sincerely yours, 

The Picaroon 



] 



Queer, but Jack Foley, did NOT speak 

with a Southern accent after being in 
contact with all those students from 
south of the Mason and Dixon line, DOT 
did he carry a six shooter. 



Did you notice all the gullible fresh- 
men occupying the front seats at Social 
Union? No sir, they were not going to 
be fooled! 



Who did the best job, the youngsters, 
the freshmen, or the Professors? 



Wednesday noon, Feb. 10, a luncheon, 
sponsored by the International Relations 
Committee of the Y.W.C.A., was held in 
the upstairs dining room in Draper Hall. 
A foreign student was present as a guest 
speaker. 



Eleanor Cande, Mary Tomlinson, and 
Edith Smith '34 have been chosen to 
represent our Y.W.C.A. at the con- 
ference in Northfield, held Feb. 12, 18, 
and 14, 1988. 



Feb. 4, '32 
Dear Pic: 

Thank you so much for the lumbago 
cure! It is perfectly delicious. I am 
sending under separate cover several 
feet of snow. My darling baby says why 
don't you come over some time? Aren't 
they cute at that age? She's only twenty- 
five. 

By the way, where can I buy an ele- 
phant gun cheap? Ever since I started 
taking your remedy, a pink elephant has 
been following me around. He seems 
harmless, but you never can tell. I 
think he's after the remedy, too. Do 
elephants have lumbago? 



STOCKBRIDGE 



The magician would have a hard time 
to live up to our Honor system with the 
handicap of being able to see with his 
finger-tips. 



Then there was the fellow who got 
into the Social Union by showing his 
meal ticket from Deady's Diner. 



About forty-five couples attended the 
freshman class dance on Saturday night 
in the Memorial buileling. Winter School 
students and Stexkbridge seniors wen- 
guests of the class. Music was furnished 
by Cerruti's Orchestra. Professor and 
Mrs. Rollin II. Barrett and Mr. and Mrs. 
John H. Vondell acted as chaperoncs. 



Results of Stockbridge basketball games 
for week ending February • '>: 

Feb. 2— S.S.A. 12, Amherst High 9 
Feb. 4— S.S.A. 13. Deerfield High 23 



After weeks of hard work Proniejter 
Clariy has finally succeeded in matching 
'Gorilla" Gagnon, the flying French- 
man, and "Bull" Gurney, the brute of 
the Berkshires, to a finish fight for the 
junior heavyweight championship of the 
campus. Both men are going through an 
extensive training program. Man 
Minarik is having "Bull" train cm a 
vegetable diet while Manager Beele i 
his man tOBf around a dozen pin boyi 
every day. Although the Battling Kn- 
tomologist is t n pounds lighter thai) 
Ambling Alph, Promoter Clancy is 
going to have I ■uerney wear two bags a 
sand on his shoulder to even the weigh 
difference-. It promises to be a sizzling 
affair for it is a grudge fight, and MA^i 
THE BEST MAN WIN! 

(Continued on Page 4) 



Feb. 5, '39 
Dear Gus: 

It was mighty white of you to send all 
that snow . Now we can have our carnival. 
Don't mind the elephant. He's just look- 
ing for a little affection. I've got six of 
'em myself, including two freckle-faced 
camels and the loveliest green beige 
alligator. 

Yours sincerely, 

The Picaroon 



EDITORIAL POINTS 



We used a lot of space in getting that off mir chest (s but nevertheless, it feels 



good. 



It is gratifying to note that the Boston Traveler still realizes that courses in agri- 
culture are offered al Mate. State. In fact they emphasized it in their release of a 
future with reference to the anticipated Amherst-State hockey game last week. 



The following from a book of Vermont 
verse was sent in By Gee: 

AN EPISODE 

She was short, brunette— and pretty, 

And 1 thought she smiled at me; 
So, when I had passed the maiden 

I looked back again to see, 
But a bit of icy sidewalk 

My unwary feet beguiled, 
And this time I did not think it; 

1 knew the maiden smiled. 

E. D. Strickland 



Guest speakers for Stockbridge Assem- 
blies this week will be Professor Frank 
Prentice Rand of the English department 
on Tuesday, Feb. 8, who will give read- 
ings from his own poems and on Thursday. 
Feb. 11, Dr. Frederick Morse Cutler wi 1 
speak on "Abraham Lincoln The Man." 



Richard G. Tonseth, S'2G, was married 
December <> at Rockport, Maine to Miss 
Ragnhild Heistad. Thomas A. Hamilton 
S'26, manager of the Nashoba Packing 
Plant at Ayer was best man, and another 
classmate, Bradford Butler, S'2G, at- 
tended the wedding. 

"Dick" majored in vegetable garden- 
ing while here at school and followed that 
business for several years after graduation. 
At present he is employed in the adver- 
tising department of the New England 
Telephone and Telegraph Company, and 
will make his new home in Lewiston, Me. 



Inter fraternity Athletics 



BOWLING RESULTS 

Interfraternity bowling isCOOting 
on the up and up. As we are writing 
this from our seat along the playing line 
the conte.-t is proving itself to be a t rue 
struggle of the powers. Kappa Sig has 
finally definitely taken the lead toward? 
first place and unless something 
drastic happens, it looks good. The vtst 
boys here in the alleys are all silent. W 
bets are being placed and the oddi M* 
dropping every day. 

Genest, Smith, and Bonzagni SJ 
holding the first places, and it 1" 
though the "best man is going to win. 
Results still damp from the score board 



are- 



We should stop "keeping up with the Joneses" and now that Military Ball, Junior 

Prom and even Soph Senior Hop are on the horizon, it would be a gooel plan for the 
committee, in charge- to CUt expense s which would result in an appreciable lowering 
of the I OS) Of tukct-. How about it? 



I have no words of praise 
For men who wear berets. 

Nor is there any merit 
In calling it a beret. 

Nor are they any betta 
Who call the thing Inretta. 

A man's a man for a' that, 
Unless he wears that kind of hat. 



HOCKEY TEAM PLAYS AMHERST 
TODAY, WEATHER PERMITTING 

Hockey fans were once more disap- 
pointed when the Amherst game was 
postponed until Wednesday, Feb. 10. 
The Brown game was set ahead one day 
in order to give the hockey men a rest 
between the game at Providence and the 
home encounter on the ice. 

Friday and Saturday will probably be 
the last dates on which hockey will be 
played by State this winter unless out- 
side games can be arranged. Vermont 
at Burlington, and Middlebury at Middle- 
bury are the two games which are sched- 
uled for the week-end. 

little is known about the relative 
strength of the two opponents or how 
they will match the team from the Bay- 
State college. 





ir 


/. 


Kappa Si« 


1 


u 


Alpha Gam 


.i 


1 


Theta Chi 


3 




Kappa Ep 


a 


2 


Lambda Chi 


:j 


2 


Alpha Sig 


3 


4 


Sig Ep 


2 


3 


ej.T.V. 


1 


3 


Hii Sig 


1 


4 


Delta I'hi 


1 


4 



■ ... 






BASKETBALL 

Interfraternity basketball n 
the week, while not startling. • 
one upset. Results of the Laml 
Delta Phi game upset all the 
dope, and may even change th 
finish results in the play-off. K.r 
and Sig Ep are still in the win 
and from the way they are goins 
we would like to be around wl 
meet during the league games. 
Results for the week: 
Lambda Chi 23, Alpha Sig 11 
Sig Ep 23, Theta Chi 7 
Kappa Ep 19, Alpha Gam 16 
Delta Phi 12, Lambda Chi 11 



FOR YOUR BANQUETS — Tl XS TO RENT 
LAST MIN UTE N EKDS PROMPTLY PILLED 

LANDIS RENTAL DEPT. 



PHONE Kll-W 



pgOF. PRINCE SPEAKS 

TO GROUP OF STUDENTS 

(Continued from l'afte 1) 

■ us into which the movement has 
net run, nor is Humanism bound 
n i its extremes, such as formalism. 

neither Humanism nor Romanti- 
c-Hook romantic art. Third, both 
in recognizing the importance of 
lie .H element in art. 
ili, both are in hearty accord in 
denouncing sentinientalism, emotional- 
ism, etc. Fifth, since both are "ways of 
i hey are concerned with conduct 
ind involve nature and man. Sixth, both 
itQi to produce the good life— Romanti- 
cjm by emphasizing expansion of the 
individual, and Humanism by stressing 
discipline of the individual. 

Difference! in the two schools exist in 
tour joints. First, concerning the nature 
ol t lie world. The Romanticist says 
external nature is good; the Humanist 
Myi it is an illusion, that nature is a 
battlefield on which is fought out the 
wrvivaJ of the fittest. Nor do they 
Igre concerning the nature of man; the 
Kuin.inticist says man, naturally good, 
has been corrupted by his environment, 

I whereas the Humanist says it is an 
error- man is divided between good and 

I bad impulses; he is dualistic. 

Concerning the nature of reality, the 
two schools are pretty much in agree- 
ment. The Romanticists believe it con- 

Igsti in Plato's idealism which affirms the 
unive rse to he an embodiment of intui- 
tively perceived higher reality. And the 

I Humanists are not greatly in variance 
with this idea. Lastly, they differ as to 
the means of achieving the good life. 
The Romanticist believes it can be 
attained by trusting to his heart, while 
tin Humanist believes that only through 
re-tr.iint and habit can he come to right 
action. 



You have tried the rest? 

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AMHERST SHOE REPAIRING CO. 

"Goodyear Welt System Employed" 



B. U. TRACK TEAM 

DEFEATED 49-23 
(Continued from Pago 1) 

while Crawford won the- KKKI and took 
second in the mile. Nate Hale, in spite 
of a poor start, led the pack in the 300- 
yarel with Warren placing third. How- 
ever, Warren came through in the 600- 
yard, while second and third places went 
to the visiting team. 

Cliff Foskett accounted for two firsts, 
one being a tie with Al Ryan in the high 
jump and the other first, in the shotput. 
Boston University took second and third 
places in the shotput and also did well 
in the dash and 000-yard run. 

The summary: 

35-yard High Hurdles— Won by Pruyne (M); 
2nd. McKenna (B); 3rd. Stephan (M). Time— 
5.1s. 

35-yard Dash— Won by Pollak (B); 2nd, Welch 
(M); 3rd. Bloom (B). Time— 5.5s. 

High jump — Tie for first between Foskett and 
Ryan, both of M.S.C.; 3rd, Saunders (B). Height 
— 5ft. 5in. 

Shotput— Won by Foskett (M); 2nd, Adams 
(B); 3rd. Nimzoff (B). Distance— 39ft. 

Mile run — Won by Caird (M); 2nd, Crawford 
(M); 3rd. Corrieri (B). Time — 5m. Ks. 

300-yard Run— Won by N. Hale CM); 2nd, 
Bloom (B); 3rd, Warren (M). Time— 37.2s. 

1000-yard Run— Won by Crawford (M); 2nd, 
Caird (M); 3rd. Corrieri (B). Time— 2m. 36.6s. 

600-yard Run— Won by Warren (M); 2nd, 
Glucker (B); 3rd. Ciccorelli (B). Time— lm. 
25.4s. 



Expressing his own views, Professor 
Prince said that he yielded to none in 
admiration of the beauty of Romanti- 
cism, as exhibited by Keats, Shelley, and 
Wordsworth. And he is thoroughly in 
sympathy with the Platonic idea. He 
admires the condemnation of both schools 
of the looseness and materialism of the 
present day. And he agrees with both 
in their condemnation of sentimental 
democracy and humanitarianism. "but 
life is larger than either philosophy," he 
concluded in criticism of both schools. 

Proiessor Prince summed up his idea of 
true Humanism in his own beautiful son- 
net addressing Horace. 



S. S. HYDE 

Optician and Jeweler 

Ocullata' Prescript ions Filled. Broken lenac 
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BIG BEN ALARM CLOCKS and other 
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3 PLEASANT STREET, (up one flight) 



BASKETBALL TEAM TO 

FACE STIFF SCHEDULE 
(Continued from Page 1) 
43-20, while the Pilgrims lost to the 
Uodnien .S'.I-.H. The State- quintet will 
be undaunted, howevc ■;, t..iii K lit and a 
great game is assured. 

I >n Friday evening, the Pilgrims again 
go on the mad and this time he-ad for 
the wilds of Vermont where an unlue kv 
Middlebury quintet lies in wait for then 
wary game. The Ycrinouters haw won 
but one game and that at the expense 
of the jumbos from Medford, while 
they have been prey for the invincible 
Dartmouth, Williams, B.U. and North- 
eastern teams. In Chalmers, Sweet, and 
Captain Ashdown, the Middlehury group 
finds its strength, all of these men being 
dead shots from long distances. Notwith- 
standing this, however, the State College 
may anticipate a victory. 

The following evening, the Massachu- 
setts quintet is slated to continue its 
itinerary when it engages the University 
of Vermont on the latter's floor. The 
Vermont team has broken even in the 
number of games won and lost, having 
beaten McGill and Boston University, 
and having been beaten by Tufts and 
the U. of Vermont Alumni. Another 
victory is expected, if we may assume 
that the Pilgrims will be in good con- 
dition. 



FISHER'S 
ANNUAL JANUARY DRESS CLEARANCE SALE 

Extraordinary Quality at Low Prices 

$3.95 to $19.95 



WESLEY AN DEFEATED 

IN FAST GAME 32-28 
(Continued from Pais 1) 

referee to distinguish between plays 
having a foul odor and plays having no 
objectionable odor. The Middletowners 
Cupped the lead very early in the tieriod 
hut the State College quintet weathered 
the storm and managed to keep within 
si^ht. With two minutes to play, Lojko 
and bush Open ed up a withering offensive 
attack which quickly oviri.tinc the 
Cardinals, and with Foley and Fletcher 
ee>-operatiiiK, the States handed the- 
Westeysfl e|iiintet a singular defeat by 
five points. The summary: 

Muss. Slate Wenleyan 

h. v. p. B, r. I*. 

Bush.rf 2 1 ."> < olciii.iti.hj 1 1 3 

Lojkojf 7 3 17 WiKiic-rs.lu O (I () 

ll.uison.c 2 4 U'.lls.ri! 1 (I ) 

Fletcher/: 1 l Sttiebuiger.c ■< <> lo 

Re-yncjlcls.ru O II (nhiistniii.il :t 2 h 

Poley.rg 1 o L' e r.iw.lf 

llouran.Ig 1 1 a lrick<-.lf 



O u i 

O (I II 

Shluma.rf 2 1 , r i 



Totals 13 32 

kctinc. Waters. 



Totals 



12 4 SJ 



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I adies' .Shoes SoUd and Kubber Heels 
LADIES SHOES HEELED 



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College Drugstore 

W. H. McGRATII, Reg. Pharm. 
AMHERST, - MASS. 



VISIT 

BARSELOTTI'S 

All the requirements for the smoker- Pipes, 
Pouches, Smokers Combination 
Ice Cream, Candy, Sandwiches 



THE BEST COFFEE IN 

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Hamilton RECIPIENT 

OF 42-22 TROUNCING 
(Continued from Pafta 1) 

s/hile Foley and Haaaoa lathered in 

four points rue h. ( UlikaiiUMi eont inued 
to add to iiis n-.im's seem- U-inc; fortified 
by Fogle, who was out s(. incline; loi I he- 
New Vorhera throughout the game. The 

contest ended as I.ojko swished the- 

strings for one point. The summary: 

Muaa. State Hamilton 

n i- p. b. r. i' 

loiko.lf L' I 7 S.eri.itto.ru (I 

ll.enson.lf 1 1 ,J Kay.rg 1 I A 

Buah,r1 4 -J in Pritchardas <» - I 

Stew.ert.rf Omit i., 1 O 2 

Fletcher .c 4 1 9 Burkr.c 1 2 

PSWCVU.C Frank ,c 1 1 

Fole-y.ls 3 1 7 Kogle.rf 1 It , r . 

Ahlitrom.lg Ollikainen.lf 3 1 7 

Uhile-.lg- L>eSorno.lf O O 

1 Ionian. rg 3 6 

Ki'Yiinlcia.rg 

1 In U.ik 



Totals 



7 K 22 



17 8 42 Totals 

Referee, Keldman. Umpire, Day. Time, 
•iO-minute halvea. 



PRES, BARSTOW GIVES 

ADDRESS IN CHAPEL 
Continued from Paga 1) 

hold up and grab is being enacted at tin- 
present moment. 

Religion is also looking backward said 
the speaker, and it is high time to shelve 
the old type of mental inertia and un- 
tenable definitions. Youth questions the 
old attitude and peers toward idealism. 
It is here that religion has a great con- 
tribution to make in guiding this mental 
alertness. 

The speaker further stated that the 
world is in its present position because 
of lack of vision and lack of far range 
planning, and that an interpre ation ol 
brotherhood has rlem o ae t r ated its value. 



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RADIO CONCERT 

Harold Bauer, pianist, who w.i- i< 
evntlv he-anl in the concert sponsored by 
the- Amherst Communtt) Concert teao 
elation, sriil Ik- the soloist Ml seal Sun- 
day's offering of the New Yoik Symphony 
Philharmonic Orchestra. The orchestra 

will be led bv Hi mm W.ilici, and will l,e 
heard on the radio in the- Memorial Mall 
at A O'clock. 

Mauer will play Shnlurt's Cumito in 

l minor. Mahh-r's Fifth Symphony will 

also be featured in the program. Mahler 

is perhaps the most outstanding English 

composer of the present day. 

PROF. II \Kl.ow TO SPKAK 

AT FORUM THIS SUNDAY 

At the Arms I'arley condneteel by the 
NW.C.A. and the Christian Association, 
last month, Professor S. Ralph ll.nlow 
one of tln^ speakers, was asked by our 
Student! what M can do to promote 
world peaee. In answer to this Proiessor 
Harlow said that he would be glad to 
spend a whole evening on that point. 
As a result of this, mem!>ers of the 
Liberal Club, the International Relations 
Club, and all others who are interested 
will have the op|H>rttmity to hear Pro- 
fessor Harlow at the Unity Forum next 
Sunday evening. He will s|>eak on 
"What we can do to promote world 
|>eaoe," and there will be a discussion 
afterwards. 

The Unity Porum is a Kroup, OOSaposad 
mostly of students, which meets every 
Sunday evening in the social rooms of 
the Unity Chun h to discuss national and 
world problems. The social |>eriod is at 
six o'clock, and the discussion is from 
>;.:«) to 7..I0. 



AMHERST 
THEATRE 1 



WED. 

FEB. 
10 

THURS. 
FEB. 

11 



LouIkc 

— Ill— 



"STWM'IM; SISIKRS' 
Laurel A Hurcly Comedy 



FRI. 
FEB. 

12 



M.i i Ion Marsh 

In "UNDKR 18" 

— Note 
FRENCH TAI.MIS 
al 4. .to p.m. 



Murium lluiikins 
I'llllllpH lloliiu-s 

- In - 
TWO KINDS OF 
WOMKN" 



SAT. 

FEB. 
13 



M0N. 

FEB. 

IS 

TUES. 
FEB. 

16 



Warner Olund 

I. in. In U.iekuis 

In "CIIAKMK CHAN'S 
CHANCE" 

- added ullrwi tion - 

Slim Summervlllc Emm l»itt» 

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«• A. C. Library. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 1932 



NETTLETON SHOES 

The Miller Cook Shoes are styled in good taste as usual for men who like to be correctly dressed. 

Come in now and see our latest assortment. 

THOMAS F. WALSH 



FACULTY SPORTS 

Faculty sports arc in full swing at the 

Physical Education Building. The hand* 
ball court in Room 11 A as well as the 
courts for other sports, is now available 
for faculty and students. The other sports 
that the faculty are trying are badminton 
and volley ball. If they so desire, some 
of them might play basketball. 

These classes are for all the men of 
the faculty and for graduate students. 
They give the professors a moderate 
amount of exercise and recreation as well 
as the opportunity to get together. This 
opportunity is given to all those who 
purchase a Winter Term Service Ticket 
at the Treasurer's Office, and report to 
Dr. Raddiffe. Then the facilities of the 
Physical Ed .nation Building are avail- 
able to them. 

The games that are being played are 
badminton on Mondays and Fridays 
between 6 and (> p.m. and volley ball and 
handball on Tuesdays and Thursdays 
between 5 and C> p.m. Badminton is an 
old game, similar to lawn tennis, which 
is very popular around Boston. With 
the help of the action they get in this 
game as well as that in volley ball and 
hand ball, the professors will soon be so 
physically fit that they will be challeng- 
ing the students to a game of basketball. 



ALUMNI NOTES 



FRATERNITIES TO HOLD 

ANNUAL ■ANQUBTS SOON 
(Continued from Page 1) 

Kappa Sigma has also decided to 
boost I local hostelry when they meet 
the lidtli of the month at the Davenport. 
Truly Dead'ys missing sign has served 
its intended purpose as another house 
refuses to be tortured by long rides and 
waits. 

Theta Chi will seek refreshments at 
the Lord Jetf. Looks like btxnning 
times locally. 

Sigma Phi Kpsilon rides to Creenfield 
and banquets at the VVeldon Hotel. Who 
says a name is not a drawing card? 

Lambda Chi says, "there is good eats 
irt this here town," and will patronize 
the Lord Jeff. Need we say more? 

Alpha Sigma Phi travels up the valley 

to Greenfield and the popular Weldon 
Hotel. It's Carnival time in Greenfield. 
Why say more? 

Ye shall eat and find no place better 
than the Lord Jeff believes Alpha Gamma 
Rho. One more marl: for the local hotels. 

The Highland Hotel in Springfield 
will be the destination of Kappa Kpsilon. 
"Them boys have courage to forage so 
far from home in such cars, but it is 
worth the try." 

Delta Phi Alpha will dine at the Draper 
Hotel in Northampton. Habit will ever 
assert itself. 



"BEGGAR! OPERA" TO BE 

PRESENTED NEXT TUESDAY 

(Continued from Page 1) 

beggars made heroes. The outline of 
Gay's first attempt at satirical play- 
writing will show that the present day 
authors who write of the underworld and 
its denizen are simply reverting to an 
old field more than two centuries old. 
In this play, all of the villains are smart 
satirists, marriage is a myth, honesty a 
fable, and a villain is the hero. The 
modern version, which will be given here, 
has been toned down a bit by Arnold 
Bennett, and the music has been re- 
written and supplemented by Frederic- 
Austin. 

The cast will include Sylvia Nelis as 
Polly Peachum, John Mott as Capt. 
Macheath, Vera Hurstas as Lucy Lockit, 
Charles Magrath as Peachum, Elsie 
French as Mrs. Peachum, and Gwilym 
Williams as Lockit. 

Tickets are $1.50 and $1.00 at the 
Alumni Office. Students may secure a 
60 cent reduction upon these prices by 
presenting their activities ticket in per- 
son at the Alumni Office. 

By special arrangement, the Iolanthe 
rehearsal for that evening has been 
scheduled for G.45. 



STATE STATIC 

(Continued from Page 2) 



because Dutchy Barnard and Barny 
Troy could not settle their dispute on 
the various merits of Humanism and 
Romanticism they called on Professor 
Prince to settle the debate, but Professor 
Prince knew his instructors, so he re- 
mained neutral. 



"Red" Ball is seriously thinking of 
taking his hockey squad down South to 
play several of the Southern universities. 
He has lost all faith in New England 
weather for when it is not hot, it is 
raining, and when it is not raining it is 
snowing. 



As usual one fraternity sent an inno- 
cent freshman to the "Hour stead" 'luring 
"Hell Week." The president of the 
Roister Doisters immediately gav. him 
a practical lesson in the art of nuking 
fudge. 



Willard S. Little '13, who took the 
landscape course here and worked in 
that line for several years, has branched 
off into sanitary engineering. Just at 
present he is attending the graduate 
school of sanitary engineering at Har- 
vard, having received a Rockefeller 
Foundation Fellowship on account of 
the fine work which he has done at 
Newburyport, Mass. and Bucksport, Me, 

'23 Edward N. Tisdale is director of 
guidance and research for the city school 
system at Great Falls, Mont. 

'29 Charles W. Barr is instructor in 
landscape architecture at the Michigan 
State College, East Lansing, Mich. 



Q.T.V. HOUSE DANCE 

Immediately following State's victory 
over Hamilton, several members of the 
visiting team found their way to the 
Q.T.V. house where a house dance was 
in progress as "Ham" Nelson once again 
played for the benefits of the brothers of 
Q.T.V. 

Members from the other houses were 
present, as were members of Hamilton's 
team. The house was decorated with 
streamers of brown and white. The 
chaperones included none other than 
Coach Melvin Taube and his wife as 
well as another backbone to the college 
football team, Doctor Raddiffe, and his 
wife. 



INTELLIGENCE TESTS SHOW 

RELATION OF CLASS GROUPS 



To see some of the members of our 
faculty chasing a piece of cork with 
some feathers stuck in it would cause 
wonder, especially in a person who has 
these faculty members guiding his scho- 
lastic career. He would not believe that 
these wild-eyed, panting men tearing up 
the ground in the Cage were the same 
that lull him to sleep every other day. 



It is surprising how some peopi, , ire 
transformed by the atmosphere of a 
theatre. No matter how dull they may 
be in a classroom, upon entering the 
theatre they suddenly become brilliant 
wits — half-wits. 



One freshman was heard to say after 
a long, cold midnight hike, "I'm not 
going to have the freshmen next y. a p 
on such a long hike." OH YEAH! 



A new "racket" has been taken up by 
various fraternities. Take a radio on 
trial for several weeks, and then try 
another one. Why buy one? 



NOW IT'S HISTORY: Once upon a 
time, back in the fall of 1961, a fresh- 
man co-ed smoking a cigarette was a 
rarity, but now . 



WHY OVER-PAY ON YOUR DRY CLEANING? 
We will dry-clean and press your suit or topcoat for $1.00 

We call and deliver free daily 
Phone 635 SWISS CLEANSERS & DYERS Phone 635 

Over First National Store 



SKI OUTFITS SKATING OUTFITS 

lowest PRICES! HIGHEST QUALITY! 

COLODNY CLOTHING COMPANY 

32 MAIN ST. (Near Depot) NOR! HAMPTON 

Ski Suits for Men and Women! 

Ski Boots $6.50 Skating Breeches $2.95 

Ski Coats $5.95— Riding Boots and Breeches 



Intelligence tests are to a freshman 
just another series of bewildering events 
during his first term as a college student. 
He takes these tests knowing almost 
nothing about them. He does not realize 
what these tests are used (or, nor what 
their importance is. 

Two of these tests are given to every 
entering class. These two are the "Army 
Alpha" test, and the psychological test. 
The other tests given this year were 
different than those given in past years. 
The results of the "Army Alpha" and 
the psychological testJ for the four classes 
now in college are as follows: 
Class Army Alpha Psychological 

1932 H9 176 

1933 145 184 

1934 148 176 

1935 142 192 
Highest possible 

score 212 370 

The psychological test, which is pre- 
pared at the University of Chicago, is 
given to many freshmen throughout the 
country every year, and the results are 
incorporated in a report published by 
the American Council on Education. In 
L029 this report showed that the results 
of the teits given to the class of '3.5 placed 
Mass. State sixth among 131 colleges, 
while the test given to the class of '34 
placed Mas*. State thirteenth among 137 
colleges. The rc|>ort on this year's tests 
throughout the country will be published 
some time this spring. 



With all the Disarmament Conferen es, 
Peace Pacts, Arms Parleys and Arbitra- 
tion Boards going on, here on campus 
we have Military majors plugging for 
their exams. It's a funny world after all. 



How about chipping in for a couple of 
new dormitories? It has been a long time 
since the last drive on campus. 



One freshman after he received his 
exam paper in Chemistry remarked, "Oh 
well, we all make mistakes, that's why- 
pencils have erasers on them." It's too 
bad the Professors do not see it that way. 

Coming events cast their shadow-, I.e. 
fore them. Why are all the Military 
majors having their cadet suits prend 
and their boots polished? Why? Because 
the Military Ball is just around the 
proverbial corner. 



(Over the radio it's "By special per- 
mission of the copyright owners," here 
on campus it's "By special permission of 
the governing commission.") 



Now that we have had the "Zebras" 
and are in the period of the "Pilgrims," 
let's get a new name. But please, NOT 
the "Statesmen." 



If you are in need of a little bit of 
excitement just step into the Cage some 
night and watch a fraternity basketball 
game. You can have your choice of a 
fist fight, a wrestling match, or a general 
mix-up. Boys must have their fun! 



We wonder if the Dean gave himself a 
cut for being late at Chapel the other 
morning. 



INFORMAL DANCE 

Illustrious illuminaries, and famous 
personages of the college, following the 
philosophy of Dr. Harlan Tarbell, de- 
cided to put a little magic into their 
meditative lives, and therefore they 
attended the Informal Committee's dance 
on Friday night. 

"Ham" Nelson was one of the mediums 
of furnishing this elusive magic called 
music, and a good crowd was the desk 
which gave the dance a magical atmo- 
sphere. Costumes, while not from ttf 
flung countries, were nevertheless color- 
ful, and there is no need to say that tk 
usual number of dancers there wire 
hypnotized. 



M. S. C. MEN'S MOTTO IS ALWAYS 
LET "DAVE" DO IT 

AMHERST CLEANSERS, DYERS 
and LAUNDERERS 



PHONE 828 



Near the Town Hall 



PHONE 828 



INTERCOLLEGIATES 



Everything in Hardware 
and Radio Equipment 

ATWATER-KENT 

________ AND ===== 

MAJESTIC RADIO 

THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 

THE WINCHESTER STORE 



At last the value of extra-curricular 
activities is being acknowledged. Among 
other colleges, the Milton College faculty 
has adopted a plan whereby worth while 
extra-curricular activities of the students 
will have official recognition with "ser- 
vice credits." 



JOSEPH GINSBERG 

19 PLEASANT ST. 

Men's Furnishings - Shoes repaired, called for and delivered 
Freshmen, come in and see our selection of shoes, priced moderately. 
Special sale now on leather coats, just what you need for cold weather 

CALL 984-M 



Professor Charles G. Shaw, of N.V.I', 
who proclaimed whistlers to be morons 
has been subjected to ruthless, multi 
lateral criticism from all over the country. 
Disregarding his purpose in his state- 
ments, and all this adverse criticism, 
there is nothing like a radical idea to give 
people food for thought. He has lightened 
the load about our hearts by giving us 
quaint ideas to think about. 

Some of his unusual ideas are that: 
"Pants are a sign of patriotism; avoiii 
knickers or Democracy will go to the 
bow-wows"; "A million dollar prize 
should be given to the man who can 
invent a reason for living"; "Women 
alone have culture in America"; "We have 
no men of culture, they are all women"; 
"The Phi Beta Kappa key is useless"; 
"Men are growing womanish and are 
losing their title to the name, 'he-men.' " 



STARTLING 1932 VALUE - MY-NAME PRINTED STATIONERY 
200 single or 100 double Sheets and 100 Envelopes with 3 lines of address on 
both. Choice of Colors in both Paper and Ink. 
$1.00 a box 

A. J. HASTINGS "TStSST' AMHERST, M ASS. 

NEW SPRING COLORS 

GOTHAM GOLD STRIPE HOSIERY $1.00 pair 

SERVICE — CHIFFON 

JACKSON & CUTLER 

AMHERST, MASS. 



RTC 
JANUARY SALE 

Men's Bostonian Oxfords - Bass Moccasins 

Women's Oxfords - Dress Pumps 

Hosiery 

BOLLES SHOE STORE 



Slfo jMaaaarfrttfigttH (Eallrgtatt 



Vol. XLII 



AMHERST, MASS., WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 1932 



Number 17 



Hockey and Basketball Men 
Complete Successful Week 



BASKETEERS DEFEAT 
THREE STRONG TEAMS 

vniiiftfield, Middlebury and Univ. of 

Vermont Successive Victims 

of Fast State Five 



Coach Freddie Ellert's basketeers de- 
flated the Springfield hoopsters in a 
clo-ely contested contest last Wednesday 
evtfliag on the floor in the Physical 
Education building cage. The attack 
shown by the State men was a withering 
me which found holes in the gymnast's 
defense. All through the game the crowd 
Vgl kept in a state of high excitement as 
the score changed frequently. 

Playing their first game in the new 
the Springfield team at once took 
pos-cssion of the lead with Randall 
scoring the first basket. After a three 
point advantage had been held for a 
abort lime the Maroon and White offence 
got under way and the Staters were out 
in front. Passwork was the feature of 
the St*«* uprising and soon the score had 
the one-sided appearance of 13-4 in favor 
of the home team. At this point in the 
fray Coach Ellert took out some of the 
wearied State team and replaced tliem 
with fresh players. Four baskets in a 
roa by the Springfield team had the 
State rooters scared but the half time 
horn was blown with State still in the 
lead by four points. 

1 he visitors started out in the second 
period to do or die in the attempt and 
danger of being headed was only averted 
by the elusive Louis Bush who tallied 
four points in quick succession. A well- 
timed shot by Meyers gave Springfield a 
lead of one point. 

Mass. State rallied and came back 
■trough/ to win by two baskets. I-ojko 
and llouran tossed the last two markers 
tor State and the game was over. 
(Continued on Pag* 4) 



Christian Association 

Asks Help for Miners 

Old Clothes to Be Collected at 
Fraternity Houses 



In response to the urgent call from the 
West Virginia coal fields for relief for the 
unemployed miners and their families 
the Christian Association is pushing a 

ipttgn for old clothes. Harold Sahcan 
34 ii the chairman of the committee in 

rgi of tills relief project, and be has 

arranged for a representative in each 
fraternity house and dormitory to collect 
the material before next Friday noon. 

For years conditions in the West 

Virginia coal fields have been intolerable 

hut now they are worse than ever. Wages 

■re very low, often only $2.00 or $3.00 a 

day, and work is far from steady. But 

B these pitiful earnings are slashed 

under the feudal system which prevails. 

From the miner's pay are subtracted 

amounts for scrip (company money), 

r ent, lights, gas, doctor, burial fund, 

insurance, smithing, explosives and other 

'tern- besides. The majority of the men 

an in ,| e fo t to thg company month after 

month and receive no money whatever on 

■'■'>'• 

The company advances the men credit 

°n their earnings— in company money. 

must be used at the company store, 

where prices range from a fourth to two- 

'• higher than in private stores, or 

"tin money" can be exchanged 

5 on the dollar. Large profits are 

from these company stores, so 

men re discriminated against and fired 

fQ elsewhere to trade. Debts 

11 'i the miners incur are subtracted 

1 their earnings and from com pen - 

payments. Boys inherit their 

debts. 

"' h is the system in which these 

ire caught. It is estimated that 

two out of every five miners are 

I, and about 100,000 miners 

' r be needed again. As a result, 

(Continued on Paga 4) 



TWO VICTORIES, ONE 
DEFEAT BY PUCKMEN 

Amherst and Middlebury Both Con- 
quered but Brown Proves Too Strong 

Amherst was the victim of the State 
attack on Wednesday afternoon last. 
The game was played on the Amherst 
Cnmpttl because there was no ice at the 
State campus. The weather was not 
very favorable and the ice was soft. 
This necessarily made the game slow. 
The attackers from the north side of the 
town started off with a rush and the 
Amherst goalie was busy keeping the 
puck out of the cage. Four well-placed 
shots passed the guardian of the Lord 
Jells in the first few minutes of play. 
Willi this lead the St. iters took things 
easy. Amherst scored once and then the 
two other State counters followed. With 
the game within their grasp the Maroon 
and White men tried to store again but 
failed. Captain Knutson played well for 
the Purple and the team from State all 
did well. Teamwork was the keynote of 
the MaM, State men. 

This victory brings to State the third 

triumph over the Purple in a major si>ort 

this college year. 

Summary: 

Amherst Mass. State 

Cummincrw hr, ((apt.) Forrest 

Turner, c 

Knutson (Capt.), lw 

Fort, rd 

Bryant, Id 

Greene, g 

Amherst 
BeJlentine. 

Mass. State spare: 
Natti. 

Goals — Henry, Sylvester, Gunness 
Cain, Fort. Forrest. 

PeaaUJa*. —Bryant, Hammond 

Referee — Dowtl. Time — 15m. periods. 

State 4, Middlebury 1 

Middlebury hockey team received a 
jolt to the tune of 4 to 1 Saturday after- 
noon at Middlebury, Vt. The State 
team played a good game against a 
strong Middlebury team which had 
beaten Vermont 9 to 2 on the previous 
Monday. The ice was fair and gave each 
team a chance to exert its full strength. 
The Maroon and White showed a smooth 
attack which was continued throughout 
the game. Mitchell in the State goal 
gave a very good exhibition of puck 
stopping. The Middlebury sextet fre- 
quently penetrated to the defense and 
only the excellent work on Mitchell's 
part held the Middlebury team to one 
goal. 

When one realizes that this Mass. 
State team, handicapped by a lack of ice 
at home BpOB which to practice, defeated 
an opponent which has not been boa ten 
on its home rink for seven years, one 
sees that Captain Forrest and Coach 
Ball have an able group of players who 
have the proper spirit. 

Cain, Gunness and Forrest did the 

storing for State while Yeomans was the 

only Middlebury man able to slip the 

puck past Mitchell. The summary: 

Middlebury Mass. State 

Mackela, rw lw, Forre-t 

Melbye c e. Cain 

Yeomans, lw rw, Tikofslci 

MacLean, rd Id. Gunness 

Nelson, Id rd, Hammond 

Goering, g g. Mitchell 
(Continued on Page 3) 



C, Cain 

rw, Tikntski 

I' I. Gunness 

rd, Hammond 

g, Mitchell 

spares — Owen, Murphy, Poim-ruy, 

-Sylvester, Snow, Henry, 

Tikofslci, 



OUTING CLUB HIKE 

The Outing Club invites everyone who 
likes hiking to participate in the forth- 
coming trip to Mt. Monadnock, on Mon- 
day, the 22nd. There will be accommo- 
dation for whoever cares to go, and the 
round trip will cost no more than sixty 
cents. Those who wish to go should give 
their names to Herman Goodell at the 
library desk, or to any member of the 
Outing Club. There will be no trip unless 
the weather is good; and if the weather 
is favorable, those who make the trip 
will have a good time and an unforget- 
able experience. Hikers should dKM 
warmly and bring along a hearty lunch, 
for mountain climbing is a sport that 
develops a hearty appetite. Snowshoes 
may be brought if desired. Members of 
the faculty and their wives are cordially 
invited! Please sign up before Thursday- 
night. Members who receive names 
should turn them in at once at the 
library. 



DEBATERS SPEAK 
AT SPRINGFIELD 

Salter, Hill and Politella Win Over 

A.I.C. and Oppose Y.M.C.A. 

College in Debates 

Pointing out the fallacies involved in 

the contention that cancellation of the 

allied war delits would bring about 
world peace; showing that the United 
States has no moral obligation to cancel 
the debts; and maintaining that can- 
cellation is financially inexpedient, the 
State College debating team was awarded 
a two-one decision over the American 
International College debaters at Spring- 
field last Tuesday evening. Practically 
the same arguments wi re used against a 
weaker team at Springfield College 
Tuesday morning, where a no-decision 
contest was held before a student con- 
vocation at the college. 

Leonard A. Salter, Jr., Nathaniel B. 
Hill, and Joseph Politella maintained the 

cane lor Maaaachuaetta, opposing Miss 
Helen Kennedy, Hall Siddall, and Mite 

Miriam Brown, of the A.I.C. The con- 
tentions of the International College de- 
baters were that the United States faces 
a moral obligation to cancel the debt! 
because of our light losses in a war that 

Continued on Page 4) 



OUTSTANDING KVENT 
OF THE WEEK 



Another sorority on campus. 



5fatu 3Jffl iSjtatarg 

Last Year 

Freshman basketball team ends 
season with five straight wins. 

Arrangements are completed for 
Fourth Annual Military Ball. 

Hay State debaters win second \ ic- 
tory by defeating Clark on Free Trade 
question. 

Five Years Ago 

Index Board buss a copy of Robert 
Frost's poems for each member of the 
Hoard with surplus profit. 

Students foal that the position of 
foreign languages is imperiled by the 
faculty. 

Rural Home Life, dietetics co ura e, 
is opened to men students for the 
first time. 

Professor Waugh regrets the abuse 
of the college bell which he compares 
to a fine Stcinwav piano. 
IfM 

College night, an informal gather- 
ing of students and faculty, is held 
at Draper Hall. 

M.A.C. Day is observed at South 
Hadley, and the following question 
debated, "Resolved, that the United 
States should establish parcels post 
system." 



Radical Changes Proposed 
at Student Forum Today 



DR. //. PAPENDIECK 
DISCUSSES GERMANY 

German Exchange Student Speaker 
at Tuesday Night Gathering 

Dr. Hans Papcndieck, German ex- 
change student from the Universitv ol 
Koenigsberg, spoke last Tuesday at the 
Language and Literature meeting, on a 
subject in no way connected with the 
previous discussions of Romanticism and 

Humanism, but on the Germa ny of 

today. 

"Most of us," said Dr. Papcndieck, 
"know the past history better than the 
present history ol a country." And the 

reason for the preseal state of the world 

is that we are living in the present and 
thinking in terms of the past. 

Today, he continued, no nation CM 

live lor itself. L.k h country is dependent 

on others, and the economic p ros p e rity 
of one affects that of another. It is 

obvious that we cannot break down local 

boundaries, but we CM destroy the 
mental barriers which p r e v e nt under 
standing. 

It is a difficult tfiittg to DOOM to an 
intelligent understanding between people. 
International broadcasting will help, as will 
exchange of people, exchange students, for 
example. "For," he stated, "you would 
change your mind about the German 

people if you cams to know them in their 

own country, just as I have changed mine 
about Americans." 

Dr. Papcndicck's discussion of Ger- 
many was divided into three parts 
development of Germany from the end 
of the war to the present, the German 

government of today, and the develop- 
ment of the national movement. 

Of the first, the speaker said that at 
the close of the War, Germany signed the 
Fourteen Points of Wilson, disarmed com- 
pletely, and signed the treaty of Ver- 
sailles all ini|K)siiig conditions a nation 
could never fulfill. Germany turned over 
all arms, destroyed factories which could 
prod l lOS armaments, turned over mer- 
chant ships, and gave up railroads. In 
August, 199*, she had paid ten billion 
dollars, but had been credited by the 
(Continued on Page 4) 



SENATE IS OPPOSED 
TO FRESHMEN RULES 

New System of Reserve Hooks and 

New Assessment of Student 

Tns Also Proposed 

At the Student Forum t bis afternoon, 

the following reports were made: Klmer 
J. Thompson, president of the Senate, 
stated the revised rulings bv the Senate 
with reference to freshman-sophomore 
relations, provision ol magazines at the 

Infirmary, repressntstion of the Senate 
on the faculty disciplinary committee 

when men students are involved in cer- 
tain cases, investigation to ascertain the 
necessity Of the present parking system, 
and the inclusion of graduate students 
under the supervision of the college 

physician and the infirmary; Patrick E. 

O'Doonell Of the Honor Council, report- 
ing for President holey on the restive 

book honor system; and Prank L. 

Springer, president of Adelphia, on the 

proposed student tax revision. Following 

is a more detailed account of the recom- 
mendations. 

Proposed Program 

1. The regular Freshman Handbook 
tO contain interesting and instructive 

information for the n e wcomer to State 

( ollege. 

2. Receptions for the fraahmen group: 
V.M.C.A. re cep t ion (students); The 
Piexy's reception (administration); In 
addition, a brief welcome to the new <lass 
by the President of Senate, to take plnOB 
immediately after Prexy's address at the 
Opening assembly. This to be followed 
by a short cheer by the upper class*- for 
the freshman class. 

.'1. Three meetings of the entire fresh- 
man group for the purpose of college 
singing and cheering. To be held on one 
(Continued on Pan* 3) 



Dr. Parks Speaks in 

Sunday Chapel Service 

Discusses Methods of Analyzing Self 



CAMPUS CAI.KNDAR 



"The scholar who cherishes the love of 
comfort is not fit to be deemed a scholar.'' 

Wednesday, February 17 

Varsity Hockey, Williams at William-town 

7.45 p. m. Y.W.C.A. Meeting 

7.30 p.m. Christian Association Meeting, 

Senate R'«ini 
Fraternity Bowling: 

L.C.A. vs. T.C.j S.P.E. vs. r.S.K. 
Vanity Basketball, Williams at Williams 
K.30 p. m. Fraternity Basketball: 
I'.S.K. vs. A.G.R.; S.l'.F;. vs. K.S. 
Thursday, February 18 

7.30 p. m. Liberal-International Club 
Philips Bradley of Amherst College, 
"Chinese-Japanese Relations" 
7.30 p. m. Fraternity Bowling: 

K.S. vs. Q.T.V.j K.IC. vs. D.P.A. 
Fraternity Basketball: 
7.I.") p.m. S.l'.K. vs. P.S.K. 
8.00 p. m. A.S.l*. vs. Q.T.V. 
8.4.1 p. m. N.F. vs. D.P.A. 
Friday. February 19 
Fraternity Basketball: 
7.15 p.m. K.S. vs. y.T.V. 
MH)p. m. A.S I' v- N.F. 
8.4."» i m. T.C. VS. K.K. 
Saturday, February 20 

Track. New England*, Boston Garden 
Vanity Basketball. New Hampshire, here 
Monday, February 22 

Holiday, Washington's. Birthday 
Outing Club Hike to Mount Mon.t'lno' k. 
from Bast K.Tperimcnt Station, starting 
at 7.30 a. m. 
Tuesday, February 2.* 

7.00 p.m. Band Rehearsal, Stotkbrirlge ' 

Hall 
7.00 p. m. Language and Literature Talk 



RELAY TEAM I.OSKS 
In the B.A.A. meet, held last Saturday 

in Post on Arena, the relay team of Mas--. 
State trailed those of the I'niversity of 
New Hampshire ami Northeastern Uni- 
versity. Mas-. Mate was scheduled t<» 

run against Colby and W o rc este r Tech, 

but at the last minute officials changed 
the Slate team's competitors. Tin- New 
Hampshire and Northeastcrni teams 
offered stronger co mp e t ition than the 
Colby and W o rc este r Tech combination 
would have. The Colby team, the 
winner in their event, was four seconds 
slower than that of Northeastern the 
latter's time being 3m. 32. (is. The Mass 
State team was made up of Pruyne, 
Warren, K. Hale, and Crawford. Pike, 
Noyce, Mann, and Thayer ran for New 
Hampshire, while Northeastern's winning 
team was composed of Fait, Hanson, 
Shea, and Grieve. 



TRACK TEAM REPRESENTED 

AT UNIVERSITY CLUB MEET 

This Saturday the Mass. State varsity 
track team goes to the Boston Carden 
to c o m p ete in the indoor meet of the 
I diversity Club of Boston. About thirty 
colleges are entered ami they are divided 
into two classes, Mass. State coming in 
(lass B. 

All track events are judged entirely 
according to time; ami although some of 
the colleges may c ompete with others 
not in their (lass, their times will be 
credited to their pro|>er < lass. Mam 
State has entered the following men: 
Kdmond, Foskett, K. Il.de, Warren, 

Wihh, Crawford, N. Hale, Pruyne, 
Stephen, Caird, MacMackin, snd Ryan. 

The nlay Pain will run against the 
te. tins of We-leyan and TttftS. 



Analyze yourself and set yourself to be 
a pei son who enjoys lile; obtain your 
enjoyments in the finest way by working 
for them; and don't fall into a rut, was 
the advice which President Edgar J. 

Park of Wheaton presented to the stu- 
dents at last Sunday's Chapel. The 
speaker pointed out that it was diltuult 
to disi us-, oneself because one knows 
himself so little. And that though other 
people may know more about a pers on 
than he himsell does, yet, even their 
opinion is not always trustworthy because 

they themselves are not always acquainted 

with the true man. They see hut the 
outer shell and often Ink vision to see 
the material in the interior. 

President Perk itated that one falls 

into a rut in his opinion of himself. He 
either tomes to think of himself SS the 
moon which draws all of the SSS toward 
it, as the buoy which floats upon the 
rising sea, or as the sieve through which 
all things flow. The speaker continued 
with the statement that it was extremely 

difficult to escape oneself and that the 

only difference between sanity and i,i- 
sanity is degree of emotional rent ion, 
and proved his point with several ex- 
amples. One was that of a woman who 

v. I- muth distressed by the habit of 

talking to herself, but was told by her 
physician not to worry. "But, Dot tor," 
she replied, "I am such a bore." Another 

example was that of a prominent man 

who married a woman who understood 
his every thought. The man planned to 
push her over a pret ipit e in order to 
regain his freedom. As the deed was 
about to l>e at ' omplished t he aj i|. Htppnd 
aside and pushed him OVef instead. 

'I he s| M -aker further mentioned that 

most personalities are one of three tspe- r 
enjoying life, outwardly enjoying but 
inwardly bond, or openly expressing the 
opinion that life is not worthwhile. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 1932 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 1932 



Ube flfoassacbusette Collegian 



Official newspaper of the Massachusetts State College. Published every 

Wednesday by the students. 

BOARD OF EDITORS 



Wallace W. Stuart ,32 
Managing Editor 



Fkank L. Springer '32 
Edilor-in-Ckitf 



Oscar Margolin 32 Rial S. Potter. Jr. *32 
Associate Editors 



DEPARTMENT EDITORS 



Editorial 
Frank L. Springer .32 



Campus 

Edmond Nash '33 W. Raymond Ward '33 

Alfreda L. Ordway '33 

Ruth D. Camphei.l '34 

Harriette M. Jackson '34 

Joseph Politella '34 

Raymond Royal '34 Mary L. Allen '35 



Athletics 

William H. Weak '32 

Eugene Guralnick '33 

Stanly F. Sbferski '34 

John P. Colman '35 

Silas Little. Jr.. '35 



Feature 
Oscar Margolin '32 David L. Arenberg "35 

BUSINESS DEPARTMENT 

Eric H. Wetterlow Jr. '32 

Business Manager 

William A. Johnson '82 

Circulation Manager 



Kenneth E. Hodge '32 
Adtrtising Manager 



Benton P. Cummings '33 
Ashlev B. Gurney '33 
Philip H. Leverault '33 



Business Assistants 



Edward J. Talbot '34 



Frank Batstone '34 
Herbert Jenkins '34 

W. LAWRENtB'StHENCK 34 



Subscriptions *2.00 per year. Single copies 10 cents. 



Make all orders payable to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In case of change of address, subscriber will please notify the business manager 
as toon as possible. 

Alumni and undergraduate contributions are sincerely encouraged. Any com 
munications or notices must be received by the editor-in-chief on or before Monday 
evening. 



ill)? praroim 

If the present trend at the Abbey con- 
tinues we may expect Sororities to be- 
come as plentiful as co-eds, (and by 
goodness, that's saying something!). 
Slogans will be something like this: 

Join the Omee Omy Sorority! 

Limited to Three Members. 

Very Exclusive. 

Bring Your Lunch. 

Own Your Own Sorority! 
Every Meal a Banquet! 
The possibilities are tremendous. An 
invitation to a sorority party will be as 
follows: 

To Mr. John J. Smoothey: 
Dear Sir: 

At the last meeting of the Ego Mihi 
Sum sorority, the president, Miss Honey 
Bunch, proposed that the sorority give 
a party. It was so voted, and conse- 
quently I am empowered to request 
your presence next Thursday evening at 
the North Sofa in the reception room of 
the Abigail Adams Home. 

Respectfully submitted, 

(Miss) Honey Bunch 
Secretary 



NOTICES 



STATE STATIC 



I foresee that chaperones will be in- 
creasingly in requisition. 



Entered as second-class matter at the Amherst Post Office. Accepted for mailing at special rate of 
postage provided for In Section 1103. Act of October. 1917. authorized August 20. 1918. 



ABOLITION OF FRESHMAN RULES 

At last the student body has become sufficiently mature to appreciate the child- 
ish camouflage which lias enveloped the trivial compulsory dictation of the sopho- 
mores over the freshmen. Through the medium of the Senate, freshman rules have 
been abolished, but we believe thai class spirit will be re-vital izc< I. 

No longer will the freshmen he compelled to wear diminutive head gear signify- 
ing lowly standing. Rather, each man will feel that he has the responsibility of 
creating (lass unity by displaying a noticeable feature such as a hat bearing the 
numerals of that (lass. Lethargic interest in the College songs and cheers will be 
replaced by competently conducted instruction amid suitable surrounds. The in- 
terclass garni s are to be continued and expanded. In fact, the program as presented 
this afternoon eppeare to be ■ stimulant to dam spirit which has been on the wane 

during the part tew yean because of the d eg en era ti n g s i' irit ot compulsion which 

dominated an attitude that can only be created by individual desire. 

This change has been placed in effect by the Senate and applies to the men stu- 
dents only. The Senate has no jurisdh t ion over the women students. We would 
suggest, however, that the co-eds devise a similar plan to release the freshman co-eds 
from childish domination or pseudo-domination by the sophomore girls. 



No sorority can be a really secret 
organization as long as the Picaroon is 
on the job. The Picaroon's spies are 
everywhere! 

You know, those old time Spanish folk 
had rare insight and judgment. In Mark 
Van Doran's World Anthology I came on 
the following stanza of a folk song trans- 
lated by Havelock Ellis: 

Oh, a pearl is a thing of much value, 

And a diamond yet more than this; 

Bttt I know what to me is most precious, 

And that is a student's kiss. 

— Old folk song 

Think I'll migrate to Spain. 



MILITARY BALL 

March 5 is the date finally agreed upon 
for the Military Ball. It is to be in the 
Drill Hall, and "Dud" Goldman's Band 
from Worcester will furnish the music. 
Tickets are three dollars and can be 
secured from any of the members of the 
committee: Cheney, chairman, Connell, 
Goodall, Harvey or Tetro. 
HOCKEY 

Three hockey games were scheduled 
for this week by Coach Ball in an effort 
to make up for some of the games not 
played during the regular season. The 
State team will have visited New Hamp- 
shire, Union, and Williams on consecutive 
days starting Tuesday. If these three 
games are played there will be only six 
games which the team has been unable 
to play. Some of these six may be 
arranged for later dates. 

COLLEGIAN 

Because of the holiday, the next issue 
of the Collegian will be issued on Thurs- 
day, February 25. 

SOCIAL UNION POSTPONED 

The Social Union entertainment sched- 
uled for February 19, and featuring an 
illustrated lecture by Professor Frank A. 
Waugh, has been postponed to Thursday, 
February 25 at 7 o'clock in Bowker 
auditorium. 



'Some few in that, but numbers ere ft 
Ten censure wrong, for one who 
amiss." 



The prize, this week, goes to the freeh 
man who brought his lunch to the dining. 
hall and calmly ordered a glass of milk. 



A certain fraternity on this campus 
had a Phrenology lecture last week. Kvi- 
dently the Rhos hav.- a bump on t Urn- 
selves. 



The hen in front of Draper Hall pj 
beginning to look bedraggled and forlorn. 
It is yet too early in the season for 
moulting. 

It is called the "Beggar's Opera," yet 
they charge admission. But what's in a 
name! 

No main speaker, no substitute speaker, 
no hymns, and no student opinion. It 
was a very successful assembly. 



It was proposed at a certain class 
meeting to raise a fund for the first class 
baby. What if the baby should be twins 
or triplets? 



COED NOTES 



STUDENT RULES 

Under Article 10 of the recommendations presented by the Senate this afternoon, 
we find a number of rules applying to the whole student body, rather than to just 
one class. These rules need not be included if students would use a bit of common 
sense, respect the rights of others, and abide by certain standards of etiquette. Re- 
member that these rules are really reminders, suggesting that you do the right thing. 
Treat them as such and we all shall benefit from the results. 



CHINA AND JAPAN AT WAR 

Special dispatdt to the Collegian 
Folks! Thk i> some war! Youse have 
no idea of what's goin' on over here. 

More people killed! More baby buggies 

upset! This certainty is some war! 

Those Japs rail certainly tight! 

And hoe they're fighting! 

It seems the Chinese d e cl a red an 
embargo on Chicken Chow Mein. And 
what a disappointment for the Japs! 

Those Chinese certainly can fight! 

And how they're fighting! 

Folks, 1 wish you could be here with 
me. Youse have no idea of what's goin 
on over here. 

More noise! More bombardment! 

( ,ee!!! 

Special Correspondent Gloyd Fibbin' 



Last Wednesday, Feb. 10, the Inter- 
national Education Committee held a 
luncheon upstairs in Draper Hall. June 
Way was the guest speaker, telling of 
some of Dr. Grenfell's work in Labrador 
and Newfoundland. Feb. IS, Dorothea 
Knopp, the German exchange studert, 
was the guest. These luncheons are to 
beheld weekly, as a part of the activities 
of the International Education Commit- 
tee. 



Springfield's football team Stopped 
Bush, but that was more than the five 
men on the basketball team could do. 



The basketball officials were proudly- 
aware of their snappy jackets, until the 
Springfield team made their appearance. 

Springfield's athletes are well-developed, 
especially their swinging hips. 



Wednesday, Feb. 17, there will be I 
Y.W.C.A. meeting in the Y room at S.4& 

Miss Henrietta Thompson will speak, 

and Edith Smith and Mary Tomlirwm 
will report on the Northfield Conference. 



Thursday evening, Feb. 11, the Fresh- 
man girls defeated the Juniors with a 
score of 21 to .'*. Also the Seniors were 
defeated by the Sophomores with a 
score of 21 to 2. 



Foley's basket coming after the final 
gun was like rubbing it in. 



The Chemistry department points with 
pride to its budding genius Range, the 
guncotton specialist. 

Only a megaphone and a microphone 
were larking at Friday chapel. 

No matter what courses you may take, 

it is the other fellow who is taking the 
"gut" cour m 



THE LOWEST FORM OF HUMOR? 

We heaved a sigh of relief when we read in the Springfield Republican that Pro- 
fessor Frank Prentice Rand of our Faculty defended that universal student sport 
of punning. Having been derided through the ages as the odor of a diseased mind 
and the lowest form of humor, we well nigh despaired of our intellectual ability for 
to us punning has been a keen source of delight for quite a while. 

In the report of his lecture on "The Absurdity of Laughter" which was delivered 
before a University Extension class in Springfield last week, we feel there is a wealth 
of material for a more than merely interesting talk at some assembly in the future. 
In fact, we would like very much to hear him some Wednesday afternoon next term. 



IN CASE WE WERE MISUNDERSTOOD 

Last week we wanted to stress the fact that we are entirely opposed to any mea- 
sure aimed to inhibit the functioning of Massachusetts State College as a college 
with true collegiate standards. That is last week's editorial stated in a few words. 
We hope you appreciate our stand and we feel that it is justified. Legislation such 
as is proposed by Mr. Shirley would be very detrimental to this College and we do 
not propose to let it slide without at least a word of rebuke. 



Stimulated by the above report, the 
Picaroon decided to investigate matters 
for himself. Disguised as Conlucius, he 
flew across the Big Ditch and landed in 
the Capitol City. Little did I expect the 
greeting I received. Crowds gathered about 
the plane. Everyone threw huge boquets 
of over-ripe fruit, or the fragrant con- 
tents of- oh well, what does it matter? 
Something was wrong. I thought at first 
that the populace had penetrated my 
disguise, but soon I saw Fujiyama in the 
distance. Horrors! I had landed in 
Tokio instead of Shanghai! 

Was I discouraged? Indeedy-deedy I 
was! But with my customary presence of 
mind, I doffed my pigtail, disguised 
myself as a Japanese parasol, and escaped 
in the subsequent Confucian. (H-m-mm! 
Something tells me that one didn't go 
over.) 

(To be continued) 



ST0CKBRIDGE 



Kolony Klub held a "Vic" dance at 
the house Saturday evening which was 
attended by twenty-five couples. Prof, 
and Mrs. Rollin H. Barrett and Mr. and 
Mrs. Alden P. Tuttle acted as chaperones. 



Professor John C. Graham addressed 
the Poultry Club at its initial meeting, 
Tuesday evening on the subject "Egg 
Size." 



Overheard at the fraternity banq 
"Now when 1 was at college." 
boacfa of fellows you have this year,' 
"Yes. we got the pick of the freshman 

, l.iss, I'he house looks great," "I mc-t 

house on campus," "Our house is the 
most important socially and athletically 
on campus," etc., etc., etc. 



Question in Botany 25: Why is the 
pith of a tree like a small dog's tail? 



Did you know that the famous Gettys- 
burg speech of Lincoln, whose birthday 
was celebrated last week, contain- 
words, 190 words of one syllable 52 
words of two syllables, and 20 words ot 
more than two syllables. 



Now that Lake Placid has had its 
Olympics, Greenfield its "little" Olympics, 
it is our turn to hold a midget Olympics. 



Professor Kellogg of the Entomology 
department will be the speaker at the 
meeting of the Agronomy Club on Wed- 
nesday evening at 7 o'clock in Room 102, 
Stockbridge Hall. 



EDITORIAL POINTS 

We see that emergency bill for dormitory construction at this college was sched- 
uled to appear before the committee on education yesterday. 

It certainly did seem good to see Dan Darling '31 back on campus last week-end. 
And his smile is just as contagious as ever. 

In keeping with tradition, this year's Carnival was postponed until some time 
in the near future. 



And there is a sophomore at Yale who is earning his way through college by 
washing dogs. 

We wonder if the photographer did get to Amherst last Wednesday. 



Apparently some budding poet of the 
American Express Company is practicing 
for the Poem of the Month Contest by 
spreading these unexpected bits of beauty 
via deliveries to the college. The case 
was first brought to our notice by the 
following stencil on a shipment to the 
Chem Lab.: 

"Handle with care, 
Chinaware." 
The latest deliveries give: 
"Use no hooks. 
Contents, books." 

"This side up. 

Young bull pup." 
"Wooden table. 

Inflammable!" 



The Amherst College sophomores de- 
feated the Stockbridge School 85-47 at 
the track meet held in the Amherst cage 
on Thursday, February 11. Sherwood 
Stedman S'32 was high scorer of the 
meet, making a total of 21 points. 

The last two meets of the season will 
be with the Amherst freshmen on Feb. 
18 at the M.S.C. cage and the Massa- 
chusetts State freshmen on February 5. 



ANNUAL INTERCOLLEGIATE 

POULTRY JUDGING CONTEST 

The Annual Intercollegiate Poultry 
Judging Contest occurs at a late date 
this year, owing to the fact that the 
Madison Square Garden Poultry Show 
was not held in January, as usual. The 
contest will occur this week on Thursday 
and Friday, February 18 and 19, at New 
Brunswick, and Frenchtown, New Jersey. 
Rutgers University will act as host for 
this event. The written examination 
will take place at the department of 
(Continued on Page 4) 



WASHINGTON BICENTENNIAL 
CELEBRATION 

The Washington Bicentennial (< libra- 
tion at this college will consist of three 
events. The initial memorial will he in 
the form of a special chapel service on 
February 19. Dr. Packard of Amherst 
College will speak on this occasion. 

At some later date a contest in original 
oratory will be held. The subject of each 
oration is "George Washington." There 
will be probably a preliminary contest to 
reduce the number of contestants is t n <j 
final public contest. Prizes of $-30 and 
$20 are offered by the College for this 
event. This is the special share that the 
students will have in this celebration. I 
is hoped that the students will r- -pond 
by entering this contest in encouraging 
numbers. 

A third event, to be held on some date 
in the spring, is an outdoor ceremonj 
including music, an address, a poem an 
tree-planting. Let all join to make these 
events successful. 

The members of the Committee * 
charge of the celebration at th« " 1,cgt 
are: Professor Patterson, Dean M 
Director Sievers, Professors M 
Jefferson and Prince. 



ANNO UNCING 
AN ADVANCE SHOWING OF SPRING SPORTSWEAR 



LANDIS HABERDASHERY 



OUALITY SINCE 1904 



Sis ME IS OPPOSED 

TO FRESHMAN RULES 
(Continued from Page 1) 

evening a week of the second, third, and 
fourth weeks respectively. 

4 Two assemblies of the entire stu- 
(Itnt body, each of one-half hour duration, 
{or the purpose of organized college sing- 
ing and cheering. To be based on the 

,r assembly requirements of the 
Dean's Office. 

To be available Freshman Class 
Hats (Maroon color), with numerals. 
ITjus, the freshman can easily manifest 
then i lass spirit, and also have a souvenir 
from the Frosh Days. The idea of com- 
pulsion will be missing, as will the former 
insignificant methods of punishment. 

6. Selling of posters by the sophomores 
to he abolished. 

7. Events to be scheduled for the 
Fall Term: Razoo Night, Sixty-man 
rope-pull, Six-man rope-pull. 

s A Freshman-Sophomore Day is to 
t„ arranged for the Spring Term: This 
il to include a baseball contest, track 
events, and boxing and wrestling bouts. 
The winner is to be decided on a point 
bests. The postponed Sixty-man rope- 
pull is to be arranged for this coming 
Spring Term. 

m A series of Educational Talks are 
10 be arranged for the freshman group. 

10. General Rules: 

1 No student shall read books or 
papers in Chapels or Assemblies. 

2 No one shall walk on the lawns, 
but shall hold strictly to the 
lanipus walks as established by 
the Grounds Department. 

., No student shall wear any pre- 
paratory school numerals or letters 
on his cap, jersey, or sweater. 
\ll students are required to wear 
a coat and necktie at assembly. 



You have tried the rest? 

Now try the BEST 

And that's the 

AMHERST SHOE REPAIRING CO. 

"Goodyear Welt System Employed" 



(5) The manner of leaving the audi- 
torium shall be Seniors, Juniors, 
Sophomores, and Freshmen, after 
all chapel and assembly exercises 

(6) Members of the Senate shall wear 
the Senate Hats during the first 
two weeks of college, and will be 
recognized by the same. 

(7) Any student is free to submit to 
the Senate suggestions at any 
time (in writing). All worthwhile 
ones will be acknowledged in due 
time, and acted upon by the 
Senate. 

Reserve Book Honor System 

Honor Council and Students — 

Students agree to replace all reserve 
books on the reserve shelves. 

Students agree to attempt to make this 
system a success by keeping its rules 
themselves, and trying to see that others 
do so. 

Students agree to keep the rule about 
taking reserve books overnight from ihe 
building. 

In order to make the system work, 
students must take from reserve shelves 
only as many books as they need, pre- 
ferably only one at a time and they 
should keep these books only as long as 
they are actually using them. It is fairer 
to return these books to the shelves than 
to pass them to friends, since others 
than their friends may have sought them 
first. 

Any student caught removing a re- 
served book from the building or hiding 
it within the building may be charged 
the price of tin- book, or otherwise 
punished at the discretion of the Honor 
Council. 

Fat ulty — 

It is the opinion of the Honor Council 
(and the librarian will propose to tin 



S. S. HYDE 

Optician and Jeweler 

Oculists' Prescriptions Filled. Broken lenst 
accurately replaced 

BIG BEN ALARM CLOCKS and other 

reliable makes 

3 PLEASANT STREET, (up one nlftht ) 



FISHER'S 

ANNUAL JANUARY DRESS CLEARANCE SALE 

Extraordinary Quality at Low Prices 
$3.*>5 to $19.95 



ARTIST MATERIALS 1 


Oil Paints 

Brushes 

Charcoal Paper 

Charcoal 

Fixitif 

JAMES A. LOWELL, 


Water Color Paints 

Palettes 

Palette Knives 

Show Card Inks 

Sketch Blocks 

BOOKSELLER 






FINAL REDUCTION 
on SUITS and OVERCOATS 

Now Priced 
»17. M and »27. 5, 

Plenty of light colors that are just right for early Spring wear. 

SKI COATS, LEATHER COATS, LINED GLOVES 

also reduced 

F. M. THOMPSON & SON 



Library Committee) that each instructor 
who wishes to have books reserved in the 
library for collateral reading should send 
to the library a list of such books in 
writing a sufficient time in advance 
(usually 10 days) to insure having the 
books ready for student use when his 
assignment is given to the class. 

The instructor must send to the Trea- 
surer and the Librarian at the time ot 
requesting to have books reserved, a list 
of the members of the class for whose use 
the books are to be reserved. 

Library— 

The library will maintain the lists <>| 
books on reserve where they may In 
easily consulted by the students, with 
accurate titles and authors and the 
library call-number of each. 

The Librarian will, at frequent intei 
vela, have the lists of books checked to 
ascertain whether or nut any books are 
missing; he will proceed to replace those 
missed as soon as possible at the i-\|X'iisc 
of the funds of the library; the tost of 
such replacement, however, is to be made 
good as stated under Treasurer. 

At the end of each term, the Librarian 
will re|>ort to the Treasurer the names of 
the books which have been thus replaced, 
with their costs and the name of the 
group or (lass res|>onsiblc. 

At the end of each term, the Librarian 
will send to the president of the Honor 
Council a report of the conduct of this 

system. 

The librarian will permit students, 
until further notice, to take books out 
overnight subject to this ruling: Such 
books must always be charged at the 
delivery desk as for any loaned book, 
the charge to be made by an attendant 
of the library ami not by the student. 
The book may be taken out at 9.90 p. in 
and m*St be returned at S..'i() a.m. tin- 
following morning. For detaining a book 
beyond this time, the offending student 

shall be Subject to a line at the disi reiioll 
of tin- Librarian and the Dean, but it is 
agreed by students th.it payment of this 
tine does not entitle students to retain 
books so loaned overnight after N..'!0 
.1.111. since others may need the book, and 
repeated infraction of this rule ma\ 
subject the student to loss of this privi- 
lege or of the use of the library. 
Treasurer — 
The treasurer will assess the classes or 



IHE NATIONAL SHOE REPAIRING 

21 MAIN STREET 

Between Town Hall and Masonic Building 

MENS' SHOES SOLED and HEELED $1.75 

FULL .1ULW and RUBBER HEJ-.l.S $2.50 

/ adit. Shots SoUd and Kubbtr llttls J1.40 

LADIES' SHOES liBELl.U «k 

All Work Guaranteed 



College Drug Store 

VV. H. McGRATH, Reg. Pharm. 
AMHERST, - - MASS. 



VISIT 

BARSELOTTI'S 

All the requirements for the smoker- Pipes, 
Pouches, Smokers Combination 
Ice Cream, Candy, Sandwiches 

THE BEST COFFEE IN 

TOWN IS ON TAP 
at BUCK'S ROADHOUSE 



PATRONIZE 

The Sandwich Man 

R. L. BATES, North Amherst 



groups responsible a proportionate amount 
per student; and when this annum: is 
collected, will return it to the Librarian 

to reimburse the library funds for the 
COM of replacing the missing books. 

In case the loss of a book or books is 
not discovered until the actual end ol 
the term, or during the term the instructor 
shall judge that a copy of some other 
book would better serve the class' needs, 
the cost may be used for some other book 
recommended by the instructor, unless 
the Librarian shall judge that the original 
book is needed for current and general 
use. 

Proposed Revisions in the 
Student Tux Accounts 

Kciomniendiitions — 

That present student taxes listed as 
Class Tax, Special Class Tax, Religious 
Work Tux, ('.iris' ( ioveriimeiit Tax, 
Freshman Cirls' Tax, and Cap and (.own 
Tax to be fused into one Student ( iovern- 

ment lax of sti.oo pet yeai and eppor* 

tinned as indicated below. 

That the special band tax be discon- 
tinued and that support of the band be 
transferred to the Academic Activities 
Hoard. 

Class funds may be used to underwrite 
< lass dames within the provisions of tin- 
budget but not to exceed JlfiO for Soph- 
Senior Hop and $1200 for Junior I'roin. 

That Collect JOB by the Treasurer for 
bron/e numerals be discontinued. 

All student tax fund accounts be audi 
ted annually by a competent auditor and 
the report printed in the Collegian. 
Summary — 

The .fti.(K) will be apportioned cadi 
year as follows: Class Lund $.'l.7f), 



FEELS GREAT TO II AVE YOUR HAIR 
SHAMPOOED AFTER A HAIRCUT! 

The College Barber Shop 

"M" BUILDING 



SANG LUNG hand laundry 

No. 1 Main St. Amherst, Mass. 
REPAIRING AND ALL KINDS OF 
WASHING DONE AT REASONABLE 
PRICES. 

Our Laundry First Class 

Our Policy Guaranteed 

NEXT TO THE TOWN HALL 

TYPEWRITERS 

for Sale and Rent 

tc si tc * * a 
H. E. DAVID 



TALLIES 

and 
PLACE CARDS 

for 

WASHINGTON'S BIRTHDAY 

and other 

Patriotic Occasions 



Miss Cutler's Gift Shop 



(.ills' < .ov< imncnt $."•<>, Men's Covcrn- 
nient lljQO, and Religious Work $.75. 
Under the old reflate, the nun paid 
$21.50 during their four years in college 
and the girls fcn.L'5. Under this new 
system, everyone pays $1.M If this 
prOVM to be too much pgf student it 
will be obvious due to a published rei>ort 
and can be c.i i I > icmcdied. 

TWO VICTORIES, ONE 

DEFEAT 11 Y PUCKMEN 

Continued from Page 1) 

Brown 6, State 4 

BraVI scored another of their hockey 
victories when the Mass. State team waa 
taken into camp on l'ebruary S by a 0-4 
store. The game was played at the 
Providence Auditorium where the State 
team played on artificial ice for the first 
time this year. The Miuins were able to 
■eON in every period. However, the 
State aggregation did well to keep in the 
running in view of the fact that only a 
lew practice sessions hav* !...,■ in Id this 
winter. 

Paige stood out for Mrown and was 
able by clever stick handling to score 
thiee limes. For the Hay Staters Tikolski 
was the outstanding puck (baser. He 
noted thiee times during the encounter, 
denting the twine in each period. 

The summary: 

Brown Mass. Stat* 

( haw, Johnston, 1 1. ill, lw rw, Sylvester, Tikofaki 
Palm, i^kb. c c, Cain, Snow 

Hurley, Hunt, llyiuaiu, rw 

lw, llt-nry, l-orrcsi (Cunt.) 
Trucey. Clement, Id ril, 1 1. minimi. I. Cross 

llurgrove, ru Id. CunneiM 

Hutton, Putter, « K , Mu. bell 

Skore -Kiown II, Main. State 4. 

Pint IH-tioil Hunt. Paige, 1-eniI. 

Se mi. I period-— Tikolski. Paige. Forrest, Tikolski 

Thiril |n-iiml ( h.ise, likofaki, I'aiue. 

lVn.illi.-s \a-m, Clement, liki.faki 2, Hurley. 
Hammond, 1 1 • nry, 

Referees HaMormn and Ai>orn. 



AMHERST 
THEATRE 1 



WED. 
FEB. 

17 

THURS. 
FEB. 

18 

FRI. 
FEB. 

19 



Robert Montgomery 
— In— 

"LOVERS 
COURAGEOUS" 

Carole Lombard 
- In • 

"NO ONE MAN" 

with 
Paul I uk. is KM.mloCnrli-/ 



SAT. 
FEB. 

20 



M0N. 

FEB. 

22 

TUES. 
FEB. 

23 



J ami's fiaimrr 

- in - 

"TAXI" 
with Lofttta Young 



Walter Houston 

- In - 

"LAW and ORDER" 

. Co-Feature - 

Mini Summervllle 

In "RACINC; YOI TH" 



Ruth Chatterton 

— In— 

•'TOMORROW 

and 
TOMORROW" 



Phillip Harrys Prize Play 
"The BARGAIN" 

with 

Lewis Stone Horls Kenyon 

C». Butterworth t na Merkrl 



Three Reasons Why You Should Eat 
at the Candy Kitchen 

/. Our food is delightfully prepared 
2. We give excellent service 
J, Our prices are moderate 

Sarris Bros. Candy Kitchen Restaurant Inc. 



THERE ARE TWO KINDS OF TRUE SMARTNESS 

A fellow has to be smart to look smart. Who chooses Langrock expresses both. 

E. M. SWITZER, JR., Inc. 



If. A. C. Library. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 1932 



HICKEY-FREEMAN SUITS 

Our suits are highly individualized in Fashion, Fabric, and Finish. The Values exceptional The Prices moderate. 

SUITS CUSTOMIZED BY HICKEY-FREEMAN 

THOMAS F. WALSH 



BASKETEERS DEFEAT 

THREE STRONG TEAMS 

(Continued from Paft« 1) 

Quirk and Crutch were tied for ■coring 
honors for the Red and White. I.ojko 
was high man for tin- Maroon and White 
scoring 1(1 point*. Bush was i lose behind 
his team mate in the business of ■coring. 

Summary: 



leading 7 »i. Taft and Tupper 
■cored five points for Vermont. 
Summary: 



each 



Mass. State 

H. K. I'. 



Vermont 



Miss 


State 




B. f. V. 


Loiko.lf 


4 2 10 


Bush.rf 


2 4 8 


Fletcher ,c 


1 2 4 


Hanson.c 





Reynolds.lb 


(» <> 


Houraii.lt) 


10 2 


Foley, rb 


2 2 6 






Totals 


10 10 30 


Referee, 


Fclilman. 1 



Spriniitielil 



Olinstcad.ib 

Kohr.lt> 

Oiiirk.lh 

Kandall.c 

Secwagin.c 

WVUs.il 

Meyers, rf 
1'rince.rf 
Ji)yce,lf 
White 41 
Crutch.lf 

Totals 



It. F. 1' 



1 


1 
1 


o 

2 



3 



H 9 25 

Time, 



Umpire, Winters. 
two Bttaunutt periods. 

State 24, Middlebury 20 
Last Friday the Mass. State basketball 
team won over Middlebury 124 to 90 M 
the latter's own Boor. The Staters had a 
nine-point lead, befoic the Middlebury 
quintet MM able to break through tlu- 
State defense. Dining the second period 

Middlebury staged a brilliant offensive, 

but was not able to overcome the strong 

State opposition. At the end of the first 

period the store stood 16-8. Ashtlown, 
with six points to his credit, letl the 
Middlebury basketeers in their attempts 
to even the score. Louis Bush, State's 
high scorer, in the game, made eleven 
points. The summary: 



Bush.rf 
Hanson, rf 
Dijko.lt 
Fletcher iC 

Foley ,rg 
Ahlstrom.rg 

Kcynolils.lK 

IIihii.iil.1k 



Totals 



2 

Q 

1 
a 

i 

o 
it 





Taft.lg 
Beckley.rg 
Winant.rg 
Morgan ,c 
Durfey If 
Tupper .if 

l'ircs.rf 
(jrunt.rf 

Saba.rf 



li 
2 
1 

(I 

1 
1 







F. P. 
1 I 



5 17 Totals 



5 6 16 



Mass. State 
B. F 



Bush.rf 
Lojko.lf 
Fawcett.c 
Fletcher.c 
Foley ,rg 
Keynolds.rg 
Ahlstrom.lg 
1 1.H ii. ii i, Ik 



Middlebury 
P. B. F. F 

5 1 11 Chalmers,rf 2 

2 2 6 Bauinnartner.rf 

10 2 Ashdown.lf 

10 2 Swett.c 

1 2 Flagg,c 

McK.enzie.rg 

1 1 Hoyle.rg 

Corliss.lg 



1 

2 
O 
(I 
O 
2 




4 6 

1 5 



4 



7 6 20 



Totals 10 4 24 Totals 

State 17, Vermont 16 

Louis Bush's last minute shot tlefeated 
the University of Vermont hoopsters 
last Saturday, giving the Mass. State 
team a 17- Hi victory. The game was 
very close. The score was tied six times 
and the lead cha n ged hands twelve times 
during the game. Fletcher led the 
attack, scoring five points to the four 
that Foley and Bush each chalked up. 
At the end of the half, Mass. State was 



DR. II. PAPENDIECK 

DISCUSSES CERMANY 
(Continued from Page 1) 
reparations commission with only two 

billion. 

With no money, how can Germany 
pay? Two solutions present themselves; 
either by export of products or with 
borrowed money. Both means have been 
used, and Germany has paid up to date. 
But she has bor rowe d so much that now 
no one will lend to her, and there is great 
economic depression in the country. She 
will be unable to pay any reparations 
for a few years. 

All of Germany's politics are con- 
trolled by three men, each of whom was 
a soldier and officer in the World War. 
The first is 1 lindenburg, who at eighty- 
four is presitlent. If he had not taken 
the office Germany would probably be 
much different today. The second, 
( '.roener, is known only in his own 
country, and serves as Minister of the 
Interior. The third, Bruening, held an 
office in the war lower than his present 
co-workers, and serves as German Foreign 
Minister. 

Reparations and disarmament are the 
chief tasks of these men. "It is important 
for Germany to keep up payments," 
stated the speaker, "and by trying to do 
so disaster will be brought on Germany 
and the whole world." 

An unusual situation develops when 
one country is disarmed and the sur- 
rounding ones are armed to the teeth. 
At the close of the war Germany disarmed, 
after the other nations promised to do so 
soon. Instead, in most cases they have 
increased. The only chance to reach an 
agreement is to substitute reason for 



force. France cannot understand this 

and probably will not until the depression 
hits her. 

The national movement in Germany is 
chiefly expressed by the National Social- 
ist Party, which is a national idea, not 
just a party. It is quite probable that 
this party will get control of the govern- 
ment in the future. 

Dr. Papendieck sketched the life 
history of Hitler, founder of this party. 
In foreign affairs this party could do no 
better than the party in control, so should 
they gain control, foreign politics will 
remain unchanged. 

As for Germany herself, it is impossible 
to prophesy what they will do. Hitler 
blames the present government for the 
present situation. The National Social- 
ist Party plates the state above economic 
activity antl above all else. The Indi- 
vidual is responsible to the state, not 
the state responsible for the happiness 
of the people. 

Probably Hitler would be much more 
successful if Hintlenberg were not at the 
head of the government, but this man 
who became president at the age of 77, 
and who will probably be elected for 
seven years more, is lovetl antl honored 
by the German people. 

Following Dr. Papendieck's address, 
there was open discussion, with questions 
asked by those in the audience, discussed, 
and when possible answered by Dr. 
Papendieck. 



POULTRY JUDGING CONTEST 
(Continued from Page 2) 

|>oultry husbandry at New Brunswick on 
Thursday! February IS. The teams will 
then embark for the Kerr Chickeries, 
Inc., at Frenchtown, where the judging 
of the various live bird classes will occur. 
Teams representing Connecticut, New 
Jersey, New York, North Carolina anil 
Massachusetts will compete. The team 
from Massachusetts State College is 
composed of Randall K. Cole '.54 of 
West Medway, Harold C. Potter '34 of 
Greenfield, and Ralph F. Sturtevant '33 
of Halifax. Professor L. Banta of the 
department of poultry husbandry will 
accompany the team as coach. Head- 
quarters will be at the Hotel Woodrovv 
Wilson at New Brunswick. 



WHY OVER-PAY ON YOUR DRY CLEANING? 
We will dry-clean and press your suit or topcoat for $1.00 

We call and deliver free daily 
Phone 635 SWISS CLEANSERS & DYERS Phone 635 



Over First National Store 



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LOWEST PRICES! 



SKATING OUTFITS 

HIGHEST QUALITY! 

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32 MAIN ST. (AVer Depot) NORTHAMPTON 

Ski Suits for Men and Women! 

Ski Unfits $6.50 Skating Breeches $2.95 

Ski Coats $5.95 — Riding Hoots and Breeches 



DEBATERS SPEAK 

AT SPRINGFIELD 
(Continued from Page 1) 
we should have entered in 1914; that the 
cancellation would be conducive to world 
peace and unity; antl that such a can- 
cellation is nettled to aid an economically 
and socially starved Europe. The debate 
was attended by more than 200 students, 
parents and teachers at the college. Mr. 
II. P. Thomas, director of research in the 
Springfield schools, Mr. G. D. Melville, 
president of the Educational Club, and 
Mr. S. C. Van Sickle of the history de- 
partment at the Springfield Technical 
High School, were the judges. President 
McGowan of the International College 
officiated as chairman. 

W. E. Dow '32 and Don McLaughlin 
.12, upholding the affirmative of the 
same subject for Springfield College 
against Salter and Politella, contended 
that cancellation was the "most expedi- 
ent way out of the world's present 
economic morass." 

The State College debaters were the 
guests of President antl Mrs. McGowan 
of the International College at a dinner 
in the President's suite at the Hotel 
Kimball in the evening, and luncheon 
guests of the Melha Temple of Masons. 
The only home debate of the season 
will be held on this campus on Wednes- 
day, March 2, when the State College 
will defend the affirmative of the ques- 
tion, "Reserved, that Capitalism has 
more to offer the people than Socialism," 
against New York University. 



FRESHMAN TRACK TEAM 
DEFEATED BY AMHERST FROSH 

Last Tuesday the freshman track team 
held a track meet with Amherst '35 in 
the Amherst Cage, in which the Lord 
|e t freshmen collected 88 1-2 points 
against the 38 1-2 of the Mass. State 
freshmen. However, a few of the Mass. 
State men stood out in their events. 
Gillette ran the mile in 4m. f>.">s. and 
placed third in the half-mile. Murray 
won the half-mile, while Cross placed 
third in the mile. Rod Cumming heaved 
the shot put 38 ft. 1 in. to win that 
event and he collected a fourth in the 
weights. Cross and Allen tied for first 
place in the pole vault, while Cone 
placed second in both the high jump and 
broad jump. Warren, Guenard, and 
Sumner placed in the dashes. 



FRATERNITY BASKETBALL 

Kappa Ep crashed through in . 
with Kappa Sig and Phi Sig to put Phi 
Sig definitely out of the running f OT 
points, and give Sig Ep practically a 
clear field for the championship. It Was 
a "dark horse "that finally upset si] the 
betting dope, and left the present results. 

Other results were as might have been 
expected, and still leave second and third 
places oj>en for dispute. 

Results to date are: 



Feb. 


9 


L.C.A. 


5 


P.S. 




14 








K.E. 


16 


K.S 




14 








S.E. 


2 


N.F 









Feb. 


11 


K.S. 


20 


P.S 




IK 








A.S. 


24 


T.C 




13 




Feb. 


12 


S.P.E. 


24 


D.P.A. 


K 








L.C.A. 


IK 


Q.T.V. 


10 




Feb. 


13 


K.E. 


13 


P.S 




10 








K.S. 


31 


A.S 




11 




League stand 


ing: 
















IP 




L 




PC 


S.P.E. 






7 









1.00Q 


K.S. 






6 




1 




.857 


A.S. 






6 




2 




.:-,. 


P.S. 






5 




i 




.625 


L.C.A. 






5 




i 




.555 


K.E. 






4 




3 




.571 


Q.T.V. 






3 




4 




428 


T.C. 






i 




6 






A.G.R 








:> 




H 


D.P.A. 






l 




7 




. IS 


N.F. 











7 




.000 



FRESHMAN HOCKEY 

Freshman hockey plans for this winter 
have been abandoned. There has been 
no available ice for freshman hockey and 
the varsity has been held to about four 
practice sessions since Christmas vaca- 
tion. This has been rather an unfortu- 
nate winter for freshman hockey en- 
thusiasts because they have not had any 
chance to show their prowess to the 
varsity coach. Thus next year the hockey 
coach will have no idea which freshmen 
will be able to compete for berths on 
the varsity team. 



FRATERNITY BOWLING 

Only four more games to go, and 
Kappa Sig still holds the lead in the 
Interfraternity Bowling League. The 
leaden in the league retain their relative 
positions and enthusiasm is keen among 
all the contestants. The total results 
after the games of the past week are as 
follows: 





W 


L 


PC 


K.S. 


6 





1.000 


K.E. 


4 


1 


m 


L.C.A. 


4 


SJj 


A.G.R. 


3 


2 


.600 


T.C. 


3 


3 


.500 


A.S.P. 


3 


5 


.375 


D.P.A. 


2 


4 


.ra 


Q.T.V. 


2 


4 


m 


S.P.E. 


2 


4 


.333 


P.S.K. 


1 


4 


.200 


N.F. 








.000 



How many of the professors on this 
campus whistle? 



ALUMNI NOTES 

W. A. Cummings '08 is superintendm: 
of parks at La Porte, Ind., where the 
park system includes an extensive bath- 
ing beach, an 18-hole golf course and 
other modern accessories. 

The Cleveland Flower Show, Inc., is a 
very large antl important enterprise. The 
first vice-president antl manager is Robot 
P, Brydon, ex-'OO, who is also chairman 
of the executive committee. A. D. 
Taylor '05 is a member of the SUM 
executive committee. 



Everyth 



ing in Hardware 
and Radio Equipment 



AT WATER - KENT 



AND 



MAJESTIC RADIO 



THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 

THE WINCHESTER STORE 



M. S. C. MEN'S MOTTO IS ALWAYS 
LET "DAVE" DO IT 

AMHERST CLEANSERS, DYERS 
and LAUNDERERS 

PHONE 828 Near the Town Hall PHONE 828 



JOSEPH GINSBERG 

19 PLEASANT ST. 

Men's Furnishings - Shoes repaired, called for and delivered 
Freshmen, come in and see our selection of shoes, priced moderately. 
Special sale now on leather coats, just what you need for cold weather 

CALL 984-M 



CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

ASKS HELP FOR MINERS 
(Continued from Page 1) 

they are being turned out of their homes, 
the children often cannot go to school 
for lack of clothing, antl in spite of the 
work being done by the American Friends 
Service Committee and other relief 
organizations, there is much starvation 
throughout the region. 

It is in an attempt to relieve some of 
this suffering that the Christian Associ- 
ation is carrying on the campaign. In 
connection with this project Clifford 
Towle '32, president of the Christian 
Association, has made the following 
statement : 

"Washington's shivering men at Valley 
Forge would have appreciated anything 
to wear that was warm. So will the 
miners of West Virginia. There is hardly 
a man in college who has not a cast-otl 
pair of shoes, an old coat, or a suit that 
can be doing some one else service. See 
that the representative in your fraternity 
or dormitory gets your old clothes by 
Friday noon. You will have the extra 
closet space antl the miners will be glad 
to get anything that can be worn." 



Regular $2.40 quality CALLING CARD SALE Regular $240 quality 

$1.39 for 100 — $1.49 for Paneled 

Sale for Two Weeks Only— Feb. 15 to 29 

A. J. HASTINGS "TSSSST* AMHERST, MAS S. 

Announcing the Opening of our 

NEW DRY CLEANSING SERVICE 

All Work Guaranteed to give Complete Satisfaction. Prices Reasonable 

JACKSON & CUTLER 

AMHERST, MASS. 



DTP 

JANUARY SALE 

Men's Bostonian Oxfords - Bass Moccasins 

Women's Oxfords - Dress Pumps 

Hosiery 

BOLLES SHOE STORE 




jWagflarfrttarttfi fflnllFiitatt 



Vol. XLH 



AMHERST, MASS., THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 1932 



Number 18 



HIGH SCHOOL TOURNEY 
SCHEDULED NEXT WEEK 

\iinual Interscholastic Basketball 

Tournament to be Held 

in New Cage 



\. , oitling to Tournament Manager 
| .,.,,„,■ E. Hriggs of the Physical 

it ion Department, the First Annual 
College Interscholastic Invitation 
Basketball Tournament, antl fifth of its 
tfad, will be held Wednesday, Thursday, 
Friday and Saturday evenings of the 
pexl week at the Phys. Ed. Building. 

; ,uri>ose of this annual invitation 
tournament is to afford a competitive 
basketball program for eight small public 
high schools of less than 5(X) enrollment 
without the contemplation of any section- 
al championship. The selection of the 
participating teams has been made by 
(Continued on Page 4) 



Professor Waugh is to 

Speak at Social Union 

To <.ive I illustrated Lecture Tonight 
in Bowker Auditorium 



Frank A. Waugh, Professor of Land- 
\rchitecture and head of the Divi- 
sion of Horticulture, will furnish the 
,1 Union entertainment this Thursday 
twnini. February 25. Famous for his 
beautiful slides, most of them made from 
his own negatives and many of them 
entirely his own work, Professor Waugh 
inning a talk on the "Cultural Value 
of Landscape Architecture" accompanied 
by a group of lantern slides chosen from 
hi> collection to illustrate the many 
variations of landscape architecture in 
1 1 iffi rent regions of the country. Although 
Professor Waugh has not as yet selected 
the slides which he will show, one can 
t to see brilliant scenes from hills 
in tin desert parts of the country, gi- 
sraterfaUs from the West, and 
quietly dignified homes and gardens from 
the South, all taken during his travels in 
the course of his work for the Federal 
Government. As a climax, the ch oi ce st 
of bit New England pictures will focus 
•I. hi on the Connecticut valley and 
perhaps on this campus. 
Although this is his fiist Social Union 
name, Professor Waugh's slides 
ih lighted many audiences, and his 
reputation as an artist in pho t og r aphy 
! as an authority on landscape 

archn ■ Hire is widely recognized on 

many i ampuses besides Massachusetts 

Si ite's. 



STATE TRACK TEAM LOSES 

IN BOSTON GARDEN MEET 

Saturday the Mass. State varsity 
'rule team ditl not score a point in the 
University Club meet in Boston Garden. 
Although the trip was a failure from that 
standpoint, it furnished excellent experi- 
ence for the State track men who saw 
many a ell-known stars perform. The 
relay team made a better showing than 
heretofore. Pruyne who started for Mass. 
State led the men from Wesleyan and 
Tufts, but Warren, K. Hale, and N. 
Hale could not hold his lead against the 
offered them. Al Ryan 

ten feet and six inches in the pole 
v ault. The State men who were entered 
■ tin I,, |,i events, through a misunder- 
standing, could not compete, because 
long spikes and only short 

or rubber-soles were allowed in 
toe Harvard Cage. 



QUINTET BREAKS EVEN 
DURING THE PAST WEEK 

Balances Defeat by Williams with 
Victory Over New Hampshire 

Williams 34, Mass. State 16 

Oat week ago this evening, the State 
basketeers fell victims to the attack of 
the Williams College quintet on the 
hitter's floor when the Purple team 
showed its marked superiority by hand- 
ing the Massachusetts aggregate a 84-16 
tlefeat, the worst so far this season. In 
winning over the Staters, the Williams 
five broke a losing streak of two games 
and added to its total of victories the 
ninth game. Strange as it may seem, the 
Maroon and White squad could not find 
the basket although there were many 
op p or tu nities to tally, and the rim might 
just as well have been covered as far as 
the visitors were concerned. Fletcher led 
the State scorers by netting five points, 
while Markoski and Monier did brilliant 
work for the winners with nine ami eight 
points respectively. 

At the end of the first half, the Purple 
quintet led the Staters by the comforting 
margin of 15 points, the score being 22-7. 
Both teams were quite wary of each 
other for the first few minutes, but 
Markoski soon shattered the trance into 
which both teams had fallen by dropping 
a short basket from the scrimmage. 
Williams then ran up five more points 
before Fletcher sunk his two contribu- 
tions. The State College failed to score 
again until the last three minutes of the 
period rolled arountl, while the Purple 
aggregate amassed 22 points in two 
scoring sprees. 

Throughout the final period, the State 
Collegians attempted to catch their 
opponents, but the best that they could 
do was to chalk up nine additional [mints 
which were insignificant for the Williams 
team scored an even dozen. State's 
aggressive offensive drives were effec- 
(Contlnued on Page 4) 



5faui 3lt a iSjtaturtj 

Last Year 
Sherwood Eddy addresses assembly. 

State 39, Amherst 19 score of 
basketball game. 
Military Ball, 

Five Years Ago 

The Honor System receives a vote 
of confidence at student forum. 

The college display <>f spples and 

orchard equipment wins a silver cup 
at Boston best of 150 entries. 

The Musical Clubs give Sni.il 
Union Concert. 

In 1910 

Local heavyweight sprint between 
senior and junior classes is chief event 
of the week. 

Two new fraternities, Sigma Tan 
Delta and Beta Kappa Phi, bring 
the total number to eight. 

Track team wins shield trophy from 
Union College. 



■ADIO CONCERT IN 

MEMORIAL BUILDINC, 

Walter will conduct his farewell 

ith the New York Symphony 

•"ilhin.'.tiic Orchestra, when the or- 

'idcasts from Carnegie Hall, 

' ew > rk next Sunday afternoon at 

The program will be heard 

0vtI " radio in the Memorial Hall. 

'Aranyi is soloist for the after- 
°° n The program includes these com- 

i 'Midsummer Night's Dream" 

Mendelssohn 

L <>*< ■;■ rto in D for violin 

tro Symphony 



Mozart 
Beethoven 



PROF. CODING TALKS 
ON AMERICAN MUSIC 

Sees the Birth of Native American 

Folk Music in the Negro Spirituals 

and the Cowboy Ballads 

"American Music" was the subject of 

the lecture of Professor Stowed C. 

Coding at the Language ami Literature 

meeting of February 2'.\. By American 

music in the narrowest definition of the 

term is meant music that is A mnunn 

anil nothing else; it must have an 

Amer i c an composer and deal with an 

American subject. So the Field becomes 

limited. 

(Continued on Pafte 3) 

INTERCLASS BOXING 
ALREADY UNDER WAY 

Class elimination for the interclass 
boxing tournament started last Wednes- 
day. For almost two months of this 
term, a rather good sized group has been 
turning out daily on the right hand 
balcony of the Phys. Ed. cage to pound 
away at the sand bag, or at the soft bag, 
or even at each other, and have under- 
gone similar tasks in an effort to con- 
dition themselves for the forthcoming 
fray. No gold watches are o ff e r ed. Not 
even a flannel medal is being put before 
this group of lads as a balm for theii 
privations. However, some really gotxi 
matchesare to be run off, and it wi 1 1 be wort h 
while to note the schedule printed below, 
antl when you have a few minutes to 
spare, come in and watch the boys mil 
it up, or if you feel the urge, sign up for 
yourself. 

The following contains the dope in 
brief: 

1035 eliminations, Wed., Feb. 24, 4 p.m. 
1934 " Thu., Feb. 25, 4 p.m. 

Uy.V.i " Sat., Feb. 27, 2 p.m. 

10:52 " Tue.. Mar. 1, 4 p.m. 

S.S.A. '32 " Wed., Mar. 2, 4 p.m. 

S.S.A. '33 " Thu.. Mar. 3, 4 p.m. 

Semi-finals and finals will follow immedi- 
ately. 
Report to the right hand balcony in the 
Phys. Ed. cage. 



Japanese Poetry Topic 

of Talk by Prof. Rand 

Well Known Member of Knglish De- 
partment Points Out Characteristics 
of Japanese Poetry 

Japanese iioctry, in particular the 
works of llitomaro, was the subject of 
the address of Professor Frank Prentice 
Rand who spoke at the Language and 
Literature meeting on February 15. 

Pattern is arbitrarily imposed in all 
poetry, whether it be Hebrew or Anglo 
Saxon. Hebrew poetry is based on 
parallelism, with the second half of the 
line repeating the first half. Anglo- 
Saxon is partly based on parallelism, but 
depends largely upon alliteration with 
the same sound occuring at least three 
times. Today, rhyme and rhythm rule 

poetry. In Japanese poetry we find ■ 

different pattern, bawd mechanically on 
the number of syllables m ,i line. It 

consists of fragmentary word-pictures, 
like quaint Japanese paintings. Rhyme is 

found, too, but that is inevitable, since 
nearly all Japanese words fall into three 
tir four rhymes. It has no rhythm. 

" Hokku" is the simplest form, ami is 
extremely difficult to translate. It < OH 
sists of three lines five, seVSJO, and live 
syllables. This form reached its height 
of popularity in the seventeenth century. 

"Tunku" is the next form; it is very 
old, very famous, and very involved. It 
consists of five lines five, seven, five, 
-i \en, and Seven syllables. In Japan we 
also find some long poems, the so-called 
epics of Japanese poetry. These eighth 
century epit s have never been excelled 
as poems. 

In translating poetry, it is difficult to 

keep both the original meaning and the 

beauty of the work. One deals with two 

utterly different patterns, and when one 

(Continued on Page 3) 



ARRANGEMENTS MADE 
FOR MILITARY BALL 

"Dud" Armstrong and his Ambassa- 
dors to I imiisli Music at Annual 
Social Event Coming March 5 

As an anti-climax to the winter term, 
the Military Department and the Stu- 
dent committee, have chosen Saturday, 

March ft, as the time for the Military 
Ball. "Dud" Armstrong and his Am- 
bassadors from Worcester, an appropri- 
ately named group for a Military Ball, 
have been engaged for this affair. Arm- 
strong ami his men wire acclaimed for 
two years in succession by popular vote 
as the best orchestra at the 1 >art mouth 
Winter Carnival of 1981 and I9S2. He 
has also been chosen to pl.iy at the "Ivy" 
Ball, Bowtloin's outstanding c\ent ol the 
Near. Another interesting feature of this 
musical group is the fact that Ira Bates, 

composer of the Massachusetts State 
College Victory March, and member oi 

the class of 1920, was at one time con- 
net tetl with this organization. 

The committee on arrangements, con- 
sisting of Howard Cheney, chairman, 
"Bob" Tetro, Leslie Goodall, "Phil" 
Caswell, and "Ed" Harvey, has worked 
diligently antl industriously to make the 
Military Ball the greatest ever. Final 
preparations are not as yet complete. 
The chaperones invited are: President 
anil Mrs. Thatcher, Dean ami Mrs. 
Machmer, Colonel .mil Mrs. Komeyn, 
Captain and Mrs. Sumner antl Captain 
and Mrs. Hughes. 

Subscriptions are three dollars a couple 
and can be purchased from any member 
Of the Committee. The Ball will com- 
mence at eight; dancing will be until 
twelve. The hall will be brilliantly 
decorated in some fashion woithv ol the 
name decoration at a military ball. 

The zero hour is then, eight, the night 
Saturday, the date, 12, the month 

March. The most glorious, magnificent, 

Ball of the year, and the most entrancing 

• n, o\able Dance uf the season. 



STATE BASKETEERS TO 
MEET TUFTS SATURDAY 

Previous Records of Both Teams 
Indicate a Closely Contested Came 

This coining Sit unlay evening, the 
Mass. State College basketball quintet 
play one of its objective games of the 
season when it stacks up against a stiong 
Tufts College aggregate on the hitter's 

floor at Medford, According to the 
comparative ■core method of prediction 

and calculation of the prowess of the 
two teams, the State College will enter 
the fray with a slight edge. I ast year at 
the Drill Hall, the Red and White de- 
feated the Jumbos lor the fust time in 
four yeais, and doubtless the bit t ci club 
will be out for blood when this entertain 
the Stateis at the new Tufts gymnasium 
this week end. 

(Continued on Pag* 4) 



PROF. RAND TO WRITE 
HISTORY OF COLLEGE 

Alumni to Sponsor Publication of 
History 

Massachusetts State College has. at 
present, no adequati l\ assembled history 

of its growth, its progress, or achieve- 
ment, There has been felt, for sonic 
time, the desirability for having an in- 
clusive, .u i urate, will written history of 
the ( ollege. 

Accordingly, at the suggestion of 

President Thatcher, and by vote of the 

board of directors of the Associate 

Alumni, a committee consisting of \\ . 

(Continued on Page 3) 



Debate to be Held in 
* 4 M" Building Wednesday 

Debating Team Meets New York U. 
in Only Home Debate of Season 



OUTSTANDING EVENT 
OF THE WEEK 

Jimmy Reynold's dot huve basket in 
the New Hampshire game. 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 



"True lore' \ the gift that ('<<>d has given 
To man alone beneath the heaven" 



Thursday, February 25 

7.oo ii in. Soi ial Union, Prof. Frank Waagn 

illuatrated lecture 
Fraternity Basketball: 
Alpha Sigma Phi ra. Sigma Piii Bpattaa 
D.T.V. vs. Kappa KpeUoB 
Friday, February 26 
Fraternity Dances: 
Phi SiL'nia Kappa 
Lambda t hi Alpha 
Alpha Gamma Rho 
Kappa Kp-ilon 
Saturday, February 27 

Vanity Basketball: Tnfti at Mcrlford 
Vanity Tr.u k: Amherst, State ( I 
Fraternity Basketball: 

Sigma I'hi BpaQoa vs. Kappa Epailon 
Sunday, February 28 

9.10 a. m. Sunday Chapel, Hilda L. Ives 

Ma-vc hi' ti- Federation of ' Imrches 
300p.m. Radio Concert, New York 
Symphony Orchestra. 

Wednesday, March 2 

MO p. m. Dean Maximo Kalaw, L'nivcr- 

-ity of the Philippines 
7.30 p.m. Debating Team vs. New York 

University, Memorial B>iilding. Topic: 
"Resahred, that Sorialism has more to 

offer the people than Capitalism." 



MEASURES ADOPTED TO 
REORGANIZE CABINET 

At the last meeting of the Christian 
Association Cabinet several measures 
were passed which fundamentally affected 
the organization of the association. The 
Changes will take effect beginning next 
year. Nominations for president of the 
Cabinet will be made by a committee 
composed of the seniors on the Cabinet. 
Secretary of the Cabinet and the chair- 
men of standing committees will be 
appointed by the newly-elected president. 
New members of the Cabinet will be 
selected by a committee rompoatd of tin- 
new president and the graduating seniors. 

It was voted to restrict the member 
ship of the Christian Association to those 

who applied for membership on the 

basis of a statement of purpose whiih is 
soon to be formulated. At present all 
men become members upon entering 
college. After the new plan goes into 
effect, the Christian Aseociattofi .i 
whole will become an active group under 
tin- direction of the Cabinet. The Cabi- 
net has also drawn Up a new plan for 
the control and management of its funds. 
This has been submitted to President 
Thatther for his approval. 

The tlrive for old clothes for the relief 
of the West Virginia miners and their 
(Continued on Pag* 3} 



Massachusetts will fate a strong de- 
bating opponent when the State College 
team opposes New York University in 
the Memorial Hall next Wednesday 
evening at 7. HO o'clock. The subject for 
debate will be "Resolved, that Socialism 
has more to offei the people than Capi- 
talism." 

Leonard A. Salter, Jr. antl Joseph 
Politella will comprise the Bay State 
team, which will maintain the case for 

capitalism. The debate will be condux ted 

on the American plan, with thirteen- 
minute main speeches and seven-minute 
rebuttals for each speaker. The repre- 
sentatives of the visiting team are not as 
\it known. 

Both teams have always been keen 
rivals in the debating activity. Theodore 
Market and Leonard Salter made up the 
team that defeated the New Yorkers in 
1930 on the disarmament question, while 
Salter and Politella represented Massa- 
chusetts (eel Mar in a no dei ision debate 

discussing free trade broadcast over 

station WBNX in New York last year. 

This will be the only home debate of the 

(Continued on Page 4) 

Mil. I) WEATHER UPSEIS 

THE HOCKEY SCHEDULE 

Hockey was a successful venture this 
winter in so (ar as the defeat of our 
opponents was loineined but the mild 

winter really won the prize for hindering 

our team. < hit of twelve s< hedllled 
games, three were played and one out- 
Mile game was al ranged as an extra 
i oiliest. 

C o nn e ct icut .Aggies were the first 

victim! of the State outfit which func- 
tioned well to win handily 17 0. hollow- 
ing this game, after a long lapse of time, 
the team was defeated by the Ihown 

Bears at Providence »i 1. Amherst was 

the vktim of the Staters in the next 

game and as a final contest the team 

went to Middlebury and won the game 
there. 



ADVERTISING EXHIBITION 

IN MEMORIAL BUILDING 

An interesting exhibition of advertis- 
ing plates submitted in competition to 
the Art Directors' Club of New York, is 
being displayed in the Memorial Build- 
ing. 'I base win- selected for the Club's 

annual exhibition of the out standing 
arttStk advertisements of the year 1031, 
The displav i- sponsored by the depart- 
ment of Agricultural Economics of this 

College, and arranged for by Miss Mary 

Foley. 

It is of interes t to note that this col- 
led ion of advertisement, shows the 
econo m k value of English in the com- 
position of striking slogans; the effect of 
tin- psychological appeals made to the 
public through the illustrations antl copy; 
and the use of the usual and the unusual 
in the .irii>ti< (tints. Many of the 
advertisements have been familiar to 
everyone during the past year, but this 
exhibition tails them to attention for 
their merit in cotnmen ial purposes. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 1932 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 1932 



Zbe Abassacbueette Collegian 



Official newspaper of 



the Massachusetts State College. 
Wednesday by the students. 

BOARD OF EDITORS 



Published every 



Frank L. Springkb '33 
Editor -in-Ckit) 



Wallace W. Stuart .33 
Manag ing Editor 



OwcAR Margolin 32 Rial S. Poms. Jr. '32 

A isociati Editor i 



DEPARTMENT EDITORS 

Editorial 

Frank L. Springer .32 



Cam put 

Eomono Nash '33 W. Raymond Ward '33 

Alfreda L. Ordwav '33 

Ruth D. Camfhkil '34 

Harriettk M. Jackson '34 

Joseph Politella '34 

Raymond Royal '34 Mary L. Allen '35 



AthletKa 

William H. Wear '32 

Eugene Guralnicx '33 

Stanly V. Seibrski '34 

John P. Colman '35 

Silas Little. Jr.. '35 



Feature 
Oscar Margolin '33 David L. Arenhrkg *35 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT 

Eric H. Wbttkrlow Jr. '33 
Hminess Manager 



Kenneth E. Hodge '32 
A tin? Using Manager 

Benton P. Cummings '33 
Ashley B. Gurney '33 
Philip H. Lrvrrault '33 



William A. Johnson '33 

Circulation Manager 



Builneas Assistants 



Edward J. Talbot '34 



Frank Batstonr *34 
Hbrbbrt Jenkins '34 
W. Lawrence' Si henck "34 



Subscriptions 42.00 per year. Single copies 10 cents. 



Make all orders payable to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In case of change of address, subscriber will please notify the business manager 
as soon as possible. 

Alumni and undergraduate contributions are sincerely encouraged. Any com- 
munications or notices must be received by the editor-in-chief on or before Monday 
evening. 



Entered ■• second-clan matter at the Amherst Post Office. Accepted for mailing at special rate of 
provided for In Section 1103. Act of October, 1817. authorized August 20. 1018. 



0% JJUarmm 

Snooping around after the Beggar's 
Opera performance last Tuesday evening, 
the Picaroon heard the following remarks: 

Gee that was pretty good! What was 
it all about? 

— a freshman 

Gee, what a lousy show! Fifty cents! 

What a roast! 

— a sophomore 

Somehow, the whole performance 
seemed to lack sincerity. 

— a junior 

There wasn't anything uplifting about 

it. 

— a senior 

One misses the great human passion 
and drama of Shakespeare. 

— a professor 
That reprieve business didn't seem 
quite natural to me. 

— a graduate student 

I don't like these gloomy plays. 

— somebody's stenographer 
It seems to me, the parts were slightly 

overacted. 

— another professor 

Is this art? Is it even realism? 

— a budding cynic 

I just cried and cried! 

— a co-ed 

The Flaming Meteor believes that 
hara-kiri takes care of Japan's surplus 
population! 

There once was a worthy professor, 
Whose students said nothing but yessir; 
"Do you think I'm a dunce?" 
He roared at them once; 
And after that they were always very 
careful to think before they spoke. 



STOCKBRIDGE 



The engagement of Milton C. Towne 
S'25 to Miss Doris G. Clark of Boston 
was announced December 20, 1931. 



Mr. Harvey Turner of AnHover, presi- 
dent of the Dairymans' Association, gave 
a very interesting talk on "Holsteins on 
Massachusetts Farms" at the meeting of 
the Animal Husbandry Club on Wednes- 
day, February 24. 



STATE STATIC 



"Some few in that, but numbers er,- 
Ten censure wrong, for one wit 
amiss." 



The new members of the Kolony Klub 
are: Alfred Hill, John' Sullivan, Henry 
Merrill, John Macdonald, Manuel Veiga, 
Eric Simmons, George Woodward, Lewis 
Cottrell, John Hameland Robert Tileston. 



Dwight Williams S'32 who suffered a 
broken neck during the past football 
season reports that he will not return to 
school until next fall. Dwight is now 
associated with the Forest Hills Develop- 
ment Corporation of Poughkeepsie, N.Y. 



Thornton Proctor, Raymond Gelineau, 
Herbert Riley, and Manuel Veiga will 
leave school March 1, to report on their 
placement training jobs. 



Outstanding event of the veek: the 
hockey team finally had one day ot - 
practice. 



Why is the street on which !l t |, e 



fraternities are 
Street? 



located called 1 ' 






Famous sayings of famous paoptt n 
campus: "Please commit to men. 



Now thst we have had hymn- 
Latin and in German it is about time 
that one was sung in English. 



There were wide open spaces in the 
orchestra, the night of the I; 
Opera, but all the fifty cent seats in the 
balcony were occupied. . . Due to the de- 
pression? . . . Wetterlow's rival was a 
member of the troupe. 



William Kenneth Webb S'31 is cow 
tester for the Lamoille Valley Cow Test 
Association at Glovers, Vt. 



Robert Hallbourg S'27 who was on the 
campus this week-end states that he is 
still gardener on the estate of Frank C. 
Wyman of Bennington, N. H. 



BY WAY OF EXPLANATION 

Rather than bore you with some provincial trivialities in the editorial column 
this week, we are passing on to you some of the choice bits which we noted during 
the week. 



Education 

Owen D. Young's ideas as to the objective of the American college should be to 
assist the student to develop his character, to stimulate his intuitions and emotions, 
to discover his mental aptitude and to train it, to learn enough about our organized 
MM hi.tery of society to apply his gifts effectively, and to acquire skill in communi- 
cations with others. 

Dr. Nicholas Murray Butler feels that what we need today is not narrow nun 
but broad men sharpened to a point. In other words, education should begin with 
breadth and let its applications deal with narrowness, if need be. The twentieth 
century university fails of its mission if it does not seek to claim leadership in the 
new movement of international understanding, responsibility and co-operation for 
meeting the grave problems which face the world at the present time. 



Government 

A French observer states that "the only political personalities that really matter 
today are Stalin, Mussolini and Hoover." Mrs. McCormick believes that "of the 
three, the least dynamic as a personality but the most powerful as a force in world 
readjustment is the President of the United States, Mr. Hoover." 



Economics 

Calvin Coolidge believes that there is not wealth enough in our country to take 
care of our people without the ablest possible management and the hardest kind of 
work on the part of all of us. The best recipe for financial security is to live within 
our means. We have found out that we were not so big as we thought we were. We 
were riding too high. We shall have to keep nearer the ground. We shall not feel 
so much elated but we shall be much safer. 

American youth, in the opinion of Mr. Dreskar, Brahmin teacher and philosopher, 
want more than money can buy and in this they are more civilized than their parents. 

Dr. I.ombroso sees hope in a reversal of the whole trend of capitalist civilization 
and a return to primitive industrial conditions, and pins her faith in the assumed 
ability, if not the disposition, of modern society to effect the change. 

Spengler sees the present world crisis of industry as the inescapable consequence 
of the conflict between man and nature and advocates merely awaiting the outcome. 

Both of these views are extreme and should be considered as such. 



International Affairs 

It seems that the League of Nations has called a special session to convene early 
in March and take direct action on the China-Japan hostilities. 

Dr. Inazo Nitobe compares the modern Japanese and Chinese by stating that 
"the modern Chinese, knowing Western mentality better, make a short cut to recog- 
nition by two methods which the Japanese have not mastered— namely, propaganda 
and a resort to violence." It looks now as if the Japanese had more than sufficiently 
mastered both of these arts attributed to the Chinese and Occidentals. 



There has been much discussion both pro and con concerning the advisability of 
boycotting Japanese products. 

In spite of the contrast resulting from activities in the East and the Geneva 
Conference, possibly it is best that they both should be coincident. The results of 
the Arms Conference should be appreciated to a greater extent if the country is 
aware of the horrors of war due to dispatches from the scenes of conflict in the 
Orie* . 



{Continued from last week) 
So then I thought I'd had enough of 
the Orient for awhile, and I flew off to 
Spain, as I threatened to do last week, 
but unfortunately for the Collegian 
readers, the senorita's were less attract- 
ive than co-eds, so I returned. Spain isn't 
all it's cracked up to be. The bull throw- 
ing was quite amateurish compared to 
the exhibitions given by some of our 
chapel speakers. Hidalgos are out of 
style, so are fiestas, and the romantic- 
tortilla has degenerated to nothing but a 
doughnut. As for the cafes, they are 
simply terrible. 

And now, if the truth were known, I 
have written the preceding, merely to 
pave the way for the following: 

SPANISH WAITERS 

{With apologies to John Masefidd, 

who I— I and loved them also.) 

Spanish waiters, Spanish waiters, you are 

dinning in my ears; 
I've forgotten what I ordered,— long ago, 

it seems like years; 
Stop your weeping and bewailing, bring- 
ing hackneyed tales to me, 
That the cook is out to dinner, or the 

oven's on a spree. 
Though you twirl your whiskers grandly, 

yet you never cease to roar, 
Though I kick you in the postern, you 

keep coming back for more, 
And you shout out last year's menu, 

breathing garlic down my neck, — 
I've checked my hat, my coat, my cane — 

but you I cannot check. 
I am weary, I am thirsty, I am starved 

and in despair, 
I'd even eat at Draper Hall, if I were 

only there, 
I'd be glad to take a pickaxe to a piece 

of Draper bread, 
Though just to smell of Draper roast beef 

is to be completely fed. 
In Spain you'll perish if you eat,— you'll 

starve if you do not, 
And the Spanish waiters are a most dis- 
reputable lot; 
I've wandered through the whole wide 

world, I've searched and searched in 

vain ; — 
Worse restaurants than Draper Hall are 

only found in Spain. 

The Outing Club hike turned out to 
be a howling success. Only, instead of 
going to Monadnock, the club found 
itself climbing Pine Ridge near Williams- 
burg. Oh, well! Everybody managed to 
get thoroughly exhausted, and isn't that 
the chief ambition of every Outing 
Clubber? 



CO-ED NOTES 



Last week the Women's Rifle Team 
contested with the Michigan State 
Women's Rifle Team and were defeated 
by a score of 485 to 483. 



April S, 1932 an Intersorority Formal 
will be held in the Memorial Building. 
The general chairman is Orris Merritt of 
Sigma Beta Chi, but the Formal is 
sj>onsored by all the Sororities, including 
the one most recently formed, Phi Zeta. 



Will the new girl's dormitory be called 
"Abbey Jr.," "Abbey II, ' or M a 
Abbey's little daughter? 



If the "old clothes" committee launches 
a wide and vigorous campaign, it will 
make a large hole in the students' ward- 
robes, and at the same time create a new 
style in men's dress about campus. 



Question in Aggie Ec. 26: How many 
hogs in Iowa? 

(Continued on Page 4) 



NOTICES 



Call for assistant manager of baseball 
from the sophomore class. Any candidates 
report to Brainard Bell on or before the 
29th. 



On Wednesday, March 9, Index photos 
will be taken after Assembly. 



TRACK TEAM MEETS 

AMHERST SATURDAY 

• This Saturday the Amherst track team 
comes to Mass. State for a dual meet with 
the State varsity track team in the cage 
at 2 p.m. Amherst has a large squad and 
with its superior man-power will furnish 
strong opposition. The value of having a 
large squad will probably be shown by 
Amherst who, since four places count. 
will have the chance to collect several 
points in each event. 

The regular out-door events the 220- 
yard, 440-yard, 880-yard, mile, and two 
mile runs — will be included as well as 
the 35-yard dash and 86-yard high and 
low hurdles. The field events will be 
the shotput, pole-vault, high jump, 
broad jump, and weight throw. 



PROFESSOR BRADLEY 

ADDRESSES LIBERAL U IB 

"If the United States were a member 
of the League of Nations, the prat* 
war in China would have been terminated 
soon after it had flamed into being,' 
stated Philips Bradley, Profesaor 4 
Political History at Amherst CotlcfC 
an address before the State I 
Liberal and International Clubs, Thurs- 
day evening. Professor Bradley opened 
his talk with an historical ski * 
background which led to the present WW 
He stated that although the JtptflM 
claim Manchuria through certain MR 
or less valid treaties with the Chinee 
Government, and that al th ough the 

Japanese are depending upon the niimnil 
resources of Manchuria to fur lish its 
industries with raw materials, and that 
although the population pressure of 
Japan is intense, seven hundred and fifty 
people per square mile as compared lit) 
30 per square mile in the United Stan-. 
yet the Japanese have failed to n 
to Manchuria in any great number."!; 
the other hand because the Japuen 
have brought law and order and modem 
methods into Manchuria, the Chinese 
are settling there in hordes. The net ■ 
Manchuria not under the control of the 
Japanese government is for the most 
part in the hands of Chinese war lords, 
said the speaker. 

By building a railroad parallel to the 
Southern Manchurian which broke one 
of the treaties, by anti propaganda, Ms 
by an effective boycott of Jape** 
goods, the Chinese government 
strumental in causing the MandraM* 
invasion, but for its attack op S 
the Japanese government has BO 
reason, was the opinion of the Bj 
The speaker concluded by stating that 
both the United States government ^ 
the nations of the world through the 
League have expressed their opj>ositjon 
to this last move. 



And now let us once more warn the 
supporters of the high school teams who 
are to play off their annual basketball 
tournament here: At Massachusetts we 
NEVER NEVER hiss or boo, no matter 
what the provocation. What — never? 
Well, hardly ever! 



POEM OF THE MONTH 

CAPE COD, FAREWELL 

Alas, farewell to thee, 
You dear old Cape Cod, — 
Land and sea; 

With your shining sand-dunes 
That gently kiss the lea; 
Where will I ever find 
Such boyhood memory 
As softly blowing breezes, 
Whispering "Cape Cod," 
Brought to me! 



author: 
judge: 



John Polar '33 
Mr. Rand 



Manuscripts for the March contest must be in Mr. Rand's 
office by the loth of the month. 



• TAILS AND TUXS TO RENT FOR YOUR MILITARY BALL 

ACCESSORIES 

LANDIS 



TEL. 811-W 



PROF. 



CODING TALKS 

ON AMERICAN MUSIC 
i Continued from Pago 1) 

In 1926 the "King's Henchmen," 
called the great all-American opera, was 
written by Taylor. The opera was pre- 
,.1 by American singers and had an 
rican libretto. But it is reminiscent 
of Kuropean composers and so cannot 
really be called all-American. 

lie must find inspiration in folk 
musk — the music of the people. In 
America there is no folk music; the 
country is too young. We have, however, 
in our country much folk music taken 
from foreign countries. 

We cannot trace much back of the 
Civil War in music and even that isn't 
strictly American, so we begin with the 
niusic of the negro. In the negro spiritual, 
there is very little of the African element 
left, as can be seen by comparison of the 
two. 

Spirituals are divided into two groups, 
lower south and upper south. These are 
further divided into spirituals of work, 
pla>, and religious fervor. Professor 
Goding played certain selections of the 
typo heard only in concert halls or 
played by leading symphony orchestras. 
The first two selections were "Deep 
Kivir," and one including "Go Down 
Moms" and "Swing Low Sweet Chariot." 

Three men have done much in the 
field of negro music; they are David 
Guion, H. J. Burleigh, and Charles W. 
( 'adman. The latter has produced operas 
of the Indians and also some of witches 
in Salem. Some of these were produced 
some years before the "King's Hench- 
men." 

\< \t the speaker played a group of 
three: "A Dance Song," "Butterfly 
Dance," and "Shuffling Eeet," Indian 
mu>i< not "dressed up." A "dressed up" 



Vuu have tried the rest? 

Now try the BEST 
And that's the 

AMHERST SHOE REPAIRING CO. 

"Goodyear Welt System Employed" 



version was MacDowell's "From an 
Indian Love" from the Woodland 
Sketches. 

"General American folk music is 
represented by the songs of the cowboys 
of the west and southwest," said Pro- 
fessor Coding. It is a type of folk ballad, 
with no known composer, and sung by 
many. There are two kinds, those they 
sang around the open fire with a guitar 
accompaniment, and those shouted out 
in a storm in a wild stampede. 

One typical cowboy song by Carl T. 
Sprague played was "Oh Bury Me Not 
On a Lone Prairie," also known as "Dying 
Cowboy." Sometimes these songs are 
tender and inspirational as well as 
narrative. A concert ized piece of the 
same type is "Home on the Range." 

"What about jazz?" is the common 
question which conies up in every dis- 
cussion of music. The "dressed up" 
form is interesting. 

We have had great composers in this 
country, but they have mostly been of 
European idiom. 

Gershwin's "Rhapsody in Blue" was 
next played. It is interesting to note 
that although he now writes jazz, he 
was once a classicist. He is the first 
jazz composer to get into the concert 
halls. 

"Mississippi" is another American 
contribution; it is a "tone journey" 
composed by Grofe. It is divided into 
four parts: Father of the Waters, 
Huckleberry Finn, Muddy Waters, and 
Mardi Gras. 

Edwin MacDowcll is of particular 
interest to New Englanders, because? he 
found his inspiration in New England. 
The concluding selection to an hour of 
delightfully entertaining music and dis- 
cussion was MacDowell's "Love Song 
from the Second Indian Suite." 



S. S. HYDE 
Optician and Jeweler 

Oculists' Prescriptions Filled. Broken lenses 
accurately replaced 

BIG BEN ALARM CLOCKS and other 

reliable makes 

3 PLEASANT STREET, (up one flight) 



FISHER'S 

Now Showing Spring Line of 

ANGORA SPORT DRESSES 

at $5.75 



COMMUNITY SALE 

Friday and Saturday, Feb. 26 and 27 



Typewriter Paper 

500 sheets 

$1 value 59c 



Social Stationery 
49c and 39c 



Wallace Nutting Pictures 
values $2.50, $2. & $1. 

All priced at $1.39 

Desk Blotter Pads 
Complete with blotter 

Haif Price 



JAMES A. LOWELL, 



BOOK BARGAINS 

from all departments 

Biography — Poetry 

T. a vel — Literature 

Episcopal Prayer Books 

Children's Books 

BOOKSELLER 



FINAL REDUCTION 
on SUITS and OVERCOATS 

Now Priced 
*17. 50 and $ 27. 50 

ity of light colors that are just right for early Spring wear. 

SKI COATS, LEATHER COATS, LINED GLOVES 

also reduced 

F. M. THOMPSON & SON 



B 


K. 


1' 


2 





4 


I 





•> 


i 





B 











I 


a 


I 











1 


I 


ft 


11 


i 


it 


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14 


6 


M 



Mass. State 

B. F. V. 



QUINTET BREAKS EVEN 

DURING THE PAST WEEK 
(Continued from Pag* 1) 

tively checked by the Purple's invincible 
defensive formation. The summary: 
Williams 

Kowle.rf 

Flint.rf 

Donnell.lf 

Killey.lf 

Monier.c 

Woodrow.c 

Shrli.in.rg 

Finckcri 

Murlcosld.lg 

Kv.iiw.lg 

Totals 



Houran.lg 

Kr\ ■ 111 ill 1;.. IfJ 
lxijkiUK 

Ahlstruin.rs 
Fletcher ,c 

l'.nurtt.c 

Bush.ll 

ll.llls.in.lt 

Foley ,rf 

Stewart ,rf 

Totals 



1 



1 1 

j 1 
(I II 



II 




1 

l 
l 





7 2 16 



Massachusetts 23, New Hampshire 21 

In one of the most exciting contests 
so far, "Jim" Reynolds, who replaced 
Foley at guard after the State captain 
had been forced out of the game with 
four personals, pulled a probable tie out 
of the fire by emulating "Dick" Merriwcll 
with a long arching shot which took the 
heart out of the stalwart New Hampshire 
basketeers who fought so hard for victory 
on the new floor at the Phys. Ed. Build- 
ing Saturday evening. The score ended 
23-21. 

Most of the excitement came in the 
second period when the Wildcats put 
forth what proved to be a vain attempt 
to win. The first period ended with Stati- 
on the long end of a 164 score by virtue 
of having out-jockeyed its opponents. Al- 
though neither team showed much team 
work, both exhibited startling individual 
performances. At the beginning of the 
second half, however, the Wildcats 
bounced out of their slump to assume 
tin- lead in the first fifteen minutes of 
play, making the si ore LM-1S. Foley 
then crashed through with a breath- 
taking basket while l.ojko got a free 
shot. Reynolds then CUM to the fore 
with his long shot which swished through 

the net without touching the rim. 



The summary: 
Mass. State 



I .ojko.it 
Biisli.ll 
Fletcher.c 
loliy.rf 

HouraaJi 

kiy nolds, lg 
Totals 



New llampnhlri- 

B 1-. P. 

1 1 I 

I 2 »> 

I I j 

l) 1 1 

1 I I 

1 II -J 



<<oriin-tlY.it 
Kim1i1ii.1i 
I rysuski.c 

Brill-trill. In 
< iiiiioy.rK 
i. if 



1(1 ■ 2:i 



Tut. ils 



7 7 21 



FEELS GREAT TO II AVE YOUR HAI R 
SHAMPOOED AFTER A HAIRCUT! 

The College Barber Shop 

"M" BUILDING 

THE NATIONAL SHOE REPAIRING 

21 MAIN STREET 

Between Town Hall and Masonic HullillnH 

MENS" SHOES SOLED and HEELED $1.7S 

FULL SOLES and RUBBER IIEEI-S $2.50 

ladies' Short Soled and Rubber lltali $1.40 

LADIES' SHOES HEELED 40c 

All Work Guaranteed 



College Drugstore 

W. II. McGRA I H, Reg. Pharm. 
AMHERST, - MASS. 

VISIT 

BARSELOTTI'S 

All the requirements for the smoker - Pipes. 
Pouches, Smokers Combination 
Ice Cream, Candy, Sandwiches 

HAVE YOU TRIED 

A SCOTCHMAN'S OMELET 

SERVED ONLY AT 

BUCK DEADY'S? 



PATRONIZE 

The Sandwich man 

R. L. BATES, North Amherst 






JAPANESE POETRY TOPIC 

Of TALK BY PROF. RAND 
(Continued from Pag* 1) 

tries to put a Japanese poem into an 
English pattern, no real poem can restdt 
which expresses the same thought. 

Japanese poetry depends on certain 
"pivot words" which are dithcult to 
translate. They are words which go 
back and forward in meaning. Certain 
"pillar-words" are also found which have 
a decorative elli-it, but whose meanings 
have become obscure with the passage 
of time. 

Symbolism also creeps into Japanese 
poetry; there is something seen, and 
something else intended. For example, 
in the three lines: 

An ancient pond, 
Jump goes the frog, 
Splash! 
the whole of Japanese philosophy is seen. 
Furthermore, an intangible spirit abounds 
in every translation. 

That habit of leaving something out, 
leaving some to the literary background 
and imagination of the reader also hinders 
successful translation. 

Professor Rand read some selections 
from Ilitomaro, a Japanese poet who 
lived over 1200 years ago. Almost noth- 
ing is known of his life, other than that 
he held some minor position in the court. 
The works of this poet are extremely 
interesting, and of an entirely different 
nature than that of most of the work we 
come in contact with today. 



PROF. RAND TO WRITE 

HISTORY Of COLLEGE 
(Continued from Page I) 

L Doom 'if>, Clark Thayer '18, ami 
George Entry 'm, was appointed to 

investigate the possibility of the writing 
of a history. 

After considerable preliminary invest i- 
K.ilion, in the course of which several 
pro min ent alumni were consulted, nr- 

r a n g emen te wen- made with Prof— m 



SANG LUNG hand laundry 
No. 1 Main St. Amherst, Man. 

REPAIRING ANI> ALL KINDS OF 
WASHING DONE AT REASONABLE 
PRICES. 

Our Laundry First Class 

Our Policy Guaranteed 

NEXT TO THE TOWN HALL 



TYPEWRITERS 

for Sale and Rent 

a at* K* * * «i 
H. E. DAVID 



THE NEW SPRING COLORS 



in 



I rank Prentice Kami of the Department 
of English at the College whereby he 
would be willing to undertake the writing 
of the history. 

At the meeting of the hoard of Directors 
of the Associate Alumni in Boston on 
January 21 it was voted to engage 
Professor Kami to write a history of 
Massachusetts State College. The cost 
of the work, im hiding Profl ssot Rand's 
coni|M-nsation, in to be hnanred by 
current Association receipts for member- 
ship. 

Mr. Rand has access to the various 
files and collections upon the campus, 
but he very much desires to get from 
alumni, classroom episodes, hits of phi- 
losophy or repartee, and particularly 
litters, which illumine the personalit its 
of the do/en or so outstanding ten hers, 
about whom the story of the College is 
so intimately woven, lie would also like 
to see any pirturcs, particularly of the 
older men, showing them in less formal 
poses than those with which we ate all 
familiar. Any material submitted for 
his inspection will be carefully used and 
promptly returned. -Alumni Bulletin 

MEASURES ADOPTED TO 

REORGANIZE CABINET 
(Continued from Page I) 
families recently conducted by the Chris- 
tian Associat ion Cabinet was in general 
successful. Contributions are still being 
received, and until after Thursday there 
will be a container for them in the base 
mint of the Memorial Building. The 
committee in < -hargc of this work, with 
Harold S.ilic.in as i hairman, has already 
collet ted about three barrels of material. 
Most of the dormitoi it s and frat ei nil im 

have contributed generously, but tin n 

are still three of lour which have not 
yet done much, and several of these have 
not yet contributed anything. Thursday 
is the last i\.\\ that old clothes ran be 
ghngfl for the inineis as the material 
must then be parked ami shipped to t he 

povert] stricken districts of VV. Virginia. 



JEWELRY 



arc beginning to arrive 



Miss Cutler's Gift Shop 



A MHERST 

dt\ THEATRE 1 


WED. 
FKB. 

24 


'BEAST of the CITY' 

witli 

Walter Huston 

Jean Harlow 


THURS. 

FEB. 
25 


"HIGH PRESSURE" 

with 
W. Powell Evelyn Brent 


FRI. 
FEB. 

26 


f.aviior Farrell 
- In - 

"DELICIOUS*' 

with Kl. HKKMH-I. 


SAT. 

FEB. 

27 


I.lly Ihtmlta Zane Grey's 
- In - 

"Woman * Rainbow 
Between" Trail" 


M0N. 

FEB. 

29 


Edward G. Robinson 
I.i.retta Young 

••HATCHET MAN" 


MAR. 

TUES. 
1 


Helen Twelve! rces 
— In- 

"PANAMA FLO" 



THE COLLEGE CANDY KITCHEN 



'THE FINEST EATING PLACE IN AMHERST" 



Sarris Bros. Candy Kitchen Restaurant Inc. 



DIVIDENDS 

The man who wears a garment hand tailored by Langrock enjoys distinctive appearance. 
A suit that repays such dividends of satisfaction is always well worth the investment. 

E. M. SWITZER, JR., Inc. 



If. A. C. Library. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 1932 



HICKEY- FREEMAN SUITS 

Our suits arc highly individualized in Fashion, Fabric, and Finish. The Values exceptional The Prices moderate. 

SUITS CUSTOMIZED BY HICKEY-FREEMAN 

THOMAS F. WALSH 



STATE RACKETEERS TO 

MEET TUFTS SATURDAY 
(Continued from Pafie 1) 

Massac liusctts should win over the 
Brown and Blue if s< ores mean anything 
at all. Our interpretation of the follow- 
ing comparative scores leads us to make 
the above statement. 
( * TUFTS SCORES 



Tufts :54 


C.A.C 21 


" 25 


W.P.I. 88 


" 24 


Springfield -•** 


" 88 


Middle-bury 85 


" 'S.i 


Univ. of Vermont 17 


130 


118 




MASS. STA'I E 


State 88 


C.A.C. 18 


" 31 


W.P.I. * 


" :«) 


Springfield 86 


" 24 


Middlebury 80 


" 17 


Univ. of Vermont 16 



138 IM 

In any event, the game should DC 
closely contested. Fletcher will have his 
hands full in order to keep Robinson 
from doing too much damage while the 
Jumbo forwards, Fine and Cochrane, 
will bear close watching. 



DEBATE TO BE HELD IN 

"M" BUILDING WEDNESDAY 
(Continued from Pag* 1) 
season, after which the local team will 
make preparations for a return encounter 
with New York University in New York, 
the Franklin and Marshall College in 
Lancaster, Pa., and with the University 
of Delaware at Newark. 



excellent judgment, energy, and fiery 

activity. Thai if need be be could curse 
with vehemence and in all things was 
essentially human. And that one of Un- 
characteristic s most worthy of praise in 
Washington was his discipline over self 
and his self control. 

"The remarkable thing is not that we 
won the war but that we took so long to 
win it," continued the speaker. "The 
Revolutionary period like all other war 
periods was filled with assorted selfish- 
ness. Washington starved at Valley 
Forge because the rich colonies refused 
to pay taxes. The average number of 
men in Washington's army was about 
five thousand men." The speaker fur- 
ther remarked that the war was won 
mainly through the unflinching deter- 
mination and patience of Washington. 
And that Washington showed his great- 
ness by at all times obeying the laws of 
Congress. "In this act alone Washing- 
ton's splendid qualities of leadership and 
self control were shown," said the speaker. 
"Washington was not a great general 
for most of his battles were lost, but it 
was through his character that freedom 
was won. And when peace was con- 
cluded he, without desiring to advance 
his own interest, undertook to guide the 
new republic with integrity and firm- 
ness," concluded the speaker. 



HIGH school TOURNEY 

SCHEDULED NEXT WEEK 
(Continued from Page 1) 

the Tournament Committee which is 
made up of three high school principals 
as well as "Kid" (lore and "Larry" 
briggs of the Phys. Fd. Department. 

As Mr. brings has said, sportsmanship 
and not championship is the real objective 
of the tourney, and sportsmanlike con- 
duct on the part of the spectators as well 
as contestants is one of the prime ob- 
jectives of the tourney. This meeting of 
the high school basketball teams affords 
a splendid opportunity for the student 
body at the Mass. State College to co- 
operate by being polite and courteous to 
the visitors on campus next week as 
well as demonstrating to the public at 
huge the fine feeling of sportsmanship so 
much in evidence at all of the State 
College athletic contests. 

Admission to these contests will be by 
reserved seats at fifty cents and twenty- 
five cents for general admission. Student 
activities tickets will not admit anyone 
to the games inasmuch as the tournament 
is entirely outside the college activities 
program. Tickets may be procured at 
the Physical Fducation Building any- 
time from now on. 



STATE STATIC 

(Continued from Page 2) 



Some of the Military majors who 
were disappointed in their cadet rankings 
are planning to go to China and become 
generals. Are there any horses in China? 



DR. PACKARD GIVES ADDRESS 
COMMEMORATING WASHING TON 

"It is a bad thing that Washington has 
been made a deity for it makes him seem 
too cold, difficult to approach and to be 
admired," stated Dr. Packard of Amherst 
College, who spoke at Friday morning 
chapel and was the first speaker on the 
Washington bicentennial program ar- 
ranged for the State College. The 
speaker continued his eulogy OB Washing- 
ton by stating that the Revolutionary 
leader was a man of common sense, 



MASS. STATE vs. AMHERST FROSH 

In the meet with Amherst Juniors in 
the State cage last Tuesday, the State 
freshman track team lost— 96 1-3 points 
to 33 2-3. A few of the State yearlings 
were outstanding in their events. Murray 
and Gillette led the field in the half-mile 
and mile respectively. K<xl Cuniming, 
whose showing has been outstanding for 
a freshman, heaved the shotput 38 feet 
and 5 inches to gain first honors in that 
event. 



Boston Herald — 

"These open-work stockings the girls 
are wearing, Prof. Norman Bradish of 
Northwestern University said today, 
have caused an outbreak of cribbing in 
examinations. 

The girls write out before examinations 
answers to the questions they think may 
be asked, Prof. Bradish said; the answers, 
he said, are on small pieces of paper, 
and the paper is placed under the stock- 
ing. 

All that remains is for the co-ed to 
move her skirt during the test and copy 
the answer from the paper. 

'And,' the professor concluded, 'what 
is a professor going to do about it?" 

Evidently the co-eds of Northwestern 
do not wear skiing ensembles. 



Now that the motto of the dinin. 
is, "a second main to each and t . ry 
one," the freshmen are making up lot 
lost time. 



What! no freshmen rules? Evidently 
the Senate believes that the educati.iual 
talks are burden enough. . . Do 
come under the head of "assinine" 
punishment? . . . And no more will die 
occupants of the Abbey be serenade 1 to 
the strains of "Abbey, my Abbey." . . , 
The members of the class of '34 have ili e 
distinction of being able to say in the 
future: "Now when I was in college.'' . . . 
At least the "Big Shots" will still be 
chastised properly by making them dis- 
card their prep and high school letters. 
No freshmen rules, no fines, no maga- 
zines, no pilgrimages to the infirmary by 
members of the Senate. 

Two minutes to play and "Frank 
Merriwell" Reynolds calmly sinks a long, 
clean basket to win the game. . . Captain 
Jack Foley giving advice; na-na-na-na 
Bush. 



Did you buy any lace from the Irish 
colleens? 



Students must shed vests in the 
sanctum of the Columbia University 
library. The students must either retain 
their jackets or divest themselves of 
both coat and jacket. The idea is that 
a "vestless" or a "jacketed" student 
body makes a more favorable appearance. 



WHY OVER-PAY ON YOUR DRY CLEANING? 
We will dry-clean and press your suit or topcoat for $1.00 

We call and deliver free daily 
Phone 635 SWISS CLEANSERS & DYERS Phone 635 

Over First National Store 



SKI OUTFITS SKATING OUTFITS 

LOWEST PRICES! HIGHEST QUALITY! 

wCOLODNY CLOTHING COMPANY 

32 MAIN ST. {Near Depot) NORTHAMPTON 

Ski Suits for Men and Women! 

Ski Boots $6.50 Skating Breeches $2.95 

Ski Coats $5.95 — Riding Boots and Breeches 



Everything in Hardware 
and Radio Equipment 

ATWATER - KENT 



EASTERN INTERCOLLEGIATE 

POULTRY JUDGING CONTEST 

The 15th annual Eastern Intercollegiate 
Poultry Judging Contest was entertained 
on February 11 by the Department of 
Poultry Husbandry at Rutgers Univer- 
sity in co-operation with the Kerr Chick- 
cries, Inc., Frenchtown, N. J. Due to 
the cancellation of the Madison Square 
Garden Poultry Show it was impossible 
to follow the usual custom of staging this 
contest at Madison Square Garden. 

live poultry judging teams represent- 
ing Cornell University, Massachusetts 
State College, Storrs Agricultural College, 
University of North Carolina, and Rut- 
gers University met at the Poultry Bldg., 
College Farm, New Brunswick, \. J., at 
S Thursday morning, February 11, where 
they took the written examination on 
the standard of ]>erfection. 

The competition both in the written 
work and in the actual judging was un- 
usually dose and the final results were 
not evident until the final scores were in 
and the totals secured which nearness 
bespoke good training ami uniform 
ability. 

A liber trophy, donated through the 
generosity of the C.I..F., Inc., Ithaca, 
N. Y., was awarded to the team placing 
first in final score and was won by the 
team from Rutgers University, (New 

J else \ 

A silver trophy, donated through the 
generosity of the beacon-Milling Co., 
Inc.. Cayuga. N. Y., was awarded to 
the team placing second in the final 
score and was won by the team from 
Cornell University (New York). 

A silver trophy, donated through the 
generosity of the National Oil Products 
Co., Harrison, N. J., was awarded to 
the team placing third in the final store 
and was won by the team representing 

Massachusetts State College (Amherst, 

Mass.). 



The Battling Entomologist is seen 
daily doing his roadwork while the 
Flying Frenchman takes his workout by 
plugging his opponent with snowballs. 



It sounds like Ripley, but believe it or 
not our hockey team has played three 
games without holding practice for over 
four weeks. This will go down in the 
annals of State history as the year of 
the iceless hockey team. 



But, nevertheless, the question still 
remains: Did, or did not, Washington 
chop down the cherry tree? 



Fvidence seems to show that some of 
the fair residents of the "Abbey" are 
subscribers to the College Humor. They 
believe in sororities for all. 



Were you the recipient of a comic 
valentine, sent by a moronic practical 
joker, or did you send one yourself? 



Apparently the sophomores found it 
harder to digest the maze of metaphysics 
than the profound depth of Pope and 
Swift. 



Don't say it if you stutter: "Obe-um- 
mergauerpassionsfesspielalpenkrauterklos- 
terdclikatfruhstuckskase." 



"Boston is a famous town, 

Both for wit and knowledge, 
Some they whip and some they hang, 
And some they send to college." 
Maybe that is the reason for so many 
students from Boston. 



"He has always given himself wholly 
to his students; that neglecting the 
public recognition he might so easily 
have won, he has chosen to live for others 
and not for himself." It is worth any- 
one's time to read about Dr. Torrey in 
the February issue of the Alumni liitllctin. 



"Can you imagine a fraternity bro 
who had flowers in his room or went out 
and picked them? . . . the average frater- 
nity smoothie is one of the most profound 
and habitual liars on earth . . . the all- 
around college man is proudest of his 
worldliness and sophistication. Vet, if 
there was ever a person unworldly and 
unsophisticated, it is he." — Wylic. 

But what about the sororities? 



M. S. G. MEN'S MOTTO IS ALWAYS 
LET "DAVE" DO IT 

AMHERST CLEANSERS, DYERS 
and LAUNDERERS 



PHONE 828 



Near the Town Hall 



PHONE 828 



Ralph Bray L'."). landscape architect by 
training, is working in the real estate 
department of the Rock Island Railroad 
in Chicago. 



WANT TO SAVE MONEY? 

Then take advantage of slash in prices on all mens furnishings at 

JOSEPH GINSBURGS 

19 PLEASANT ST. 



INTERCOLLEGIATES 



AND 



MAJESTIC RADIO 

THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 

THE WINCHESTER STORE 



College men prefer college women as 
life companions, according to the nation- 
wide poll of the College Stories Magazine. 
The poll revealed that men preferred 
college girls because they have "it," 
intelligence, and a knowledge of the 
higher values of life. 

There were some, however, that thought 
that college did a girl more harm than 
good. A statistician in Kansas revealed 
that figures show that the Kansas divorce 
rate is one to every five among non- 
college graduates, and only one to every 
hundred among college graduates. College 
people have ninety-nine more chances of 
being right. 



Regular $2.40 quality CALLING CARD SALE Regular $240 quality 

$1.39 for 100 — $1.49 for Paneled 

Sale for Two Weeks Only— Feb. 15 to 29 

A. J. HASTINGS "^SSSST* AMHERST, MA SS. 

COMMUNITY SALE 

Friday and Saturday, February 26 and 27 

JACKSON & CUTLER 

AMHERST, MASS. 



THE EHILLIE OXFORD TIE 

for women is already walking away with Spring 
fashion honors. You'll see Ehillies worn every- 
where this Spring, so why not be among the 
first to wear them? It is a smart note in the 
footwear mode. It is an unlined elkskin shoe 
with rubber sole and built-up heel. 

BOLLES SHOE STORE 



Sfo HaBHarfrmsgttii (Enlkgnm 



Vol. XLII 



AMHERST, MASS., WEDNESDAY, MARCH 2, 1932 



Number 19 



Decorations for Military 

Ball Feature Washington 



ANNUAL SOCIAL EVENT 
COMES THIS SATURDAY 



"Dud" Goldman and his Ambassa- 
dors to Furnish Music for 
the Evening 

Pacifism will shrink before the terrific 
onslaught of militaristic decorations, de- 
signed and executed by the Student 
iiitcc, as the Military department 
entertains in the Drill Hall Saturday 
night. A guest of honor will be will be 
the reputable "Dud" Goldman and his 
Ambassadors, among whom is Ira Hates 
js. official diplomats and representatives 
oi the world of music. This fifth annual 
Military Hall will be staged with all the 
pomposity and all the stately magnifi- 
ol ambassadorial ball at the court 
(if St. James. There will be the sparkling 
evening dresses of the ladies, maje-tir 
uniforms of army men, immaculate 
tuxedoes of the civilians. 

Panel*, a p prop ri ately drawn by Leslie 
Goodall, will hang on the wall further 
promoting the regal atmosphere. A 
portrait of Washington, will be one of 
these hand drawn panels. The soldier in 
i it rest, on horse, and at war will 
be exemplified by the panels. Indirect 
ting will send soft lights through the 
lial! ■ ti as is a camp on the o|ien trail. 

All the usual components of a dance- 
Hill be there refreshments, chape roaw. 

etc but there will be that something 
Iter which is intangible but necessary 
> -in ial event. 

II yon have not already purchased 
that all-important ticket for three dollars 
step up to either Cheyney, Goodall, 
Cornell, Tetro or Harvey and terminate 
th..; worry at once. 

I he correspondent sincerely apologises 
to the Student Committee and the 
Military department for stating last 
•eea in the article on the Ball that 
"Dud" Armstrong would play. The 
error is corrected in the above statement 
that Dud" Goldman and his Ambassa- 
dors from Worcester would play. As far 
- it i- known, there is no such person 
U Mr. Armstrong. 



TRACK TEAM RECEIVES 
SETBACK BY AMHERST 

Warren, Pruyne and Kdmond Star 
in Running Events 



In the indoor track meet held last 
Saturday, the State trackmen bowed to 
the Lord Jeff track team. The informal 
meet in the State cage ended with the 
score, 111 1-f, to 60 5-ti in Amherst's favor. 

Hie Lord Jeff track men took every 
running event except the 390 and half- 
mile. Phil Warren's victory in tin- L'L'O 
and Kdmond's win in the half were- the 
only firsts that State took in the running 
events. M.iss. State did its best work in 

the field events. Cliff Foafcett captured 

first honors in the shotput and second in 
the high jump, while Pruync and Ryan 
placed first and sec mid in the broad jump. 
Ryan also ti,.,| f or second in the pole- 
vault and took third in the high jump. 
(Continued on Page 4) 



16 GAMES SCHEDULED 
FOR BASEBALL TEAM 



Practice to Start After Spring Vaca- 
tion According to Coach 
"Mai" Taube 

Mel Taube of the baseball 

team, his nothing to say just yet about 

-peets of the coming season. Just 

material will be available is still 

questionable. Practice will not start 

rl) until after the recess beginning 

March 1<>. 

Northeastern will be the first opponent 

for the team. Thus the season will start 

*''tri a game at home, giving the student 

"*!> a chance to see how the team will 

up for the season, which includes 

nes. As usual, two contests 

Continued on Page 3) 



STRONG INTEREST IN 
HIGH SCHOOL TOURNEY 

Mi «n> Fast High School Teams to 
Meet in New Cage This Week 



TRACK TEAM TO MEET 
WORCESTER SATURDAY 

Meet to be Held in New Cage 
On March 5th, the Worcester Tech 

track team COCneS to Mass. State' lor a 
dual indoor meet. This neat marks the 
resumption of the indoor meets between 
Wore ester and State, which were broken 
oil some years ago, because- State- did not 
think it advisable to train its men for 
only one indoor meet. These- neetfl B/era 
always held at Worcester, because- at 
that time State did not have a suitable 
place. If the arrangiiuents follow ,is they 
will this year, State and Worcester will 
have three track events each year; a 
cross-country race in the fall, an indoor 
meet in the winter, and an outdoor meet 
in the spring. 

Worcester Tech brings a strong track 
squad here. Last Saturday they de- 
feated the Boston University track team, 
59 to 18, while State was able to band 
Hoston University only a 49-2.5 defeat. 
Against Worcester Tec h, Hoston Uni\er- 
sity gained one first and four seeends, 
while against State they peeked up one- 
first and four seconds. Although t he- 
scores can not be considered too seriously, 
yet the times that the Engineers made 
in their meets have been considerably 
better than those by the- State tracknters. 
Harry Jensen will bear close- watching, 
as he broke the Tech record in the (KKi- 
yard run as well as placing first in the 
M-yard dash and being lead-off man in 
the relay team which, also, broke the 
Tech relay record. State, with PosJoett's 
help, should be able to take the shotput 
and high jump, but will probably be 
handicapped by lack of men. 



DEBATE TONIGHT 
IN "AT BUILDING 

State College and N.Y.U. Debaters 
To Discuss Socialism and Capital- 
ism in Only Home Debate 

New York University and the State 
College debating teams will oppose each 
other in a verbal battle in the Memorial 
Hall at 7.80 o'clock toniglu, when they 
debate the subject, "Resolved, that 
Socialism has more to offer to the people 
than Capitalism." The Bay Staters will 
maintain the ease lor Capitalism. 

James Keller and Gus Tilove will 
represent New York I'ruvcrsit y, Oppos- 
ing Joseph I'olitella and Leonard A. 
Salter, Jr., in that order. The debate, on 
the American plan, provides for 13- 
(Contlnued on Pago 4) 



Maroon and White Defeats 
Tufts Basketeers 20 to 1 5 



STRING QUARTET TO 

PLAY NEXT WEEK 



Committee Postpones 

Bill for Dormitories 

Petition Presented by Trustees to 

Await Action of Next Year's 

Legislature 



Rehearsals for "Swan" 

Being Held Regularly 

Molnar's Play, to Be Given by Roister 
Doisters, Acclaimed by Many Critics 



for Annual Event 



Be 



small 
the 



■g tonight, the fifth annual 



i tourney makes its debut in 



us cage at the Phys. Ed. 

- the defending champions of 

Vlams High, clashes with an 

iekj High aggregation with 

; sult that plenty of smoke will be 

W- The tournament includes eight 

lal1 High school teams picked from 

- of the western part of the 

ag attendances of not more 

.students. The competing 

; ar e: Adams, Agawam, Amherst, 

■eerfieKl. Hopkins Academy, Ludlow, 

Continue*! on Pat* 3) 



Rehearsals are in progress for the 
second act of Franz Molnar's "The 
Swan," which is to be given April 15 
by the Roister Doisters. 

Following are excerpts from what the 
critics said after the triumphant opening 
of "The Swan" in New York. 

"Franz Molnar triumphs in romantic 
high comedy. At the end of the second 
of three acts the audience rose to play 
and players with a spontaneity and in- 
tensity of enthusiasm which has seldom 
been surpassed in our theatre. The hand 
of the master wrought firmly throughout, 
and every word spoken in the three 
hours between 8.22 and 11.20 was 
integral and significant. What is unique 
in the play is its literary art, the fresh- 
ness and beauty of its characterization, 
and the dramaturgic skill with which it 
is sustained on the level of high comedy 
(Continue*] on Pals 3) 



House BUI 4J7, which is a petition of 

the- Board of Trustees oi this College for 

the- construction of two dormitories, one 
to house- IfiO m,-n stucle-nts, and the 
Other teSO women students at a total cist 
of !?: :.V>,< MH), has been postpone-il tor 
action until next seal's assembly of the 
I egiaJature, according tO the- l.ite-M news 

available from the President's <>itie <-. 

A healing was granted to the Rill ,„i 
February 16 at the- State- House, before 

the joint legislative committee em Edu- 
cation. rVenkJent Thatcher, intro<luce-.| 

by Mr. Louis A. Webster 'I.J, a re pie 
sentativc in the Legislature-, presented a 
survey of the- situation to the .omniit tee-, 
describing the urgent need of the College 
for dormitory accommodations. \|, 

George II. Kllis, vice- p aakaaal of the 

Hoard of Trustees, presented the Triiste « 

viewpoint of the matter, and Mrs. Clifton 
Johnson of Hadley, representing t he- 
Women's Advisory Council, spoke in 
favor of the Hill. Mr. Fred I). Griggs of 
the class of I'.M.j, and a member of t he- 
Hoard of Trustees, tlescrilied further 
aspects eif the housing problem, and 

presented a plan to the Committee for 
financing these dormitories so that all 
maintenance and interest charges could 
be paid out of the income, and in addi- 
tion the building could be amortized at 
the rate of approximately 2% per year. 

President D. II. Huttrick of the- \ n 
c -iate Alumni spoke of the Alumni interest 
in the- matter, placing the Alumni body 
generally on record as favoring t he- 
petition. Dr. Payaon Smith, Corttmis- 
sioner of Educa t ion , and Senator James 

Warren, a member of the- committee- on 
Education, also spoke- in favor of t he- 
Bill. No cine- spoke in opposition to the 
measure. 



New York Strlnft Quartet to Git* Orange Team Piles Up 43-19 Score 



Association Concert at Amherst 

Themes from the classical compositions 
of Griag, Mendelssohn, llayeln, and 
Debussy, will feature- the last of the 
year's concerts under the auspices of the 
Amherst Community Concert Assoc i 
ation, and will be rende-red by the New 
York String Ouartet. The concert will 
be given in College- Hall, Amhe rst College 
next Tuesday evening, March S, .it S.'JO 

o'clock. 

bounelc.l in I'.H'.t, the New York 
filing Ouartet is the- oldest quartet in 
this country whose- members devote 
themselves exc lusive !v to e lumber music. 
Of this group, a metropolitan critic baa 
written: "A perfect string quartet th.it 
le-aehes above all othe-r i-nsc-mMes, ac. 
(Continued on Paget 4) 

REVEREND HILDA IVES 
GIVES CHAPEL SPEECH 



SYRACUSE PROVES TOO 
MUCH FOR STATE TEAM 



OUTSTANDING EVENT 
OF THE WEEK 



XI Ryan broke the record for the in- 
door rx>lc vault at this College by clear- 
ing eleven feet in Saturdays games. 



CAMPUS (.MI.MHH 



N.Y.U.. 
Memorial 



Wcednesday, March 2 

7.:«>p.m. Degbste, M.S.C. vs 
"Capitalism vs. Socialism,' 
Hall 

Mathematic Seminar 
Thursday, March i 

S.00 p.ni. Index McecKiog 
8.<TO p.m. Female! Club Meeting, Fernald 
Hall 

Friday, March 4 

Christian Association Cabinet Meeting 
8.00 p.m. Landscape Dance, Wilder Hall 
Saturday, March 5 

2.00 p.m. Varsity Track, W.P.I, vs. State 

College, in the (axe 
8-12 p.m. Military Ball, Drill Hall 
Sunday, March 6 
9.10 a.m. Chapel. Reverend Everett R. 
Clinchy, National Conference of Jew and 
Christian 
3.00 p.m. Radio Concert, Memorial Bldg. 
3.00 p.m. Interfraternity Sing, Stock bricjge 
Hall 

Tuesday, March 8 
8.00 p.m. tUombincl Chorus, Memorial 

Hall 
8.30 p.m. Community Concert, New York 
String Uuartet, College Hall 



Speaker Sees Solution ,,f Problems 
of Rural Churcbes in Union 

"Ninety percent <-i the rural peoples 

are not eorabjpini a living God in some- 
church," slated the- ke-ve-lend Hilda Ises 
of the Massachusetts federation ol 

Churches in an address at Sttnday chapel. 
The Reverend Hilda Ives continued by 

nying that the- challenge e>| bringing to 

rural people religious education and 

ideals e oust it utes .! uortliv (ask. The 
spe-aker gave- as reasons |,,i this decline- 
of New Knulaiiel religious feeling in rural 
section* the- Em Is that industry has laken 
UN surplus .inel best ,,f .|„. Mlla || , (m(1 

Bad that the rural church has been t he- 
refuge- of the- old retired minister, the 
sanitarium for the ill ami ne-i ve urae ked 
City leader, and the leainin K ,,nel te-sting 

ground for the- newly graduated divinity 

stuelent to spre-ael his uin K !,. She- said 
that the first e>f these- lacked the /...I 
and the fresh iehas to win t|„. youth of 
the se-ctioii .111,1 t,, minister t o the nee-ds 

of the population, while tin- last lacked 

I hat maturity whie h is so e-ssential to 
worthy work in the- re-ligious fie-lel ,,nd 
was placed in a position whe-rein then- 

was no eider person to shape his maturity, 

"Not ui'til agriculture rieei\es a just 
share- ol the nations ue.ilth and schools 
eoinp.irable- to the- e itv\ education sa ., 
teni are in vogue cm rural religion be 
restored to its former iiosition and be- a 
iiselnl and enmnrsging factor to rural 
peoples," was a point stressed by the 
speaker. The Reverend | vers spoke- at 
length on her pre-se-iit work and how one- 
(Continued on Paget .*) 

Basketball Classic is 

to be Played Saturday 

Annual Contest Between Tray Tfftatl 

and Dish Dryers Attracts 

Unusual Interest 



Vkl.iiiiNt Maroon and White 

Altai staging a COUrageOUS tally in the 
first fe-w minutes ol the se,,,n,| hall to 
bring the score to within six points of 
then opponents, the State PttgrlUM 
succumbed to a faster, note easily- 
functioning S\r.icuse- citiiniet last Wed- 
nesday on the Orange floor, the- seoic- for 
the name- bcbtg 48-19. Captain Elliot of 
the- home team dazzled (he visitois with 
individual brilliance-, while- l.ojko, stellar 

Massachusetts forward, gatlu-re-d in seven 

points to lead his team '" seining. 

I in- Orange team early in the opening 

half found the- Stat.- ,h I, ns,- weak, ami 
as a result piled up IS points to had the 

Pilgrims at th,- hall by twelve- counters. 
l.ojko drew first blood for the- visitors 

by caging a neat held goal, while Fletcher 
.ind Mush measiiieel the- baske-t for one 
tally to help swell the s, ore-. In the 
se-ce.nd half, the Staters came- out o| the 

showera to take the Nee Yorkers for 

eight amntera before the- latter OOUld not 
know what it was all about. Willi 
Armstrong replacing Elliot at center, 
however, the- spur was applied and soon 
the Syraeiise- team sailed awav lioin all 

possible cornpetition by acquiring 89 

tallies, holding State- to but two baskets 
thcreaftei . The summary: 



■Syracuse 



VoedJU 

1-li.cll.ll 

I ipeayjf 

H... k.il 

H...I1.1I 

Vvill.-ul 

Elliot ,1 

AeeiMiong.c 

I'IiiIIiim.Ik 

l-ii/p.iiti. I..U-. 

M.IUll I.IK 

Tuggart.rg 
Totals 



II. f. IV 

1 0| 
u 11 11 
U ei 

2 U 4 
11 O 11 
II I) 
I I 17 



Muss. Stale- 



Foley ,rg 
Pawc i-ii.m 

1 1 1 >ei 1 .t ii.Ik 

I' 1 vnulili.lg 
l-l<lc tin .. 

Lojkojf 

Sle-WMll ,i| 



.'. u Hi Bush,ll 

2 2 li 

n u 

2 (I I 

11 11 I) 



it. r. iv 

u 2 2 

U II II